ASSESSING READINESS TO OFFER NEW DEGREE PROGRAMS
Master of Science in Biomedical Engineering, 09/08/2011
Assessing Readiness to Offer New Degree Programs is a supplemental campus-based document that will
a) Inform the academic program development process and
b) Illustrate the unit’s readiness to offer the proposed degree program.
The proposing unit is expected to
a) Submit the assessing readiness document with the proposed program’s planning document and
b) Update the assessing readiness document as unit conditions change for submission with the proposed
program’s request to establish.
Part One: Assessing Need for the Program
Need for the Program
As the population ages, the need for advanced medical tools, devices and diagnostics increases along with a need
to improve our understanding of disease states. Thus as this need increases so does the demand for biomedical
engineers. Due to their unique background, biomedical engineers have one foot grounded in the medical field and
one foot grounded in engineering principles. By straddling these fields, biomedical engineers form a bridge upon
which medical need, clinical practice, creativity, collaboration and research can travel freely from one side to the
other. Our students will have a direct impact on the lives and health of those living in eastern North Carolina.
According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the employment growth for biomedical engineering will increase by
72% over the next ten years illustrating an increasing demand for people in this field. In addition the Labor
Market Information Division of the Employment Security Commission of North Carolina predicts a 38% increase
in biomedical engineering jobs from 2006-2016. Thus there is a demand within the state of North Carolina for
biomedical engineers.
Table 1: BLS Growth Projections (in thousands) for Biomedical Engineering and Related Occupations
http://www.bls.gov/oco/ocos027.htm
Occupational title
Biomedical Engineer
SOC
Code
Employment,
2008
Projected
employment,
2018
17-2031
16,000
27,600
Change, 2008-18
Number Percent
11,600
72
Graduates of the program will be highly qualified candidates and prepared for the Brody School of Medicine
(BSOM), the School of Dental Medicine, current PhD programs offered in the BSOM and positions in industry.
In addition, this program will prepare our students to compete in PhD, medical and dental programs at other UNC
constituent institutions. Upon completion of this program students may enter the education profession, improving
the STEM teaching pool for eastern North Carolina. Students will be qualified to compete for programs and
fellowships in government sponsored research laboratories.
Fit with Strategic Plan
This unique program, which targets an emerging and advanced technological field, integrates with key
components of the ECU mission statement: to serve through education, to serve through research and creative
activity, and to serve through leadership and partnership. The proposed MS in biomedical engineering is
consistent with and supports these components. This MS program:
 Offers a unique graduate education option preparing engineers and scientists to meet the challenges of
biomedical discovery and applications of engineering to medicine in service to the people of North
Carolina, their health and their welfare.
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



Provides opportunities for partnership with the Brody School of Medicine, School of Dental Medicine,
College of Allied Health Sciences, industry, government, and defense system organizations.
Enhances new and emerging research opportunities for faculty in the Brody School of Medicine, School
of Dental Medicine, College of Allied Health Sciences and the Department of Engineering to form
partnerships in an emerging field.
Focuses on development of technology professionals in a key field and promotes development of strong
linkages and interactions with the industrial, business, and public sector organizations of eastern North
Carolina.
Advances the art of biomedical engineering.
The proposed MS program specifically addresses the following ECU Strategic Directions and related sub
elements as presented in ECU Tomorrow:
Education for a new century: We will be responsive to the changing demands of the economy, offering excellent
undergraduate and graduate programs that provide the global skills and knowledge necessary for success in the
twenty-first century.
Economic Prosperity in the East: We will invest in academic programs that give individuals the right skills and
tools needed to compete and thrive in a twenty-first-century workplace. We will invest in programs that improve
access to our resources for communities and individuals. We will provide ongoing educational and learning
opportunities to support the continued development of a competitive workforce for North Carolina.
Biomedical engineering is a twenty-first century career field which meets the demands of the economy for
excellent graduate programs which allow ECU graduates to compete in the global economy. In addition, this
degree has the potential to provide a substantial positive impact, improving the resources for the regional
community to improve health care and jobs. Globalization of both engineering and the overall field of
healthcare has been increasing over the past 10-20 years and is continuing to increase. Graduates of the
proposed program will have a strong background in both fields and will be able to compete and contribute to
this growing global economy.
Since 2004, the ECU BS in engineering program has had a positive impact on industry and economic
development in eastern North Carolina. Faculty from the biomedical and bioprocess undergraduate
concentrations work regularly with industry and economic development professionals from across the region.
The Department of Engineering’s active Engineering Advisory Board (EAB) includes two economic
development professionals, one from Pitt County and one from the East Region. The time and effort spent by
the 40+ members of the EAB are testament to the fact that local industry cares very much about the program.
A number of the EAB members are from healthcare-related industries, providing internships and senior
capstone project opportunities. Members of the EAB are strong contributors to the department.
ECU will increase investment in innovation and research: We will be the third-largest research university in the
University of North Carolina system, exceeding $100 million in external support for our programs. We will lead in
innovation in health sciences and information technology and seek to develop products that compete in the
growing knowledge-based economy. We will invest in interdisciplinary research centers that will support the
region’s growth in health care, tourism, education, marine trades, and biotechnology. We will focus on developing
applied, translational, and externally focused research that emphasizes the economic and physical health of our
citizens.
Health Care and Medical Innovation: ECU will save lives, cure diseases, and positively transform the quality of
health care for the region and state. ECU will expand our research in health sciences with a particular emphasis
on the health concerns of the region and state. We will expand biomedical and health-related research funding to
$75 million annually.
The MS in biomedical engineering will have a positive impact on the research productivity of the university,
support innovation in health sciences, support interdisciplinary research improving health care and
biotechnology, and support overall improvement of the health of the citizens of North Carolina. By
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emphasizing the application of engineering and mathematics to medical research, the proposed program
advances the university’s focus on improving student STEM proficiency.
Impact on other Unit Programs
The proposed program does not compete with any program either within the Engineering Department, or within
the College of Technology and Computer Science generally. This program will be the first engineering graduate
program available at ECU.
More broadly, the proposed MS in biomedical engineering complements many programs in a variety of colleges
across both campuses of ECU. For example, the new graduate engineering program integrates well with the MS
in biomedical sciences, offered by the BSOM. The biomedical science program emphasizes basic science,
medical, pharmaceutical, and biotechnology research.
In addition, the proposed program integrates very well with the interdisciplinary doctoral program in biological
sciences (IDPBS). This program currently offers graduate curricula and research in the areas of biology,
chemistry and biomedical sciences. The proposed program will complement these research areas, and will
expand course selection for graduate students both in engineering and in the above disciplines. Drs. Bossetti and
George have been accepted as participants in the IDPBS. The experience gained in advising students in the
IDPBS will translate well to advising students in the proposed MS in biomedical engineering.
The average enrollment over the next five years is estimated to be approximately 10 students per year although
this number may increase when additional faculty are hired. The five year cumulative enrollment target is 25
students. This program will attract quality students from the Department of Engineering’s BS program, Thomas
Harriot College of Arts and Sciences, pre-med students with quantitative research interests, and basic science and
engineering students from across the state.
Comparison to Similar Programs in Other Universities
Within North Carolina, there are five universities offering masters in biomedical engineering (NCA&T,
UNC/NCSU Joint Department of Biomedical Engineering (2), Wake Forest (joint program with Virginia Tech)
(10), and Duke (17)), two of which are private universities. The numbers in parentheses indicate the number of
MS degrees awarded in AY 2008-09 (source is ASEE Profiles). Therefore there is still a need to be fulfilled
within the state of North Carolina for the training of biomedical engineers. East Carolina University has an
advantage, both nationally and regionally, as the only university within the University of North Carolina that
offers academic programs in engineering, medicine, dentistry, business and allied health on one campus. This
proximity of complementary programs provides an unequaled opportunity for collaboration and professional
growth of faculty, staff, and students.
This program will expand research and competitive, externally funded grant opportunities for faculty in
engineering and other collaborating departments. The curriculum development team will design an innovative
research intensive curriculum founded on engineering education research. Such an innovative curriculum would
be competitive for extramural funding and national recognition.
Accreditation Standards
There are no standard accrediting bodies for graduate programs in biomedical engineering.
Part Two: Assessing Readiness of Current Faculty
Complete the Faculty Information Sheet (attached, with instructions for downloading from Sedona) for each
individual who will serve as a core faculty member, actively involved in delivering the proposed program.
Please see attached.
Provide a summary of faculty readiness in the unit to include the cumulative totals of the following:
Faculty Readiness Summary (with emphasis on the last five years)
Number of core faculty at each rank who will be actively engaged in this program
Professor
1
3
Associate Professor
Assistant Professor
Number of core faculty with experience directing theses/dissertations
Number of scholarly and professional activities related to proposed degree (with
emphasis on the past 5 years):
Number of publications related to proposed degree
Number of grants & contracts submitted and awarded related to proposed degree
Invited research presentations outside ECU
Patents/disclosures/copyrights
Participation in scholarly collaborations with other universities, laboratories, & centers:
Number of faculty
Service on related national/international boards or committees: Number of faculty
3
3
5
39
38
89
12
8
7
Part Three: Assessing Adequacy of Instructional/Research Facilities and Personnel to Support the
Program
Instructional and Research Facilities
Implementation of the proposed degree program will require additional laboratory and office space beyond
the facilities employed by the BS in biomedical engineering, the BSOM, and the dental school. Future
growth or expansion will be funded based on university and UNC-GA models as is currently the case.
The faculty associated with the proposed program will mentor graduate research using the equipment and
facilities described below. This equipment, and the associated laboratory space, are already in place, and are
actively used in current research.
The Department of Engineering supports a number of laboratories across several engineering
disciplines.
Within biomedical engineering, there are several lab spaces housing a variety of equipment. Room 350 (1200
sq. ft.) in the Science and Technology Building houses a complement of advanced electronics fabrication and
test equipment. This equipment includes an MSO4054B 500 MHz mixed-signal oscilloscope; a Tektronix
AFG3022B 25 MHz, dual-output arbitrary waveform generator; Tektronix P5205 high-voltage differential
probe and ADA400 differential preamplifier; a TCP0030 current probe; and an Agilent 34410A digital
multimeter. Room 243 in the Science and Technology Building is predominantly a teaching laboratory space.
Within that space are several fully stocked electronics test benches, including Agilent E3631A triple-output
power supplies; Agilent 34410A digital multimeters; Agilent 33220A, 20 MHz arbitrary waveform generators;
and Agilent 5000 series oscilloscopes.
Additional high-end electronic measurement and test equipment is available in the Biosensors Research Lab.
Specific equipment includes Agilent MSO6034A oscilloscope, 1682A logic analyzer, 6622A power supply,
34410A digital multimeter, 33220A function generator, Cadence P-SPICE, Electronics Workbench Multisim,
soldering stations, wireless communication modules (Bluetooth, Zigbee) and development tools, medical
sensors, personal computers, LPKF print circuit board rapid-prototype machine, Microchip Integrated
Development Tools, software licenses for LabVIEW, MATLAB, Solidworks, and NI-ELVIS.
The Bioprocess Engineering Laboratory (1100 sq. ft.) is a teaching and predominantly research laboratory,
located in room 131 of the Science and Technology Building. Current courses in upstream bioprocessing
(wet-lab techniques, bacterial cultures in both shaker flasks and benchtop bioreactors, and cell harvesting) and
downstream processing (distillation, extraction, affinity chromatography) are taught in this laboratory each
semester. The major equipment housed in the laboratory that is available for teaching and research includes
two 5L and two 2L benchtop bioreactors (Sartorius BioStat Aplus), GE AKTA Purifier system, centrifuge
(Beckman Coulter Avanti J-E), top loading autoclave for the bioreactors (Hirayama HICLAVE), front loading
autoclave (Tuttnauer Brinkmann 2540E), table-top shaker/incubator, pH meter (Thermo Orions Star series),
sonic dismembrator (Fisher Model 100), spectrophotometer (Perkin Elmer Lambda 45 UV/VIS), bath
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sonicator, analytical balance (Mettler Toledo), stir/hot plates, lyophilizer (Labconco Freeze Zone 4.5),
luminometer (Promega Glomax 20/20), fluorometer (Promega, Modulus), three-door chromatography cabinet,
protein and DNA electrophoresis equipment, thermal cycler, and small equipment and tools to conduct
molecular biology research (micropipettes, table-top centrifuge, etc.).
In addition, this facility houses a TA Instruments AR-2000 stress-controlled Rheometer, an Olympus BX-51
reflected light microscope with a 12MP digital camera and bright field/dark field/fluorescence, and a raméhart Model 250 Standard Contact Angle Goniometer/Tensiometer for contact angle and surface tension
measurements.
The Engineering Department maintains a variety of industrial quality fabrication and mechanical engineering
instrumentation equipment, including (but not limited to) lathes, milling machines, a variety of welders, a
band saw, workbenches, vices, a wide assortment of hand tools, a phototachometer, an extensometer, a shear
test fixture, durometers, and hardness testers.
East Carolina University maintains and supports shared research facilities and services.
Shared equipment available on ECU’s main campus includes an Accelerator Laboratory, Acoustic Laboratory,
Biomedical Laser Laboratory, Biomedical Optics Laboratory, Genomics and Bioinformatics Laboratory, High
Performance Computing Facility, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Laboratory and Mass
Spectrometry Facility.
The computing needs of biomedical engineering graduate students will be supported by the department, High
performance computing laboratory and Information Technology and Computing Services (ITCS).
The laboratories listed above, and any office space, are equipped with the computers needed to perform data
analysis or other research related tasks. ITCS supports additional student computing needs through two
unique services: high performance computing and the Virtual Computing Lab. The high performance
computing capabilities offered by ITCS are optimized for solving some of the advanced computational
problems that arise in engineering research. The Virtual Computing Lab, located at NC State University,
provides remote access to a variety of advanced software packages. ITCS provides this access through ECU’s
network.
In addition, the College of Technology and Computer Science will provide an array of support that will
include software, hardware, and technical services support. Examples of support include desktops on demand,
virtual servers on demand and network attached storage space. In addition, TECS technical services can
provide support for cluster computing and remote display of graphically intensive applications.
Research facilities supported by the Brody School of Medicine include:
Major laboratory equipment is available in the Brody Medical Sciences Building (3S-16, 400 sq. ft), including
a laminar flow hood, chemical hood, three CO2 water-jacketed incubators, centrifuge with rotors, laboratory
refrigerator and freezer; an inverted microscope, upright microscope and dissecting microscope; distilled
water source, balance, and pH meter.
The Brody School of Medicine also offers core facilities to support east and west campus research efforts.
These facilities include a flow cytometry/confocal microscopy facility, an electron microscope lab, a
histology lab, and a phosphor-imaging/fluorescence imaging lab. Shared resources include (but are not
limited to) centrifuges, electrophoresis equipment, various imaging systems, chromatography systems, an
ultrasound machine, microscopes, and spectrophotometers.
The Tissue Culture Facility located in room 279 Warren Life Science Building (LSB 279, 800 sq ft) offers
additional lab space. Major equipment includes four bench top work areas with adjacent laminar flow hoods,
one chemical hood, two CO2 water-jacketed incubators, tabletop centrifuge with rotors, laboratory refrigerator,
two laboratory freezers (-20° C, -80° C), a Dewar liquid nitrogen cell storage system, inverted and upright
light microscopes, a digital camera with C-mount, and distilled water source.
● How will assignment of this space to the proposed program impact existing programs?
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The spaces proposed are currently available for use by our faculty and will not impact existing program
utilization of the space.
● Describe additional facilities or specialized equipment that would be needed over the next five years.
With the growth of the program additional space will be needed for graduate student desk space and for new
faculty members.
● Describe current holdings in library resources in the proposed program and projected library resources needed
to support the proposed program.
Current journal subscriptions and books are sufficient to start the proposed program including the Journal of
Biomechanics, the Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Medical and Biological Engineering and
Computing, several IEEE Transactions series, and the Journal of Neural Engineering. A few additional
subscriptions (for example, Journal of Biomechanical Engineering) may need to be added over the first five
years.
● Provide e-mail verification of consultation with Office of Space Management about the feasibility of new or
additional space needs for the proposed program.
Please see attached email.
Personnel
● What additional personnel would be needed to make the proposed program successful for growth and
development over a five-year period?
-
Faculty – 1 additional position in Year 3
Two post-doctoral associates, one research technician, and one additional position to oversee
research and graduate lab courses
Graduate assistants – 10 by Year 5
Other staff – 0.5 additional position to oversee graduate program paperwork
● What will be needed to recruit such individuals and what is the recruitment market like?
To recruit the one additional faculty member a start-up package will be needed to attract highly qualified
individuals. Graduate assistantships will be needed to attract quality graduate students. As biomedical
engineering is a specialized field most industry jobs require at least an MS degree illustrating a high
demand for the program.
Part Four: Assessing Financial Resources to Support the Program
● Describe existing financial resources to be devoted to the proposed program.
The Department of Engineering currently has 17.5 FTE faculty positions, with seven of the current
faculty supporting the biomedical engineering concentration indirectly. Allocation of two additional
positions has been made for the coming year, and a portion of 1.5 FTE of those positions will support
biomedical engineering. Faculty resources are sufficient for initiation of the program.
● Describe what additional financial resources would be needed over the next five years and their proposed
sources of funding.
-
Ten graduate assistantships at $15,000 each
Five out of state tuition remissions, phased in over five years
One additional faculty member in Year 3 of the MS Program
Two postdoctoral associates to support the research and educational objectives of the program
● What new financial resources will come to the university based on the projected increase in enrollment?
At our projected enrollment of 25 MS students, taking 18 credits of engineering courses during the course
of their program, the additional student credit hours will justify one additional faculty position. In
addition, the students will be involved in performance of externally-funded research programs, which will
result in additional funding for ECU, along with indirect costs. Additional scholarship will also result
from the program.
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We believe there is considerable potential for patents to result from the research and development
conducted as part of this program. As an example, Dr. Jason Yao of Engineering and Dr. Greg Givens of
Communication Sciences and Disorders have filed a patent for “Internet-based Multi-user Diagnostic
Hearing Assessment Systems Having Client-server Architecture with User-based Access Levels for
Secure Data Exchange,” provisional patent, 2009-2010; currently filing PCT (Patent Cooperation Treaty)
to protect intellectual property rights worldwide. The university share of the royalties would generate
financial resources.
● Will the program students contribute to the financing of the program through teaching, research, and clinical
practice?
The students will contribute by serving as teaching assistants in the undergraduate program and
performing externally funded research.
● What are your plans for the program if the financial resources anticipated for the program (enrollment, external
support, etc.) are 25% lower and 50% lower than expected?
Considering the current strength of the program and the growth in the related networking jobs forecasted
by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, a decline in program enrollment is unlikely. Current employment and
labor projections in biomedical engineering related areas are very strong. If the decision was made to cut
resources at the University or College level, possibly by refusing the graduate assistantships or the
additional faculty line in Year 3, the program would still be viable. Reduction of the number of
assistantships would effectively reduce the “quality” of the students in the program since the best students
would find assistantships at other universities and our program would be forced to admit students who are
not able to find assistantships elsewhere. If the additional faculty position were refused, the projected size
of the program might be reduced. In addition, the potential for research efforts in bioengineering would be
reduced overall if faculty numbers are lower.
Part Five: Assessing External Support and Collaboration
● List of active grants/contracts specifically related to the proposed program.
Award No.
R01HL091348
R01HL081720
Faculty
Member
Sponsor
Primary Biomedical Engineering Faculty
Mechanisms for stem cell
National
Muller-Borer
differentiation into cardiac
Heart, Lung,
(comyocytes (co-investigation
and Blood
investigator)
with Duke University)
Institute
National
NO-independent cGMP
Muller-Borer
Heart, Lung,
regulation of vascular
(coand Blood
remodeling
investigator)
Institute
The Eastern
Assessment of myocardial
Carolina
Muller-Borer
cellular transplantation via
Cardiovascular
(Co-PI)
multiple delivery modes
Institute &
BSOM
East Carolina
Role of thymosin B4 in
University
stem cell engraftment and
Muller-Borer
Division of
myocardial tissue
(PI)
Research and
regeneration
Graduate
Studies
Title
Award
$357,612
$252,325
$125,000
$40,000
7
Effects of
cardiopulmonary bypass
on adult stem cell
transplantation
East Carolina
University
Division of
Research and
Graduate
Studies
$25,000
Limberis (PI)
NC
Biotechnology
Center
$75,000
Williams (PI)
NC
Biotechnology
Center
$40,480
Yao (PI)
NSF
$88,100
Williams (PI)
NSF
$136,480
Muller-Borer
(coinvestigator)
Associated Engineering Faculty
A11-0048001
A10-0176001
A10-00430001
A08-00530001
Engineering
photoreceptor-controlled
aggregation and
disaggregation of
nanoparticles
Integration of hands-on
short course into a
bioprocess engineering
curriculum
Portable cyberlaboratories: virtual
instruments and affordable
prototyping kits to
enhance learning and
improve access to
electrical engineering
education
Design and development
of educational modules for
bioprocess engineering
● Describe existing collaborative efforts related to the proposed program with community or state agencies, other
institutions of higher education, federal laboratories or agencies, national centers, or other external
organizations.
The Engineering Department maintains a collaborative relationship with the following industry partners,
who are members of the Engineering Advisory Board:
- Becton Dickenson Medical
- Pitt County Memorial Hospital
- Glaxo SmithKline, Inc.
- Pharmaceutical Calibrations and Instrumentation
- Pioneer Surgical Orthobiologic, Inc.
- DSM Pharmaceutical Products, Inc.
- DSM-Dyneema, LLC
- Triangle Biosystems Inc.
- Wyeth Vaccines
- NC Biotechnology Center
- Pfizer
- NASA Langley Research Center
- NAACO Materials Handling Group
- PCS Phosphate
- Metrics, Inc.
- Avoca
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The Engineering Advisory Board is comprised of approximately 40 members from industry, consulting
firms, academia, and government laboratories. The board meets twice per year to review current and
planned programs, review student achievement, and to provide guidance on future directions of the
program. The board is extremely active, and the department chair maintains contact with the board
throughout the year. A number of these organizations participate in the department’s Senior Capstone
Design Project, and offer collaborations for graduate level research projects. The faculty is continuously
pursuing industry and government partners. A new partner for 2011 is the Centers for Disease Control
who is sponsoring a Senior Capstone Project.
● How do you plan to use external funding to support the proposed program? To what agencies or programs
would proposals be submitted and with what timeframe?
The following external agencies support academic biomedical engineering research, both nationally and
regionally:
-
The National Institutes of Health. One of the stated goals of the NIH is to foster creative discoveries,
innovative research strategies, and their applications as a basis for protecting and improving health.
The NIH realizes this goal by supporting a wide range of research activities, through the 27 Institutes
and centers that comprise this federal organization. Specific institutes that are pertinent to the
proposed program include the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB),
National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), National Institute of General
Medical Sciences (NIGMS), and the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI).
The NIH also funds research projects at less-established research universities through several grant
mechanisms. One such mechanism is the Academic Research Enhancement Award (AREA) grant,
which is specifically designed to stimulate biomedical research at institutions that provide
baccalaureate and advanced degrees.
-
The National Science Foundation. A well-established federal agency created “to promote the
progress of science; to advance the national health, prosperity and welfare; to secure the national
defense…” This organization has a long-standing history as a major source of federal funding for a
wide assortment of cutting-edge STEM research.
-
Department of Defense. The DoD provides a number of grant mechanisms through the Defense
Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), Office of Naval Research (ONR), Air Force Office
of Scientific Research (OSR), and the Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative (MURI). A
popular graduate fellowship program offered by the DoD, is the National Defense Science and
Engineering Graduate Fellowship. This program provides three years of support for studies in
biosciences, electrical engineering, and cognitive, neural, and behavioral sciences.
-
The North Carolina Biotechnology Center. The NC Biotech center is a state-funded, privately held
non-profit organization dedicated entirely to biotechnology development. The mission of this center
is to provide long-term economic and societal benefits to North Carolina by supporting biotechnology
research, commercialization, collaboration, and education. The NCBC funds biotechnology research
in areas such as nanobiotechnology and combination medical devices. The center also funds
multidisciplinary research, for projects consisting of scientists from at least three distinct fields.
The engineering faculty supporting the proposed program has experience applying for, and receiving,
external funding from the above organizations. The stated goals of each grant agency, and the funding
programs offered, align with the research background of the faculty. Specifically, the proposed
biomedical engineering graduate program will foster research in the following areas: neural and cardiac
electrophysiology, cardiac stem cell therapies, computational hemodynamics, blood flow analysis using
MRI, medical imaging, and medical device design and MRI compatibility.
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Research efforts in these areas are either ongoing through existing grants (listed above), or are already in
development. Faculty members in the proposed program are currently preparing competitive grant
applications for initial submission in the 2010-2011 and 2011-2012 academic years.
As mentioned in the personnel requirements, the program can be started with current faculty personnel
and resources, however to initiate research momentum, funding for graduate assistants may be needed
during the start-up period. This will allow for preliminary research to be conducted preparing the core
engineering and collaborating faculty to compete for external funding.
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Faculty Information Sheet
Name: Odis Hayden Griffin, Jr., Ph.D., P.E.
1. Rank: Professor and Chair, Department of Engineering at East Carolina University
2. Degrees:
 Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State University, Blacksburg, Virginia
Doctor of Philosophy in Engineering Mechanics, June, 1980. Course work primarily in area of solid
mechanics. Dissertation “Three Dimensional Inelastic Finite Element Analysis of Laminated Composites.”
Use of finite element method with a modified Hill-type yield criterion and flow rule to study interlaminar
stresses in laminates subject to thermal and mechanical loading.
 Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas
Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering, May 1971. Course work primarily in thermodynamics and
heat transfer. Thesis, “A New Theory of Protoplasmic Streaming.” Application of nonequilibrium
thermodynamic principles to living cells.
Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering, August 1970. Course work in thermodynamics, heat
transfer, machine design, fluid dynamics, strength of materials, and metallurgy.
3. Teaching Experience related to proposed degree (with emphasis on the past five years)
Workload assignment: 15% teaching, 85% administrative

July 2010 to present, Professor and Chair, Department of Engineering, East Carolina University,
Greenville, North Carolina 27858
Leading the faculty of the East Carolina University Department of Engineering. Serve as chief
administrative officer, reporting to the Dean of the College, responsible for department’s resources, staff,
and budgets. Provide leadership for the department in accomplishing departmental mission and setting
and achieving goals. Promote excellence in teaching and advising, scholarship, research productivity,
economic development, and professional service. Serve as principal advocate for the department within
the College, serving on the Administrative Council. Ensure proper application of tenure and promotion
policies set forth in the East Carolina University Faculty Manual. Conduct annual faculty activity
planning and evaluation. Working to evaluate possible new concentrations in the BS in Engineering
program and working with a faculty group to develop a MS in biomedical engineering degree program.

