Curriculum and Instruction – Office of Science--Biology
Third Nine Weeks
Introduction
In 2014, the Shelby County Schools Board of Education adopted a set of ambitious, yet attainable goals for school and student
performance. The District is committed to these goals, as further described in our strategic plan, Destination2025. By 2025,
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80% of our students will graduate from high school college or career ready
90% of students will graduate on time
100% of our students who graduate college or career ready will enroll in a post-secondary opportunity
In order to achieve these ambitious goals, we must collectively work to provide our students with high-quality, College and Career
Ready standards-aligned instruction. Acknowledging the need to develop competence in literacy and language as the foundation for
all learning, Shelby County Schools developed the Comprehensive Literacy Improvement Plan (CLIP). The CLIP ensures a quality
balanced literacy approach to instruction that results in high levels of literacy learning for all students across content areas. Destination
2025 and the CLIP establish common goals and expectations for student learning across schools. CLIP connections are evident
throughout the science curriculum maps.
The Tennessee State Standards provide a common set of expectations for what students will know and be able to do
at the end of a grade. College and Career Ready Standards are rooted in the knowledge and skills students need to succeed in postsecondary study or careers. While the academic standards establish desired learning outcomes, the curriculum provides instructional
planning designed to help students reach these outcomes. Educators will use this guide and the standards as a roadmap for curriculum
and instruction. The sequence of learning is strategically positioned so that necessary foundational skills are spiraled in order to
facilitate student mastery of the standards.
Our collective goal is to ensure our students graduate ready for college and career. The standards for science practice describe
varieties of expertise that science educators at all levels should seek to develop in their students. These practices rest on important
“processes and proficiencies” with longstanding importance in science education. The Science Framework emphasizes process
standards of which include planning investigations, using models, asking questions and communicating information.
Curriculum and Instruction – Office of Science--Biology
Third Nine Weeks
Construct
explanations
and design
solution
Obtain,
evaluate, and
communicate
information
Engage in
argument
Ask questions
and define
problems
Patterns
Develop and
use models
Practices
in
Science
Use math,
technology,
and
computational
thinking
Plan and carry
out
investigations
Cause and
Effect
Stability and
change
Cross Cutting
Concepts
Analyze and
interpret data
Energy and
matter
Systems and
system
models
Crosscutting concepts have value because they provide students with connections and intellectual tools that are related across the
differing areas of disciplinary content and can enrich their application of practices and their understanding of core ideas. Throughout
the year, students should continue to develop proficiency with the eight science practices. Crosscutting concepts can help students
better understand core ideas in science and engineering. When students encounter new phenomena, whether in a science lab, field trip,
or on their own, they need mental tools to help engage in and come to understand the phenomena from a scientific point of view.
Familiarity with crosscutting concepts can provide that perspective. A next step might be to simplify the phenomenon by thinking of it
as a system and modeling its components and how they interact. In some cases it would be useful to study how energy and matter flow
through the system, or to study how structure affects function (or malfunction). These preliminary studies may suggest explanations
for the phenomena, which could be checked by predicting patterns that might emerge if the explanation is correct, and matching those
predictions with those observed in the real world.
Curriculum and Instruction – Office of Science--Biology
Third Nine Weeks
Science Curriculum Maps
This curriculum map is designed to help teachers make effective decisions about what science content to teach so that, our students
will reach Destination 2025. To reach our collective student achievement goals, we know that teachers must change their instructional
practice in alignment with the three College and Career Ready shifts in instruction for science.
To ensure that all student will be taught science content and processes in a comprehensive, consistent, and coherent manner,
Science Curriculum Maps are provided. Foundation texts for the maps include Shelby County Schools Framework for Standards
Based Curriculum, Science Curriculum Frameworks-K-12 (State of Tennessee Board of Education, and National Science Education
Standards).
Teachers function most effectively and students learn best within an “aligned” curriculum delivery system. An aligned system begins
with a concerted effort to implement the state curriculum frameworks. Many districts have developed curriculum guides built around
these frameworks to ensure that what is taught in particular grades and courses is closely linked with student Learning Expectations
found in the state standards. Classroom teachers use these locally-generated curriculum guides to plan and implement their individual
grade or course Pacing Guides. Expectations for student performance are clear and carefully tied to daily instructional events and
classroom assessment practices. In theory, a fully aligned system closes the loop between state standards and student learning.
Additionally, a coherent instructional/assessment system offers the potential for heightening student learning as reflected by their
performance on state-mandated standardized tests. Our collective goal is to ensure our students graduate ready for college and career.
Most of the elements found in the state Curriculum Frameworks were incorporated into the curriculum mapping material prepared by
Shelby County Schools. Additional features were included to add clarity and to offer avenues that could assist teacher in developing
grade level lessons.
