UNIVERSITY OF NEWCASTLE UPON TYNE
School of Chemical Engineering and Advanced Materials
Health and Safety Handbook
2014
Health and Safety Handbook
School of Chemical Engineering and Advanced Materials
Table of Contents
Statement of intent................................................................................................................................. 1
Introduction ........................................................................................................................................ 1
Policy Statement ................................................................................................................................. 1
Management arrangements for the School ....................................................................................... 3
University Safety Management Hierarchy .............................................................................................. 4
School Safety Committee .................................................................................................................... 5
School Safety ........................................................................................................................................... 5
Health and Safety for Principal Investigators, Managers and Supervisors (PIMS) ............................. 5
Staff/Researchers Training .................................................................................................................. 5
Safety Related Documents .................................................................................................................. 5
Incidents and Near Misses .................................................................................................................. 6
Statement of roles of key members of staff ........................................................................................... 7
Head of School .................................................................................................................................... 7
School Safety Officers ......................................................................................................................... 7
School Safety Committee ................................................................................................................ 7
Manual Handling Co-ordinators...................................................................................................... 7
Display Screen Assessor .................................................................................................................. 7
Portable Appliance Testing (PAT Testing) ....................................................................................... 7
First Aiders ...................................................................................................................................... 8
University Safety Office Advisors ........................................................................................................ 8
Specific Issues ......................................................................................................................................... 9
Emergency Procedures ....................................................................................................................... 9
Emergencies ........................................................................................................................................ 9
Accidents ......................................................................................................................................... 9
Fire Safety ......................................................................................................................................... 10
Fire Outside Normal Working Hours (5.30 pm - 8.00 am, weekends and holidays)..................... 11
Fire extinguishers .......................................................................................................................... 11
Personal Emergency Evacuation Plan (PEEP) ................................................................................ 12
General Risk Assessment ...................................................................................................................... 13
Electrical Safety ............................................................................................................................. 13
Field Trips ...................................................................................................................................... 14
First Aid Provision ......................................................................................................................... 14
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Laboratory Safety – Teaching and Research ......................................................................................... 15
Risk Assessments .......................................................................................................................... 15
Safe handling, storage and disposal of chemicals ........................................................................ 16
COSHH Risk Assessment................................................................................................................ 16
BIOCOSHH ..................................................................................................................................... 17
Waste Disposal .................................................................................................................................. 17
Chemicals ...................................................................................................................................... 17
Clinical ........................................................................................................................................... 17
Disposables and sharps ................................................................................................................. 18
Electrical ........................................................................................................................................ 18
Glass .............................................................................................................................................. 18
Metals ........................................................................................................................................... 18
Compressed Gases ............................................................................................................................ 18
Gas Cylinders ................................................................................................................................. 18
Safe use of gas cylinders ............................................................................................................... 18
Manual Handling ............................................................................................................................... 19
Mobile Phones .................................................................................................................................. 19
Risk Assessment ................................................................................................................................ 19
Out of Hours Working ........................................................................................................................... 20
Out of Hours use of Computer Cluster Rooms in Merz Court ...................................................... 20
Out of Hours working in Laboratories in Merz Court ................................................................... 22
Safety in Transportation ................................................................................................................... 22
Safety Training ...................................................................................................................................... 23
Visitors .............................................................................................................................................. 23
Contractors ....................................................................................................................................... 23
Unattended Experiment Procedure ...................................................................................................... 24
Workshop/ Laboratory access ...................................................................................................... 24
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Statement of intent
Introduction
The School Health and Safety Policy contains general and specific safety arrangements to enable and
assist members of the School staff and students, and visitors to comply with the University's rules
and UK Health and Safety Law. It contains advice, information and some specific instructions which
apply to all who work in, or visit, the School.
You are required to read this booklet carefully and then to ensure that you obtain copies of other
relevant health and safety information which apply to you. All new staff, research associates and
research visitors must also attend a Health and Safety induction course. This course will cover
University Health and Safety (H&S) and School local H&S rules. The H&S document will be available
on the CEAM website for all to read. The document includes links to relevant documentation and
forms relating to research work to be undertaken.
It is the responsibility of academic, administrative and technical staff to ensure, as far as is
reasonably practicable, their own safety and also the safety of staff, researchers, students and
visitors working in the School.
Policy Statement
General Statement for Health, Safety and Welfare Issue
The Head of School has overall responsibility for the health and safety of personnel within the
school. Part 1 (General Duties, Section 2 (3) of the Health and Safety at Work Act (1974)) requires