May 2004 – June 2010, Professor and Head, Department of Engineering Education (departmental name
change), College of Engineering, Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State University, Blacksburg, Virginia
24061-0218
Planned and led changes in the department from a primarily teaching-only, freshman engineering program
to a degree-granting, research-oriented department, increasing external research funding from near zero in
2003 to several million dollars at the present time, including three NSF CAREER Awards (Borrego,
Paretti, and Johri) and one PECASE (Borrego). Added new faculty in the area of academic assessment,
technical communications, engineering design, and learning sciences. Led and participated in research
proposals in the area of engineering education. Diversified the faculty from all white males (1997) to a
department in which half (9 of 18) of the faculty are women, with good ethnic and disciplinary diversity
as well. Tenure outcomes for faculty hired since 1997 were good, and newer hires are progressing well
toward tenure due to continuous attention to faculty development, assessment, and feedback.
Beginning in 2004, I led the effort to create a graduate program from scratch, culminating in a Ph.D. in
Engineering Education, which accepted students in January 2008 and currently has 15 Ph.D. candidates.
Have developed and taught or co-taught five new engineering education graduate courses: “Preparing for
the Engineering Professoriate,” “Teaching Engineering,” “Practicum in the Engineering Classroom,”
“Training System Design,” and “Foundations of Engineering Education.” Led the development of a
Graduate Certificate in Engineering Education which is in place and has approximately 20 students
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participating. Presented the new courses and degree programs at all committees and commissions
reviewing it for approval and also presented at the Board of Visitors and State Council of Higher
Education for Virginia. Served as Graduate Program Director from January 2008 to February 2009.
Presented information on engineering education and our graduate program to a Virginia General
Assembly subcommittee considering creation of K-12 level standards of learning and other programs in
Virginia public schools.
In 2006 my department was one of two university departments designated as a University Exemplary
Department for developing and sustaining innovative and effective departmental approaches to
introductory courses at the graduate and undergraduate levels. These awards are highly competitive and
result in a $20,000 award to the department. As a group the faculty decided to spend the award on new
office furniture as we moved into newly renovated space that I spent approximately two years working
with the Provost and the Dean to obtain for the department. I am currently on the team that is providing
design information for a new engineering building.
Worked with college development office personnel to gain gifts for laboratory renovation, facility
maintenance, support for academic programs, and overall department support from both alumni and
industry. Have obtained gifts in the form of cash, stock, hardware, and shop equipment.
Overall management of departmental budget of approximately $2M. In 11 years as department head, was
never over budget, even though considerable resources were directed toward development of new courses,
supporting the success of new faculty, creation of spaces for hands-on learning, and development of a
PhD program. Department typically teaches 7,000-8,000 student credit hours annually.
Serving on the Program Assessment Committee of the Advisory Board for the University of Texas at El
Paso College of Engineering. Regularly review papers for JEE, AEE, ASEE, ASME, iNEER. Served on
NSF grant review panels twice for CCLI grants. Served on numerous College and University level
committees. Most recently served on search committees for Director of Academic Assessment, Assistant
Director of Academic Assessment, and Director of the Center for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching.
Served on the VT-Science Museum of Western Virginia Partnership Task Force and the Organizing
Committee for the Governor’s Conference on STEM Education.
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August 1997 – May 2004, Professor and Director, Division of Engineering Fundamentals (renamed as
Department of Engineering Education in 2004), College of Engineering, Virginia Polytechnic Institute &
State University, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061-0218
In addition to regular duties of a faculty member in the College of Engineering, oversee the efforts of the
Engineering Fundamentals faculty and staff. The faculty currently has 14 members, including two parttime professional advisors. There are three full-time classified staff. Managing the Joseph F. Ware, Jr.
Advanced Engineering Laboratory, an undergraduate student project laboratory with projects spanning
numerous departments in the College of Engineering, Pamplin College of Business, and the College of
Arts & Sciences. Leading the review and revision of the freshman engineering curriculum. Teaching
courses in Engineering Fundamentals (problem solving, programming, introduction to design, and
engineering graphics) and Mechanical Engineering (Advised Mini Baja Team, which is the capstone
design project for some students, from August 1995 to May 2001).
Instituted policies for common syllabi, common tests, and common final exams in introductory
engineering courses. Currently responsible for managing enrollments, assigning faculty teaching loads,
and overseeing development of EF teaching schedule. Have encouraged, with success, EF faculty to write
grant proposals, leading to several faculty who buy out of courses with project money. Scholarly
production is also increasing steadily.
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July 1993 – August 1997, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, College of Engineering, July 1994 –
August 1997, Professor of Engineering Science & Mechanics, Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State
University, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061-0217
In addition to regular duties of a faculty member in the College of Engineering, have responsibility for the
undergraduate program of the College. Responsible for preparing ABET materials for College and
coordinating departmental packages for Fall 1995 visit, with highly successful outcome. Serve on
numerous College- and University-level task forces, commissions, and committees. Responsible for
assembling departmental offerings for summer school and overseeing College summer school budget
($725K-$825K). Advise students on major changes, approve exceptions to University and College
policies for undergraduates. Working on evaluation of curriculum and curriculum reform including course
overlap between departments, cross-listing common courses. Chairing college-level committee assigned
to review the undergraduate curriculum and revise from the beginning courses. Work with College
Curriculum Committee for review of all proposed course modifications and inclusion of Engineering
courses in the University Core Curriculum. Visit community colleges to recruit students, assist with inhouse recruitment and retention programs. Proposed a new category for students wanting engineering who
had previously been offered a general studies curriculum so that they are now students in Engineering and
are able to take Engineering courses without difficulty. The first class of these students was admitted in
the Fall 1994, and we are currently evaluating their performance. General response from students and
parents has been overwhelmingly positive. Work with Admissions, Provost’s Office, Registrar’s Office,
and other Associate Deans across the University in dealing with student admissions, appeals for academic
exceptions, and resolving graduation problems.
During the period 1996-1998 I was the leader of the team that designed, oversaw the renovation, and
directed the operations of the Joseph F. Ware, Jr. Advanced Engineering Laboratory. The Ware Lab, as it
is popularly known, is one of a few such facilities in the country dedicated to undergraduate engineering
projects. The Ware Lab (http://www.eng.vt.edu/warelab/) is a 10,000 square foot facility with a machine
shop, welding shop, design studio, and work bays for student projects. Opened in September 1998, the
Ware Lab has been a great success.
Courses taught include: ESM 1000, Statics; ESM 4044, Mechanics of Composite Materials; ESM
4734/AOE 4024, Introduction to the Finite Element Method; ESM 3074 (now 2074), Computational
Methods; ESM 2004, Mechanics of Deformable Bodies; ESM 5184, Special Study (Scientific Visual
Analysis); ESM 5734, Introduction to the Finite Element Method; ESM 6734, Finite Element Method;
ME 4014, Design Studies in Mechanical Engineering (Mini-Baja car project); ME 4016, Engineering
Design and Project (Mini-Baja car project); EF 1005, Introduction to Engineering. Have modernized
several courses, including Computational Methods. To date have advised ten M.S. theses and seven Ph.D.
dissertations.
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September 1985 - June 1994, Associate Professor of Engineering Science & Mechanics, Virginia
Polytechnic Institute & State University, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061-0219
Involved in teaching, advising students, and performing research in mechanics of composite materials.
Primary research interests include development of analytical and design tools for composites, including
laminates and textile composites. Current efforts include designing crashworthy composite airframe
components, analysis techniques for textile composites, and developing design and analysis tools for
smart, damage tolerant/compensating composite structural components.
Co-investigator, NASA-Virginia Tech Composites Program, an ongoing program with NASA Langley
Research Center. Primary activity was with Impact Dynamics Branch, involving analytical and
experimental work in the dynamic response and failure of composite frames such as those used in aircraft
primary structures and with the Mechanics of Materials Branch, developing analytical models for
predicting stiffness, strength, and residual strength in textile composites.
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Co-investigator of a University Research Initiative on mechanics of smart materials and structures, funded
by the Army Research Office. Responsibility for developing models for designing active control
mechanisms for detecting and preventing growth of delaminations in composite laminates.
 Graduate student supervisory experience (theses/dissertations):
10 M.S. (with thesis) graduates, 7 Ph.D. completed.
 Mark D. Sensmeier (co-advised with E. R. Johnson of AOE), M.S. Thesis, “Static and Dynamic
Large Deflection Response of Graphite-Epoxy Beams,” June, 1987.
 Marco A. Vidussoni, M.S. Thesis, “Global-Local Finite Element Analysis of Laminated
Composites,” July 1988.
 Gajanan V. Gandhe, M.S. Thesis, “Impact Response of Interleaved Composite Materials,”
November 1988.
 Shih Y. Lin, M.S. Thesis, “Investigation of the Use of Composite Materials in Highway Bridge
Deck Modules,” December 1988.
 David E. Bowles, Ph.D., “Micromechanics Analysis of Space Simulated Thermal Deformations
and Stresses in Continuous Fiber Reinforced Composites,” December, 1989.
 Danniella M. Thompson, M.S. Thesis, “Two-Dimensional to Three-Dimensional Global/Local
Finite Element Analysis of Laminated Composites in Compression,” May 1990.
 Dong K. Shin (co-advised with Z. Gurdal of ESM), Ph.D., “Minimum-Weight Design of
Symmetrically Laminated Composite Plates for Postbuckling Performance Under In-plane
Compression Loads,” September 1990.
 Nicole Breivik (co-advised with Z. Gurdal of ESM), M.S. Thesis, “Compression of Thick
Laminated Composite Beams with Initial Impact-Like Damage,” February 1992.
 David H. Mollenhauer, M.S. Thesis, “Induced Strain of Actuation of Surface Bonded and
Embedded Piezoceramic Patches,” April 1992.
 Seshu R. Yalamanchili (co-advised with M. W. Hyer of ESM), M.S. Thesis, “Response of
Multiple Fastener Composite Joints: Numerical and Experimental Results,” May 1992.
 Jae Lee (co-advised with Z. Gurdal of ESM), Ph.D., “Vibration, Buckling and Postbuckling of
Laminated Composites with Delaminations,” May 1992.
 Elissa E. Carapella (co-advised with M. W. Hyer of ESM), M.S. Thesis, “Micromechanics of
Crenulated Fibers in Carbon/Carbon Composites,” October 1992.
 Su-Yuen Hsu, Ph.D., “Finite Element Micromechanics Modeling of Inelastic Deformation of
Unidirectionally Fiber-Reinforced Composites,” July 1992.
 Lucie M. H. Parietti, M.S. Thesis, “Micromechanical Finite Element Model for Constitutive
Elastoplastic Analysis of Unidirectional Fiber-Reinforced Composites,” August 1994.
 Eduardo Moas, Jr., Ph.D., “Progressive Failure Analysis of Laminated Composite Structures,”
April 1996.
 Edward H. Glaessgen, Ph.D., “Modeling of Textile Based Composite Materials, June 1996.
 Mark D. Sensmeier, Ph.D., “Optimum Crashworthiness Design of Grid-Stiffened Composite
Fuselage Structures,” September 1996.
Served on advisory committees of numerous students in Departments of Engineering Science and
Mechanics, Aerospace and Ocean Engineering, Civil Engineering, and Mechanical Engineering. Served
on the examining committee for one MS student in Technology Education. Serving on PhD committees
of one student in Technology Education, one student in Computer Engineering, and several students in
Engineering Education.
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Recent and Current Graduate Student Advising
Served on Ph.D. advisory committees of Jennifer Mullin (Ph.D., Engineering Education, Virginia Tech,
May 2010) and Ricky Castles (Ph.D., Computer Engineering, Virginia Tech, May 2010). Currently
serving on Ph.D. committee of Parhum Delgoshaei (Ph.D. Candidate, Engineering Education, Virginia
Tech, anticipated completion May 2012).
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4. Scholarly & Professional Activities related to proposed degree (with emphasis on the past
five years):
a. Publications/Scholarly Activity related to proposed degree:
 Benson, Lisa, Kurt Becker, Hayden Griffin, and Karl Smith, 2010. “Engineering Education:
Departments, Degrees and Directions,” International Journal of Engineering Education, Special
Edition on Applications of Engineering Education Research, Vol 5.
 Lohani, V., Castles, R., Lo, J., and Griffin, H., 2008. “Tablet PC Applications in a Large Engineering
Program,” Computers in Education Journal, Vol XVIII, No. 1, April-June 2008, pp 52-63.
 Snook, J., Lohani, V.K., Lo, J.L., Sirvole, K., Mullin, J.S., Kaeli, J.K., and Griffin, O.H.,
“Incorporation of a 3-D Interactive Graphics Programming Language into an Introductory
Engineering Course,” Computers in Education Journal, Vol XVI, No. 3, July-September 2006, pp
63-72.
 Lee, J., Gurdal, Z., and Griffin, O. H., Jr., “Buckling and Postbuckling of Circular Plates Containing
Concentric Penny-Shaped Delaminations,” Computers & Structures, vol. 58, No. 5, 1996, pp.
1045-1054.
 S. Y. Hsu and O. H. Griffin, Jr., “Algorithmic tangent matrix approach for mixed hardening model of
endochronic plasticity,” Computer Methods in Applied Mechanics and Engineering, Vol 133,
1996, pp 1-14.
 E. H. Glaessgen, C. M. Pastore, O. H. Griffin, Jr., and A. Birger, “Geometrical and finite element
modeling of textile composites,” Composites: Part B, Vol 27B, No 1, 1996, pp 43-50.
 E. H. Glaessgen and O. H. Griffin, Jr., “Micromechanical Analysis of Thermal Response in TextileBased Composites,” AIAA Progress in Aeronautics and Astronautics, Earl A. Thornton, Editor,
Volume 168, 1995, pp 204-217.
 J. Lee, Z. Gurdal, and O. H. Griffin, Jr. “Postbuckling of Laminated Composites with Delaminations,”
AIAA Journal, Vol 33, No 10, October 1995, pp 1963-1970.
 D. Cohen, M. W. Hyer, O. H. Griffin, Jr., S. R. Yalamanchili, M. J. Shuart, and C. Prasad, “Failure
Criterion for Thick Multi-Fastener Graphite-Epoxy Composite Joints,” Journal of Composites
Technology and Research, Vol 17, No 3, 1995, pp 237-248.
 L. M. Parietti, S. Y. Hsu, and O. H. Griffin, Jr., “Mini Constitutive Finite Element Model for Plastic
Response of Unidirectional Fiber Composites,” Computers and Structures, Vol 55, No 3, May
1995, pp 463-470.
 E. Moas, R. L. Boitnott, and O. H. Griffin, Jr., “An Analytical and Experimental Investigation of the
Response of Curved, Composite Frame/Skin Specimens,” Journal of the American Helicopter
Society, July, 1994, pp. 58-66.
 J. Lee, R. T. Haftka, O. H. Griffin, Jr., L. T. Watson, and M. D. Sensmeier, “Detecting
Delaminations in a Composite Beam using Anti-optimization,” Structural Optimization, Vol 8
(2/3), October 1994, pp 93-100.
 E. E. Carapella, M. W. Hyer, O. H. Griffin, Jr., and H. G. Maahs, “Micromechanics of Crenulated
Fibers,” Journal of Composite Materials, Vol 28, No 14, 1994, pp 1322-1346.
 D. H. Mollenhauer and O. H. Griffin, Jr., “Induced Strain of Actuation of Surface Bonded
Piezoceramic Patches: A Numerical and Experimental Study,” Journal of Intelligent Material
Systems and Structures, Vol 5, No 3, May 1994, pp 355-362.
 O. H. Griffin, Jr., M. W. Hyer, S. R. Yalamanchili, M. J. Shuart, C. B. Prasad and D. Cohen,
“Analysis of Multi-Fastener Composite Joints,” Journal of Spacecraft and Rockets, Vol 31, No 2,
March-April 1994, pp 278-284.
 David H. Mollenhauer, Danniella Muheim Thompson, and O. Hayden Griffin, Jr., “Finite Element
Analysis of Smart Structures,” Advances in Engineering Software, Vol 17, No 1, 1993, pp 7-12.
 N. L. Breivik, Z. Gurdal, and O. H. Griffin, Jr., “Compression of Laminated Composite Beams with
Initial Damage,” Journal of Reinforced Plastics and Composites, Vol 12, No 7, July 1993, pp 813824.
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D. M. Thompson and O. H. Griffin, Jr., “Finite Element Predictions of Active Buckling Control of
Stiffened Panels,” Journal of Intelligent Material Systems and Structures, Vol 4, No 2, April,
1993, pp 243-247.
O. H. Griffin, Jr., E. R. Johnson, and M. D. Sensmeier, “Nonlinear Response of Graphite-Epoxy
Wide Columns Subject to Eccentric Load,” Journal of Applied Mechanics, Vol 60, No 1, March
1993, pp 101-108.
D. K. Shin, O. H. Griffin, Jr., and Z. Gurdal, “Postbuckling Response of Laminated Plates Under
Uniaxial Compression,” International Journal of Nonlinear Mechanics, Vol 28, No 1, Jan 1993,
pp 95-115.
S. Y. Hsu and O. H. Griffin, Jr., “On Stability and Efficiency of Numerical Integration of
Endochronic Constitutive Equations,” Computers and Structures, Vol. 44, No. 3, 1992, pp 657-665.
D. M. Thompson and O. H. Griffin, Jr., “Verification of a 2-D to 3-D Global/Local Finite Element
Method for Symmetric Laminates,” Journal of Reinforced Plastics and Composites, Vol 11, No 8,
August 1992, pp 910-931.
D. K. Shin, Z. Gurdal, and O. H. Griffin, Jr., “Minimum-Weight Design of Laminated Composite
Plates for Postbuckling Performance,” Applied Mechanics Reviews, Vol 44, No 11, part 2, Nov
1991, pp S219-S231.
D. E. Bowles and O. H. Griffin, Jr. “Micromechanics Analysis of Space Simulated Thermal Stresses
in Composites. Part II: Multidirectional Laminates and Failure Predictions,” Journal of Reinforced
Plastics and Composites, Vol 10, No 5, September 1991, pp 522-539.
D. E. Bowles and O. H. Griffin, Jr. “Micromechanics Analysis of Space Simulated Thermal Stresses
in Composites. Part I: Theory and Unidirectional Laminates,” Journal of Reinforced Plastics and
Composites, Vol 10, No 5, September 1991, pp 504-521.
N. F. Knight, Jr., J. B. Ransom, O. H. Griffin, Jr., and D. Muheim Thompson, “Global/Local
Methods Research Using a Common Structural Analysis Framework,” Finite Elements in Analysis
and Design, Vol 9, No 2, June 1991, pp 91-112.
S. S. Lane, R. H. Moore, H. P. Groger, G. V. Gandhe, and O. H. Griffin, Jr., “Eddy Current
Inspection of Graphite/Epoxy Laminates,” Journal of Reinforced Plastics and Composites, Vol 10,
No 2, March 1991, pp 158-166.
S. Y. Hsu, S. K. Jain, and O. Hayden Griffin, Jr., “Verification of Endochronic Theory for
Nonproportional Loading Paths,” ASCE Journal of Engineering Mechanics, Vol 117, No 1,
January 1991, pp 110-131.
D. Muheim Thompson, O. H. Griffin, Jr., and M. A. Vidussoni, “Global/Local Finite Element
Analysis of Cross-Ply Composite Laminates,” Journal of Composites Technology and Research,
Vol 12, No 4, December 1990, pp 209-216.
D. Muheim Thompson and O. H. Griffin, Jr., “2-D to 3-D Global/Local Finite Element Analysis of
Cross-ply Composite Laminates,” Journal of Reinforced Plastics and Composites, Vol 9, No 5,
September 1990, pp 492-502.
J. L. Sevart, O. H. Griffin, Jr., Z. Gurdal, and G. A. Warner, “Flammability and Toxicity of
Composite Materials for Marine Vehicles,” Naval Engineers Journal, Vol 102, No 4, September,
1990, pp 45-54.
D. K. Shin, Z. Gurdal, and O. H. Griffin, Jr., “A Penalty Approach for Nonlinear Optimization with
Discrete Design Variables,” Engineering Optimization, Vol 16, No 1, July, 1990, pp 29-42.
G. V. Gandhe and O. H. Griffin, Jr., “Post-Impact Characterization of Interleaved Composite
Materials,” SAMPE Quarterly, Vol 20, No 4, July 1989, pp 55-58.
Mark D. Sensmeier, O. Hayden Griffin, Jr., and Eric R. Johnson, “Effect of Axial Impact on the
Static Flexure of Graphite/Epoxy Beams,” Journal of Reinforced Plastics and Composites, Vol 8,
No 3, May 1989, pp 299-309.
O. Hayden Griffin, Jr., “Three Dimensional Thermal Stresses in Angle-Ply Composite Laminates,”
Journal of Composite Materials, Vol 22, No 1, January 1988, pp 53-70.
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b.
O. H. Griffin, Jr., “The Use of Proper Shear Moduli in the Analysis of Composite Materials,”
Composites Technology Review, Vol 6, No 1, Spring 1984, pp 22-24.
O. H. Griffin, Jr. and J. C. Roberts, “Numerical/Experimental Correlation of Three Dimensional
Thermal Stress Distributions in Graphite/Epoxy Laminates,” Journal of Composite Materials, Vol
17, Nov 1983, pp 539-548.
J. C. Roberts and O. H. Griffin, Jr., “Numerical/Experimental Heat Transfer in Dry Sliding of
Polymeric Composites,” ASLE Transactions, Vol 26, No 4, 1983, pp 493-500.
O. H. Griffin, Jr. “Three Dimensional Curing Stresses in Symmetric Cross-ply Laminates with
Temperature Dependent Properties,” Journal of Composite Materials, Vol 17, Sept 1983, pp 449463.
O. H. Griffin, Jr. and C. R. Wilson, “Finite Element Analysis on a Microprocessor Based Personal
Workstation,” Computers and Structures, Vol 17, No 4, 1983, pp 617-619.
O. H. Griffin, Jr., “Evaluation of Finite Element Software Packages for Stress Analysis of Laminated
Composites,” Composites Technology Review, Vol 4, No 4, Winter 1982, p 136.
O. H. Griffin, Jr., M. P. Kamat, and C. T. Herakovich, “Three Dimensional Inelastic Finite Element
Analysis of Laminated Composites,” Journal of Composite Materials, Vol 15, Nov 1981, pp 543560.
Status of Grants & Contracts submitted related to proposed degree (including agency names, years
of funding, collaborative partners):
 “A National Symposium to Develop and Present a Case for the Establishment of Engineering
Education Academic Programs (SEEAP),” NSF Engineering Education and Centers unsolicited
proposal, Kurt Becker (Utah State), Kamyar Haghighi (Purdue), Esin Gulari (Clemson), Hayden
Griffin (Virginia Tech), ($99,548 for 1 year)