A district-wide, K-12, standards-based curriculum is implemented in science. This curriculum is articulated in the form of individual
SCS curriculum maps for each grade and subject. These SCS curriculum maps enable the district to implement a single curriculum
that emphasizes specific standards. Since Shelby County has a high rate of mobility among the student population, the SCS
curriculum maps ensure that all students receive the same program of high-level instructional content and academic expectations,
regardless of which school they attend. The utilization of a district-wide standards-based curricular program ensures that students in
SCS are engaged in hands-on inquiry based activities as teachers implement the curriculum map.
High School Science: Curriculum Map for Biology
Third Nine Weeks
State Standards
Embedded Standards
Outcomes
Resources
Connections
Unit 3.1 Cellular Energy -3 weeks
CLE 3210.3.2 Distinguish
between aerobic and
anaerobic respiration.
CLE 3210.3.3 Investigate the
relationship between the
process of photosynthesis and
cellular respiration.
CLE 32010.Math.2 Utilize
appropriated mathematical
equations and processes to
understand biological
concepts.
CLE 3210.Inq.2 Design and
conduct scientific
investigations to explore new
phenomena verify previous
results test how well a theory
predicts, and compare
opposing theories.
CLE 3210.Inq.5 Compare
experimental evidence and
conclusions with those drawn
by others about the same
testable question.
.
Distinguish between aerobic
and anaerobic respiration.
Construct a concept map to
differentiate between aerobic
and anaerobic respiration.
Compare and contrast
photosynthesis and cellular
respiration in terms of energy
transformation.
Conduct experiments to
determine the factors that
affect the rate of
photosynthesis.
Design and conduct an
experiment to investigate
whether plants release carbon
dioxide.
Conduct experiments to
investigate photosynthesis
and cellular respiration.
Investigate the process of
fermentation.
Glencoe Chapter 8 pages
217-241
8.1 – how Organisms Obtain
Energy
8.2 – Photosynthesis
8.3 – Cellular Respiration
www.biologygmh.com
Scientific Argumentation in
Biology—Activity 18-Plants
and Energy (Cellular
Respiration and
Photosynthesis) p. 218
Scientific Argumentation in
Biology—Activity 12-Plant
Biomass (Photosynthesis) p.
149
Mini-Lab “Relate
Photosynthesis to Cellular
Respiration,” p 220.
Mini-Lab Observe
Chloroplasts p. 223
Teacher Demonstration Photosynthesis p. 224
Biolab “ “Rate of
Photosynthesis,” p. 235
www.biologygmh.com
TE p. 216
Academic Vocabulary
Energy, thermodynamics,
metabolism, photosynthesis,
cellular respiration, adenosine
triphosphate, thylakoid,
granum, stroma, pigment,
NADP+, Calvin cycle, rubisco,
anaerobic process, aerobic
respiration, glycolysis, Krebs
cycle, fermentation
Follow precisely a complex
multistep procedure when
carrying out experiments,
taking measurements, or
performing technical tasks,
attending to special cases or
exceptions defined in the text.
Students will make foldable to
understand how all organisms
get energy form food through
cellular respiration p. 217.
Creative writing – Students
will write a short poem
describing the flow of energy
from autotrophs to
heterotrophs. P. 219
Using a model, illustrate that
cellular respiration is a
chemical process whereby the
bonds of food molecules and
oxygen molecules are broken
4
2015-2016
High School Science: Curriculum Map for Biology
Third Nine Weeks
State Standards
Embedded Standards
Outcomes
Resources
Glencoe Resources
TE p. 216
Respiration and
Photosynthesis Review
Photosynthesis Millionaire
Prentice Hall Chapter 9
pages 221-225
Activities/Labs
TE: Build Science Skills,
p224
SE: *Inquiry Act, p220
*Problem Solving, p224
*Real-World Lab, pp234235
Lab Worksheets: Ch 9
BTM: Lab 1
Connections
and the bonds in new
compounds are formed
resulting in a net transfer of
energy
NGSS Practices
3. Planning and carrying out
investigations
4. Analyzing and interpreting
data.
5. Using a model, illustrate
how photosynthesis
transforms light energy into
stored chemical energy.
Math.Practice.MP2 Reason
abstractly and quantitatively.
Vernier Biology #s 11 A- 11 B
Vernier Biology #s 31A – 31 B
Unit 3.2 – Sexual and Asexual Cellular Reproduction -2 Weeks
CLE 3210.1.4 Describe the
process of cell growth and
reproduction.
CLE3210.Inq.4 Apply
qualitative and quantitative
measures to analyze data and
draw conclusions that are free
of bias.
.
Determine the relationship
between cell growth and cell
reproduction.