that a written statement of the Health and Safety Policy be brought to the attention of employees
and all other personnel working in the School.
The School of Chemical Engineering and Advanced Materials recognises and accepts its
responsibilities under Part 1 (General Duties, Section 2 (1) of the Health and Safety at Work Act
(1974)).
This deems that that all personnel within CEAM, as far is reasonably practicable, will ensure that
Health, Safety and welfare regulations are complied with, as encompassed in the Health and Safety
at Work Act.
There are systems integrated within the School safety procedures to ensure compliance with these
responsibilities which are written into the management structure. The School further accepts and
recognises its additional obligations to the health and safety of students within the School and of
other users of the School facilities, as specified under Part 1 (General Duties, Section 3 & 4 of the
Health and Safety at Work Act (1974)). In carrying out these statutory duties, the School will seek the
advice and full co-operation of its managers, staff and students; all recognised trade unions and
professional associations, as well as that of the University Safety Office.
The promotion and management of the health and safety of all persons working in the School is
regarded as an essential requirement of the duties of all staff. They are expected to adopt high
personal standards with regard to Health and Safety matters and to transmit their standards to
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colleagues and students. Health and Safety considerations must be given equal weight with
objectives when planning any programme of work. Adequate resources of time and funding will be
made available to carry out safety duties and for safety work.
The School supports the concept that Health and Safety, quality and productivity in work are
mutually supporting aspirations. The competence of staff and students to carry out their work safely
will be assured by adequate and appropriate training and supervision. All persons working within the
School must recognise that there is a clear duty on them to do everything they can to prevent injury
to themselves and others, and loss to the School. Safety is everyone’s responsibility.
This policy is a local statement of policy and must be read in conjunction with the University Safety
Policy, any relevant Safety Policy Supplements and any other relevant Local Rules. Everyone issued
with this policy will be required to acknowledge their acceptance of it by submitting a signed copy
and handed in to a member of the safety committee to be retained as proof of acceptance.
Acceptance of the content of this policy is a condition of working within the School. Anyone found to
be consistently failing to comply with this policy may have sanctions, including (but not limited to)
withdrawal of access to the building, taken against them.
This Safety Policy is reviewed on an annual basis.
Head of School
February 2014
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Management Arrangements for the School
The Head of School has overall responsibility for all aspects of the health and safety of personnel
within the School. The formulation, implementation and development of School policy is delegated
by the Head of School to the Safety Committee. Health and Safety management is a core
management function within the School, and receives appropriate prominence on the agenda of
management meetings.
Day to day monitoring of the School Health and Safety Policy, and routine advice on health and
safety issues, is a responsibility of the School Safety Officers.
The School’s Health and Safety Committee is established to advise the Head of School and to coordinate and assist in implementing all aspects of the Health and Safety Policy. The committee
meets regularly and representatives on the committee include school staff and the school safety
officers.
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University Safety Management Hierarchy
The University safety management hierarchy is reproduced from the University's Health and Safety Policy
document:
Highlighted in red is the Safety Management in the School of Chemical Engineering and Advanced Materials
Council
University Council
EB
University Executive
Board
EB Member
for Safety
University
Safety
Office
Council Appointed
Lay Member
Responsibility
of Line Management
University
Safety Committee
Includes Student and Union
representation in membership
Faculty PVC
Chair FSC
Faculty Safety Committee
School
Safety Officers
School
Safety Committee
Head of School
Or Director of
Institute
Or Director of Service
Staff and Students
Staff and Students
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School Safety Committee
The School’s key tasks are to:
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Ensure health and safety policy and practice is suitable and sufficient in the areas under the School
control
Ensure that health and safety is fully integrated into School management plans
Ensure suitable and sufficient resources are allocated to health and safety issues
Communicate and co-operate with the Faculty, USO, other Schools, ESS and other shared building
occupiers
Enable staff and students in the School to effectively communicate on health and safety issues
Annually report to the Faculty and University Safety Committee summarising the health and safety
activities undertaken and plans for the forthcoming year
monitor and report compliance, incidents and defects (as necessary) on any health and safety or related
matters (including building maintenance issues) relating to areas in their control or shared space under
their control
The Head of School holds personal responsibility for ensuring that the School is run in a safe manner and
is supported by School Safety Officers and other trained persons as necessary to advise, monitor and
plan for safe activities without undue risks to health
Where more than one School occupies a building they are required to co-operate with each other for
those aspects that require a building overview (such as fire evacuation)
School Safety
Health and Safety for Principal Investigators, Managers and Supervisors (PIMS)
All Principal Investigators, Managers and Supervisors within the School should attend the training course ‘Health
and Safety for Principal Investigators, Managers and Supervisors’ which is provided by the University Safety
Office or an equivalent ISOH course. The training gives a good grounding in Health and Safety Legislation,
University Systems and Responsibilities, Health and Safety Management, Risk Assessment, Training and
Accidents. Follow the link below to book your place on one of these courses.
http://www.safety.ncl.ac.uk/training.aspx
Staff/Researchers Training
All members of staff and researches are required to attend general safety courses and specific safety courses
related to their research activities.
Staff will also be expected to attend refresher training for specific courses at recommended intervals.
University Training courses are advertised on their website:
http://www.safety.ncl.ac.uk/training.aspx
Safety Related Documents
Safety related documents are kept in a secure filing cabinet in Millennium Laboratory (C324) office and are
available to relevant persons for inspection on request to the Safety Officers or a member of the Safety
Committee.
In house Health and Safety Training is also delivered via a Health and Safety Induction Course. This course covers
both university regulations and local regulations.
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Incidents and Near Misses
The School has a duty to investigate incidents (including accidents and near misses).
These should be reported to the University Safety Office (USO) using the forms available on their website:
http://www.safety.ncl.ac.uk/accidentfireandemergency.aspx
At School level, each laboratory has a book for the reporting of incidents or near misses. These books are
reviewed on a regular basis and reported back to the safety committee for review and subsequent remedial
action to be taken if necessary.
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Statement of roles of key members of staff
Head of School
The Head of School has overall responsibility for all aspects of the health and safety of personnel within the
School. The formulation, implementation and development of School policy is a responsibility delegated by the
Head of School.
School Safety Officers
School Safety Officers are appointed by the Head of School.
The School Safety Officer role is principally to advise the Head of School on all aspects of health, safety and
welfare within the School. To make this task manageable there are additional appointments that can be made
including; Deputy School Safety Officers, Biological Safety Supervisors, and Radiation Protection Supervisors. This
role may include the management of local procedures and School self-inspection, and undertaking review of
School Safety Policies and Local Rules. School Safety Officers are expected to assist the USO in carrying out
safety audits and inspections, and to undertake basic investigations of incidents and record their findings. Safety
tasks related to individual projects would normally be carried out by the Principal Investigator concerned rather
than the SSO, though the latter will be in a position to offer advice or to know where such advice might be
sought. The Safety Officers will also liaise with other safety personnel in the School about risks involved within
their specific discipline i.e. Biological Safety Supervisor.
School Safety Committee
The aim of the Safety Committee is to advise the Head of School of safety issues arising within the School and to
implement the University Safety Policy.
Mr S Latimer (Chair) (Superintendent) (Merz Court)
Mr R J Dixon (Deputy Chair) (Laboratory Supervisor) (Merz Court)
Professor A Wright (Safety Officer) (Merz Court)
Dr E A Charles (Safety Officer) (Herschel / Bedson Building)