“Building Connections Within the Engineering Education Research Community,” NSF Engineering
Education and Centers unsolicited proposal, Hayden Griffin (PI), Lisa McNair, Jenny Lo, Lisa
McNair, and Marie Paretti ($153,691 for 1 year)

“Building Connections Within the Engineering Education Research Community,” NSF Engineering
Education and Centers unsolicited proposal, Hayden Griffin (PI), Lisa McNair, Marie Paretti, Aditya
Johri, and Christopher Williams ($307,468 for 2 years)
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“International Network for Engineering Studies Workshop #1: Engineers and Education,”, NSF
Office of International Science & Engineering, Gary Downey, Joe Pitt, Hayden Griffin ($32,820)
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In 1993-94, I was the Principal Investigator at VPI&SU of SUCCEED Coalition, an eight-university
consortium funded by NSF to conduct engineering education research. As a part of this research, I
was responsible for monitoring all of the VPI&SU projects, control of the $100,000 plus
administrative budget, and had authority and responsibility for determination of how to use the six
FTE’s (approximate value $330,000 per year) associated with SUCCEED. I passed the SUCCEED
responsibility along to an assistant dean because the demands on my time were too much considering
my responsibilities to the undergraduate program.
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“Bridges for Engineering Education – Virginia Tech,” $100,000, National Science Foundation,
8/1/2004 – 7/31/2006. One of many faculty involved.
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“The NASA-Virginia Tech Composites Program”
NASA Langley Research Center
1974 - 1997
Total funding - 1986 - 1997 - $4,300,000 (approximate)
Principal investigators:
O. H. Griffin, Jr., Z. Gurdal, M. W. Hyer, E. R. Johnson, A. C. Loos, D. H. Morris
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My share of the responsibility was for planning and conducting a portion of the work done with the
Landing and Impact Dynamics Branch, Mechanics of Materials Branch, Aircraft Structures Branch,
and the Applied Materials Branch. In addition, I worked with the Program Director one year in
reviewing student applications, and was involved in the management of the Program during the year
when we had an Interim Director.
My share of the project funding is as follows:
1985 - 1986: $11,000, 1986 - 1987: $50,000, 1987 - 1988: $48,500, 1989: $58,500,
1990: $46,000, 1991: $108,000, 1992: $138,035, 1993: $104,895, 1994: $95,000, 1995: $50,000
My portion of funding, 1985 - 1995 was $709,930.
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“Smart Materials, Structures and Mathematical Issues for Active Damage Control”
Army Research Office University Research Initiative
Total funding - $400,000
July 1, 1992 - June 30, 1994 (years 1 and 2 of three years)
Principal Investigators: C. A. Rogers, H. H. Robertshaw, R. T. Haftka, and O. Hayden Griffin, Jr.
The responsibility was equally divided between the four investigators
My share of the project funding for 92-93 was $100,000 ($79,909 directly, plus $20,091 in
educational and visiting scholar programs) and for 93-94 was $65,000.
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“Development and Verification of Global/Local Analysis Techniques for Laminated Composites”
NASA Langley Research Center
June 16, 1986 - December 31, 1992
Total funding - $183,194
I was totally responsible for this project. The total funding, $183,194, was my responsibility.
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“Thick Composite Joint Failure Analysis”
Hercules Aerospace Company
Total funding - $70,048
April 20, 1989 - December 31, 1991
Principal Investigators: M. W. Hyer and O. Hayden Griffin, Jr.
The responsibility of this project was equally divided between myself and Dr. Hyer.
My share of the project funding was $35,024.
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“Design of Stiffened Composite Plates for Postbuckling Performance”
Newport News Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Company
October 7, 1988 - September 30,1990
Total funding - $40,052 (plus 70% overhead returned to project)
Principal Investigators: Z. Gurdal and O. Hayden Griffin, Jr.
The responsibility of this project is equally divided between myself and Dr. Gurdal
My share of the project funding was $20,026.
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“Virginia Institute for Material Systems”
Commonwealth of Virginia
July 1, 1988 - July 1, 1990
Total funding 1988-89 - $353,208, 1989-1990 - $518,061, 1990-1991 - $487,871, 1991-1992 $479,563 (excluding overhead)
Principal Investigators: J. McGrath, K. L. Reifsnider, G. Wilkes, T. Ward, W. W. Stinchcomb, A. C.
Loos, H. F. Brinson, O. H. Griffin, Jr., D. Baird.
My share of the responsibility has been to serve as an Associate Director of VIMS and conduct
research into the mechanical behavior of composite materials.
My share of the project funding was: 1988-89 - $34,000, 1989-90 - $40,000, 1990-91 - $30,000,
1991-92 - $35,000, 1992-93, $18,843, 1993-94, $17,000 ($174,843 total).
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“Automated Design of Composite Plates for Marine Applications”
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Virginia Center for Innovative Technology / Institute of Material Science and Engineering
Nov 20, 1987 - Nov 19, 1988
Total Funding - $34,543
Principal Investigators: Z. Gurdal and O. Hayden Griffin, Jr.
The responsibility of this project was equally divided between myself and Dr. Gurdal
My share of the project funding was $17,271.
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“Design of Composite Plates for Marine Vehicles”
Newport News Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Company
Nov 20, 1987 - Nov 19, 1988
Total funding - $37,997
Principal Investigators: Z. Gurdal and O. Hayden Griffin, Jr.
The responsibility of this project was equally divided between myself and Dr. Gurdal
My share of the project funding was $18,998.
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“Application of Composite Materials to Rail Transit Systems”
NASA Langley Research Center and U.S. Department of Transportation
May 1, 1986 - April 30, 1987
Total funding - $39,998
Principal Investigators: C. T. Herakovich, O. H. Griffin, Jr., and Z. Gurdal.
My portion of the project was to conduct a survey of the current uses and near-term planned uses of
composite materials in urban mass transit systems. I also took the lead in writing the final report to the
sponsors.
My share of the funding was $18,000.
c. Invited research presentations outside ECU:
 Griffin, H., “Capturing Recent and Near Future Advances in Engineering Education,” Invited
presentation at The Ohio State University, January 2008.
 Griffin, H., “Innovation, Research, and Outreach in Engineering Education,” Invited presentation at
The Ohio State University, September 2007.
 Lohani, V. and Griffin, H., “A New Department of Engineering Education- Accomplishments in First
Year and Near-Term Goals,” Invited paper, International Conference on Engineering Education
(iCEE 05), Gliwice, Poland, July 25-29, 2005.
 Muffo, J., Lohani, V.K., Mullin, J., Backert, R., and Griffin, H., 2005, ‘From Engineering
Fundamentals to Engineering Education –What’s in a Name?’, Invited Paper, International
Conference on Engineering Education, February 28-March 5, 2005, Tainan, Taiwan.
 Aning, A. O., Lohani, V.K., Griffin, H., Kampe, J.C.M., and Aref, H., ‘An Interdisciplinary Graduate
Program in Engineering Education,’ Invited Paper, International Conference on Engineering
Education, February 28-March 5, 2005, Tainan, Taiwan.
 O. Hayden Griffin, Jr., “The Virginia Tech Department of Engineering Education: Present and Future,”
presented at Purdue University, May 3, 2004.
 O. H. Griffin, Jr., “Computational Structural Mechanics Needs Assessment,” presented at the
Computational Structural Mechanics Branch Grant Review, October 23-24, 1991, NASA Langley
Research Center, Hampton, Virginia.
 O. H. Griffin, Jr., “Computational Mechanics Applied to Modern Materials and Structures,” invited
lecture at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications, The Beckman Institute, University of
Illinois, July 25, 1991.
 O. H. Griffin, Jr. and D. M. Thompson, “2-D to 3-D Global/Local Finite Element Analysis of
Laminated Composites,” invited presentation at the First U. S. National Congress on Computational
Mechanics, Chicago, July 21-24, 1991.
 O. H. Griffin, Jr., “The Use of Computers in the Evaluation of Three Dimensional Stress Effects in
Composite Materials Products,” invited Keynote Address, presented at the Second International
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Conference on Computer Aided Design in Composite Material Technology, Brussels, Belgium, April
25-27, 1990, pp 171-187.
O. H. Griffin, Jr., “Development and Verification of Local/Global Analysis Techniques for Laminated
Composites II,” invited presentation at the LaRC Grant Review/ACT Review, NASA Langley
Research Center, Hampton, Virginia, May 16-19, 1989.
O. H. Griffin, Jr., “Development and Verification of Local/Global Analysis Techniques for Laminated
Composites I,” invited presentation at the NASA Workshop on Computational Structural Mechanics,
NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia, 18-20 November, 1987, NASA Conference
Proceeding 10012, N. P. Sykes, Editor, February 1989, pp 683-732.
d. Chapters of Books, Editor of Proceedings, Instructional Movies, Manuals
 Wrote article on “Composites” for Encyclopedia of Science and Technology, 1998.
 Wrote articles on “Simple Machines,” “Lever,” “Wheel and Axle,” “Pulley,” “Inclined Plane,” for
1998 and 1999 versions of Microsoft Encarta electronic encyclopedia.
 Computer Aided Design in Composite Material Technology III, S. G. Advani, W. R. Blain, W. P. de
Wilde, J. W. Gillespie, and O. H. Griffin, Jr., Editors, Computational Mechanics Publications and
Elsevier Applied Science, Publishers, 1992.
e. Refereed Papers Presented at Major International or National Technical Meetings
 Prashanth Jayaraman, Vinod Lohani, Garrett Bradley, Hayden Griffin, and John Dooley 2008.
“Enhancement of an Engineering Curriculum Through International Experiences,” Proceedings of the
2008 ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition, Pittsburgh, PA, June 22-25, 2008.
 Vinod Lohani, Ricky Castles, Jenny Lo, and Hayden Griffin, 2007. “Tablet PC Applications in a
Large Engineering Program,” Proceedings of the 2007 ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition,
Honolulu, HI, June 24-27, 2007.
 Odis Hayden Griffin, Jr. and Susan Cortes, “A Learning Space Of, By, And For Engineers: Virginia
Tech’s Joseph F. Ware, Jr. Advanced Engineering Laboratory,” Paper DETC2006-99205,
Proceedings of IDETC/CIE 2006: 3rd Symposium on International Design and Design Education,
September 10-13, 2006, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
 Jennifer Mullin, Hayden Griffin, Jenny Lo, Vinod Lohani, “Co-teaching a Freshman Engineering
Course: A Collaboration Between Experienced Faculty and Novice Graduate Students,” 2006 ASEE
Conference, Chicago, June 19-21, 2006
 Sharnnia Artis, Glenda Scales, Hayden Griffin, “From the Classroom to the Boardroom: The Use of
Role Play in Graduate Education,” 2006 ASEE Conference, Chicago, June 19-21, 2006
 Jenny Lo, Vinod Lohani, Hayden Griffin, “Full Implementation of a New Format for Freshman
Engineering Course at Virginia Tech,” 2006 ASEE Conference, Chicago, June 19-21, 2006
 Jennifer Mullin, Hayden Griffin, Jenny Lo, Vinod Lohani, “Sustainable Development Design Projects
for Engineering Freshmen,” 2006 ASEE Conference, Chicago, June 19-21, 2006.
 Lohani, V. K., Lo, J., Mullin, J., Muffo, J., Backert, R., and Griffin, H., 2005. “Transformation of a
Freshman Year Engineering Course,” International Conference on Engineering Education, July 25-29,
2005, Gilwice, Poland.
 Lohani, V. K., Wildman, T., Connor, J., Mallikarjunan, K., Wolfe, M. L., Muffo, J., Knott, T.W., Lo,
J., Loganathan, G.V., Goff, R., Gregg, M., Chang, M., Cundiff, J., Adel, G., Agblevor, F., Vaughan,
D., Fox, E., Griffin, H., Mostaghimi, S., 2005. “Spiral Curriculum Approach to Reformulate
Engineering Curriculum,” Work-in-progress paper, Frontiers in Education Conference, Indianapolis,
IN, 18-21 October 2005.
 Griffin, O. H. and T. Walker, “Faculty and Student Response to a Laptop Computer Requirement for
Engineering Freshmen,” 2005 ASEE Annual Conference, Portland, Oregon.
 Griffin, H., Aning, A., Lohani, V.K., Kampe, J., Goff, R., Paretti, M., Alley, M., Lo, J., Terpenny, J.,
Walker, T., Aref, H., Magliaro, S., and Sanders, M. 2005. “Designing and Implementing Graduate
Programs in Engineering Education.” 2005 ASEE Annual Conference, Portland, Oregon.
21
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Lo, J., Goff, R., Lohani, V., Walker, T., Knott, T., and Griffin, H., 2005. “New Paradigm for
Foundational Engineering Education.” 2005 ASEE Annual Conference, Portland, Oregon.
Knott, M., Lohani, V.K., Griffin, H., Loganathan, G.V., Adel, G., Paretti, M., Wolfe, M.,
Mallikajunan, K., and Wildman, T., 2005, “Using e-portfolios in a large engineering program.” 2005
ASEE Annual Conference, Portland, Oregon.
Snook, J., Lohani, V.K., Lo, J., Sirvole, K., Mullins, J., Kaeli, J., and Griffin, H., 2005. “Incorporation
of a 3-D Interactive Graphics Programming Language into an Introductory Engineering Course.”
2005 ASEE Annual Conference, Portland, Oregon.
Lohani, V.K., Sanders, M., Wildman, T., Connor, J., Mallikarjunan, K., Dillaha, T., Muffo, J., Knott,
T.W., Lo, J., Loganathan, G.V., Adel, G., Wolfe, M.L., Goff, R., Gregg, M., Chang, M., Agblevor, F.,
Vaughan, D., Cundiff, J., Fox, E., Griffin, H., and Magliaro, S., 2005, “From BEEVT to DLR NSF
Supported Engineering Education Projects at Virginia Tech,” 2005 ASEE Annual Conference, June
12-15, Portland, Oregon.
O. Hayden Griffin, Jr., Edward A. Fox, Calvin J. Ribbens, Thomas D. L. Walker, Nathaniel J. Davis
IV, Richard M. Goff, Jenny L. Lo, Vinod K. Lohani, Michael H. Gregg, and Dwight Barnette, “Work
in Progress – A Freshman Course for Engineering and Computer Science Students,” presented at the
IEEE/ASEE Frontiers in Education Conference, October 2004, Savannah, GA.
Snook, J.S., Lohani, V. K., Lo, J., Sirvole, K., Mullins, J., Kaeli, J., Griffin, H. 2005 “Use of a
Graphical Programming Language in an Introductory Engineering Course.” Poster presented at ACM
SIGCSE 2005, St. Louis, MO, February 23-27, 2005.
Lohani, V. K., Sanders, M., Knott, T., Griffin, H., Bull, E., McIntyre, S., Connor, J., Loganathan, G.
V., Wildman, T., Adel, G., and Magliaro, S. 2004, “Engineering-Education Collaboration - Virginia
Tech,” Proc. Int. Conference on Engineering Education, Gainesville, FL. Oct. 2004.
O. H. Griffin, Jr., “Hands On, 24/7 – Virginia Tech’s Joseph F. Ware Jr. Advanced Engineering
Laboratory,” Proceedings of the 2004 ASEE Conference, Salt Lake City, UT.
J.B. Connor, V.K. Lohani, E. Bull, T.M. Wildman, S.G. Magliaro, T.W. Knott, O.H. Griffin, Jr, and
J.A. Muffo, “An Analysis of Freshman Engineering: A Cross-College Perspective”, Proceedings of
the 2004 ASEE Conference, Salt Lake City, UT.
T. W. Knott, V. K. Lohani, O.H. Griffin, Jr., G.V. Loganathan, G. T. , Adel, and T. M. Wildman,
“Bridges for Engineering Education: Exploring ePortfolios in Engineering Education at Virginia
Tech”, Proceedings of the 2004 ASEE Conference, Salt Lake City, UT.
E. Moas and O.H. Griffin, Jr., “Progressive Failure Analysis of Laminated Composite Structures,”
37th AIAA/ASME/ASCE/AHS/ASC Structures, Structural Dynamics, and Materials (SDM)
Conference, April 1996, pp 2246-2256.
M. D. Sensmeier, P. K. Sensharma, R. T. Haftka, O. H. Griffin, Jr., and L. T. Watson, “Experimental
Validation of Anti-optimization Approach for Detecting Delamination Damage,” Proceedings of the
36th AIAA/ASME/ASCE/AHS/ASC Structures, Structural Dynamics, and Materials (SDM)
Conference, New Orleans, LA, April 1995, p 3717.
E.H. Glaessgen and O. H. Griffin, Jr., “Effect of Applied Boundary Condition on the Analysis of
Composites Based on Woven Preforms,” Proceedings of the 36th AIAA/ASME/ASCE/AHS/ASC
Structures, Structural Dynamics, and Materials (SDM) Conference, New Orleans, LA, April 1995, p
38.
D. Cohen, M. W. Hyer, O. H. Griffin, Jr., S. R. Yalamanchili, M. J. Shuart, and C. Prasad, “Strength
Predictions for Thick Multi-Fastener Graphite-Epoxy Composite Joints,” ASTM Symposium on
Bolted and Bonded Joints in Composite Materials, November 16-17, 1993, Fort Worth, Texas.
J. Lee, O. H. Griffin, Jr., and Z. Gurdal, “Postbuckling of Laminated Composites with Delaminations,”
presented at the AIAA/ASME/ASCE/AHS/ASC 34th Structures, Structural Dynamics, and Materials
Conference, La Jolla, California, April 1993.
22
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E. E. Carapella, M. W. Hyer, and O. H. Griffin, Jr., “Micromechanics of Noncircular Fibers,”
presented at the American Society for Composites 7th Technical Conference on Composite Materials,
State College, PA, October 1992.
N. L. Breivik, Z. Gurdal, and O. H. Griffin, Jr., “Compression of Laminated Composite Beams with
Initial Damage,” presented at the American Society for Composites 7th Technical Conference on
Composite Materials, State College, PA, October 1992.
D. Cohen, L. Q. Do, M. W. Hyer, O. H. Griffin, S. R. Yalamanchili, M. J. Shuart, and C. B. Prasad,
“Failure Criterion for Thick Multi-Fastener Graphite/Epoxy Composite Joints,” Proceedings of the
6th Japan-U.S. Conference on Composite Materials, Orlando, Florida, 22-24 June, 1992.
Danniella Muheim Thompson, David H. Mollenhauer, O. Hayden Griffin, Jr., “Finite Element
Analysis of Smart Structures,” in Computer Aided Design in Composite Material Technology III, S.
G. Advani, W. R. Blain, W. P. de Wilde, J. W. Gillespie, and O. H. Griffin, Jr., Editors,
Computational Mechanics Publications and Elsevier Applied Science, Publishers, 1992, pp 419-429.
D. M. Thompson and O. H. Griffin, Jr., “Finite Element Predictions of Active Buckling Control of
Stiffened Panels,” Proceedings of the Conference on Recent Advances in Adaptive and Sensory
Materials, Blacksburg, Virginia, April 27-29, 1992, pp 377-384.
O. H. Griffin, Jr., M. W. Hyer, S. R. Yalamanchili, M. J. Shuart, C. B. Prasad and D. Cohen,
“Analysis of MultiFastener Composite Joints,” Proceedings of the AIAA/ASME/ASCE/AHS/ASC
33rd Structures, Structural Dynamics, and Materials Conference, Dallas, April 13-15, 1992, pp 745753.
J. Lee, Z. Gurdal, and O. H. Griffin, Jr., “A Layer-wise Approach for the Bifurcation Problem in
Laminated Composites with Delaminations,” Proceedings of the AIAA/ASME/ASCE/AHS/ASC 33rd
Structures, Structural Dynamics, and Materials Conference, Dallas, April 13-15, 1992, pp 10-20.
E. Moas, R. L. Boitnott, and O. H. Griffin, “An Experimental and Analytical Investigation of the
Failure of Gr/Ep Composite I-Frames,” Proceedings of the 1991 American Helicopter Society (AHS)
National Technical Specialists’ Meeting on Rotorcraft Structures Technology for the 1990’s and
Beyond, Williamsburg, VA, October 28-31, 1991.
D. M. Thompson and O. H. Griffin, Jr., “2-D to 3-D Global/Local Finite Element Analysis of
Symmetric Composite Laminates with Holes,” Proceedings of the Thirteenth Canadian Congress of
Applied Mechanics, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, June 2 - June 6, 1991, pp 200-201.
D. K. Shin, Z. Gurdal, and O. H. Griffin, Jr., “Minimum Weight Design of Composite Plates for
Postbuckling Performance,” Proceedings of the AIAA/ASME/ASCE/AHS/ASC 32nd Structures,
Structural Dynamics, and Materials Conference, April 8-10, 1991, Baltimore, Maryland, pp 257-267.
D. K. Shin, Z. Gurdal, and O. H. Griffin, Jr., “Minimum Weight Design of Laminated Composite
Plates for Postbuckling Performance,” Proceedings of the Second Pan American Congress of Applied
Mechanics, Vina del Mar, Chile, January 1991, pp 580-583.
O. H. Griffin, Jr., “The Use of Computers in the Evaluation of Three Dimensional Stress Effects in
Composite Materials Products,” invited Keynote Address, in Composite Materials Design and
Analysis, Proceedings of the Second International Conference on Computer Aided Design in
Composite Material Technology, Brussels, Belgium, April 25-27, 1990, Springer Verlag, New York,
pp 171-187.
D. M. Thompson and O. H. Griffin, Jr., “2-D to 3-D Global/Local Finite Element Analysis of
Composite Laminates,” Proceedings of the 4th Technical Conference of the American Society for
Composites, Blacksburg, Virginia, October 3-6, 1989.
S. S. Lane, R. H. Moore, G. V. Gandhe, and O. H. Griffin, Jr., “Eddy Current Inspection of
Graphite/Epoxy Laminates,” Proceedings of the 4th Technical Conference of the American Society
for Composites, Blacksburg, Virginia, October 3-6, 1989.
D. E. Bowles and O. H. Griffin, Jr., “Analysis of Thermal Stresses in Polymer Matrix Composites,”
Proceedings of the 34th International SAMPE Symposium, Reno, Nevada, May 8-11, 1989.
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f.
D. K. Shin, Z. Gurdal, and O. H. Griffin, Jr., “A Penalty Approach for Nonlinear Optimization with
Discrete Design Variables,” Proceedings of the Association for Applied Mathematics and Mechanics
(GAMM) Seminar on Discretization Methods and Structural Optimization - Procedures and
Applications, University of Siegen, Federal Republic of Germany, October 3-5, 1988.
D. K. Shin, Z. Gurdal, and O. H. Griffin, Jr., “A Penalty Approach for Nonlinear Optimization with
Discrete Design Variables,” Proceedings of the Second NASA/Air Force Symposium on Recent
Advances in Multidisciplinary Analysis and Optimization, September 28-30, 1988, Hampton,
Virginia.
O. H. Griffin, Jr. and M. A. Vidussoni, “Local/Global Finite Element Analysis of Composite
Materials,” in Computer Aided Design in Composite Material Technology, Proceedings of the
International Symposium, Southampton, UK, April 13-15, 1988, C. A. Brebbia, W. P. de Wilde, and
W. R. Blain, Editors, Springer-Verlag, 1988, pp 513-524.
M. D. Sensmeier, O. H. Griffin, Jr., and E. R. Johnson, “Effect of Axial Impact on the Static Flexure
of Graphite/Epoxy Beams,” Proceedings of the Joint ASC/CCM Symposium on Composites Science
and Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, DE, September 1987.
C. R. Wilson and O. H. Griffin, Jr., “An Integrated Multi-computer Network for a Research Center,”
Proceedings of the 1983 ASME International Computers in Engineering Conference, Chicago, August,
1983.
J. C. Roberts and O. H. Griffin, Jr., “Analytical/Experimental Heat Transfer in Dry Sliding of
Polymeric Composites,” Proceedings of the ASME-ASLE Joint Lubrication Conference, Washington,
DC, October 5-7, 1982.
O. H. Griffin and C. M. Blackmon, “Finite Element Stress Analysis of U.S. Navy MARK 83 Base
Detonating Fuze Body,” Proceedings of the Army Symposium on Solid Mechanics, Cape Cod,
September, 1978.
C. R. Crowe, W. Holt, W. Mock, and O. H. Griffin, “Dynamic Fracture and Fragmentation of
Cylinders,” Proceedings of the International Congress on Materials II, Boston, August 16-20, 1976.
Formal Reports Printed and Circulated by Agencies of the State or Federal Governments
 O. H. Griffin, Jr., and E.H. Glaessgen, “Finite Element Based Micro-Mechanics Modeling of Textile
Composites,” in NASA Conference Publication 3311 (Part 2), C. C. Poe, Jr. and C. E. Harris, Editors,
NASA, October 1995, pp 555-586.
 Lucie Parietti and O. H. Griffin, Jr., “Micromechanical Finite Element Model for Constitutive
Elastoplastic Analysis of Unidirectional Fiber-Reinforced Composites,” VPI&SU Center for
Composite Materials and Structures report CCMS-94-11), August 1994.
 E. E. Carapella, M. W. Hyer, and O. H. Griffin, Jr., “Micromechanics of Crenulated Fibers in
Carbon/Carbon Composites,” VPI&SU College of Engineering Report VPI-E-93-01 (CCMS-93-01),
January 1993.
 S. R. Yalamanchili, M. W. Hyer, O. H. Griffin, Jr., M. J. Shuart, C. B. Prasad and D. Cohen,
“Analysis of MultiFastener Composite Joints: Numerical and Experimental Results,” VPI&SU
College of Engineering Report VPI-E-92-14 (CCMS-92-15), June 1992.
 J. Lee, O. H. Griffin, Jr., and Z. Gurdal, “Vibration, Buckling and Postbuckling of Laminated
Composites with Delaminations,” VPI&SU College of Engineering Report VPI-E-92-13 (CCMS-9213), June 1992.
 N. L. Breivik, Z. Gurdal, and O. H. Griffin, Jr., “Compression of Thick Laminated Composite Beams
with Initial Impact-Like Damage,” VPI&SU College of Engineering Report VPI-E-92-15 (CCMS-9216) June 1992.
 D. H. Mollenhauer and O. H. Griffin, Jr., “Induced Strain of Actuation of Surface Bonded and
Embedded Piezoceramic Patches”, VPI-E-92-09 (CCMS-92-08) April, 1992
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S. Y. Hsu and O. H. Griffin, Jr., “Efficient Endochronic Finite Element Analysis: An Example of a
Cyclically Loaded Boron/Aluminum Tube,” VPI&SU College of Engineering Report VPI-E-92-8,
April 1992.
S. K. Jain, S. Y. Hsu, and O. Hayden Griffin, Jr., “On the Models of Hereditary Evolutions of
Plasticity,” VPI&SU Report VPI-E-91-13, June, 1991.
D. M. Thompson and O. H. Griffin, Jr., “Development and Verification of Global/Local Analysis
Techniques for Laminated Composites,” NASA Contractor Report CR-185060, (VPI-E-91-12), June
1991.
D. M. Thompson and O. H. Griffin, Jr., “Two-Dimensional to Three-Dimensional Global/Local Finite
Element Analysis of Laminated Composites in Compression,” VPI&SU CCMS Report CCMS-91-14
(VPI-E-91-11), June 1991.
S. Y. Hsu and O. H. Griffin, Jr., “On Stability and Efficiency of Numerical Integration of
Endochronic Constitutive Equations,” College of Engineering Report VPI-E-91-06, May 1991.
N. F. Knight, Jr., J. B. Ransom, O. H. Griffin, Jr., and D. Muheim Thompson, “Global/Local Methods
Research Using the CSM Testbed,” Proceedings of the Eighth DOD/NASA/FAA Conference on
Fibrous Composites in Structural Design, compiled by J. H. Starnes, Jr., H. L. Bohon, and S. B.
Garzon, NASA Conference Proceeding, CP-3087, Part 1, 1990, pp 281-309.
M. A. Vidussoni and O. H. Griffin, Jr., “2-D to 3-D Global/Local Finite Element Analysis of Crossply Composite Laminates,” VPI&SU Report CCMS-90-09, September, 1990.
G. V. Gandhe and O. H. Griffin, Jr., “Impact Response of Interleaved Composites,” VPI&SU Report
CCMS-90-01, March, 1990.
S. Y. Hsu, S. K. Jain, and O. Hayden Griffin, Jr., “Numerical Integration of the Constitutive
Equations of the Endochronic Theory of Plasticity,” VPI&SU Report VPI-E-90-02, January, 1990.
S. Y. Hsu, S. K. Jain, and O. Hayden Griffin, Jr., “A Procedure for Determining Endochronic Material
Functions and Verification of Endochronic Theory for Nonproportional Loading Paths,” VPI&SU
Report VPI-E-89-25, June, 1989.
S. Y. Lin, O. H. Griffin, Jr., and R. M. Barker, “Feasibility of Fiber Reinforced Composite Materials
Used in Highway Bridge Superstructures,” VPI&SU Report CCMS-89-05, December, 1988.
CCMS Five Year Plan Committee (O. H. Griffin, Jr., Chairman, C. E. Bakis, D. Frederick, Z. Gurdal,
J. Morton, D. Post, W. W. Stinchcomb, and R. E. Swanson), “History, Current Status, and a FiveYear Plan for the VPI&SU Center for Composite Materials and Structures,” CCMS Report, April
1988.
O. H. Griffin, Jr., Z. Gurdal, and C. T. Herakovich, “Composite Materials for Rail Transit Systems,”
NASA Contractor Report 178401, December, 1987.
J. L. Sevart, O. Hayden Griffin, Jr., and Z. Gurdal, “Flammability and Toxicity of Composite
Materials,” VPI&SU Report VPI-E-87-33, December, 1987.
M. D. Sensmeier, O. H. Griffin, Jr., and E. R. Johnson, “Static and Dynamic Large Deflection
Flexural Response of Graphite-Epoxy Beams,” VPI&SU Report CCMS-87-07 (VPI-E-87-7), May
1987. Also published as NASA Contractor Report 4118, March 1988.
O. H. Griffin, Jr., M. P. Kamat, and C. T. Herakovich, “Three Dimensional Inelastic Finite Element
Analysis of Laminated Composites,” VPI&SU Report VPI-E-80-28, November, 1980. Also published
as NASA Contractor Report CR-163712.
Approximately ten U.S. Naval Surface Weapons Center (now Naval Surface Warfare Center) reports,
most unclassified, some classified.
I authored portions of “Virginia Institute for Materials Systems (VIMS) Interim Report” and “VIMS
Final Report,” 1989 and 1990.
g. Patents/disclosures/copyrights:
US Patent No. 5,612,505 “Dual Mode Warhead,” J.S. O’Brasky, A. A. Alexander, O. H. Griffin, Jr., J. S.
Foster, M. C. Shamblen, March 18, 1997
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5. Other:
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November 1983 - September 1985, Assistant Supervisor, Engineering Design Group, Johns Hopkins
University/Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, Maryland
Responsible for technical activities, primarily in mechanical design area, of Engineering Design Group.
This group was in the same Branch as the electrical and mechanical fabrication shops, and definition and
improvement of communication between these groups was a part of the job. Interfaced with other groups
at the Laboratory to obtain projects for Engineering Design Group, which was at that time composed of
50 to 60 personnel including engineers, manual designer/drafters, CAD operators, and CAM programmers.
Made both formal and informal presentations on Group capabilities and activities to both technical and
management audiences. Prepared time and cost estimates for engineering jobs, supervised work, reviewed
reports, and prepared performance appraisals of engineers in the Group. Supervised and participated in
design of an all composite center support column for a satellite being designed and fabricated at APL.
Played primary role in introducing workstation-based computer aided mechanical engineering tools to
APL. Heavily involved in both hardware and software selection during a project to convert all
designer/drafters at APL to CAD/CAM/CAE technology.
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February 1981 - October 1983, Member, Technical Staff, Bendix Advanced Technology Center,
Columbia, Maryland
Responsible for proposing, planning, and executing the composite mechanics portion of a multidisciplinary applied research project aimed at bringing advanced composites technology into the Bendix
Corporation. Areas of research included analysis of environmental and processing-induced stresses in
composites, the objective being to determine means of producing laminates with extreme long-term
dimensional stability. Also studied the use of micromechanics analysis to predict the thermomechanical
properties of hypothetical composites. Unpublished work includes analyses conducted to determine
induced stress fields and thus validate a number of non-standard tests used by Bendix personnel to
evaluate experimental composite materials. Consulted with Bendix divisional personnel in the area of
composite mechanics and design, including both new introduction of these materials and analysis and
understanding of in-service behavior. Applications consulted on included composite airplane driveshaft,
composite probe arm for precision measurement device, and composite/steel actuators for aircraft.
Developed software and conducted studies of feasibility of using microprocessor based personal
engineering workstations for performance of small to large scale finite element analysis.
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November 1979 - February 1981, Senior Tire Development Engineer, BF Goodrich, Tire Analysis
Research, Akron, Ohio
Proposing and conducting numerical research to determine proper techniques for finite element analysis
of tires using both the material and geometric nonlinearity capabilities of ADINA. Research in proper
application of finite element analysis to orthotropic materials. Investigated using the finite element heat
transfer program ADINAT for modeling of the tire curing process. Developed pre-/post-processing and
stiffness bandwidth minimization software for ADINA and ADINAT. Utilized a variety of computer tools,
including DEC and IBM computers and Versatec, Tektronix, and Ramtek graphics devices.