Demonstrate the movement of
chromosomes during mitosis
in plant and animal cells.
Demonstrate the movement of
chromosomes during mitosis
in plant and animal cells.
Glencoe Chapter 9
9.1 Cellular Growth
9.2 Mitosis and Cytokinesis
9.3 Cell Cycle Regulation
Launch Lab – From where do
healthy cells come? P. 243
Cells Alive: Mitosis
Mitosis Tutorial
Academic Vocabulary
Cell cycle, interphase, mitosis,
cytokinesis, chromosome,
chromatin, prophase, sister
chromatid, centromere,
spindle apparatus,
metaphase, anaphase,
telophase, cyclin, cyclindependent kinase, cancer,
carcinogen, apoptosis, stem
cell
5
2015-2016
High School Science: Curriculum Map for Biology
Third Nine Weeks
State Standards
Embedded Standards
Outcomes
Resources
Connections
Mitosis Quiz
Mini Lab – Investigate Cell
Size p. 245
Data Analysis Lab. P. 251
Critical Thinking –Observe
and Infer p. 254
Scientific Argumentation in
Biology--Activity 11Spontaneous Generation (Cell
Theory) p. 137
Comparison of Mitosis and
Meiosis Cell Growth
Mitosis internet activity
Prentice Hall Chapter 10
pages 241-252
Activities/Labs
(Sect 10-1)
TE: Build Science Skills
SE: *Inq Act, p240
*QuickLab, p242
(Sect 10-2)
TE: *Demo, p244
*Build Sci Skills, pp245,
246, 247
SE: *Analyzing Data, p249
*Exploration, pp254-255
LMA: Ch 10
LMB: Ch 10
BTM: Lab 3
Mitosis and Cytokinesis –
Students will make a foldable
to help understand how cells
reproduce by a process called
mitosis, resulting in two
genetically identical cells.
Big Idea
Have students make a
concept map using the terms
cell cycle, mitosis, interphase,
cytokinesis, anaphase,
metaphase, prophase, and
telophase.
Narrative Writing Have
students write a paragraph
containing the words
chromosomes, sister
chromatids, and centromere.
Students’ paragraph should
demonstrate the correct
usage of each of these terms.
Read Biology and Society p.
258 – Students will create a
pamphlet depicting the
benefits of adult stem cell
research.
NGSS Practices
1. Using a model, illustrate the
role of cellular division
(mitosis) and differentiation in
producing and maintaining
complex organisms.
6
2015-2016
High School Science: Curriculum Map for Biology
Third Nine Weeks
State Standards
Embedded Standards
CLE 3210.4.5 Recognize how
meiosis and sexual
reproduction contribute to
genetic variation in a
population.
CLE3210.Inq.5 Compare
experimental evidence and
conclusions with those drawn
by other about the same
testable question.
Outcomes
Resources
Describe how meiosis is
involved in the production of
egg and sperm cells.
Glencoe Chapter 10 pages
268-291
10.1 Meiosis
Explain how meiosis results in
the production of haploid cells
and how this influences
genetic variation.
Launch Lab -- What Would
Happen Without Meiosis? TE
p. 269
Academic Vocabulary
Gene, homologous
chromosome, gamete,
haploid, fertilization, diploid,
meiosis, crossing over,
Activity – Variation p. 275
Illustrating Meiosis –
Students will make a foldable
to help sequence, illustrate,
and explain the phase of
meiosis.
Prentice Hall Chapter 11
pages 263-278 and Chapter
14 pages 349-354
Reading Strategy – Have
students do the five steps
SQ3R - page 271
SECTION 11-1
Activities/Labs
TE: *Build Science Skills,
p263, 266
*Demo, p265
SE: *Inquiry Act, p262
SECTION 11-4
Activities/Labs
TE: *Demo, p277
*Build Science Skills,
p278
SE: Exploration, p281
Writing Support- Informal
Writing – Have students write
a letter from a cell’s point of
view about the changes that
happen to its chromosomes
during meiosis, p. 272,
Data Analysis Lab. P. 274
Associate gene mutation with
changes in a DNA molecule.
Connections
Creative Writing – Have
students write a poem about
the stages of meiosis I and II.
Their poem can be humorous
or serious but should be
scientifically accurate. Have a
live poetry reading. p. 275
NGSS
7. Make and defend a claim
based on evidence that
inheritable genetic variations
may result from: (1) new
genetic combinations through
7
2015-2016
High School Science: Curriculum Map for Biology
Third Nine Weeks
State Standards
Embedded Standards
Outcomes
Resources
Connections
meiosis, (2) viable errors
occurring during replication,
and/or (3) mutations caused
by environmental factors.
Unit 3.3 Mendelian Genetics - 4 Weeks
CLE 3210.4.3 Predict the
outcome of monohybrid and
dihybrid crosses.