Mr P Sterling (laboratory Manager) (Merz Court)
Mr Simon Daley (Electrical/Electronics Supervisor) (Merz Court)
Manual Handling Co-ordinators
The manual handling co-ordinator for the School is Mr Stewart Latimer ([email protected]). He will
give training on manual handling and will assess all tasks that require any significant degree of lifting and
movement.
Display Screen Assessor
Display Screen Assessment will be carried out by the Information Technology Officer or another trained DSE
assessor.
Portable Appliance Testing (PAT Testing)
Wiring, servicing or testing of portable appliances may only be carried out by those with a sufficient level of
experience and technical knowledge.
All mains powered electrical equipment used at the University is required to be subject to examination and
testing both periodically and before the equipment is bought into service.
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For all portable appliances (things with plugs) it is the responsibility of the School or Service to ensure that
examination and testing is undertaken. Personal equipment used on site may also be examined and tested and
action taken should any defects be found.
Records must be maintained for PAT testing undertaken. Further information and guidance is available at
www.safety.ncl.ac.uk/electricalsafety.aspx
Portable Appliance testing is undertaken by Mr Stewart Latimer, Mr Paul Sterling, Mr Iain Ditchburn,(Merz
Court) and Mr Neville Dickman and Mr Chris Dunn (Bedson Building) or another trained PAT assessor.
First Aiders
The School has four first aiders
Merz Court Building
Mr Rob Dixon (Laboratory Supervisor), Mr Iain Ditchburn
Herschel / Bedson Building
Mr Chris Dunn, Dr Isabel Arce-Garcia
For immediate medical treatment of "walking wounded" for more than superficial injury and any exposure to
chemicals go, or take the victim, directly to the Minor Injuries Unit of the A&E of the RVI.
For more serious injury or in cases of any doubt CALL AN AMBULANCE.
University Safety Office Advisors
The University Safety Office provides general advice on health and safety. It also has specialists who give advice
and guidance in specific areas, for example Radiation Protection (UV, Laser etc), Biological Protection, Fire Safety
and Occupational Health.
Contact details for specialist advisors are available from the University Safety Office web site.
http://safety.ncl.ac.uk/contacts.aspx
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Specific Issues
Emergency Procedures
Emergencies
Emergency Contact Numbers
In the first instance call University Security Office Dial ext 6817 ([email protected]) for
FIRE - POLICE – AMBULANCE
Dial Internal 6666 [if no response, dial External 9-999]
If unsuccessful with above, use emergency Red Telephone outside the Students Common Room on the ground
floor, (up from the Porters Lodge) which is connected directly to the House Services Office.
Accidents
All accidents (including incidents not involving injury) and "near misses" must be reported. The reporting
procedure is in two parts,
(i)
(ii)
informing a responsible person to take control of the incident and
completion of an official accident report.
The following must be informed of accidents as soon as is reasonably practicable:
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School Safety Officers
Supervisor(s) or Research group leader
Workshop Supervisor
School First Aiders
If the above are not available the accident must be reported to a member of academic staff as soon as possible
and to the above when they become available.
The member of staff assuming control must ensure that an Accident Report form is completed. The form is
available on the University Web Site address;
http://www.ncl.ac.uk/internal/safety/acc-form.html
Copies are then automatically cascaded to:
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The School Safety Officers
The Head of School
The person submitting the form
The accident will be investigated by the School Safety Officers and other staff if deemed necessary, all persons
involved may be required to write down the details of the incident and this information will then form part of
the official report to the University Safety Officer.
All incidents involving carcinogens must also be reported to the University Potent Carcinogens Officer.
Ill-health that is believed to be work-related (including stress) should be reported using the accident report
book. Confidential matters may be taken up with the University Safety Officer directly.
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Fire Safety
Fire
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1 Typical fire alarm break point
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In the event of fire
Sound the alarm
Report to the Fire Marshal based at the Fire Assembly Point based at the
entrance to the building.
On hearing the alarm, leave the building immediately, but calmly, using the
nearest fire exit. Close all doors behind you.
Do not use the lifts.
Do not search for the seat of the fire or for the cause of the alarm
sounding.
Go to the Fire Assembly Point, immediately outside the Old Library
Building (Merz Court) or the car park (Bedson Building).
2 Assembly point (Merz Court)
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On hearing the alarm, the Fire Marshal, or his deputy will Ring 6666 to summon the Fire Brigade without
delay unless informed by the wardens that there is no fire or other emergency.
On hearing the alarm, the Fire Wardens, or their deputies will check their assigned areas to ensure that
everyone has left.
Report to the Fire Marshal, who will be stationed outside the main entrance, next to the Fire alarm
Panel in Main Foyer.
Wardens who are in a location remote from their assigned areas should leave the building immediately
and not attempt to carry out their duty. Such wardens should inform the Fire Marshal that they were
not able to assist with the evacuation of the area assigned to them.
On hearing the alarm, the Head of School or the acting Head of School will:
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Take up station next to the Fire Marshal.
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Check whether the Fire Brigade has been summoned.
On hearing the alarm, the Fire Marshal will take up station next to the Fire alarm Panel in Main Foyer.
In the event of the absence of all the above staff; the first member of staff to reach the reporting point
should assume responsibility until relieved. On being given the all clear by the Senior Officer of any
Emergency Service present, the Fire marshal or Staff member who has assumed control will give
instructions to return to the building, or parts of it, when it is safe to do so.
Fire / Evacuation Wardens (Appendix 1, page 25)
It is the duty of the Fire Wardens to check their assigned areas (laboratories, offices, etc.), to ensure that
everyone has left and then report to the Fire Marshal who will be who will be stationed outside the main
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entrance. The persons named in brackets will deputise in the absence of the Warden. In the absence of
both any member of staff in the area should report.
The Fire alarm is tested every Tuesday morning at approximately 8-30am, it will sound for approximately 30
seconds.
Fire Outside Normal Working Hours (5.30 pm - 8.00 am, weekends and holidays)
In the event of Fire;
Sound the alarm.
Call Security
[6666 or use the Red Telephone outside the Students Common Room on the ground floor, (up from the Porters
Lodge) which is connected directly to the House Services Office].
Follow normal evacuation procedures and report to whoever takes control.
Fire extinguishers
Fire extinguishers are sited in strategic positions outside of laboratories and all laboratories have fire blankets.
Everyone should know the location of firefighting equipment in their work areas.
Fire Safety Training courses are held by the University Safety Office; http://safety.ncl.ac.uk/training.aspx
Foam
Use on general fires (paper, cloth, wood), oil and highly flammable liquids
DO NOT USE on live electrical equipment
Carbon dioxide
Produces a high pressure stream of carbon dioxide gas which should be directed at
the base of the fire.
A general purpose extinguisher for laboratory use and for electrical fires.
Ineffective against alkali metals.
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Fire blanket
Effective at smothering clothing fires, oil baths etc
Personal Emergency Evacuation Plan (PEEP)
The Personal Emergency Evacuation Plan (PEEP) is one part of the reasonable adjustment arrangements made
by the University to include disabled staff and students in all aspects of working or studying at the University
(where this is reasonably practicable). This includes emergency egress during out of hours working as well as
during normal hours.
Responsibilities
Disabled Member of Staff or Student
The individual must inform the University on appointment if they need assistance in an emergency and be
involved in discussions about how their needs will be met. If anyone at the University considers that a disabled
person needs assistance or observes that someone has mobility difficulties then they should discuss this with
Human Resources (staff) who will call an anonymous case conference if the situation is not already in hand.
School Safety Officers
It is the responsibility of the School Safety Officers (SSO) to coordinate the PEEP for both staff and students. The
SSO should be familiar with the existing fire arrangements for the building and be able to identify staff to assist
in any evacuation.
Evacuation chairs are located on alternate landings on the stairs and trained evac chair operators are available.
The PEEP co-ordinator should also liaise with School Safety Officers in other buildings where applicable and
should follow up with any timetabling issues with the School Manager. In the case of students the SSO should
also report back to the Head of School. It is the responsibility of the School to distribute the PEEP.