May 1971 - October 1979, Mechanical Engineer and Aerospace Engineer, U.S. Naval Surface Weapons
Center, Dahlgren, Virginia
Structures and materials specialist. Involved in design, analysis, and testing of ordnance hardware.
Extensive use of finite element analysis of elastic and elastic-plastic response. Participated in research on
heat transfer and loading of large caliber gun barrels and ammunition during firing and several in-service
malfunction investigations. Involved in the design, prototype development, and prototype testing of the
dual mode warhead for the SMAW weapon. This development was granted a Certificate of Patentability
by the U.S. Navy (not patented until 1997 because of security classification). Had responsibility for
building, maintaining, and user training for a library of numerical analysis (finite difference and finite
26
element) software. Conducted numerical analysis of jointed projectile response to oblique target impact
and inelastic response of composite laminates.
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Awards at Virginia Tech
Academy of Teaching Excellence, 2008 Inductee
Alumni Teaching Award – 2008 (two awards per year are made across the University)
Diggs Teaching Scholar – 2006 (no more than 3 awards per year are made across the University)
Certificate of Teaching Excellence – Virginia Tech College of Engineering for academic years 199798 and 2004-05 (no more than 4 awards per year made in the College)
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Professional Registration
Registered Professional Engineer (Certificate 008474) in Virginia since 1976. License is current.
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Consulting
Have worked with a number of attorneys in analysis of failure of consumer products and vehicle
accident-related investigations.
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Professional Societies
- Member of American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE)
- National Academic Advising Association (NACADA)
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Education
From 2004-2010 took graduate courses in the Virginia Tech School of Education in the area of
Curriculum and Instruction. Courses taken include Advanced Educational Psychology, Principles of
Instructional Design, Foundations of Educational Research, Program and Platform Evaluation, Research
Assessing Student Achievement and Cognitive Processes & Education.
27
Faculty Information Sheet
Name: Barbara Jean Muller-Borer, Ph.D.
1. Rank: Associate Professor - Department of Cardiovascular Sciences, The Brody School of Medicine at East
Carolina University
Adjunct Professor - Departments of Biology East Carolina University
Adjunct Professor - Department of Engineering, East Carolina University
2011-present
2007 - present
2010-present
2. Degrees:
BS
MS
Ph.D.
Postdoctoral Fellowship
NIH Postdoctoral Fellowship
Postdoctoral Fellowship
1979, Tufts University School of Engineering, Medford, MA.
Engineering Psychology, Deflorez Prize in Human Engineering Senior
Undergraduate Award, Tau Beta Pi Engineering Honor Society, Magna
Cum Laude.
1986, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC.
Biomedical Engineering Thesis: “Control Electronics for an Implantable
Hydrocephalic Shunt”.
1991, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC.
Biomedical Engineering Dissertation: “The Effects of Cellular Uncoupling
on Action Potential Propagation in Ventricular Tissue: A Computer
Modeling and Simulation Study”.
1991-1994, The University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Division
of Cardiology, Chapel Hill, NC. Cardiovascular Modeling.
1994–1996, The University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Division
of Cardiology Chapel Hill, NC. Cardiovascular Physiology.
1996-1998, The University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Division
of Cardiology Chapel Hill, Cardiovascular Imaging.
3. Teaching Experience related to proposed degree (with emphasis on the past five years):
Workload Assignment: 10% teaching, 80% research, 10% service
Lecturer
2005 Department of Physiology, Physiological Proteo-Genomics (PHLY-7704), “Stem Cells and Tissue
Bioengineering”, Fall Semester, 2 lectures and 1 laboratory.
2005 Division of Cardiology, Electrophysiology Noon Conference, ”Cardiac Regenerative Cell
Therapy”.
2006 Department of Biology, BIOL 6880 Seminar, “Cardiovascular Translational Biology
Laboratories”. Fall Semester.
2006 Division of Cardiology Grand Rounds, CME, “Cell-Based Therapy for Cardiovascular Disease”.
2006 Department of Biochemistry, Graduate Seminar, “Plasticity of a Liver Adult Stem Cell in a Cardiac
Myocyte Microenvironment”.
2007 Department of Biology, BIOL 6880 Seminar, “Cardiovascular Translational Biology
Laboratories”. Fall Semester.
2007 Department of Physiology, Physiological Proteo-Genomics (PHLY-7704), “Stem Cells and Tissue
Bioengineering”, Fall Semester, 2 lectures and 1 laboratory.
2007 Division of Cardiology Grand Rounds, CME, “Cell-Based Therapy for Cardiovascular Disease”.
2008 Department of Physiology, Physiological Proteo-Genomics (PHLY-7704), “Stem Cells and Tissue
Bioengineering”, Fall Semester, 2 lectures.
2008 Department of Pathology, Grand Rounds, CME, “Stem Cell Differentiation into Cardiac Myocytes”.
2008 Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Graduate Seminar, “Stem Cell Differentiation in a
Cardiac Microenvironment”.
2009 Department of Engineering, BIME 3000, “Introduction to Biomedical Engineering”, Fall Semester.
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2009
2009
2009
2010
2010
2010
2010
2010
2010
2010
2010
2010
Department of Physiology, Physiological Proteo-Genomics (PHLY-7704), “Laser Capture
Microdissection”, Fall Semester, 1 lecture and laboratory.
Department of Physiology, Physiological Proteo-Genomics (PHLY-7704), “Laser Capture
Microdissection”, Fall Semester, 1 lecture and laboratory.
Department of Cardiovascular Sciences, Grand Rounds, CME, “Cardiac Regeneration and CellBased therapies for Ischemic Heart Disease”.
Department of Engineering, BIME 4040, “Physiological Systems and Modeling for Engineering”,
Spring Semester, 2 lectures per week, 15 weeks.
Department of Cardiovascular Sciences, “Overview of Regenerative Medicine Research and Laser
Capture Microdissection”. Lecture to NCState Park Fellows.
Department of Physiology, “Gap Junctions: Intercellular Channels”, Lecture to graduate and
undergraduate students in Tulis Laboratory.
Department of Physiology, Physiological Proteo-Genomics (PHLY-7704), “Stem Cells and Tissue
Bioengineering”, Fall Semester, 2 lectures and 1 laboratory.
Department of Physiology, Physiological Proteo-Genomics (PHLY-7704), “Laser Capture
Microdissection”, Fall Semester, 1 lecture and laboratory.
Department of Physiology, Physiological Proteo-Genomics (PHLY-7704), “Cell Culture
Techniques”, Fall Semester, 1 lecture and laboratory.
Department of Engineering, BIME 3000, “Introduction to Biomedical Engineering”, Fall Semester.
Department of Biology, BIOL 6880 Seminar, “Cardiovascular Translational Biology
Laboratories”. Fall Semester.
Instructor, Brody School of Medicine Personal Professional Leadership Program.
Seminars
2004 Department of Physiology, Journal Club, “Stem Cell Trans-Differentiation in a Cardiac Myocyte
Microenvironment”, October 2004.
2005 Metabolic Studies Research Group, “Stem Cell Plasticity in the Cardiovascular System”, February
2005.
2005 Department of Surgery, “Cardiovascular Translational Biology Laboratories”, Presentation to
visiting professor Frank Selke, MD and surgical residents, October 2005.
2006 Division of Endocrinology and Metabolic Studies Group, “Confocal Fluorescence Microscopy”,
January 2006.
2007 Stem Cell Interest Group, “Stem Cell Trans-Differentiation in a Cardiac Myocyte
Microenvironment”, February 2007.
2007 East Carolina University Brody School of Medicine Confocal Microscopy Symposium, “Gap
Junction Coupling and Calcium Signaling in Live Cell Cultures”, November 2007.
2008 Stem Cell Interest Group, “Review of Symposium on Cardiovascular Regenerative Medicine –
October 2007”, February 2008.
2008 Metabolic Studies Research Group, “Mechanisms Controlling the Acquisition of a Cardiac
Phenotype by Liver Stem Cells”, March 2008.
2009 Stem Cell Interest Group, “Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells”, December 2009.
Course Director
2007 Liaison to UNC-Chapel Hill, Fall 2007. Webcast, “Stem Cells and Maturational Lineage Biology:
Relevance in Quiescent, Regenerative and Diseased Tissues and in Clinical/Commercial Programs
in Tissue Engineering and Cell Therapies Course # 625”. Collaborated with Lola Reid, PhD,
UNC-Chapel Hill to coordinate the webcast of 3 weekly lectures for 16 weeks. This was the first
time the course was taught over the internet using the NCREN system.
2010 East Carolina University Department of Engineering, BIME 4040, “Physiological Systems and
Modeling for Engineering”, Spring Semester 2010. Developed and taught course, 2 lectures per
29
2010
week for 15 weeks. This was the first time the course was offered in the biomedical engineering
concentration.
Core Faculty and Research Advisor for Interventional Cardiology Program, Department of
Cardiovascular Sciences.
Graduate student supervisory experience (theses/dissertations):
Doctoral Student Committee
2008 – 2011
Member of doctoral student committee, Jessica Dries, PhD Candidate,
Department of Physiology, “EphrinA1/EphA Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Signaling
in Myocardial Infarct Repair”.
Doctoral Student Training
2006
Preceptor, Jessica Dries, First year graduate student, Department of Physiology.
Doctoral student laboratory rotation.
2008
Preceptor, Di Wu, First year graduate student, Department of Physiology.
Doctoral student laboratory rotation.
Surgical and Internal Medicine Residents
2005 - 2006
Co-advisor, George Hart Tyson, MD. Third year Surgical Resident research
project, “Evaluating Microbead Injection Techniques in a Porcine Heart”.
2006
Preceptor, Christopher Karkut, MD, First year Internal Medicine Resident.
Laboratory rotation.
2006 - 2007
Co-advisor, Wes Hudson, MD. Third year Surgical Resident research project,
“Evaluating Stem Cell Delivery Techniques and Analysis in a Porcine Model”.
2006 - 2007
Co-advisor, Dorian deFreitas, MD. Third year Surgical Resident research project,
“Developing a Rodent Bypass Model”.
2008
Preceptor, Jacqueline Carter, MD. Third year Surgical Resident. Laboratory
methods and training.
Masters Students
2006 – 2008
2006 - 2008
2007 - 2008
2008 – 2009
2010 – 2011
Medical Students
2006
Co-Advisor, Master’s student thesis project, Graham V. Byrum III. Research
project/thesis. “Role of Thymosin Beta-4 in hMSC engraftment and
differentiation in myocardial tissue “. Wake Forest Medical School, Class of
2012
Advisor, Master’s student thesis project, Yasmeen Midgette, Department of
Biology. Research project/thesis, “The Effect of Mechanical Stress on the
Differentiation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells into a Cardiac Phenotype in Vitro “.
Advisor, Master’s student, Catherine Gouge, Department of Biology.
Advisor, Master’s student thesis project, Maria C. Collins, Department of
Biology. Research project/thesis “Expression of cardiogenic markers in bone
marrow derived hMSC’s using mechanical strain and treatment with growth
factors”.
Advisor, Master’s student thesis project, Katherine Crifasi, Department of Biology.
Research project/thesis “What Degree of Protection does T4 hold for MSCs
against Hypoxia Induced Apoptosis?”
Mentor, Christopher Karkut (M4), East Carolina University Brody School of
Medicine. Individually designed selective in Cell-Based Therapy and Tissue
Engineering Laboratory, “Evaluating Effects of LPS on Gap Junction Expression in
Adult Stem Cells”.
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2007
2009
2010
Research co-advisor, Brian Burrows, “Cellular loss associated with xenographic
mesenchymal stem cell cardiomyopathy”. Brody School of Medicine Summer
Scholars Research Program.
Research advisor, Joseph B. Padgett, ”Thymosin Beta 4's Wound Healing Propensity
and the Heart “. Brody School of Medicine Summer Scholars Research Program.
Research co-advisor, Richard Elliott Overman, Jr,. “Effects of BAY 41-2272 on
Connexin 43 Expression in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells.” Brody School of
Medicine Summer Scholars Research Program.
4. Scholarly & Professional Activities related to proposed degree (with emphasis on the past
five years)
a. Publications/Scholarly Activity related to proposed degree:
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Muller-Borer BJ, Erdman D, Buchanan JW. "Electrical Coupling and Impulse Propagation in
Anatomically Modeled Ventricular Tissue". IEEE Transactions in Biomedical Engineering (IF 1.857)
1994:41(5);445-454.
Muller-Borer BJ, Johnson TA, Gettes LS, Cascio WE. "Directional Differences in Propagation in a
Modeled Ischemic Border Zone". Journal of Cardiovascular Electrophysiology (IF 3.703)
1995:6(12);1101-1112.
Hyatt CJ, Lemasters JJ, Muller-Borer BJ, Johnson TA, Cascio WE. "A Superfusion System to Study
Border Zones in Confluent Cultures of Neonatal Rat Heart Cells". American Journal of Physiology (IF
4.0) 1998:274;H2001-H2008.
Muller-Borer BJ, Yang H, Marzouk SA, Lemasters JJ, Cascio WE. "Measurement of Endocardial and
Subendocardial pHi and pHo in Perfused Rabbit Papillary Muscles by Confocal Fluorescent
Microscopy". American Journal of Physiology (IF 4.0) 1998:275(6 pt 2);H1937-H1947.
Henriquez AP, Vogel R, Muller-Borer BJ, Henriquez CS, Weingart R, Cascio WE. "Influence of
Dynamic Gap Junction Resistance on Impulse Propagation in Ventricular Myocardium: A Computer
Simulation Study". Biophysical Journal (IF 4.507) 2001 Oct;81(4):2112-21.
Cascio WE, Yang H, Johnson TA, Muller-Borer BJ, Lemasters JJ. "Electrical Properties and
Conduction in Reperfused Papillary Muscle". Circulation Research (IF 9.7) 2001 Oct 26;89(9):807-14.
Muller-Borer BJ, Cascio WE, Anderson PAW, Snowwaert JN, Frye JR, Desai N, Bagnell CR,
Coleman WB, Grisham JW, Malouf NN. "Adult Derived Liver Stem Cells Acquire a Cardiac Myocyte
Structural and Functional Phenotype in Culture". American Journal of Pathology (IF 6.039) 2004
July;165(1): 135-45.
Cascio WE, Yang H, Muller-Borer BJ, Johnson TA "Ischemia-Induced Arrhythmia: The Role Of
Connexins, Gap Junctions, And Attendant Changes In Impulse Propagation”. Journal of
Electrocardiology (IF 1.2) 2005 Oct;38(4 Suppl):55-9.
Muller-Borer BJ, Cascio WE, Grisham JW, Anderson PAW, Malouf NN “Acquired Cell-to-Cell
Coupling and Cardiac-Like Calcium Oscillations in Adult Stem Cells in a Cardiomyocyte
Microenvironment”. Proceedings of the 28th IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society,
2006;1:576-579.
Muller-Borer BJ, Cascio WE, Esch GL, Kim HS, Coleman WB, Grisham JW, Anderson PAW,
Malouf NN. “Mechanisms Controlling The Acquisition Of A Cardiac Phenotype By Liver Stem Cells”.
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (IF 10.231) 2007 March; 104(10): 3877-3882.
Hudson W, Collins MC, Dorian deFreitas D, Sun, YS, Muller-Borer BJ, Kypson AP. “Beating And
Arrested Intramyocardial Injections Are Associated With Significant Mechanical Loss: Implications
For Cardiac Cell Transplantation”, Journal of Surgical Research (IF 2.087) 2007 Oct;142(2):263-7.
Anderson PAW, Muller-Borer BJ, Esch GK, Coleman WB, Grisham JW, Malouf NN. “Calcium
Signals Induce Liver Stem Cells to Acquire a Cardiac Phenotype”. Cell Cycle (IF 4.087). 2007
Jul;6(13):1565-9.
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Muller-Borer BJ, Collins MC, Gunst PR, Cascio WE, Kypson AP. “Quantum Dot Labeling of
Mesenchymal Stem Cells”. Journal of Nanobiotechnology (IF 5.09) 2007 Nov. 7, 5-9.
b. Book Chapters
 Gettes LS, Cascio WE, Johnson TA, Muller-Borer BJ, and the Experimental Cardiology Group.
Characteristics and causes of conduction changes associated with 1a and 1b arrhythmias in acute
ischemia. In: Discontinuous Conduction in the Heart. Spooner PM, Joyner RW, Jalife J, editors.
American Heart Association Monograph Series. Futura Publishing Company, Inc., Armonk, New
York, 1997, pp 441-452.
 Lemasters JJ, Qian T, Trollinger DR, Muller-Borer BJ, Elmore SP, Cascio WE. Laser Scanning
Confocal Microscopy Applied to Living Cells and Tissue. In: Methods in Cellular Imaging. Periasamy
A, editor. Published for the American Physiological Society by Oxford University Press, New York,
NY, 2001, Chapter 5 (pp 66-87).
c. Abstracts
 Muller-Borer BJ, Cascio WE, Esch GL, Graff DW, Lemasters JJ, Anderson PAW, Grisham JW,
Malouf NN. “Cardiac-Like Calcium Transients in Liver Stem Cells Co-Cultured with Cardiac
Myocytes”, Proceedings of the Gordon Research Conference in Cardiac Arrhythmia Mechanisms,
February 2005.
 Graff DW, Cascio WE, Muller-Borer BJ, Aghajanian A,. Sama P, Yan GX,. Devlin RB. "Zinc
Produces a Transmural Voltage Gradient and Disruption of Intercellular Communication in the
Heart”. Society of Toxicology, March 2005.
 BJ Muller-Borer, WE Cascio, GL Esch, DW Graff , JJ Lemasters, PAW Anderson, JW Grisham,
NN Malouf. “Cardiac-Like Calcium Transients in Liver Stem Cells Co-Cultured with Cardiac
Myocytes”. Proceedings of the 2005 BSOM Department of Internal Medicine Research Day, May
2005.
 Lindsey CW, Muller-Borer BJ, Yang H, Cascio WE. "BAYK8644 Enhances Longitudinal
Conduction Velocity in Depolarized Ischemic Myocardium: Possible Role for ICa in Impulse
Propagation". Proceedings of the 2005 BSOM Department of Internal Medicine Research Day, May
2005.
 Muller-Borer BJ, Cascio WE, Esch GL, Graff DW, Aghajanian A, Kim HS, Lemasters JJ, Kim JS,
Coleman WB, Grisham JW, Anderson PAW, Malouf NN, “Calcium Driven Transcription of a
Cardiac Specifying Gene Program in Liver Stem Cells”. Circulation, 2005:112(17); II-266.
 Muller-Borer BJ, Cascio WE, Esch GL, Graff DW, Kim HS, Lemasters JJ, Kim JS, Coleman WB,
Grisham JW, Anderson PAW, Malouf NN, “Cardiac-Like Oscillations in Liver Stem Cells Induce
Their Acquisition of a Cardiac Phenotype”. Proceedings of the American Society of Cell Biology,
Dec. 2005.
 Tyson GH, Muller-Borer BJ, Cascio WE, Chitwood WR, Kypson AP, “Cell Therapy Infusion
Device”. Proceedings of the 9th Annual NewEra Cardiac Care Meeting, January 2006.
 Burrows BJ, Gunst PR, Muller-Borer BJ, Cascio WE, Johnson TA, “Identification Of Border Zones
In Swine Cardiac Tissue With The Use Of A Typhoon Variable Mode Imaging System”. Proceedings
of the 2006 BSOM Department of Internal Medicine Research Day, May 2006.
 Gunst PR, Collins M, Burrows BJ, Kypson AP, Muller-Borer BJ, “Viability Of Mesenchymal Stem
Cells Labeled With Quantum Dot Nano Particles”. Proceedings of the 2006 BSOM Department of
Internal Medicine Research Day, May 2006.
 Muller-Borer BJ, Gunst PR, Collins MC Cascio WE, Kypson AP, “Long-Term Labeling of
Mesenchymal Stem Cells Using Quantum Dot Bioconjugates”. Circulation, 2006:114(18); II-662.
 Kypson A, Tyson H, Collins M, Sun Y, Nifong W, Muller-Borer B. “Significant Mechanical Loss Is
Associated With Direct Intramyocardial Injection For Cellular Cardiomyoplasty”. Journal of
Surgical Research, 2007:137(2);.295.
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Collins MC, Hudson W, deFreitas D, Sun YS, Muller-Borer BJ, Kypson AP. “Beating And Arrested
Intramyocardial Injections Are Associated With Significant Mechanical Loss: Implications For
Cardiac Cell Transplantation”, Proceedings of the 2007 BSOM Department of Internal Medicine
Research Day, May 2007.
Muller-Borer BJ, Cascio WE, Esch GL, Kim HS, Coleman WB, Grisham JW, Anderson PAW,
Malouf NN, Mechanisms Controlling the Acquisition of a Cardiac Phenotype by Liver Stem Cells”.
Proceedings of the 2007 BSOM Department of Internal Medicine Research Day, May 2007.
Burrows BJ, Collins MC, Muller-Borer BJ, Kypson AP.”Cellular Cardiomyoplasty: Results of
Injected Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell Survival Rates in a Beating Rat Heart Model”. Journal of
Surgical Research, 2008: 144(2);274-5
Carter JJ, Manwaring ML, Salleng KJ, Muller-Borer BJ, Collins MC, Stoner MC.” Paralysis and