CLE 32010.Math.2 Utilize
appropriated mathematical
equations and processes to
understand biological
concepts.
Determine the probability of a
particular trait in an offspring
based on the genotype of the
parents and the particular
mode of inheritance.
Glencoe Chapter 10 pages
277-291
Apply data to complete and
interpret a genetic pedigree.
Mini-Lab Predict Probability in
Genetics p. 281 and Map
Chromosomes p. 284
10.2 Mendelian Genetics
10.3 Gene Linkage and
Polyploidy
Scientific Argumentation in
Biology—Activity 16Environmental Influence of
Genotypes and Phenotypes
(Genetics) p. 191
Text Sect 11-2: 267-269
Activities/Labs
TE: *Make Connections,
p267
*Build Science Skills,
p269
SE: Quick Lab, p268
Academic Vocabulary
genetics, allele, dominant,
recessive, homozygous,
heterozygous, genotype,
phenotype, law of
segregation, hybrid, law of
independent assortment,
genetic recombination,
polyploidy
Translate quantitative or
technical information
expressed in words in a text
into visual form (e.g., a table
or chart) and translate
information expressed visually
or orally.
Writing Strategy – Creative
Writing – Have students work
in pairs to create a cartoon
about the inheritance of more
than one trait in pea plants. p.
280
NGSS Practices
5. Using mathematics and
computational thinking.
2. Developing and using
models.
8
2015-2016
High School Science: Curriculum Map for Biology
Third Nine Weeks
State Standards
Embedded Standards
CLE 3210.4.4 Compare
different modes of inheritance:
sex linkage, co-dominance,
incomplete dominance,
multiple alleles, and
polygenetic traits.
CLE 3210.Inq.4 Apply
qualitative and quantitative
measures to analyze data and
draw conclusions that are free
of bias.
Outcomes
Describe how the process of
meiosis controls the number
of chromosomes in a gamete.
Explain the processes of
segregation of alleles and
independent assortment of
alleles in terms of the number
of chromosomes present in
given cells during meiosis.
Compare different modes of
inheritance: sex linkage, codominance, incomplete
dominance, multiple alleles,
and polygenic traits.
Resources
Glencoe Chapter 11
11.1 Basic Pattern of Human
Inheritance
11.2 Complex Patterns of
Inheritance
11.3 Chromosomes and
Human Heredity
Launch Lab -What Do You
Know About Human
Inheritance? TE p. 295
Mini Lab – Investigate Human
Pedigree p. 300
Connections
Academic Vocabulary
Carrier, pedigree, incomplete
dominance, codominance,
multiple alleles, epistasis, sex
chromosomes, autosome,
sex-linked trait, polygenic trait,
karyotype, telomere,
nondisjunction
Genetic Disorders –
Students will make a foldable
to help understand how
variations in nucleotide base
sequences are linked to
genetic disorders.
Data Analysis Lab p. 303
Apply pedigree data to
interpret various modes of
genetic inheritance.
Describe the relationship
between pedigree studies and
the development of genetic
screening tests.
Demonstration – Gene
Expression p. 309
Mini-Lab – Explore the
Methods of the Geneticist p.
314
Scientific Argumentation in
Biology—Activity 29Misconception about
Inheritance(Genetics) p. 315
Formative Assessment, TE p.
p.310
Mini-Lab
Investigate Human Pedigrees,
TE p. 300
Writing Support – Summary
Writing - Have students work
in small groups to research an
inherited condition such as
Tay-Sachs or sickle cell
disease that is more frequent
in some populations than
others. Have them write a
summary of the condition and
present it to the class. p. 298
Technical Writing – Have
students investigate other
dominant or recessive
disorders that are not
mentioned in the chapter.
Have them design and write a
technical pamphlet describing
the genetic disorder. The
pamphlet should include
symptoms, genetic causes,
frequencies of occurrence,
9
2015-2016
High School Science: Curriculum Map for Biology
Third Nine Weeks
State Standards
Embedded Standards
Outcomes
Resources
Scientific Argumentation in
Biology—Activity 29Misconception about
Inheritance(Genetics) p. 315
Mini-Lab – “Investigate
Human Pedigrees, TE p. 300
Scientific Argumentation in
Biology—Activity 4-Fruit Fly
Traits (Genetics) p. 45
Connections
treatments, and at least on
graph. p. 298
NGSS Practices
4. Analyzing and interpreting
data.
5. Using mathematics and
computational thinking.
Prentice Hall
Prentice Hall Chapter 11
pages 270-274 and Chapter
14 pages 341-354
Text Sect 11-3: 270-274
Sect 14-1: 341-348
Sect 14-2: 349-354
10
2015-2016
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