Full guidance on PEEP can be found on the USO website at the following address:-
http://safety.ncl.ac.uk/forms.aspx
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General Risk Assessment
The process of Risk Assessment is at the heart of the control of risks at the University. In many places in this
policy a requirement for a risk assessment is stated. In these cases a specific risk assessment will be needed to
deal with the issue concerned. However it is commonly practicable to combine issues (making a combined risk
assessment) or have generic risk assessments for a specific topic provided that the assessment remains ‘suitable
and sufficient’ for the work to be undertaken. (See www.safety.ncl.ac.uk/riskassessment.aspx for more
information.)
It is therefore University Policy that all aspects of work where a significant hazard exists are subject to risk
assessments that are suitable and sufficient to identify the risks concerned, the persons who are at risk, the
proper control measures needed and the correct means of ensuring that those controls are put into place,
monitored and any deviations followed up.
Electrical Safety
Only electrical equipment which has a current Portable Appliance Testing (PAT) sticker may be used in any area
of the School.
PAT (Portable Appliance Testing) should be carried out on any new equipment before it can be used, and
existing equipment must have an up to date PAT sticker before being used. Any equipment with an out of date
PAT test labels must not be used, and should be reported to the appropriate trained PAT testers for testing.
These are Mr Stewart Latimer, Mr Paul Sterling, and Mr Iain Ditchburn (Merz Court), Mr Neville Dickman and Mr
Chris Dunn (Herschel/Bedson Buildings) or any other suitably PAT qualified technician.
Electrical apparatus must be suitably fused and maintained with the help of the Electrical/Electronics Supervisor
(Mr Simon Daley – Merz Court) or another qualified electrical technician.
Electrical flex on any apparatus should be carefully examined before each use to ensure no damage has occurred
that could expose live wires. Check that any plug you use is securely attached to the flex by the retaining screws
or clamps. All electrical repairs must only be carried out by the Electrical/Electronics Supervisor or another
qualified electrical technician.
No wiring of anything electrical/electronic must be carried out by anyone except the Electrical/Electronics
Supervisor or another qualified electrical technician.
Any equipment with broken plugs/connectors must not be used and should be reported to the
Electrical/Electronics Supervisor or another qualified electrical technician for repair
If any damage is evident on any electrical equipment, under no circumstances must equipment be switched on.
The problem should be reported immediately to a member of the technical staff, and any repairs will be carried
out as required by the Electrical/Electronics Supervisor or another qualified electrical technician.
Any spillage of liquids on or around any electrical equipment must be reported to a member of the technical
staff.
If an EARTH cable exists with any heating tape, process heater or heating element, it MUST be connected to the
appropriate connection point. If in doubt ask the Electrical/Electronics Supervisor or another qualified electrical
technician.
No mains plugs should be fitted by anyone other than the Electrical/Electronics Supervisor or another qualified
electrical technician.
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Field Trips
The University Safety Policy Supplement on field trips provides more detail and guidance on organising and
managing trips.
Guidance is also available from UCEA / USHA (see www.ucea.ac.uk/en/Publications/Health_and_Safety.cfm )
A British Standard that should be complied with wherever appropriate.
http://safety.ncl.ac.uk/pol-sups.aspx
First Aid Provision
All Laboratories have a First Aid Box.
Eye Wash Bottles Eye Wash Sprays over a sink are available
The first aiders as previously referred to in the document under First Aiders.
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Laboratory Safety – Teaching and Research
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Most laboratories are either research or teaching labs. Some laboratories are used for teaching and
research. The same safety measures are applicable to both uses. No research work is to be carried out
when laboratories are in use for teaching.
All students, postgraduates, researchers and staff must wear appropriate safety clothes when working in
laboratories.
Laboratory coats / protective gloves and other protective equipment must not be worn outside of
laboratory areas.
Visitors must be equipped with the appropriate safety equipment when visiting the laboratories.
No food or drink or to be consumed in the laboratories.
All accidents must be reported to Technical staff.
All faults must be reported to Technical staff.
COSHH forms must be situated next to the experiment and copies must be given to the Laboratory
Supervisor and one kept by the researcher before commencement of the experiment.
Unattended Experiment Forms must be completed before out of hours experiments begin.
http://www.ncl.ac.uk/ceam/about/Safety.htm
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All bottles and containers must be suitably labelled.
Volumetric Flasks used for making up stock solutions must not be used for storing solutions.
Movement of Winchesters (2.5L bottles) must be done using a bottle carrier.
Movement of chemicals/apparatus should be transported in suitable carrying trays
Wear appropriate safety clothing when transporting chemicals.
If unavoidable when transporting chemicals/apparatus from laboratory to laboratory wear one glove
only and open the doors with the ungloved hand.
No equipment or chemicals are to be removed from the laboratories without prior permission of the
Technical staff or the researchers in charge of the project.
Dispose of waste chemicals in the designated containers (following instructions on the laboratory notice
board). These instructions are reviewed annually or if any situation arises that is not addressed by these
criteria.
Inform the technicians when these containers are full and they will then transport them ready for
disposal.
The Good Chemical Practice Guide is a document that underpins good laboratory practices.
The Good Chemical Practice Guide is given out in Health and Safety Induction Courses and is also available on
the School Safety Website. (see Appendix 2, pages 26-29)
Risk Assessments
COSHH (Chemicals) assessment includes
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Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS)
A copy will accompany a chemical when it is delivered from the supplier. If it is not included it can be
obtained from chemical supplier’s website.
Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)
Standard protective equipment for laboratory work is a laboratory coat, safety glasses and gloves.
Additional PPE must be identified when carrying out the COSHH assessment.
Potent Carcinogens
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Any chemical with CHIP classification must be registered with the University Safety Office before it may
be ordered or used. http://safety.ncl.ac.uk/carcinogenregistration.aspx
CHIP carcinogen classification system
Category
Definition
Carc. Cat. 1 Substances known to be carcinogenic to man.
Carc. Cat. 2 Substances which should be regarded as if they are carcinogenic to man.
Carc. Cat. 3 Substances which cause concern due to possible carcinogenic effects.
CHIP carcinogen classifications will be written in MSDS precisely as "Carc. Cat." followed by the rating of 1, 2 or
3. The Carc. Cat rating will normally be in the same section as the Risk phrases (R phrases) e.g. R45 or R49. All
carcinogens should be assigned into the above categories on the registration form.
A new chemical classification system called CLP / GHS is currently being implemented worldwide. This system
classifies carcinogens as follows: CLP / GHS carcinogen classification system
Category
Definition
Category 1A
Chemicals known to have carcinogenic potential for humans
Category 1B
Chemicals presumed to have carcinogenic potential for humans
Category 2
Suspected human carcinogens
Safe handling, storage and disposal of chemicals
Instructions are given out in the Health and Safety induction session. There is also a PowerPoint presentation on
the School Safety website.
COSHH Risk Assessment
http://safety.ncl.ac.uk/forms.aspx
Anyone who uses or intends to use chemicals should complete a COSHH assessment form.
Under the Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (COSHH) Regulations (2002) a risk assessment must be
made before hazardous chemicals may be used or purchased. The way the forms are completed will vary from
one project/experiment to another. In some cases a single form will suffice for a project (when it consists of a
series of very similar experiments), whilst for others a form needs to be completed for most experiments. If the
risks for a series of experiments are the same then it is acceptable to refer to previous assessments. The
Supervisor(s) of a research worker, technician, undergraduate project student, etc. or the principal investigator
of a research group should discuss the contents of the form and sign it before the project/experiment
commences. The date for review should be carefully set to ensure proper supervision and in any case must not
be more than 5 years. For "one-off' experiments this should be indicated in the review date box. Experiments
which are not ‘one off’ but are continually changing, the COSHH assessment must be regularly brought up to
date. If experiments are not changing on a continuous basis then the COSHH form must be reviewed and their
Supervisor sign and date the revised form.
Three copies of the COSHH form should be produced;
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Health and Safety Handbook