Cell Death from Thoracic Aortic Stenting Ameliorated by Peroxynitrite Decomposition Catalyst”.
Journal of the American College of Surgeons 2008; 207(3 sup.):22.
Collins MC, Gunst PR, Virag JI, Muller-Borer BJ. “ThymosinMesenchymal Stem Cells and Cardiomyocytes”. Proceedings of the 2008 BSOM Department of
Internal Medicine Research Day, May 2008.
Byrum GV, Collins MC, Muller-Borer BJ, Virag JI. “ Role of ThymosinMesenchymal Stem Cell Engraftment, survival and Differentiation in Murine Myocardium”.
Proceedings of the 2008 BSOM Department of Internal Medicine Research Day, May 2008.
Midgette YA, Collins MC, Gunst PR, Muller-Borer BJ, “The Effects of Mechanical Strain on the
Differentiation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells into a Cardiac Phenotype In Vitro”. Proceedings of the
2008 BSOM Department of Internal Medicine Research Day, May 2008.
Collins MC, Muller-Borer BJ, “Expression of Cardiogenic Markers in Bone Marrow Derived
hMSC’s using Mechanical Strain and Treatment with Growth Factors”. Proceedings of the 2009
BSOM Department of Internal Medicine Research Day, April 2009.
Collins MC, Gunst PR, Byrum G, Virag JI, Muller-Borer BJ, “Thymosin β4 Pretreatment of Human
Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Rat Neonatal Cardiomyocytes”, Proceedings of the Keystone Symposia
on Molecular and Cellular Biology. Cardiac Disease: Development, Regeneration and Repair (D1),
June 2009.
Moore JL ,Collins MC, Virag, JI, Muller-Borer BJ, ”Exploring Intramyocardial Stem Cell
Engraftment with Laser Capture Microscopy”. Proceedings of the 2010 BSOM Department of
Internal Medicine Research Day, May 2010.
Collins MC, Gunst PR, Moore JL, Virag JI, Muller-Borer BJ, ” Thymosin Beta-4 Provides
Enhanced Environment for Human Stem Cell Transplantation”, Proceedings of the International
Society for Stem Cell Research, 2010.
Collins MC, Midgette YA, Gunst PR, Muller-Borer BJ, ” Simulated Cardiac Micromechanical
Environment Increases Cx43 Expression and Proliferation in Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells”,
Proceedings of the International Society for Stem Cell Research, 2010.
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Status of Grants & Contracts submitted related to proposed degree (including agency names, years
of funding, collaborative partners):
a. Active Extramural Research Grants
 PI of ECU Subaward (Sole ECU Investigator), “Mechanisms For Stem Cell Differentiation Into
Cardiac Myocytes” National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute R01 (PI: Margaret Kirby, PhD, Duke
University), Annual Direct Costs $357,612 (07/2009 - 06/2011).
 Collaborating Investigator, “NO-independent cGMP Regulation of Vascular Remodeling”.
National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute R01 (PI: Dave Tulis, PhD, ECU Department of
Physiology), Annual Direct Costs $252,325 (04/2010 – 04/2012).
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b. Pending Extramural Research Grants
 Co-PI, “EphrinA1 Reduces Myocardial Injury”. National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute R21,
(PI: Jitka I. Virag, PhD, ECU Department of Physiology). $275,000. Submitted 07/2011, in
review.
c. Funded Intramural Research Grants
 Principal Investigator, “Stem Cell Engraftment And Trans-Differentiation In A Cardiac Cell
Microenvironment”. University Research Council Grant, The University of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill. $4,000 (05/2003 – 04/2005).
 Principal Investigator, “A Proteomic Study of Stem Cell Engraftment and Trans-differentiation to a
Cardiac Phenotype”. Junior Faculty Development Award, The University of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill, Committee on Faculty Research. $5,000 (01/2004 – 12/2004).
 Co-PI, “Assessment of Myocardial Cellular Transplantation via Multiple Delivery Modes”,
Murray and Sydell Rosenberg Foundation, A Joint Project of The Eastern Carolina Cardiovascular
Institute & East Carolina University Brody School of Medicine. $125,000 (01/2005).
 Principal Investigator, “Role of Thymosin β4 in Stem Cell Engraftment and Myocardial Tissue
Regeneration”. Research Development Grant, East Carolina University Division of Research and
Graduate Studies. $40,000 (07/2006 – 06/2007).
 Collaborating Investigator, “Effects of Cardiopulmonary Bypass on Adult Stem Cell
Transplantation”. Research Development Grant, East Carolina University Division of Research
and Graduate Studies (PI: Alan P. Kypson, MD, Department of Surgery). $25,000 (07/2006 –
06/2007).
d. Funded Extramural Equipment and Other Grants
 Co-PI, “Laser Capture Microdissection: Advanced Technology for Biomedical Research”. North
Carolina Biotechnology Center Institutional Development Grant. $163,539 (01/2007).
 Co-Chair, “Laser Technologies and Applications Group (Laser TAG”). North Carolina
Biotechnology Center (NCBC), NCBC Science & Technology Development Program, Intellectual
Exchange Group. Total funding support: $3000 per year, Awarded September 2009, Renewed
September 2010.
e. Pending Extramural Development Grants
 Co-Director, Preparing Biomedical Engineers for Careers in Biotechnology: Developing Outreach
and Collaborative Partnerships. North Carolina Biotechnology Center, $20,000 (08/2011).
 Invited research presentations outside ECU:
 Living Proof: Senior Faces of Research: Documentary video about the benefits of biomedical
research. North Carolina Association for Biomedical Research. October 2005 (interview).
 Gordon Research Conference in Cardiac Arrhythmia Mechanisms. “Cardiac-Like Calcium
Transients in Liver Stem Cells Co-Cultured with Cardiac Myocytes”. Muller-Borer BJ, Cascio
WE, Esch GL, Graff DW, Lemasters JJ, Anderson PAW, Grisham JW, Malouf NN. Beullton, CA,
February 2005.
 2005 BSOM Department of Internal Medicine Research Day, “Cardiac-Like Calcium Transients in
Liver Stem Cells Co-Cultured with Cardiac Myocytes”. BJ Muller-Borer, WE Cascio, GL Esch,
DW Graff , JJ Lemasters, PAW Anderson, JW Grisham, NN Malouf. May 2005 (oral presentation).
 78th Scientific Sessions of the American Heart Association. "Calcium-Driven Transcription of a
Cardiac Specifying Gene Program in Liver Stem Cells ", Muller-Borer BJ, Cascio WE, Esch GL,
Graff DW, Aghajanian A, Kim HS, Lemasters JJ, Kim JS, Coleman WB, Grisham JW, Anderson
PA, Malouf NN. Dallas, TX, November 16, 2005.
 2006 BSOM Department of Internal Medicine Research Day. “Viability Of Mesenchymal Stem Cells
Labeled With Quantum Dot Nano Particles”. Gunst PR, Collins M, Burrows BJ, Kypson AP,
Muller-Borer BJ. Greenville, NC, May 2006.
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 28th IEEE EMBS Annual International Conference. Invited Speaker. Muller-Borer BJ, Cascio WE,
Grisham JW, Anderson PAW, Malouf NN, “Acquired Cell-to-Cell Coupling and Cardiac-Like
Calcium Oscillations in Adult Stem Cells in a Cardiomyocyte Microenvironment”. New York City,
NY, August 2006 (oral presentation).
 2006 Scientific Sessions of the American Heart Association. “Long-Term Labeling of Mesenchymal
Stem Cells Using Quantum Dot Bioconjugates”. Muller-Borer BJ, Gunst PR, Collins MC, Cascio
WE, Kypson AP, Chicago, IL, November 2006 (oral presentation).
 2007 BSOM Department of Internal Medicine Research Day, “Mechanisms Controlling the
Acquisition of a Cardiac Phenotype by Liver Stem Cells”. Muller-Borer BJ, Cascio WE, Esch GL,
Kim HS, Coleman WB, Grisham JW, Anderson PAW, NN Malouf. May 2007 (oral presentation).
 Sigma Xi – ECU Chapter, Awards Banquet, Invited Speaker, “Mechanisms Controlling the
Acquisition of a Cardiac Phenotype by Liver Stem Cells”. Muller-Borer BJ, Cascio WE, Esch GL,
Kim HS, Coleman WB, Grisham JW, Anderson PAW, NN Malouf. January 2008 (oral
presentation).
 2008 BSOM Department of Internal Medicine Research Day. “
Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Cardiomyocytes”, Collins MC, Gunst, PR, Virag JI, Muller-Borer
BJ. Greenville, NC, May 2008.
 2009 BSOM Department of Internal Medicine Research Day. “Expression of Cardiogenic Markers
in Bone Marrow Derived hMSC’s using Mechanical Strain and Treatment with Growth Factors”,
Collins MC, Muller-Borer BJ. Greenville, NC, April 2009.
 Keystone Symposia on Molecular and Cellular Biology, Cardiac Disease: Development,
Regeneration and Repair (D1). “Thymosin β4 Pretreatment of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells and
Rat Neonatal Cardiomyocytes”. Collins MC, Gunst PR, Byrum G, Virag JI, Muller-Borer BJ,
March 17, 2009.
 2009 BSOM Department of Internal Medicine Research Day, “Expression of Cardiogenic Markers
in Bone Marrow Derived hMSC’s using Mechanical Strain and Treatment with Growth Factors”.
Collins MC, Muller-Borer, Greenville, NC, April 2009.
 2010 BSOM Department of Internal Medicine Research Day, ”Exploring Intramyocardial Stem Cell
Engraftment with Laser Capture Microscopy”, Moore JL ,Collins MC, Virag, JI, Muller-Borer BJ,
Greenville, NC, April 2010.
 International Society for Stem Cell Research ” Thymosin Beta-4 Provides Enhanced Environment
for Human Stem Cell Transplantation”. Collins MC, Gunst PR, Moore JL, Virag JI, Muller-Borer
BJ, June 2010.
 International Society for Stem Cell Research. “Simulated Cardiac Micromechanical Environment
Increases Cx43 Expression and Proliferation in Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells”. Collins MC,
Midgette YA, Gunst PR, Muller-Borer BJ, June 2010.
 Patents/disclosures/copyrights:
 Report of Invention -Cell Therapy Infusion Device, GH Tyson, MD, Co-Advisors Alan P.
Kypson, MD, Barbara J. Muller-Borer, Ph.D. Submitted and presented to the East Carolina
University’s Office of Technology Transfer and the University Committee on Intellectual
Property/Patents, January 2006.
 Participation in scholarly collaborations with other universities, laboratories, & centers:
 PI of ECU Subaward (Sole ECU Investigator), “Mechanisms For Stem Cell Differentiation Into
Cardiac Myocytes”. National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute R01 (PI: Margaret Kirby, PhD,
Duke University), Annual Direct Costs $357,612 (07/2009 - 06/2011).
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 Service on related state/national/international boards or committees:
Grant Peer Review
American Institute of Biological Sciences, New York State Department of Health and the Empire
State Board NYSTEM Program, October 2008
Ad Hoc Peer Reviewer
1992-1994
IEEE Transactions Engineering in Medicine and Biology
2005
Cardiovascular Research
2005
Journal of Cardiac Electrophysiology
2006 - present Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society
2008 – 2009
Molecular Vision
2009 – 2010
Connective Tissue Research
Sigma Xi, Scientific Research Society – East Carolina University Chapter
2006 – 2008
Membership Committee
2009-2011
Executive Committee Secretary
2009 - present Science Café, Steering Committee Member
5.Other:
Employment History
1979-1982
Human Factors Engineer, New Product Development, Eastman Kodak Co., Rochester, NY.
1985-1986
Masters Candidate and Research Assistant, Curriculum in Biomedical Engineering and
Mathematics, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC.
1988-1991
Predoctoral Fellow Duke/North Carolina National Science Foundation, Engineering Research
Center for Emerging Cardiovascular Technologies, Curriculum in Biomedical Engineering
and Mathematics, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC.
1991-1994
Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Department of Internal Medicine/Division of Cardiology,
UNC School of Medicine, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC.
1994-1996
NIH Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Department of Internal Medicine/Division of Cardiology,
UNC School of Medicine, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC.
1996-1998
Postdoctoral Research Assistant, Department of Internal Medicine/Division of Cardiology,
UNC School of Medicine, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC.
1998-2001
Research Associate, Department of Internal Medicine/Division of Cardiology UNC School of
Medicine, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC.
Professional Honors and Awards
2009
East Carolina University Chancellor’s Leadership Academy.
2009
Bridges Academic Leadership for Women, William and Ida Friday Center for Continuing
Education, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Professional Societies
1997 – present
Tau Beta Pi, Engineering Honor Society
1990 – present
Biomedical Engineering Society
1990 – present
1993 – present
Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE)
American Heart Association
1997 – present
Cardiac Electrophysiology Society
1999 – present
Sigma Xi, Scientific Research Society
2005 – present
2005 – present
International Society for Stem Cell Research
Society of Women Engineers
36
2009 – present
International Society for Heart Research
University Committees and Service
2005 – present
Member, Course Committee, Physiological Proteo-Genomics (PHLY-7704).
2006 – present
Member, Engineering Advisory Board, Department of Engineering.
2006 – present
Member, Biomedical Engineering Concentration Planning Committee, Department of
Engineering.
2006 – present
Member, Brody Women Faculty Committee.
2006 – present
Program Committee Co-Chair, Stem Cell Interest Group. Co-organize and arrange
monthly meetings and speakers.
2006 – present
Member, Brody School of Medicine Laser Capture Microdissection Advisory Board.
2008
Member, Senior Design Capstone Project Review and Evaluation Committee,
Department of Engineering.
2009
Member, Senior Design Capstone Project Review and Evaluation Committee,
Department of Engineering.
2009 – 2010
Program Committee Co-Chair, Brody Women Faculty Committee. Co-organized and
arranged monthly meetings and speakers. Co-organized Women in Science and
Medicine Conference with the BSOM Office of Academic and Faculty Development,
ECU Brody School of Medicine, March 2009.
2009 – 2010
Member, Faculty Search Committee, College of Health and Human Performance,
Department of Exercise and Sport Science.
2009 – present
Member, Biomedical Engineering Master’s Program Committee, Department of
Engineering.
2009 – present
Member, Industrial Outreach Committee, Department of Engineering.
2009 – present
Steering Committee Vice Chair, North Carolina Biotechnology Center Intellectual
Exchange Group for Laser Capture Microdissection (Laser TAG).
2009 – 2011
Elected Member, ECU Faculty Senate Faculty Information Technology Review
Committee, East Carolina University.
2010 – 2011
Member, Brody School of Medicine Graduate Studies Committee.
2010 – 2011
Chair Brody Women Faculty Committee.
2011 – present
Co-Program Director for Interdisciplinary Studies Program in Biological Sciences,
Biomedical Science Graduate Program
Undergraduate Student Advising
2008-2009
Instructor, Megan Watkins, Independent Study, “Analysis of Cardiac Calcium Signaling”,
Department of Engineering undergraduate student, ECU College of Technology and
Computer Sciences.
2010 – present
Mentor/research advisor, Arun Ajmera, recipient of ECU Early Assurance Award 2010,
ECU Department of Biology.
Other Teaching Activities
2005
Preceptor, Undergraduate, 3 month laboratory rotation. Freshman undergraduate, Amherst
University, Amherst, MA..
2006
Preceptor, Undergraduate, 3 month laboratory rotation. Park Fellow undergraduate student,
North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC.
2006
Preceptor, Undergraduate, 1 month laboratory rotation. Senior undergraduate in Biomedical
Sciences, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL.
2006
Preceptor, High school student, 3 month laboratory rotation. Senior, JH Rose High School,
Greenville, NC.
2006- 2007
Preceptor, Senior, JH Rose High School Medical Honors program. Greenville, NC.
37
2008
2009
2010
2010
2010 – 2011
Member, Review Committee, Senior Capstone Project, Department of Engineering, ECU
College of Technology and Computer Sciences.
Member, Review Committee, Senior Capstone Project, Department of Engineering, ECU
College of Technology and Computer Sciences.
Judge, Graduate Student Oral Presentation, 2010 Department of Internal Medicine Research
Day.
Preceptor, High school student ,1 month laboratory rotation. Junior, Chantilly HS, Chantilly,
VA.
Preceptor, Senior, D.H. Conley High School Medical Honors program, Greenville, NC.
Professional Development
 MATLAB Fundamentals and Programming Techniques, Raleigh, NC. April 2003
 Lecture and Presentation Skills, Office of Academic and Faculty Development , ECU Brody School
of Medicine. October 2004.
 Virtual Cell Short Course, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, CT. June 2006.
 Basic Statistical Skills and Advanced Statistical Skills, Summer Workshop, Center for Faculty
Development, East Carolina University. June 2006.
 NIH Regional Seminar on Grant Preparation, Research Triangle Park, NC. April 24-26, 2007.
 International Society of Computerized Electrocardiography, Riverside, CA. May 1 – 5, 2008.
 Integrative Computational Modeling of the Cardiac Myocyte, NHLBI-JHU T15 Short course on
Myocyte Modeling, Baltimore, MD. August 18 – 22, 2008.
 East Carolina University Chancellor’s Leadership Academy, Office of Academic Affairs Special
Projects. Jan – May 2009.
 9th Annual Coherent – Zeiss Workshop and Multiphoton Users Group Meeting, David H. Murdock
Research Institute, Kannapolis, NC. August, 27-28, 2009.
 Bridges Academic Leadership for Women, William and Ida Friday Center for Continuing Education,
The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, September – November 2009.
 Medical Education Grand Rounds, Blackboard, BSOM Office of Academic and Faculty
Development, ECU Brody School of Medicine. November 2009.
 Preparing a Personnel Action Dossier, BSOM Office of Academic and Faculty Development, ECU
Brody School of Medicine, March 2005, October 2009.
 Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET) Faculty Workshop on Sustainable
Assessment Processes – January 2010.
Research and Teaching Honors and Awards
2005
W. James Metzger, Jr. MD, Brody School of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine
Research Day, Junior Faculty Presentation Award.
2006
Best Drawing Board Invention, “Cell Therapy Infusion Device”, Tyson GH, Co-Mentors MullerBorer BJ & Kypson AP. 9th Annual NewEra Cardiac Care Meeting.
2007
Best Research Poster, 2007 BSOM Department of Internal Medicine Research Day. “Beating And
Arrested Intramyocardial Injections Are Associated With Significant Mechanical Loss:
Implications For Cardiac Cell Transplantation”, Co-Authors Collins MC, Hudson W, deFreitas D,
Co-Mentors Muller-Borer BJ & Kypson AP. Greenville, NC.
2006
Faculty Author Recognition Award, East Carolina University, Division of Health Sciences.
2007
Faculty Author Recognition Award, East Carolina University, Division of Health Sciences.
2008
Sigma Xi, 2008 Helms Award for Faculty Research in Biological Sciences, East Carolina
University Chapter.
38
Faculty Information Sheet
Name: Jianchu (Jason) Yao, PhD
1. Rank: Associate Professor - Department of Engineering, East Carolina University (ECU)
2. Degrees:
Doctorate of Philosophy
Electrical Engineering Dec. 2004
Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, USA
Dissertation: Design of Standards-Based Medical Components
and a Plug-and-Play Home Health Monitoring System
Master of Engineering
Electrical Engineering July, 1995
Shaanxi University of Science and Technology, Shaanxi, China
Thesis: On Papermaking Process Expert Control System
Bachelor of Science
Electrical Engineering July, 1992
Shaanxi University of Science and Technology, Shaanxi, China
3. Teaching Experience related to proposed degree (with emphasis on the past five years)
Workload Assignment: 50% teaching, 30% research, 20% service
Associate Professor (Tenured)
August 2010
Department of Engineering, East Carolina University (ECU), Greenville, NC, 2005 –Present
Develop engineering curriculum, teach electrical engineering related courses, conduct scholarly research,
and provide service to the department and the university. Specific duties and accomplishments include:

Started the Department of Engineering (General Engineering) at ECU along with other colleagues, in
charge of electrical engineering curriculum and laboratory development. This includes a wide range
of duties for structuring new courses from scratch, such as creating course catalog descriptions and
course syllabi, identifying course-prerequisites and objectives, developing assessment instruments,
planning laboratory space, and researching, purchasing, and maintaining lab equipment;

Develop, teach, and improve four courses, including both lectures and laboratories: ENGR-1014
Introduction to Engineering, ENGR-3014 Circuit Analysis, ENGR-3050 Instrumentation and
Controls, and MENG 4350-Electromechanical Systems;

Teach ENGR1012-Engineering Graphics, ENGR 4501-FE Review, COAD 1000-Freshman Seminar;

Advised three senior capstone projects; two projects established collaboration with the health science
campus.

Started and direct the Bio-Sensors Laboratory (a research lab funded by ECU; currently has two
undergraduate students working in the lab; supported one research associate, one graduate student,
and six undergraduate students); conduct technical research in telemedicine, novel application of vital
sign signals, and ad-hoc research collaborating with researchers from the ECU medical and health
community;

Serve on various committees: Department Assessment Committee, Engineering Core Curriculum
Committee, Biomedical Engineering Committee, College International Committee, and University
Teaching Grants Committee;

Serve as a reviewer for professional journals, conferences, and federal and local funding agencies

Outreach K-12 students to expose them with science, technology, engineering, and mathematics.
Involvements include teaching high school summer programs, leading engineering/technology events,
helping with university open houses, etc.
39
4. Scholarly & Professional Activities related to proposed degree (with emphasis on the past
five years)
 Journal Publications:
 Crowell, E., Givens, G., Jones, G., Brechtelsbauer, P., & Yao, J. Audiology Telepractice in a
Clinical Environment: A Communication Perspective. Journal of Otology, Rhinology and
Laryngology, 120 (7), 441-447.
 Howard, E., Williams R., and Yao J. (2010). “Simulations of Carnival Rides and Rube Goldberg
Machines for the Visualization of Concepts of Statics and Dynamics,” Engineering Design Graphics
Journal, Vol. 74, No. 2.
 Yao, J., & Wan, Y. (2010). Improving Computing Efficiency of a Wavelet Method Using ECG as a
Biometric Modality. International Journal of Computer and Network Security, 2(1), 15.
 Yao, J., Wan, Y., & Givens, G. D. (2009). Using web services to realize remote hearing assessment.
Journal of Clinical Monitoring and Computing.
 Yao, J., Wan, Y., & Givens, G. (2009a). A Tele-Hearing Diagnosis System Based on Web Services
(Abstract). Telemedicine and e-Health, 15(S1), 105.
 Yao, J., Sullivan, S., Eckert, C., & Bartlett, E. (2009). An Orthopedic Injection Training Instrument
Using Flow Impedance to Indicate Needle Tip Locations. Journal of Clinical Computing and
Monitoring, 23( 6).
 Yao, J., Givens, G., & Wan, Y. (2009). A Web Services-Based Distributed System with BrowserClient Architecture to Promote tele-audiology Assessment. Telemedicine and e-Health, 15(8,), 777782.
 Yao, J., & Limberis, L. (2009). Coupled-Tanks Level Control: an Effective Course Project and Its
Software Design. Computer in Education Journal 19(4).
 Yao, J., Limberis, L., Williams, R., & Howard, E. (2009). A Efficient PID Control Teaching Module
with LabVIEW Simulation. Computer in Education Journal, 19(2), 30-41.
 Yao, J., & Warren, S. (2005a). Applying the ISO/IEEE 11073 Standards to Wearable Home Health
Monitoring Systems. Journal of Clinical Monitoring and Computing, 19(6), 427-436.
 Yao, J., Schmitz, R., & Warren, S. (2005). A Wearable Point-of-Care System for Home Use that
Incorporates Plug-and-Play and Wireless Standards. IEEE Transaction on Information Technology in
Biomedicine, 9(3), 363-371.
 Warren, S., Yao, J., & Lebak, J. (2005). Applying Emerging Interoperability Standards to Wearable
Point-of-Care Systems (Abstract). Telemedicine and e-Health, 11(2), 193.
 Yao, J., Ding, X., Zhan, Q., & Zhang, Q. (2000). On Task-based Directional Manipulability of
Redundant Robot. Robots (Chinese), 22 (6).
 Yao, J. (1999). Application of Single-Chipped Microcomputer on Automatic Package Machine.
Machinery and Electronics (Chinese).
 Yao, J., & Wang, M. (1998). Boiler Water Lever Control System in Sodium Recycling Process.
Journal of Northwest Institute of Light Industry (Chinese).
 Sun, Y., Yao, J., Fei, J., & Wang, M. (1998). Application of GENIE on Pulp-Making Process.
Journal of Northwest Institute of Light Industry (Chinese).
 Refereed Conference Proceedings:
 Li, Jiting Zheng, Ruoyin Zhang, Yuru Yao, Jianchu. iHandRehab: An interactive hand exoskeleton
for active and passive rehabilitation, presented at the 2011 IEEE International Conference on
Rehabilitation Robotics (ICORR), Zurich, Switzerland, June 29 2011-July 1, 2011.
 Yao, J., Limberis, L., & Warren, S. (2010). A Ubiquitous Laboratory Model to Enhance Learning in
Electronics Courses Offered by Two Universities with Dissimilar Curricula. Presented at the 2010
Frontier in Education, Washington, DC.
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Warren, S., & Yao, J. (2010). Updates to a Mobile Circuits-and-Signals Learning Kit that
Incorporates a USB Data Acquisition Unit. Presented at the 2010 Frontier in Education, Washington,
DC.
Warren, S., & Yao, J. (2010, June 20-23). Portable Cyber-Laboratories for Electrical Engineering
Education. Paper presented at the 2010 Annual ASEE Conf., Louisville, KY, USA.
Howard, W., Williams, R., & Yao, J. (2009, October 12-18). Simulations of Carnival Rides and Rube
Goldberg Machines for the Visualization of Concepts of Statics and Dynamics. Paper presented at the
ASEE Engineering Design Graphics Division’s Mid Year Conference, Erie, PA.
Yao, J., Wan, Y., & Givens, G. (2009b, Sept. 3-6). Design of a Web Services Based System for
Remote Hearing Diagnosis. Paper presented at the the 31st IEEE-EMBS Conf., Minneapolis, MN
USA.
Yao, J., & Barttlet, E. (2009, June 14-17). Design and Prototype of an Injection Location Indicator:
A Senior Capstone Project and Multi-Party Partnership. Paper presented at the 2009 Annual
American Society of Engineering Education Conference, Austin, TX.
Yao, J., & Wan, Y. (2008, June 1-3, 2008). A Wavelet Method for Biometric Identification Using
Wearable ECG Sensors. Paper presented at the the 5th International Workshop on Wearable and
Implantable Body Sensor Networks (BSN 2008), Hong Kong, China.
Yao, J., & Limberis, L. (2008, June 22-25). A Project-Driven Approach to Teaching Controls in a
General Engineering Program. Paper presented at the 2008 Annual American Society of Engineering
Education Conference, Pittsburg, MA, USA.
Wan, Y., & Yao, J. (2008, October 22-24). A Neural Network to Identify Human Subjects with
Electrocardiogram Signals. Paper presented at the the World Congress on Engineering and Computer
Science (WCECS) 2008 of International Association of Engineers (IAENG), San Francisco, CA.
Yao, J., Sun, X., & Wan, Y. (2007). A Pilot Study on Using Derivatives of Photoplethysmographic
Signals as a Biometric Identifier. Paper presented at the the 29th IEEE-EMBS Conf., Lyon, France.
Yao, J., Limberis, L., & Kauffman, P. (2007, June 21-24). An Electrical Systems Course in a General
Engineering Program: Experience and Lessons. Paper presented at the Annual American Society of
Engineering Education Conference, Hawaii, USA.
Wan, Y., Sun, X., & Yao, J. (2007, October 17-20). Design of a Photoplethysmographic Sensor for
Biometric Identification,. Paper presented at the 2007 International Conference on Control,
Automation and Systems, Seoul, Korea.
Sullivan, S., Williams, R., Howard, E., & Yao, J. (2007, June 21-24). Identifying the Content of a
General Engineering Program Using Benchmarking and the Fundamentals of Engineering
Examination. Paper presented at the 2007 Annual ASEE Conf, Hawaii, USA.
Yao, J., Warren, S., & Simmons, S. (2006, April, 2-4). Ease of Use Considerations for Point-of-Care
Devices in Home Environments. Paper presented at the Conf. of Decentralization of Healthcare via
Distributed Diagnosis and Home Healthcare (D2H2), Arlington, VA, USA.
Yao, J., & Lunsford, P. (2006, June 18-21). Laboratory from the First Day: an Efficient Method to
Convey Electrical Concepts to Engineering Students. Paper presented at the 2006 Annual American
Society of Engineering Education Chicago, IL.
Yao, J., Dieck, G., Dixon, G., Howard, E., McLawhorn, S., Williams, R., et al. (2006). ‘Who is the
Biggest Pirate?’ Design, Implementation, and Result of a Robotics Competition for General
Engineering Freshmen. Paper presented at the 2006 Annual American Society of Engineering
Education Conference, Chicago, IL.
Warren, S., Lebak, J., & Yao, J. (2006, April, 2-4). Lessons Learned from Applying Interoperability
and Information Exchange Standards to a Wearable Point-of-Care System. Paper presented at the
Conf. of Decentralization of Healthcare via Distributed Diagnosis and Home Healthcare (D2H2),
Arlington, VA, USA.
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Yao, J., & Warren, S. (2005b, September 1-4). A Short Study to Assess the Potential of Independent
Component Analysis for Motion Artifact Separation in Wearable Pulse Oximeter Signals. Paper
presented at the the 27th IEEE EMBS Conf, Shanghai, China.
Yao, J., & Warren, S. (2005). Stimulating Student Learning with a Novel ‘In House’ Pulse Oximeter
Design. Paper presented at the 2005 Annual Conference and Exposition, American Society for
Engineering Education.
Warren, S., Lebak, J., Yao, J., Creekmore, J., Milenkovic, A., & Jovanov, E. (2005, September 1-4).
Interoperability and Security in Wireless Body Area Network Infrastructures. Paper presented at the
the 27th IEEE EMBS Conf., Shanghai, China.
Yao, J., & Warren, S. (2004, Sept). A Novel Algorithm to Separate Motion Artifacts from
Photoplethysmographic Signal Obtained with a Reflectance Pulse Oximeter. Paper presented at the
the 4th Joint EMBS-BMES Conf., San Francisco, CA, USA.
Warren, S., Yao, J., Schmitz, R., & Lebak, J. (2004, Sept). Reconfigurable Point-of-Care Systems
Designed with Interoperability Standards. Paper presented at the the 26th IEEE EMBS Conf, San
Francisco, CA, USA.
Lebak, J., Yao, J., & Warren, S. (2004). HL7-Compliant Healthcare Information System for Home
Monitoring. Paper presented at the the 26th IEEE EMBS Conf., San Francisco, CA, USA.
Yao, J., Schmitz, R., & Warren, S. (2003, Sept). A Wearable Standards-Based Point-of-Care System
for Home Use. Paper presented at the the 3rd Joint EMBS-BMES Conf., Cancun, Mexico.
Warren, S., Yao, J., Schmitz, R., & Nagl, L. (2003, Sept.). Wearable Telemonitoring Systems
Designed with Interoperability in Mind. Paper presented at the the 25th IEEE EMBS Conf, Cancun,
Mexico.
Lebak, J., Yao, J., & Warren, S. (2003, Sept). Implementation of a Standards-Based Pulse Oximeter
on a Wearable Embedded Platform. Paper presented at the the 25th IEEE EMBS Conf., Cancun,
Mexico.
Yao, J., & Warren, S. (2002). Design of a Plug-and-Play Pulse Oximeter. Paper presented at the
Second Joint Meeting of BMES and EMBS.
Warren, S., Yao, J., & Barnes, G. E. (2002, Oct). Wearable Sensors and Component-based design for
Home Health Care. Paper presented at the the 2nd Joint EMBS-BMES Conf. , Houston, TX, USA.
 Book Chapters
 Jianchu Yao, Yongbo Wan and Steve. Warren. Biometric Applications of One-Dimensional
Physiological Signals – Electrocardiograms. Recent Application in Biometrics. ISBN 978-953-307488-7. Editors: Jucheng Yang and Norman Poh. InTech Publisher.
 Wan, Y., & Yao, J. (2008). Human Identification with Electrocardiogram Signals: a Neural Network
Approach IAENG Transactions on Engineering Technologies Volume II - Special Edition of the
World Congress on Engineering and Computer Science 2008. ISBN: 978-0-7354-0663-6. American
Institute of Physics, 2009.
 Yao, J. (2008). Work Harder and Work Smarter to Land a Faculty Job. In Z. J. Pei (Ed.), Tips on
getting an academic position. ISBN: 978-0-557-05363-6, Lulu.com, 2009.

Status of Grants & Contracts submitted related to proposed degree (including agency
names, years of funding, collaborative partners):
 National Science Foundation. “Portable Cyber-Laboratories: Virtual Instruments and Affordable
Prototyping Kits to Enhance Learning and Improve Access to Electrical Engineering Education”,
$88,100. Role: PI. Collaborate with Kansas State University.
 North Carolina Department of Transportation, “Fleet Management Criteria: Depreciated Life,
Disposal Point & Utilization,” $95,334. Role: Co-PI. PI: Dr. Paul Kauffmann.
 East Carolina University Office of Technology Transfer, Development of a Location Identification
Device for Orthopedic Injections (Phase II), $1,500. Role: PI.
42
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East Carolina University Office of Technology Transfer, Development of a Location Identification
Device for Orthopedic Injections (Phase I), $6,000. Capstone project fund. Role: Faculty Advisor.
East Carolina University College of Allied Health, Development of a Web Services Based Distributed
System for Tele-hearing Diagnosis, $25,000.
East Carolina University Start-up Award, Realizing Self-Help Healthcare through Pervasive Sensing
and Intelligent Human-Device Interactions, $120,000. Role: PI.
 Presentations/Talks
 “A Web Services-based Distributed System with Browser-Client Architecture to Promote
Tele-audiology Assessments”, ECU, Business of Healthcare Symposium 2010.
 “Conduct Scholar Research in a Developing Undergraduate Program,” East Carolina University
Engineering Advisory Board Annual Meeting, October, 27, 2009.
 “A Web-services Based Distributed Tele-audiology System,” East Carolina University Innovation
Expo, Brody School of Medicine, April 2, 2009.
 “A Web-services Based Distributed Tele-audiology System,” East Carolina University International
Scholars Symposium, April 1, 2009.
 “Design of PnP Home Health Monitoring Systems and Their Standards,” Chinese Academy Sciences,
Shenzhen Advanced Technology Institute, Shenzhen, China. June 4, 2008.
 “Development of Home Health Monitoring Systems,” Beijing University of Posts and
Telecommunications, Beijing, China. May 15, 2008.
 “Use a Personal Electronic Nurse to Promote Self Care,” 1st Healthcare Mini Research Symposium,
Nursing School, East Carolina University. November 9, 2006.
 “Plug-and-Play Home Health Monitoring Systems Using Wearable, Standards-Based Medical
Components,” Northwest Polytechnic University and Shaanxi University of Science and Technology,
Xi’an, China. June 7, 2006.
 “Design and Implementation of Standards-Based Point-of-care System for Home Use,” 8th Research
Forum, Kansas State University, April 4, 2003, Manhattan, KS.
 “Veterinary Telemonitoring for Disease Prevention in Cattle Herds,” Cattlemen’s Day, Kansas State
University, March 7, 2003, Manhattan, KS.
 Patents/disclosures/copyrights:
 “Internet-based Multi-user Diagnostic Hearing Assessment Systems Having Client-server
Architecture with User-based Access Levels for Secure Data Exchange,” Provisional patent, 20092010; currently filing PCT (Patent Cooperative Treat) to protect intellectual property rights cross the
world. Co-inventor: Gregg Givens
 An Online Calculation Toolbox for Health Care,” Disclosed on July 29, 2011. Co-inventor: Zhibin
Huang.
 “Systems integrating virtual instruments and virtual reality to support ubiquitous laboratory learning,”
disclosed on August 8, 2011.
 Service on related state/national/international boards or committees:
 East Carolina University Graduate Faculty
 East Carolina University Intellectual Property/Patent Committee: ’10
 East Carolina University Teaching Grants Committee: ’07-’09. Secretary ’09
 College of Technology and Computer Science International Committee: ’08-’09
 Department of Engineering: Engineering Core Committee, Biomedical Engineering Concentration
Committee, Assessment Committee
 North Carolina Summer Ventures in Math and Science (’06-’10)
 Science Olympia Tournament (’09, ’10)
43
 East Carolina University Engineering/Technology Day (’06-’09)
 East Carolina University Open House (’05-’09)
 Outreach: Chinese New Year’s Traditionals presentation to 1st graders in W. H. Robinson Elementary
School, 2009
5.
Other:
PREVIOUS PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE:
Research Assistant
Medical Component Design Laboratory
Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS
2001– 2005
Designed, developed, and prototyped wearable, standards-based medical sensors and wireless body
networks to construct plug-and-play health monitoring systems with an open architecture. Developed and
tested a novel motion artifact reduction algorithm for wearable pulse oximeters.
Accomplishments/duties include:
 Designed medical components in three categories (base station, data logger, and sensor unit) by
integrating Bluetooth with the Medical Information Bus;
 Prototyped a desktop base station with LabVIEW interfaces; a wearable, low-power data logger with
larger memory; two wearable, microcontroller sensor units (pulse oximeter and ECG); and a weight
scale with temperature and humidity measuring capability;
 Congregated the medical components into a plug-and-play, interoperable, scalable, dynamical healthmonitoring system with an open architecture; built Bluetooth wireless body area networks and local
area networks; and achieved device plug-and-play performance without human interventions;
 Developed and tested a novel bio-signal process algorithm that improves signal-to-noise ratio by
separating motion artifacts from desired PPG signal and calculates both venous and arterial oxygen
saturation, surpassing its traditional alternatives that can only compute the arterial oxygen saturation.
Research Engineer
Robotics Research Institute
Beijing, China
1998–2000
Researched redundant robot kinetic control and tasks-based directional manipulability to maximize path
planning with given tasks; built motion control units for modular robots which can work either as a standalone controller or under a host controller with commands received over a RS-232 serial port.
Controls Engineer and Group Leader
Institute of Microcomputer Applications, Shaanxi, China
1995–1998
Design, developed, and installed SCADA (supervisory control and data acquisition) systems for industrial
processes, primarily focusing on manufacturing processes in pulp & paper industry. Managed two
projects with 4 members – assigned work to members, planned timelines, and examined daily progress.
Responsibilities include:
 Analyzed target processes and documented system specifications;
 Evaluated, selected, and integrated components (sensors, controllers, and actuators);
 Designed control algorithms and human-machine interfaces;
 Tuned control parameters (e.g., PID);
 Performed field installation, debugging, and testing;
 Oversaw two contract projects valued at $150,000.
Representative projects:
 Designed and developed SCADA systems for the following pulp & paper processes:
Sodium recycling, Linqing Pulp & Paper Inc. Shangdong, Jan.1997–July, 1998
44
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Pulp plant, Zhongwei Pulp & Paper Inc. Ningxia, Sep.1996–Apr. 1997
Paper basis weight & moisture, Dongying Papermaking Co., Shangdong, Jan. 1995–Sep. 1996
Pressurized Headbox, Shouguang Pulp & Paper Inc., Shangdong, July 1995–Feb.1996
Implemented sequence-control for automatic package machines.
HONORS AND AWARDS
 The Oppenheimer Award: 64th ASEE Engineering Design Graphics Division’s Mid Year Conference,
2009 (coauthor: William Howard, Rick Williams)
 Treasured Pirate Award 2009 for Display of Creativity and Initiative, East Carolina University
 International Travel Award to present papers at Hong Kong and Shenzhen, China, ECU International
Affairs Office, 2008.
 Best Paper Nominee, Experimentation and Laboratory-Oriented Studies, ASEE 2008, (coauthor:
Loren Limberis)
 Elevated to IEEE Senior Member in 2007
 New Faculty Research Award, 2006. East Carolina University
 Graduate Travel Award, Kansas NSF EPSCoR, 2004
 Graduate Travel Award, Kansas State University Graduate Student Council, 2003
REVIEWER:
 IEEE Transactions on Instrumentation and Measurement
 Sensors
 China National Science Foundation proposal review, 2011
 National Science Foundation proposal review panelist, twice in 2006
 Technology Interface Journal
 International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBC ’07-’09)
 American Society of Engineering Education Annual Conference (ASEE ’06-’09)
 International IEEE Conference on Industrial Informatics (INDIN 2006)
 International IEEE Conference on Control, Automation and Systems (ICCAS 2007)
PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT:
 “Conducting Rigorous Research in Engineering Research” Workshop, Golden, CO (4 days, August,
2010)
 ABET Accreditation Assessment Training Workshop, Baltimore, MD (one day, February, 2007)
 MIT Leadership Skill Workshop, Boston, MT (two days, July, 2007)
 VaNTH ERC “How People Learn Engineering” Workshop, Nashville, Tennessee (two days, April,
2006)
MEMBERSHIPS
2001 – Present
2009 – Present
2002 – Present
2005 – Present
2003
Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) (S’01-M’05-S’07)
American Telemedicine Association
IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society
American Society of Engineering Education
IEEE Instrumentation and Measurement Society
45
Faculty Information Sheet
Name: Loren Limberis
1. Rank: Assistant Professor of Engineering - East Carolina University
2. Degrees:
University of Utah, Department of Bioengineering, 2006 Ph.D. in Bioengineering
Dissertation title: Toward Kinesin-Powered Chemomechanical Devices
University of Utah, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, 1992 B.S. Electrical
Engineering
3. Teaching Experience:
Workload Assignment: 45% teaching, 30% research, 25% service
Assistant Professor of Engineering
East Carolina University
Fall 2006—present
Assistant Professor of Electrical and Biomedical Engineering
The College of New Jersey
Fall 2002 – Spring 2006
Teaching Assistant, Department of Bioengineering
Biopolymer Characterization
University of Utah
Fall 1998
Teaching Assistant, Department of Biology
Human Physiology
University of Utah
Fall 1993