School of Chemical Engineering and Advanced Materials
One placed next to or near the experiment/rig.
One passed to the Laboratory Supervisor.
One held by the researcher.
The responsibility of this process is with the researcher and then the Supervisor.
The COSHH form must be signed by the Supervisor(s) (or a nominated substitute). Safety inspections will include
the monitoring of the working of this scheme.
The use of particularly dangerous chemicals may be further restricted by UK, University, and/or School rules.
Chemicals with unknown hazards should be treated with great caution. Some assessment may often be made
from knowledge of similar compounds.
Training will be given to researchers on how to complete the forms and instruction are also on the School Safety
Website.
BIOCOSHH
A separate School induction session is presented to Researchers working in the Biotechnology laboratory. This
will enhance the general School H&S induction session given to all Academics, Postgraduates and researchers.
http://safety.ncl.ac.uk/forms.aspx
Waste Disposal
Chemicals
Disposal of chemical waste should be addressed during the COSHH risk assessment.
Members of staff who sanction the purchase of chemicals are responsible for their safe storage, use and
disposal.
Each laboratory, group or Section (as appropriate) should establish a system for dealing with chemical waste
along the following lines:






Separate containers should be used for different types of waste.
Waste should be properly labelled, the label should indicate the type of waste, the origin and volume,
concentration (e.g. lab C317), and the date the container was brought into use.
Waste which is highly flammable must be kept in fire resistant bins.
Waste should be disposed of promptly (within 3 months, or less for some waste. If in doubt seek advice
from the School Safety Officer). The Laboratory Supervisor/Technicians are responsible for organising
the collection and disposal of chemical waste from laboratories.
Anything (paper, cloths, gloves etc.) that is contaminated with chemicals must be treated as hazardous
chemical waste and placed in container with the correct labelling.
Drains must not be used for the disposal of chemical waste.
The majority of materials are not suitable for disposal by this route and to do so would contravene the
requirements of the Water Authority. It is understood that trace amounts of organic and inorganic
substances may remain in aqueous washings, which can be flushed down the drains, but all reasonable
steps should be taken to minimise these quantities and to ensure that effective dilution takes place.
Clinical
Laboratories designated for the use of bio-hazardous material must have specific protocols for the collection and
disposal of waste, with arrangements approved by the University Safety Office.
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Health and Safety Handbook
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Disposables and sharps*
Laboratory disposables (plastics, gloves, etc.) and sharps (needles, scalpels, etc.) must be placed in the
appropriately labelled containers, provided in research group areas and teaching laboratories, for disposal. Such
disposal is arranged by the Laboratory Technicians.
Electrical*
Small pieces of electronic/electrical equipment should be placed in the blue container. When it is full request it
to be emptied by one of the Technical staff. If the piece is too large for the container, ask for assistance from one
of the Laboratory Technical staff on how to dispose of it.
Glass *
Thoroughly cleaned and unlabelled laboratory waste glass should be placed in appropriate glass bins for
disposal. Each group/laboratory should identify someone who will be responsible for ensuring that this system is
operated in their area.
Metals*
Metal containers (e.g. secondary packaging) should have labels removed or obscured and be placed in the blue
container in each laboratory. When it is full request it to be emptied by one of the Technical staff. If the piece is
too large for the container, ask for assistance from one of the Technical staff on how to dispose of it.
*Instructions on how to dispose of waste (Appendix 3, page 30-33)
Compressed Gases
Gas Cylinders
Compressed gases are only to be used from safely clamped cylinders, which should be located away from doors
and stores of chemicals or solvents. Permanent apparatus dependent on such gas supplies should be connected
with leak-proof gas lines. Suitable precautions should be taken for the use of other gases (e.g. from small
cylinders) and these must be kept away from corrosive sources in a well-ventilated place, or in a fume cupboard
if at all toxic. Academic Staff who obtain special gases must supervise their use and arrange the disposal of waste
gas and empty cylinders.
All gas cylinders are kept in a secure store with access restricted to authorised technical staff, all gas cylinders
removed from this store are logged by the technical staff.
Safe use of gas cylinders
When transporting gas cylinders always use the correct trolley and ensure the cylinder is secured with the trolley
chains.
Upon reaching the required location the cylinder should be properly secured to a wall or table with a clamp or
chain and the trolley returned to the store.
The gas cylinders are fitted with valve protection caps or guards that need to be removed before a regulator can
be fitted.
A member of the technical staff will fit the regulator to the gas cylinder checking both the condition of the
regulator and the cylinder; he will then carry out a gas leakage test.
If at any time a gas leak is detected inform a member of the technical staff immediately.
Safe gas cylinder handling and usage is demonstrated in the H&S induction course.
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Health and Safety Handbook
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Manual Handling
Risk assessments (laboratories, offices, workshops, etc.) should take manual handling into consideration. Advice
and guidelines about moving heavy objects can be obtained from the School’s Manual Handling Coordinator.
The following items of manual handling equipment are available to assist; potential users must obtain
permission and instruction from the manual handling coordinator.
Mobile Phones
Mobile phones and Ipads must not be used in any laboratory areas.
Computers & Laptops
Where it is necessary to use a laptop or computer in a laboratory a disposable second skin should be fitted to
the keyboard.
Risk Assessment
This Risk Assessment differs from the COSHH assessment in its nature as it is for equipment and physical risks
e.g. pressurized system, moving machinery, heat and written protocols where necessary are some of the
examples.
To obtain the form go to the USO website; http://safety.ncl.ac.uk/forms.aspx
Training will be given to researchers on how to complete the forms and instruction will also be on the School
Safety Website.
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Health and Safety Handbook
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Out of Hours Working
The University Health and Safety 2012 policy document gives detailed instructions relating to 'Work Outside
Normal Hours' (USO website: Policy Supplement – http://www.safety.ncl.ac.uk/pol-sups.aspx ) which must be
adhered to.
In addition, the School Out Of Hours Working Policy which, is subject to monitoring and review for work outside
normal hours is given below. For the purposes of this policy 'work outside normal hours' refers to working in the
School outside the hours Monday - Friday 8.00 am – 6:00 pm (workdays) and at weekends and University
holidays.
No student may work outside normal hours without permission of the Head of School.
For postgraduates, permission is automatically given provided the permission to work agreement has been
completed.
Only the main entrance and courtyard entrance are open during working hours. All other outer doors are closed.
At weekends, during holidays and after 5.00 pm on weekdays the courtyard entrance door will also be closed.
Outside of hours swipe-card access to the Merz Court and Bedson Building may be granted on a case-by-case
basis.
Out of Hours use of Computer Cluster Rooms in Merz Court
CEAM Policy for Undergraduate and taught MSc students.
The University Out of Hours Policy states that although Undergraduate students are not normally allowed to
work outside normal hours, they may do so “with the explicit permission of the Head of School. Undergraduates
cannot be left to their own devices, and in particular can only be permitted to work unsupervised, after they have
received appropriate training, and only in carefully defined and low-risk areas”.
http://www.safety.ncl.ac.uk/universitypolicy.aspx.
The School recognises that students need access to computing facilities outside normal hours and must manage
this. This Policy Document sets out the conditions for individual STUDENTS working outside normal hours in the
School.
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Health and Safety Handbook
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CEAM Out of Hours Policy for 3rd and 4th year Undergraduate and Taught MSc Students using the Schools
Cluster Computers in Merz Court.
For the purpose of this document Undergraduate and Taught MSc Students will be referred to as STUDENTS.
1. Permission to work: All STUDENTS require the explicit permission of the Head of School for out of hours
working. This will be in the form of a dated permission slip in their name, signed by the Head of School
2. Training Permission to work will only be given once STUDENTS have received appropriate training in the
following:
Fire evacuation routes
Summoning first aid
Emergency numbers
Personal safety
3. Permitted areas: Students may only work in Cluster rooms M412 and M414, and the Design Suite. The
facilities must only be used for work directly related to their studies. Food and drink must not be
brought into the rooms.
4. Entry to the Building: Only the main entrance at the front of the building should be used. STUDENTS
must go directly to the cluster rooms. Other areas of the building are out of bounds unless in the case of
an emergency.
Only CEAM STUDENTS with permission to work are allowed in the building.
5. Registration for After Hours Working. All STUDENTS working in the building after hours must sign the
After Hours Working Book situated inside the main entrance. The book must be signed when entering
the building, or signed no later than 6pm if a student is already in the building. All STUDENTS working
after hours must sign out when leaving the building. This includes temporary absence. STUDENTS
returning to the building must sign in again.
6. After Hours Working times After hours working is defined as 18.00 to Midnight on weekdays (Monday
to Friday) and 09.00 until 21.00 on weekends and holidays. No after hours working is permitted when
the University is officially closed at Christmas and Easter. Working is not permitted outside of the After
Hours Working times.
7. Lone Working. Lone working is strictly forbidden. There must be at least two people in a room.
8. Monitoring These arrangements will be monitored by the School. Any STUDENT breaking the rules will
have their permission withdrawn by the Head of School.
9. First and Second year Students are not allowed to work in the building out of hours
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Health and Safety Handbook
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Out of Hours working in Laboratories in Merz Court
CEAM Policy for Undergraduate and taught MSc students, PhD students and Research Staff
1. For undergraduates, any laboratory work after 5.00 pm must be under the direct supervision of an
academic member of staff. For project students, permission to work outside normal hours may be given
by their supervisor(s).
2. Postgraduate students and research staff must complete the form “Working Outside Normal Hours in
Laboratories in Merz Court” before work commences. This declaration must be renewed weekly.
3. Hazardous procedures must not be performed at any time unless
 a suitable risk assessment has been carried out,
 the worker has been trained in the relevant operations, and
 provision is made for the appropriate level of supervision.
 a ‘Buddy’ colleague must be present.
4. For laboratory work the supervisor(s) must also sign the form, if he/she gives permission for a particular
research student or postdoctoral worker to perform a specified procedure outside normal hours. The
supervisor must also be satisfied that there is a sufficient level of provision for an “appropriately skilled”
person to be within call in the event of an emergency.
5. The “Working Outside Normal Hours in Laboratories in Merz Court” form must be completed and
submitted to the School Safety Officer before and work begins.
6. Anyone working in the building outside the hours 8.00 am – 6:00 pm (workdays) and at weekends and
University holidays must sign in and out in the late working book near the main Merz Court Entrance.
Safety in Transportation
The use of vehicles for University business.
USO website - University Safety Policy Supplements
http://safety.ncl.ac.uk/pol-sups.aspx
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Health and Safety Handbook
School of Chemical Engineering and Advanced Materials
Safety Training
All Academic, Postgraduates and Research staff must attend the Safety Lecture given for their stage during an
induction session delivered within the School. Safety aspects of chemical experimentation are discussed,
demonstrated and reinforced throughout practical sessions.
All postgraduates must attend the Safety Induction Sessions arranged on their acceptance to the School.
Individual safety instruction is given for specific work by supervisors.
New postdoctoral assistants and staff are expected to attend safety courses appropriate to their area of
research.
All staff are encouraged to take safety training (including refresher courses) appropriate to their work.
Visitors
All visitors must obtain a visitors pass from the Main Office, 3rd Floor Merz Court.
Casual visitors must not enter laboratories. If it is necessary for a visitor to enter a laboratory they must first
obtain permission from the Head of School and secondly they then should be provided with safety spectacles
and other personal protective equipment as necessary.
Contractors
University guidelines for engaging contractors are summarised in the paragraph below:
In this context 'contractors' refers to people not employed by the University who are brought into the School to
do a particular job, e.g. service equipment (photocopiers, instruments, machinery). They should report to the
School Office (3rd Floor, Merz Court) to obtain a visitor’s pass, which must be worn visibly at all times. The
technical staff should be notified in advance of any proposed contract work.
For further guidance visit the USO website – http://www.safetyt.ncl.ac.uk/guidance-contractors.aspx
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Health and Safety Handbook
School of Chemical Engineering and Advanced Materials
Unattended Experiment Procedure
No experiment is to be left on overnight without completing an Unattended Experiment Form
The researcher concerned and the supervisor, or deputy, should be available for consultation during the
duration of the experiment. It is advised that the unattended experiment procedure should be reviewed every 3
months and the form signed and dated by the Supervisor.
A copy is delivered to The Security Control Centre, Armstrong Building.
A copy is placed on the notice board outside of the laboratory.
A copy is to be handed to a member of Laboratory technical staff for filing.
All services will be turned off by either a member of the technical staff or the security unless the appropriate
form is on display.
If the experiment is not running then the form must be removed from the notice board.
Visit the School website for guidance on how to complete the forms
http://www.ncl.ac.uk/ceam/about/Safety.htm
Workshop/ Laboratory access
Anyone entering the workshops or laboratories must report to a member of the technical staff.
Safety spectacles and laboratory coats to be worn at all times in any workshop or laboratory area.
Under no circumstances are tools or equipment to be taken from the workshops or laboratories without the
consent of a member of the technical staff.