Courses:
BIOE 3000 Bioprocess Engineering Systems (with laboratory)
BIOE 3016 Engineering Applications in Microbiology
BIOE 4010 Bioprocess Separation Engineering (Developed and delivered 4-week laboratory)
BIOE 4020 Bioprocess Plant Design, Simulation, and Analysis
BIOL 7345 Cell Motility (Guest lecturer)
COAD 1000 Engineering Freshmen Experience
ENGR 1014 Introduction to Engineering (with laboratory)
ENGR 3014 Circuit Analysis (with laboratory)
ENGR 3050 Instrumentation and Control Systems (with laboratory)
ENGR 3902 Undergraduate Research in Engineering
ENGR 3903 Undergraduate Research in Engineering
ENGR 4010 and 4020 Senior Capstone (Faculty advisor)
ITEC 2010 Introduction to Industry and Technology (Guest lecturer)
4. Scholarly & Professional Activities related to proposed degree (with emphasis on the past
five years)
 Publications/Scholarly Activity related to proposed degree:
 Yao, J. and Limberis, L. (2009) Coupled-Tanks Level Control: An Effective Course Project and Its
Software Design. Computers in Education Journal. 19(4):53-62.
46




Yao, J, Limberis, L, Williams, R, Howard, E. (2009) An Efficient PID Control Teaching Module with
LabVIEW Simulation. Computers in Education Journal. 19(2):30-41.
Limberis, L., Magda, J.J., and Stewart, R.J. (2001) Polarized alignment and surface immobilization of
microtubules for kinesin-powered nanodevices. Nano Letters 1:277-280.
Limberis, L. and Stewart, R.J. (2000) Toward kinesin-powered microdevices. Nanotechnology 11:4751.
Ho, C-H., Limberis, L., Caldwell, K.D., and Stewart, R.J. (1998) A metal-chelating pluronic for
immobilization of histidine-tagged proteins at interfaces: immobilization of firefly luciferase on
polystyrene beads. Langmuir 14:3889-3894.
Invited Book Chapters:
Stewart, R.J. and Limberis, L., (2007) Engineering a Molecular Railroad, In: NanoBioTechnology:
BioInspired device materials of the future; Editors: Oded Shoseyov and Ilan Levy, Humana Press, NJ.
Professional Employment:
Research Assistant, Biomolecular Engineering Laboratory
University of Utah, Department of Bioengineering

1995 – 2001
Research Associate
Allvivo of Birmingham, Alabama, University of Utah
2000 – 2001
Research Analyst
Southwest Research Institute
Hill Air Force Base, Clearfield, Utah
1994 – 1995
Status of Grants & Contracts submitted related to proposed degree (including agency names,
years of funding, collaborative partners):
2010 – Limberis, L. (PI) & Hu, X-H. “Engineering photoreceptor-controlled aggregation and
disaggregation of nanoparticle suspensions as a platform for biotechnology devices,” North Carolina
Biotechnology Center Biotechnology Research Grant (BRG), ($82,500).
2009 – Williams, R. (PI), Aswell, J., Limberis, L., Amico, L., Picard, G., Umphlett, R., Yarley, D.,
“Integration of Hands‐on Short Courses into a Bioprocess Engineering Curriculum,” North Carolina
Biotechnology Center Education Enhancement Grant (EEG), ($59,533).
2009 – Limberis, L. (PI) & Millard, S., “Project Photo-Link: Photoreversible Control of Nanoparticle
Aggregation and Disaggregation as a Platform for Biotechnology Devices,” Office of Technology
Transfer, East Carolina University, ($5,000).
2008 - Limberis, L. (PI), Stellwag, E., Bier, M., & Hu, X., "Development of a Biohybrid DNA Separation
Device Featuring Fast and Linear Separation with Single Base Pair Resolution," Research Development
Award (RDA) Program at ECU, ECU Research Development Award (RDA) Program, ( $19,820).
2008 - Williams, R. (PI), Klein, S., Limberis, L., & Sullivan, S., "Design and Development of
Educational Modules for Bioprocess Engineering," GOV-National Science Foundation (NSF),
( $136,480).
Small Grants
VaNTH – “How People Learn Engineering” Workshop Scholarship
The College of New Jersey – Support of Scholarly Activity
2007
2006
47
3 credit course release
The College of New Jersey – Support of Scholarly Activity
3 credit course release
Biobased Engineering Fellowship, The Whitaker Foundation
National Institutes of Health Research Training Grant
2005
1996
1995
 Invited research presentations outside ECU:
 Nanoengineering with Motor Proteins, Guest Lecturer BIOL 7345 Cell Motility (Spring 2010)
 Introduction to Biotechnology, Guest Lecturer ITEC 2010 Introduction to Industry and Technology
(Fall 2007; Spring 2008)
 Nanosystem Engineering with Kinesin Motor Proteins. Invited presentation at Science at the
Starlight; North Carolina Biotechnology Center and Sigma Xi The Scientific Research Society,
Greenville, North Carolina, December 2007.
 Nanoengineering with Motor Proteins, Professional Engineers of North Carolina, Greenville, NC,
February 2007
 Nanoengineering with Motor Proteins, The College of New Jersey, Ewing, NJ, March 2005
 Introduction to Biotechnology, The College of New Jersey, Ewing, NJ, March 2005
 Ultrasonic Bioinstrumentation, The College of New Jersey, Ewing, NJ, March 2005
 Review of Mathematics (Fundamentals of Engineering Review Course) The College of New Jersey,
Ewing, NJ, February 2005
 Review of Chemistry (Fundamentals of Engineering Review Course) The College of New Jersey,
Ewing, NJ, February 2005
 What is Bioengineering?, The College of New Jersey, Ewing, NJ, October 2004
 Toward Kinesin-Powered Chemomechanical Devices, The College of New Jersey, Ewing, NJ,
December 2003
 The Emerging Field of Biomedical Engineering: Opportunities for all Engineering Disciplines The
College of New Jersey, Ewing, NJ, October 2003
 Toward Kinesin-Powered Chemomechanical Devices, The College of New Jersey, Ewing, NJ,
October 2002
 Kinesin-Based Active Microdevices, Department of Bioengineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake
City, UT, October 2000
 Overview of Microtubule Motor Proteins; In Vitro Kinesin Motility, Department of Bioengineering,
University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, November 1999
 Patents/disclosures/copyrights:
Metal-Chelating Surfactant. U.S. Patent 6,087,452—July 11, 2000. Inventors Russell Stewart, Karin
D. Caldwell, Chih-hu Ho, and Loren Limberis

Service on related state/national/international boards or committees:
Reviewer
IEEE Transactions on Advanced Packaging
Special section on Packaging for Micro/Nano-Scale Systems
ASEE Annual Conference Proceedings
NSF Career Awards
ECU Undergraduate Research and Creative Activities grant reviewer
Faculty Advisor
ISPE ECU Student Chapter
2009 – present
Student Activities Coordinator
2002 – 2006
48
IEEE Princeton/Central New Jersey Section (Region 1)
Includes Princeton University, The College of New Jersey,
Rutgers University, Middlesex County College, and DeVry University
East Carolina University and Engineering Department Committees:
Departmental Bioprocess Engineering Committee (Chairman) (2006-present)
Departmental Assessment Committee (2006-present)
Departmental Biomedical Engineering Curriculum Committee (2006-2009)
Departmental Capstone Committee (2008-present)
University Undergraduate Research and Creative Activities Committee (2006-present)
5. Other:
Affiliations
International Society for Pharmaceutical Engineering (ISPE)
American Society Engineering Education (ASEE)
Graduate Research Committee Membership
Tess Byers (2008-2009) Master’s Thesis Committee Member (Paul Gemperline Chair) – Research
involves slurry sampling, measurement, and chemometric methods of evaluation.
Undergraduate Research Projects and Senior Theses Supervised:
DSM Water Conservation (2010-2011) Faculty Advisor
Design and Optimization of Firefly Luciferase Production, Purification, and Characterization at the
Benchtop Bioreactor Scale (2008-2009) Faculty Advisor
IEEE Micro-mouse (2004-2006) Co-advisor
The 2005-2006 team won first place in the 2006 IEEE Region 1 Micro-mouse competition in Maine and
was awarded $700
The 2004-2005 team won first place in the 2005 IEEE Region 1 Micro-mouse competition in Buffalo, NY
and was awarded $1000.
Home Theater Calibration System (2003-04) Principal Advisor
Prosthetic Hand (2002-2004) Co-advisor
Use of emerging technologies for a distributed HVAC system in Armstrong Hall (2002-03) CoAdvisor
Professional Workshops Attended that are Related to Teaching:
VaNTH workshop on “How People Learn Engineering”, February 2007, Vanderbilt University
Council on Undergraduate Research workshop titled “Institutionalizing Undergraduate Research”, October 2004,
The College of New Jersey
Week-long NSF sponsored workshop titled “How to Engineer Engineering Education”, July 2004,
Bucknell University
Awards
Centennial Award for Excellence (Spirit) – East Carolina University
2010
Refereed Conference Proceedings:
Yao, J., Limberis, L., and Warren, S., (2010) Work in Progress – A ubiquitous laboratory model to
enhance learning in electronics courses offered by two universities with dissimilar curricula. Frontiers in
Education Annual Conference.
49
Williams, R., Klein, S., Limberis, L., and Sullivan, S., (2009) Design and Development of Educational
Modules for Bioprocess Engineering. American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Annual
Conference Proceedings.
Klein, S., Williams, R., Limberis, L., and Sullivan, S., (2009) Bioprocess Engineering Curriculum
Development and Assessment. American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Annual Conference
Proceedings.
Yao, J, Limberis, L. (2008) A Project-Driven Approach to Teaching Controls in a General Engineering
Program. American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Annual Conference Proceedings.
Yao, J., Limberis L., and Kauffmann, P. (2007) An Electrical Systems Course in a General Engineering
Program; American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Annual Conference Proceeding.
Sepahpour, B. Clark, E. and Limberis, L. (2004) Modular Lumped Mass Experiment, Experimentation &
Laboratory Oriented Studies; American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Annual Conference
Proceedings.
Limberis, L. and Stewart, R.J. (1998) Biological transport in a microfabricated device: active
immunochromatography with motorized antibodies; in Microfluidic Devices and Systems, A. Bruno
Frazier, Chong Hyuk Ahn, Editors, Proceedings of SPIE Vol. 3515, 66-75.
Conference Abstracts and Presentations:
Klein, S., Williams, R., Limberis, L., and Sullivan, S., (2009) Bioprocess Engineering Curriculum
Development and Assessment—ASEE Annual National Conference, June 2009, Austin, TX.
Sepahpour, B. Clark, E. and Limberis, L. Modular Lumped Mass Experiment. Experimentation &
Laboratory Oriented Studies—ASEE Annual National Conference, June 2004, Salt Lake City, UT.
Limberis, L., Ho, C-H., and Stewart, R.J. Kinesin-powered microchemomechanical systems
(MCMS). Seventh Foresight Conference on Molecular Nanotechnology, October 1999, Santa
Clara, CA.
Limberis, L. and Stewart R.J. Biological transport in a microfabricated device: active
immunochromatography with motorized antibodies. Microfluidic Devices and Systems—SPIE
Proceedings Conference September 1998, Santa Clara, CA.
50
Faculty Information Sheet
Name: RICHARD R. WILLIAMS
1.
Rank: Associate Professor, Engineering
2.
Degrees:
Ph.D. Mechanical Engineering, Auburn University, 2002
M.S. Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 1983
B. Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 1982
East Carolina University
3. Teaching Experience related to proposed degree (with emphasis on the past five years)
Workload Assignment: 60% teaching, 20% research, 20% service

East Carolina University, Greenville, NC
 Assistant Professor, Engineering, 2005-Present

Auburn University, Auburn, AL
 Associate Director, Materials Processing Center, 2003-2005
 Auburn University, Associate Research Professor, 2002-2005
 Auburn University, Graduate Research Assistant, 1999-2002

United States Navy
 US Naval Academy, Instructor, Naval Systems Engineering, 1987 - 1989
 Submarine Officer, 1983-1989
 Courses:
East Carolina University
COAD 1000, Freshman Seminar
ICEE 1010, Integrated Collaborative Engineering I (course coordinator)
ICEE 1020, Integrated Collaborative Engineering II
ENGR 1012, Engineering Graphics (course coordinator)
ENGR 1014, Introduction to Engineering (course coordinator)
ENGR 2010, Computer Applications in Engineering
ENGR 2070, Materials and Processes
ENGR 3024, Mechanics of Materials
ENGR 4010, Capstone Design
BIOE 4010, Bioprocess Separations Engineering (course coordinator)
ENGR 4503, Special Topics: Advanced Thermal Systems
ENGR 4503, Special Topics: Mechanics of Materials
ENGR 4503, Special Topics: Robotics
ENGR 4503, Special Topics: Robotic Sensors
Summer Ventures (NC School of Science and Mathematics)
Auburn University
MECH 4250, Comprehensive Design II
MECH 3030, Fluid Mechanics
ENGR 2200, Introduction to Thermodynamics, Fluids, and Heat Transfer
United States Naval Academy
EN 100, Naval Propulsion Systems
51
Georgia Institute of Technology
ME 3055, Mechanical Measurements (Lab TA)
4. Scholarly & Professional Activities related to proposed degree (with emphasis on the past
five years)
 Publications/Scholarly Activity related to proposed degree:
Journal Articles
 Williams, R., Howard, W., & Martin, S. (accepted 2010). Composite Sandwich Structures with
Rapid Prototyped Cores. Rapid Prototyping Journal.
 Howard, W., Williams, R., & Yao, J. (accepted 2010). Simulations of Carnival Rides and Rube
Goldberg Machines for the Visualization of Concepts of Statics and Dynamics. Engineering Design
Graphics Journal.
 Yao, J., Limberis, L., Williams, R., & Howard, W. (2009). An Efficient PID Control Teaching
Module with Labview Simulation. Computers in Education Journal, 19(2), 30-41.
 Williams, R., Shao, R., & Overfelt, R. (2008). The Flowability of Fine Powders in Reduced Gravity
Conditions. Granular Matter, 10(2), 139 - 144.
 Shao, R., Williams, R., & Overfelt, R. (2006). The Fluidization Behavior of Fine Powders in
Reduced Gravity Conditions. Journal of Thermophysics and Heat Transfer, 20(3), 371-375.
 Williams, R. & Harris, D. (2006). A Device and Technique to Measure the Heat Transfer Limit of a
Planar Heat Pipe Wick. Experimental Thermal and Fluid Science, 30(3), 277-284.
 Williams, R. & Harris, D. (2005). Heat Transfer Limit of Step Graded Metal Felt Heat Pipe Wicks.
Int. Nat. J. of Heat and Mass Transfer, 48(2), 293-305.
 Williams, R. & Harris, D. (2003). Cross-Plane and In-Plane Porous Properties Measurements of Thin
Metal Felts: Applications in Heat Pipes. Experimental Thermal and Fluid Science, 27(3), 227-235.
Books
Musto, J. Howard, W., & Williams, R. (2009). Engineering Computations: An Introduction Using
MATLAB and Excel. Boston: McGraw-Hill, 2009.

Status of Grants & Contracts submitted related to proposed degree (including agency names, years
of funding, collaborative partners):
 Williams, R. (PI), Aswell, M., & Limberis L. (2010). Integration of Hands-on Short Courses into a
Bioprocess Engineering Curriculum, North Carolina Biotechnology Center, $40,323, awarded.
 Williams, R. (PI), Limberis, L., Klein, S., and Sullivan, S. (2008). The Design and Development of
Educational Modules for Bioprocess Engineering. NSF CCLI, $136,480, awarded.
 Howard, W., (PI), Bosse, M., & Williams, R. (2008). Engineering Explorations: A Course Using
Engineering Methods and Tools for Math and Science Education Majors. NSF CCLI, $105,630,
rejected.
 Howard, W., (PI), Bosse, M., Williams, R, & James, L. (2007). Engineering Explorations: A Course
for Education Majors to Model the Application of Mathematics and Science in Engineering. NSF
CCLI, $148,891, rejected.
 Howard, W., (PI), Micklow, G., Dixon, E., & Williams, R. (2006). Acquisition of Rapid Prototyping
Equipment for Basic Research and Integration into the New Undergraduate Systems Engineering
Program. NSF MRI, $400,000, rejected at the University level.
 Williams, R. & Howard, W. (2006). Composites Innovation. ECU Division of Research and
Graduate Studies, $130,145, awarded.
 Williams, R. (2005). Rapid Prototyping Vacuum Casting. ECU Faculty Senate Research/Creative
Activities Grant, $22,218, rejected.
52


Williams, R. (2005). Auburn University Equipment Transfer: $150,000, transferred capital
equipment from Auburn University to ECU to maintain research collaboration.
Invited research presentations outside ECU:
 Williams, R. & Howard, W. (2010). The Assessment Driven Evolution of a First-Year Program.
Proceedings of the 2010 ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition, Louisville, KY.
 Howard, W., Williams, R., & Yao, J. (2009). Simulations of Carnival Rides and Rube Goldberg
Machines for the Visualization of Concepts of Statics and Dynamics. 64th Annual Midyear
Conference of the Engineering Graphics Division of ASEE, Erie. PA.
 Williams, R., Klein, S., Limberis, L., & Sullivan, S. (2009). Design and Development of Educational
Modules for Bioprocess Engineering. Proceedings of the 2009 ASEE Annual Conference and
Exposition, Austin, TX.
 Klein, S., Williams, R., Limberis, L., & Sullivan, S. (2009). Bioprocess Engineering Curriculum
Development and Assessment. Proceedings of the 2009 ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition,
Austin, TX.
 Howard, W., Williams, R., & Agarwala, R. (2008). Solid Modeling as a Visualization Tool for High
School Math and Science Topics. Proceedings of ASEE EDGD 63rd Mid-Year Conference, San
Diego, CA.
 Brown, E., Williams, R., & Bedenbaugh. P. (2008). An Example of Vertical Integration in and
Engineering Curriculum. Proceedings of the 2008 ASEE Southeast Section Conference, Memphis,
TN.
 Williams, R.& Howard, W. (2007). A Versatile and Economical Apparatus for Experiments in
Statics,” Proceedings of the 2007 ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition, Honolulu, HI.
 Howard, W. & Williams, R. (2007). An Introductory Engineering Design Project Using Finite
Element Analysis and Rapid Prototyping. Proceedings of the 2007 ASEE Annual Conference and
Exposition, Honolulu, HI.
 Sullivan, S., Williams, R., Howard, W., Yao, J., & Kauffmann, P. (2007). Identifying the Content of
an Engineering Program using Benchmarking and the Fundamentals of Engineering Examination.
Proceedings of the 2007 ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition, Honolulu, HI.
 Howard, E., Williams, R., & Prantil, V. (2007). Work-in-Progress - Incorporating Realistic Problems
into a Finite Element Analysis Course. Proceedings of the 2007 IEEE Frontiers in Education
Conference, Milwaukee, WI.
 Yao, J., Dixon, E., Howard, W., Williams, R., Williamson, K., Dieck, G., & McLawhorn, S. (2006).
“Who is the Biggest Pirate?” Design, Implementation and Result of a Robotics Competition for
General Engineering Freshman. Proceedings of the 2006 ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition,
Chicago, IL.
 Williams, R., Shao, R., & Overfelt, R. (2006). The Flowability of Fine Powders in Reduced Gravity
Conditions. Proceedings of the Fifth World Congress on Particle Technology, Orlando, FL.
 Williams, R., Shao, R., & Overfelt, R. (2005). The Fluidization of Cohesive Powders in Reduced
Gravity Conditions. Workshop on Granular Materials in Lunar and Martian Exploration, NASA,
JFK Space Center, FL.
 Overfelt, R., Williams, R., Bakhtiyarov, S., & Wang, D. (2003). Future Needs and Opportunities in
Thermophysics from a Materials Engineer's Perspective. Proceedings of the 27th International
Thermal Conductivity Conference, Knoxville, TN.
 Williams, R., Flenniken, J., & Harris, D., (2002). The Characterization of Micro-fibrous Materials
for the Use as Heat Pipe Wicks. Proceedings of SECTAM XXI Conference, Orlando, FL.
 Overfelt, R., Crumpler, M., Cobb, H., Langley, R., Strom, B., & Williams, R. (2001). Vulcan-TP:
Industrial Thermophysical Property Measurements in Space. Proceedings of the International Space
Station Utilization Conference, Titusville, FL.
53
5.