Students are not allowed to use workshop hand tools unless under supervision by a technician.
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Health and Safety Handbook
School of Chemical Engineering and Advanced Materials
APPENDIX 1
CEAM Fire Test
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
A fire drill will be held twice each academic year; Semester I and II.
You should:
carry out the duty of any member of your group who is away.
ensure that your allocated area is clear of personnel.
check that all doors and windows are shut.
note any alarm failure or ways in which the drill may be carried out more effectively.
Report to the Fire Marshall (or deputy) in the foyer on the Queen Victoria road side of the building.
GROUP
A
MEMBER
Mr S Daley
ExxonMobil Design Suite C111; Coulson Laboratory C112,
including Process Control Laboratory; Electronics Workshop
C123; Office C124; Lab C125; Meeting Room C202; Meeting
Room C203; Offices C204, C204A, C205, C206, C207, C209;
Cleaners Room; EEE Office 4.03; 2nd Floor Toilets.
Mr J Banks
Process Intensification Lab C113 including Test Bays, 6, 7, 8,
9, 16 & Office C114; Process Development Lab C115 including
Office C116; Analytical Room C119; Office C122.
Mr S Latimer
Mechanical Workshop C22; Workshop Store C24; Ground
Floor Toilet; Solvent store; Acid store; Outside Lab; Outside
Store; Compressor Room.
Mr I Strong
Pilot Plant C11 (Ground Floor Level); Technicians Tea Room
C20, Lower Switch Room; Laboratory C12, including Test
Bays 1 & 2; Store C13A, Laboratory Store C15; Process
Intensification Laboratory A C18, including Office C18A;
Electrochemistry Laboratory C19.
Mr B Grover
Pilot Plant C11 (Upper Floor Level & Gallery including Test
Bays 10, 11, 12, 13, 14 & 15; Office C21: Basement & Stores
C1, C3, C4.
Mr R Dixon
Cleaners Room; Offices C314, C315, C316; Catalysis
Laboratory C317; Laboratory C318; Fuel Cell Laboratory,
including Internal Offices; C320; Millennium Teaching Lab
C324.
Mr P Sterling
School Reception & Office Area C309 including 3rd Floor
Toilets, Kitchen, C304, C305; BBTC Office area C309
including C309A, C310A, C310B, C310C, C311; Electrochem
Fabrication Lab C312; BBTC Bio-processing Lab C313.
B
C
D
E
F
AREA (Merz Court)
Dr C O’ Malley
Dr A Oila
Mr I Ditchburn
Mr J Halliday
Offices C401, C401A, C401B, C402, C403; 4th Floor Toilets.
Dr C O’ Malley
Dr A Oila
Mr I Ditchburn
Mr J Halliday
PC Cluster C412; Meeting room M413; PC Cluster C414;
Office C415; Student Study Space C416; Offices C417, C418,
C421, C422A, C422B, C422C, C424, C424A, C424B, C424C;
EEE Office 8.20; 4th Floor Rear Toilets.
Dr C O’ Malley
Mr I Ditchburn
Mr J Halliday
Offices C514, C515, C516, C517, C518, C519, C520, C521,
C523-4, C525, C526, C527, C528, C529, C530, C531, C532,
C500, C501, C501A, C503; EEE Offices 8.04, 9.05, 9.06, 9.08;
5th Floor Toilets.
June 2013
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Health and Safety Handbook
School of Chemical Engineering and Advanced Materials
APPENDIX 2
GOOD CHEMICAL PRACTICE (GCP)
'Good Chemical Practice' relates to the safe use of chemicals in laboratories: it does not apply to any other
situation. It defines a MINIMUM acceptable standard for work with ALL laboratory chemicals.
For SOME laboratory chemicals no other precautions will be necessary.
School Safety Policy and Arrangements.
Three principles underlie this document:1) The quantities of chemicals in use at any one time are small.
2) Use and access are restricted to competent people or to staff or students undergoing a planned and
supervised learning process. These people have learned, or are learning, the principles of good chemical
practice (GCP).
3) The laboratory is a controlled working environment with a number of special features designed and
provided for users of chemicals.
Competence and Supervision
Chemicals may only be used by individuals with a sufficient level of competence with an appropriate level
of supervision.
This document is not a training manual and may not be used as a substitute for this requirement.
Introduction
The aim of ‘Good Chemical Practice' is the protection of people against hazardous substances encountered at
work in laboratories by appropriate means of control. The underlying fundamental principle is
Contact with chemicals must be avoided by the use of appropriate control measures.
Laboratory Design
1. The laboratory should be easy to clean.
2. Bench surfaces should be impervious to water and resistant to chemicals.
3. The laboratory should meet published design standards. Mechanical ventilation, if available, should
operate by extracting air from the laboratory to atmosphere outside the building in such a manner that reentry of the discharged air is unlikely.
Working Methods
4. A COSHH risk assessment should be completed prior to research work beginning and displayed as close
as possible to the experiment being undertaken.
5. Smoking, eating, drinking, use of mobile phones and the application of cosmetics are prohibited in areas
where chemical substances are used or kept.
6. Food, drink etc can readily become contaminated if kept and used alongside chemical substances. It is
then possible to transfer dangerous substances to the mouth or other sensitive areas of the face.
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7. Inhalation of vapours or skin contact with any substance is to be avoided. In general terms, fume
cupboards must be used for substances which are toxic by the inhalation route even though a written
COSHH risk assessment may not be required (e.g. substances allocated the risk phrases R23 -'Toxic by
inhalation')
8. Work must be performed cleanly with the minimum of spilling and splashing in order to limit
contamination. Suitable dispensing aids must be used and substances handled over spill trays, where
appropriate.
9. Bench tops and laboratory equipment must be cleaned as soon as practicable after use.
10. Contaminated surfaces and equipment must be cleaned without delay.
11. Exposure to gases and vapours should be limited by covering vessels, prompt replacement of caps and
stoppers to bottles and, if possible, the handling of volatile, gaseous or dusty substances in closed
systems.
12. The work area should be kept tidy and substances should be put in approved storage enclosures when not
in use.
13. Bottles, especially Winchester size, should be transported in special carriers.
14. The correct handling equipment should be used to transport and manipulate cans and drums.
15. The procedures for unattended experiments should be observed, and the forms kept up-to-date.
16. The appropriate equipment must be available for prompt clean-up and decontamination after spills.
17. Work which requires personal control should never be left unattended.
18. Flames and compressed gas supplies should be shut off when not in use and on leaving the laboratory.
19. The limitations on late and on lone working may be found in the University Safety Policy. Additional
restrictions may be imposed by departmental local rules.
20. Hands should be washed before leaving the laboratory.
Containers and Storage
21. Containers must be properly labelled.
22. Chemicals not in use should be returned promptly to their correct storage enclosures.
23. Light sensitive substances (e.g. chlorinated solvents) should be stored in amber-coloured bottles away
from the light.
24. It is prudent to keep all chemicals out of direct sunlight
25. Surplus materials should not be allowed to accumulate in laboratories.
Spillage
26. Sufficient detailed information concerning the chemicals, including methods for dealing with spillage,
should be readily available. Individuals should be aware of the hazards of the materials they are using,
and familiar with spillage procedures.
Waste (Refer to PowerPoint presentation on the School website)
27. Waste receptacles should be covered, labelled, and not overfilled.
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Health and Safety Handbook
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28. Incompatible wastes (e.g. halogenated and non-halogenated solvents) should be kept apart, with particular
care to separate the disposal/storage of acetone and chloroform.
29. Disposal should take place in accordance with School/University procedures, at the earliest opportunity.
In no case should they be left for the unsuspecting to inherit.
Personal Protective Equipment
30. Using personal protective equipment is not a substitute for other control measures. The purpose of
personal protection is normally to prevent accidental exposure to hazardous substances. It is always
necessary to match the type of protection (e.g. glove material) to the particular substance, but this is
especially important if likely exposure is to be longer than accidental or, of course, if the risk to health
from exposure is very high.
31. Laboratory Coats. Personal clothing must be protected from contamination by a suitable laboratory coat
or overall which should be changed before becoming excessively soiled. If protective clothing is liable to
become heavily contaminated, a heavy-duty plastic or rubber apron should also be worn.
32. Gloves: Wear suitable protective gloves to avoid hand contact, or the longer sleeved type if the arms are
also at risk of contact with the substance.
33. Gloves should be suitable for the material being used. This information is provided by the supplier. If in
doubt ask your supervisor or your School Safety Officer.
34. Gloves should be checked for holes before use.
35. Before removal, gloves should be washed in warm detergent solution (preceded by a specific cleansing
agent, if necessary).
36. Suitable eye protection should be worn at all times in laboratories where the handling of chemicals is the
predominant work.
37. Safety spectacles must be worn to protect the eyes from splashes when liquids are being handled.
However, if the work may generate fumes, mists, dust clouds or heavy splashing then suitable goggles or
a face shield should be worn.
38. Masks and respirators: Since the principal method for the control of airborne hazards is to contain the
substance, respiratory protection should only be necessary in emergency situations.
Filter-type
respirators do not have universal applicability so that it is always necessary to match the filter to the
substance. Information on suitability is available from the suppliers. If in doubt ask your Supervisor or
School Safety Officers.
Accidents
39. Any personal contact with a substance should be dealt with immediately by safe and effective
decontamination.
40. All
accidents
must
be
reported
using
http://safety.ncl.ac.uk/forms.aspx
41. Near misses should also be reported.
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Health and Safety Handbook
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Glass and Sharps
42. Many laboratory accidents arise from the handling of glassware and sharp objects. Such injuries may
provide a ready means for toxic substances and biological materials to enter the body, and should be
treated immediately.
43. Detergents should be employed as the normal means of cleaning glassware.
44. Cleaning techniques involving oxidising agents merit an individual risk assessment.
45. Glass and sharps must be disposed of into the relevant containers.
Highly Flammable Liquids
46. Vapours from highly flammable liquids are denser than air and thus tend to sink to ground level where
they can spread, undetected, over a large area. IT IS ESSENTIAL TO MINIMISE THE PRODUCTION
OF SUCH VAPOURS AND THE ASSOCIATED RISK OF IGNITION BY FLASHBACK FROM A
REMOTE SOURCE.
47. Fire and explosion can occur when vapours are mixed with oxygen or air in proportions that lie between
the Lower and Upper Explosive Limits (LEL and UEL respectively). For most solvents the LEL is
between 1% and 5% in air, and therefore good ventilation is necessary for fire safety as well as control of
toxic hazards.
48. Some substances (e.g. certain ethers and aldehydes, carbon disulphide) can be ignited at temperatures
produced by hot plates and ovens. Carbon disulphide, for instance has an auto-ignition temperature only
just above 100C. Static electricity (which may be generated by liquids flowing through pipes or by
pouring) is a possible source of ignition to any highly flammable liquid, as is any electrical fitting
capable of sparking.
49. Highly flammable liquids should be stored in sealed containers in fire resisting enclosures.
50. Quantities should be kept to a minimum and the aggregate quantity should not exceed 50 litres in any
laboratory.
51. They must not be stored in refrigerators and freezers unless expressly designed for the purpose (units with
internal lights, in general, are not).
Unsuitable refrigerators and freezers should carry the standard warning label.
52. Flammable substances must be kept well away from sources of ignition including naked flames, electric
hot plates and non-flameproof electrical equipment.
53. Do not overheat substances with low auto-ignition temperatures, or allow their vapours to come into
contact with hot surfaces.
54. Bulk dispensing must only be carried out by trained staff in a safe area.
55. Highly flammable liquids must not be poured down the sink.
56. Special risks exist during heating under reflux and distillation. Departmental Safety procedures should
cover such points as safe heating methods and the level of attendance during the procedure.
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Health and Safety Handbook
School of Chemical Engineering and Advanced Materials
APPENDIX 3
BROKEN/WASTE GLASSWARE
Chemical Containers
Organic (solvents)
Glassware (Broken/Waste)
Inorganic (solutions)
Inorganic/Organic Solids Dry/clean wherever possible
Place into
waste glass container
Remove top and clean and dry, place
Remove top and clean and dry, place
into lab plastics recycling bin
into lab plastics recycling bin
Vent container in fume cupboard to
Remove any residual chemical(s)
remove any residual chemical(s)
Rinse and dry container
Rinse and dry container
Remove/disfigure label
Remove/disfigure label
Place into waste glass bin
Place into waste glass bin
If>2.5l store until sufficient quantity
If>2.5l store until sufficient quantity
accumulated and request removal by
accumulated and request removal by
Laboratory Staff
Laboratory Staff
If <1l place into waste glass container
If <1l place into waste glass container
When bin full request removal by Laboratory Staff
IF HEAVILY CONTAMINATED SEEK ADVICE FROM LABORATORY TECHNICAL STAFF PRIOR TO DISPOSAL
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Health and Safety Handbook
School of Chemical Engineering and Advanced Materials
WASTE LABORATORY PLASTIC
Chemical Containers
Organic (solvents)
cuvettes
General Laboratory Waste
Inorganic (solutions)
Inorganic/Organic Solids
Any other waste e.g.
Place into
plastic recycling bin
Vent container in
Remove any residual chemical(s) Remove any residual chemical(s) (see photo of contaminated waste)
fume cupboard to remove
any residual chemical(s)
Rinse and dry
container + Lid
Rinse and dry
container + Lid Rinse and dry container + Lid
Remove/disfigure label
Remove/disfigure label
Place into plastic recycling bin
Place into plastic recycling bin
Remove/disfigure label
Place into plastic recycling bin
When bin full request removal by Laboratory Staff
IF HEAVILY CONTAMINATED SEEK ADVICE FROM LABORATORY TECHNICAL STAFF PRIOR TO DISPOSAL
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Health and Safety Handbook
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SHARPS WASTE

Syringes

Hypodermic needles

Cutting blades e.g. scalpel blades

Tips from automatic pipettes

Biological waste (do not close lid prior to autoclaving)

Do not fill above the line indicated on the bin.

When the bin is full ask the Laboratory Technical Staff to
replace with a new one and remove the full one for disposal.
CONTAMINATED WASTE

Blue tissue

Hand towels

Gloves

Cuvettes

Paper waste

Tubing

Weighing boats

Plastic disposable pipettes

Flatten cardboard boxes and leave by waste bin for disposal
CARDBOARD WASTE
by cleaning staff.
32
Health and Safety Handbook
School of Chemical Engineering and Advanced Materials
ELECTRICAL/ELECTRONIC AND METAL WASTE
Small electronic/electrical
waste pieces
Batteries
Larger electronic/electrical
waste pieces, See Technical
Staff
Small metal waste pieces
Larger metal waste pieces, See
Technical Staff
33
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Health and Safety Handbook