Patents/disclosures/copyrights:
 Abbott, III, J. & Williams, R., (1999). Method for Coating Fibers. United States Patent 5974837.
 Williams, R. (1999). Vertical Vaporizer for Halide-free, Silicon-containing Compounds. United
States Patent 5938853.
 Williams, R. (1997). Method of Providing Vaporized Halide-free, Silicon-containing Compounds.
United States Patent 5632797.
 Amos, L., Chludzinski, P., Leoni, H., Watson, J., & Williams, R. (1994). Method and Apparatus for
Coating Optical Waveguide Fibers. United States Patent 5366527.

Service on related state/national/international boards or committees:
 University Research Council: 2008-2009
 College Curriculum Committee: 2009-present
 College Laboratory Committee: 2005-2008
 College Technology Consultant Search Committee: 2006
 College Lab Supervisor Search Committee: 2006
 Engineering Department Curriculum Committee (chair): 2006-present
 Engineering Department Admissions Committee: 2006-present
 Engineering-Math Committee: 2008-present
 Engineering Department Bioprocess Concentration Committee: 2006-present
 Engineering Department Mechanical Concentration Committee: 2008-2009
 Engineering Department K-12 Outreach Committee: 2006 -2008
 Engineering Department Major Grants Committee: 2006-2007
 Engineering Department Software Committee: 2005-2006
 Engineering Department Chair Search Committee: 2006
Other:
Professional Experience
Corning Inc., Wilmington, NC
· Section Supervisor, Eagle Engineering, 1995 – 1999
· Equipment Engineer/Project Engineer/Sr. Project Engineer, 1989 – 1995
Theses/Dissertations
“An Investigation of the Use of Step-Graded Metal Felt Wicks to Improve Heat Pipe Performance,”
Doctor of Philosophy; Supervisor: Dr. Daniel K. Harris
Society Memberships and Professional Honors and Awards
Registered Professional Engineer
American Society of Mechanical Engineers
American Society of Engineering Education
Reviewer: IEEE Transactions on Electronic Packaging Manufacturing
Reviewer: Metallurgical and Materials Transactions
Reviewer: Journal of Porous Materials
Reviewer: American Society of Engineering Education
Faculty Advisor, Sol of Auburn, Auburn University’s Solar Car Team
Tau Beta Pi
Pi Tau Sigma
Corning, Inc., Outstanding Contributor Award, Division Cash Award (4 times)
54
Faculty Information Sheet
Name: Stephanie M. George
1.
Rank: Assistant Professor of Engineering - East Carolina University
2. Degrees: Ph.D. Biomedical Engineering, August 2008
Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia
Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia
Classification of Portal Hypertension and Cirrhosis using Magnetic Resonance Imaging- Using
MRI to classify and quantify the hemodynamics of the portal venous system as relating to portal
hypertension and cirrhosis.
Advisor: Don P. Giddens, PhD, Dean of Engineering
B.S. Engineering Science and Mechanics, May 2002
Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, Virginia
3. Teaching Experience related to proposed degree (with emphasis on the past five years):
Workload Assignment: 50% teaching. 40% research, 10% service
Assistant Professor of Engineering, August 2010 to Present
College of Technology and Computer Science
East Carolina University, Greenville, NC

Teaching undergraduate courses, ENGR 1012

Designing and implementing junior and senior level courses for Biomedical
Concentration, BIME 3000 and BIME 4030
Problem Based Learning Across the Curriculum Fellowship, Fall 2007-Spring 2009
Center for Science Education, Emory University
 Designed, implemented and assessed problem based learning cases at a City of Atlanta
High School
Gandy/Diaz Teaching Fellowship, Fall 2007, Spring 2008, Spring 2010, Summer 2010
Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering, Georgia Tech
 Designed, implemented and assessed cases in an undergraduate biomedical engineering
problem based learning class, BMED 1300
 Developed and gave lecture on mathematical modeling
 Facilitated small groups of students as they solved cases
Engineering Science I, Graduate, Spring 2005
Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering, Georgia Tech and Emory University
 Held review and homework help sessions
 Graded papers
Problem Based Learning II, Undergraduate BMED 2300, Fall 2004
Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering, Georgia Tech
 Facilitated small group of students and assessed research, teamwork, and communication
skills
T.A.T.T.O Training, Emory University, Fall 2003
55

Teacher Assistant training
4. Scholarly & Professional Activities related to proposed degree (with emphasis on the past
five years)

Publications/Scholarly Activity related to proposed degree:
 S.M. George, D.R. Martin and D.P. Giddens. Contribution of Superior Mesenteric Vein Flow to
the Right and Left Lobes of the Liver Using CFD. In Preparation.
 S.M. George, D.R. Martin and D.P. Giddens. Characterizing Normal Portal Vein Hemodynamics
using Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Computational Fluid Dynamics. In Preparation.
 S.M. George, D.R. Martin and D.P. Giddens. Hemodynamic Changes in Patients with Chronic Liver
Disease Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Computational Fluid Dynamics. In Preparation.
 S.M. George, D.R. Martin and D.P. Giddens. Portal Vein Contribution to the Right and Left Lobes of
the Liver Using MRI and CFD. 6th World Congress of Biomechanics (WCB 2010). August 1-6, 2010
Singapore, IFMBE Proceedings, 2010, Volume 31, Part 2, 473-476.
 Y.Yang, S. George, D. Martin, A. Tannenbaum, and D. Giddens. 3D Modeling of
Patient-Specific Geometries of Portal Veins Using MR Images. In Proceedings of
the 28th IEEE EMBS Annual International Conference, pages 5290-5293, 2006.

Invited research presentations outside ECU:
 S.M. George, B. Fasse and K.S. Lee. Acquiring Experimental Design Skills Through ProblemBased Learning. 2010 Biomedical Engineering Society Annual Meeting. Austin, Texas. October
2010.
 S.M. George, D.R. Martin and D.P. Giddens. Portal Vein Contribution to the Right and Left Lobes
of the Liver Using MRI and CFD. 6th World Congress of Biomechanics (WCB 2010). Singapore,
August 2010.
 S. M. George, D. R. Martin, and D. P. Giddens. Computational Analysis of Flow in the Portal Vein
of Normal Subjects and Patients Using MRI and CFD. Electronic Poster Presentation at the
International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine 2010 Annual Meeting. Stockholm,
Sweden. May 2010.
 S.M. George, D.R. Martin, D.P. Giddens. Contribution of Superior Mesenteric Vein Flow to the
Right and Left Lobes of the Liver Using CFD. Proceedings of the ASME 2008 Summer
Bioengineering Conference, Lake Tahoe, CA. June 2009.
 S. M. George, D. R. Martin, and D. P. Giddens. Hemodynamic Investigation of Flow in the
Normal Portal Vein. Student Poster Competition. Proceedings of the ASME 2008 Summer
Bioengineering Conference. Marco Island, Florida. June 2008.
 S. M. George, P. Sharma, D. R. Martin, and D. P. Giddens. Geometry and Flow in the Portal Vein
of Normal Subjects and Patients using Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Electronic Poster
Presentation at the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine 2008 Annual
Meeting. Toronto, Ontario. May 2008.
 S.M. George, P. Sharma, Y. Yang, Y. Gao, D.R. Martin and D.P. Giddens. Investigation Of
Geometry And Flow In The Portal Vein Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging Poster Presentation
at Biomedical Engineering Society 2007 Annual Meeting. Hollywood, CA. Sept. 2007.
 S.M. George, D.R. Martin and D.P. Giddens. A Computational Model of Hemodynamics in the
Portal Vein. Poster Presentation at Biomedical Engineering Society 2007 Annual Meeting.
Hollywood, CA. Sept. 2007.
 S.M. George. Medieval Women Mystics and the Question of Anorexia. Conference on Gender
Studies, Radford University, Radford, Virginia, March 2001
56
5.
Other
 Research Experience:
Comparison and Statistical Validation of Cerebral Flow Results Obtained Using Phase
Contrast MRA and Computational Flow Dynamics in an In Vitro Cerebral Aneurysm
Model. August 2009 to Present Frank Tong, M.D., Emory University, Atlanta, GA
 Developed computational models of two cerebral aneurysm models
 Validated and compared the in vitro measurements with computational results
Patient Outcome Assessment Comparative Evaluation: Rabia Balkhi Hospital, Afghanistan,
January 2009 to October 2009 (unpaid)
Denise Giles, MPH, WHO Collaborating Center in Reproductive Health, Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia
 Comparison of YR2003, YR2005, and YR2008 Patient Outcome Assessment data using
epidemiologic and industrial systems engineering methods.
 Improvement of maternal and newborn services in a low resource setting.
 Calculation of risk profiles and modeling of risk through health services areas.
Post-Doctoral Fellowship, August 2008 to August 2010
Diego Martin, M.D., PhD and Don Giddens, PhD, Georgia Tech and Emory University, Atlanta,
Georgia
 Investigated clinical significance of hemodynamic parameters to diagnosis, progression
and monitoring of chronic liver disease.
 Used CFD to determine source of the right liver lobe’s blood supply
Effect of Problem Based Learning on Undergraduate Students, July 2008 to Present Barbara
Fasse, PhD, Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, Georgia Tech, Atlanta, Georgia
 Created scoring system for pre- and post-Problem Based Learning assessments
 Quantitatively measured experimental design knowledge gained from PBL
Doctoral Student, August 2002 to August 2008
Don Giddens, PhD, Georgia Tech and Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia
 Optimized data acquisition for portal vein geometry and flow measurements using MRI
and phase contrast-MR
 Analyzed normal subject and patient flow data to determine potential parameters that
may change due to disease
 Created four computational model of the blood flow within the portal vein
Investigating the Use of Resin, Summer 2003 Robert Taylor, M.D., PhD Emory University,
Atlanta, Georgia
 Researched different types of resin and tested them as a means of fixing tissues.
 Constructed polymerization chamber, cut histological sections using microtome and
conducted tissue staining.
Imaging Aortic Wall Compliance using MRI and High Speed Camera Imaging, Spring 2003
John Oshinski, PhD, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia
 Measured the area changes of a phantom model using MRI and high speed camera
imaging and compared the results.
Co-op Student, Jan 2000 to May 2000, Aug 2000 to Jan 2001, May 2001 to Aug 2001 DuPont
Advanced Fiber Systems- Kevlar, Richmond, Virginia
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Hypothesized and tested design differences in parts to determine potential causes of
process instability
Developed and implemented Uptime model for use in monitoring, auditing, and
upgrading Kevlar performance
Learned and applied Six Sigma tools and methodology in polymer isolation, pump
reliability, and fiber materials handling
Activities:
Founding Member of Georgia Tech’s Parent’s Network 2008-2010
Graduate Student Representative to Georgia Tech’s Childcare Task Force ’05-‘07
Worked with Georgia Tech’s Women’s Resource Center on graduate student issues
Certified Water Aerobics and Pre/Post Natal Fitness Instructor
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Faculty Information Sheet
Name: Chad Bossetti
1.
Rank: Assistant Professor - Dept. of Engineering, East Carolina University
2.
Degrees:
Duke University
Durham, NC
Ph.D., Dept. of Biomedical Engineering
Experimental Electrophysiology Laboratory, Mar. 2009
Design and Evaluation of a Transcutaneous Energy
Transfer System. Advisor: Patrick D. Wolf, Ph.D.
University of Colorado B.S., Electrical and Computer Engineering
Colorado Springs
May 2002, Special Honors
3. Teaching Experience related to proposed degree (with emphasis on the past five years):
Workload Assignment: 50% teaching, 40% research, 10% service
Assistant Professor
Teacher
Dept. of Engineering, East Carolina University
Biomedical Instrumentation. August 2010-Present
Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University.
Instructor for Signals and Systems course, Fall 2007.
Responsible for all aspects of the course, including
selection of topics, bi-weekly lectures, and supervision of a
grader and teaching assistant.
Kaplan, Inc., 2001-2002.
Prepared and presented lectures for ACT, SAT, and GRE
test preparation courses.
Teaching Assistant
Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University.
 Biomedical Signals and Measurements, Fall 2002 and Spring
2003. Included lab and project supervision.

Mentor
Electrophysiology, Spring 2004. Included wet lab supervision.
Pratt School of Engineering, Duke University.
Provided project guidance and technical expertise to a group of three
undergraduates enrolled in the Devices for the Disabled course. Spring
2006. Project was a wireless battery-recharging unit.
4. Scholarly & Professional Activities related to proposed degree (with emphasis on the past
five years)

Publications/Scholarly Activity related to proposed degree:
Peer-Reviewed Journal Publications
M. Rizk, C.A. Bossetti, T.A. Jochum, S.H. Callender, M.A.L. Nicolelis, D.A. Turner, and P.D. Wolf,
“A fully implantable 96-channel neural data acquisition system.” Journal of
Neural Engineering, vol. 6, no. 2, Apr. 2009.
59
C.A. Bossetti, M.J. Birdno, W.M. Grill, “Analysis of the quasi-static approximation for
calculating potentials generated by neural stimulation.” Journal of Neural Engineering, vol. 5, no. 1,
pp. 44-53, Mar 2008.
C.A. Bossetti, J.M. Carmena, M.A.L. Nicolelis, P.D. Wolf, “Transmission latencies in a telemetrylinked, brain-machine interface.” IEEE Transactions on Biomedical
Engineering, vol. 51, no. 6, pp. 919-924, Jun 2004.
Conference Papers/Abstracts
M.J. Birdno, C.A. Bossetti, W.M. Grill, “Validity of the quasi-static assumption for
calculating potentials generated in neural stimulation.” Neural Interfaces Workshop,
National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, Bethesda, MD, Aug 2006.
C.A. Bossetti, T.A. Jochum, S.H. Callender, P.D. Wolf, “A transcutaneous energy
transfer system for brain-machine interface applications.” Biomedical Engineering
Society, Baltimore, MD, Oct 2005.
J. Morizio, D.S. Won, I. Obeid, C.A. Bossetti, M.A.L. Nicolelis, P.D. Wolf, “16-Channel neural preconditioner device,” 1st Int IEEE BMES Conf on Neural Engineering. Capri Island, Italy. Mar 2003.
5. Other:
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RESEARCH EXPERIENCE
Dissertation Project
Neural Stimulation
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Switching power supply design for a transcutaneous energy
transfer system (wireless power supply). Hardware design and
VHDL interface for an implantable thermometry system. FDA
compliance testing for tissue temperature rise from an implanted
medical device. FCC compliance
testing of specific absorption rate for EM dosimetry.
A computational modeling study of the potential developed in a
tissue volume conductor as a result of stimulation. A comparison
was made between the solution to the inhomogeneous scalar
Helmholtz wave equation and classic quasi-static simplifications.
Stimulus efficacy was quantified for a model neuron in a
frequency-dependent dielectric medium. Dr. Warren Grill, Duke
University.
RESEARCH INTERESTS:
Transcutaneous Energy Transfer: Design of switch-mode power supplies; coil design
and radiated electromagnetic fields; tissue temperature rise and specific absorption rate.
Field Potential Modeling in Tissue: Effects of dielectric tissue properties on
electromagnetic wave propagation.
Implanted Medical Devices: neural recording and stimulation systems; visual and cortical
motor prosthesis; and low- and high-voltage implanted cardiac systems.
Electromagnetic Field Measurement and Calibration: Instrumentation for measurement
of the high-strength static magnetic fields, low-strength AC magnetic fields, and RF
electromagnetic fields associated with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).
60
 PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE
St. Jude Medical
Sylmar, CA, July 2008-July 2010 Senior Hardware Design
Engineer, Cardiac Rhythm Management Division Lead Engineer,
characterization and verification of implanted device MRI
compatibility.
American Journal Durham, NC, Aug 2006-Jan 2007.
Experts
Independent contract editor
LSI Logic, Inc.
Colorado Springs, CO, 2000
Competitive Analysis Group, Summer Internship
U. S. Air Force
90th Space Wing, F.E. Warren AFB, Cheyenne, WY,1995-1998,
Honorable Discharge Strategic Communications Maintenance,
Electronic computer and switching system specialist Department
of Defense Top Secret/Single-Scope Background Investigation,
1995-1998
 AWARDS AND HONORS:
Colorado Scholars Award, 2000-2002
Outstanding Student Engineer, Colorado Engineering Counsel, 2002
Eta Kappa Nu
 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT:
Introduction to College Teaching, Duke University. A course focusing on approaches to
teaching, development of learning objectives, and syllabus and course design.
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Faculty Information Sheet
Name: Stephanie T. Sullivan, PhD, CPIM
1.
Rank: Teaching Instructor, Department of Engineering
2.
Degrees:
B.S.M.E., 1990, Aerospace & Mechanical Engineering, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN
M.S., 1996, Chemical Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC
Doctoral Student, 2006-Present, Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering, North Carolina State University
East Carolina University
3. Teaching Experience related to proposed degree (with emphasis on the past five years):
Workload Assignment: 75% teaching, 15% research, 10% service
Teaching Instructor, Department of Engineering, East Carolina University
2006-present
Courses:
BIOE 4000; ENGR 2050; ITEC 3000, 4150, 4250, 4350, 4550; ICEE 1020, 3300
4. Scholarly & Professional Activities related to proposed degree (with emphasis on the past
five years)
 Publications/Scholarly Activity related to proposed degree:
Yao, J., Sullivan, S. T., Eckert, C., & Bartlett, E., (2009). An Orthopedic Injection Training
Instrument Using Flow Impedance to Indicate Needle Tip Locations. Journal of Clinical Monitoring
and Computing 23:347-353.
Hall, C., Sullivan, S. T., Kauffmann , P. J., Batts, D. & Long, J., (2009) "Are there Gender
Differences in Factors Influencing Career Considerations?" American Journal of Educational Studies
vol 2, no1, pp 23-38.
Sullivan, S. T., Eckert, C., Cannon, M. & Khan, S. A., (2009) Functional gels of whey protein and
pullulan blends, 2009 Proceedings, The International Symposium on Food Rheology and Structure,
Zurich, Switzerland.
Williams, R. R.; Klein, S.; Sullivan, S.; Limberis, L.; (2009) ASEE 2009 Annual Conference, June
2009, Bioprocess Engineering Curriculum Development and Assessment.
Williams, R. R.; Sullivan, S.; Klein, S.; Limberis, L.; (2009) ASEE 2009 Annual Conference, June
2009, Design and Development of Educational Modules for Bioprocess Engineering.
Sullivan, S. T., Khan, S. A., & Eissa, A. S. (2008). Whey Proteins: Functionality and Foaming under
Acidic Conditions. In C. Onwulata & P. Huth (Eds.), Whey Processing, Functionality and Health
Benefits (Institute of Food Technologists Series) (pp. 99-132). : Wiley-Blackwell.
Sullivan, Stephanie; Hall, Cathy; Kauffmann, Paul; Batts, David; Long, Jeremy; (2008) Influences
on Female Interest in Pursuit of STEM Fields in Higher Education, 2008 American Institute of
Higher Education Conference Proceedings.
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Sullivan, Stephanie T.; Williams, Rick; Howard, William E.; Yao, Jason; Kauffmann, Paul. (2007)
Identifying the content of an Engineering program using benchmarking and the Fundamentals of
Engineering examination; 2007 ASEE Annual Conference Proceedings.
Kabin J.A.; Tolstedt S.L.; Sáez A.E.; Grant C.S.; Carbonell R.G. (1998). Removal of Organic Films
from Rotating Disks Using Aqueous Solutions of Nonionic Surfactants: Effect of Surfactant
Molecular Structure. Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, vol 206, no 1, pp 102-111.
 Service on related state/national/international boards or committees:
East Carolina University Service
 NSF ITEST Grant, Biomechanics Curriculum Coordinator, Spring 2007 – Present.
 Biomedical Engineering Concentration Curriculum Committee, Fall 2007 – Present.
 Bioprocess Engineering Concentration Curriculum Committee, Fall 2006 – Present.
 College of Technology & Computer Science Distance Education Task Force, Spring 2007.
 Engineering Management Curriculum Committee, Fall 2006 – Spring 2007.
 Engineering K-12 Outreach Committee, Fall 2006 – Present.
5.
Other:
Engineering Course Coordinator: ENGR 3300, BIOE 4000, BIME 4030
INDUSTRY EXPERIENCE
Merck & Co., Inc., Wilson, NC
Contract Operations, March - August 2006
Operations Planning, August 2003 – March 2006
Quality Assurance, Manufacturing Quality Operations, July 2001 – July 2003
Engineer/Scientist, Pharmaceutical Technical Operations, September 1998 – July 2001
PCS Phosphate & Co., Inc., Aurora, NC
Production Engineer, Diammonium Phosphate Granulation Plants, July 1997 – September 1998
Maintenance Engineer, Phosphoric Acid Manufacturing, November 1996 - June 1997
Stone & Webster Engineering Corporation, Houston, TX
Fluid Systems Engineer, July 1992 – August 1993
Amoco Oil Company, Whiting, IN & Texas City, TX
Project Engineer, June 1990 – June 1992
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Professional Exams/Certifications
American Production and Inventory Control Society (APICS) Certification in Production and Inventory
Management (CPIM), 2006.
Engineer-In-Training, (Fundamentals of Engineering) State of Indiana, 1990.
Honors & Awards
Nanofibers for the 3rd Millenium: A Summit of the World’s Leaders in Nanofibers. August 2010. 2nd
place in poster competition.
NSF CCLI Grant Co-PI, Award No. 0737198, Design and Development of Educational Modules for
Bioprocess Engineering, CCLI-Phase 1.
North Carolina Future Program Partner, FoodMASTER, 2008 Science Education Partnership Award,
National Center for Research Resources, National Institutes of Health
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Guest Faculty, UNC Chapel Hill School of Pharmacy graduate level course PPES 180 “Pharmaceutical
Research, Development & Marketing,” Pharmaceutical Manufacturing, 2000 – 2004.
National Academy of Engineering Summit on Women in Engineering, Washington D.C., 1999.
Duke University Materials Science & Mechanical Engineering Research Fellowship, 1996.
Poster Presentation, M.S. thesis research. International Symposium on Surfactants in Solution “Micelles,
Microemulsions and Monolayers: Quarter Century Progress and New Horizons" at University of Florida,
(300 researchers from 25 countries in attendance), 1995.
Patricia Roberts Harris Fellow, North Carolina State University, 1994-1995.
Glenna R. Joyce Scholar, University of Notre Dame, full 4-year academic scholarship, 1986-1990.
National Science Foundation Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) appointment, University of
Notre Dame, 1989.
American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE) Leadership
Societal Impact Operating Council Member, 2003 – 2004.
Process Development Division Topical Proceedings Chair, AIChE Annual Meeting, 2003 & 2004
Chair, AIChE Women’s Initiatives Committee (WIC), 2001.
Chair, AIChE Annual Meeting WIC technical session, 2001
Co-Chair, AIChE Annual Meeting WIC Inaugural technical session, 2000
Vice Chair, 2000; Secretary, 1999; Visibility Subcommittee Chair, AIChE WIC, 1998.
COLLABORATORS
Collaborators: Gerald Micklow, Tarek Abdel-Salam, William Howard, Paul Kauffmann, Tom Fink,
Cathy Hall, Melani Duffrin, East Carolina University; Saad Khan, North Carolina State University; G.
Donald Allen, Texas A&M University. Graduate Advisors: Saad Khan (PhD), Christine Grant, Ruben
Carbonell (MS), North Carolina State University
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Faculty Information - East Carolina University