Year 9 IGCSE Physics Outline 2013-2014
1 General Physics – Autumn Term
2. Thermal Physics - Spring Term
3. Waves ,Light and Sound
Spring Summer
Topic
1.1 Unit, length and time
1.3 Mass and Density
1.4 Density
End of Unit Test
1.2 Speed, velocity and acceleration
End of Unit Test
1.5 Forces
1.7 Pressure
End of Unit Test
1.6 Work, Energy and Power
End of Unit Test
2.1 Simple kinetic molecular model of
matter
2.2 Thermal properties
2.3 Transfer of thermal energy
End of Unit Test
3.1 General Wave properties
3.3 Sound
3.2 Light
End of Unit Test
Time
6 lessons + Test
12 lessons + Test
12 lessons + Test
12 lessons + Test
16 lessons + Test
7
5
9
Modern English School
Year 9 IGCSE Physics 2013-14
Term 1
Unit and Measurement – 6 lessons + Test
Time
Frame
Topic
1 Lesson
Practical Skills
3 lessons
Cur
ref.
1.1
1.4
objectives
Activities
Resources
Introduce the students to IGCSE
Physics and your expectations. The
first lesson is to make sure that the
students understand that scientists
have agreed on SI units, prefixes
and scientific notation.
Hand out books, brainstorm and
completing worksheets.
Worksheets and
PowerPoint’s available
on the S-drive.
Use and describe the use of rulers
and measuring cylinders to
determine a length or a volume.
Use and describe the use of clocks
and devices for measuring an
interval of time.
A circus of simple measuring experiments
can work well here.
Use and describe the use of a
mechanical method for the
measurement of a small distance
measure and describe how to
measure a short interval of time
(including the period of a
pendulum).
It may be a good idea to tell the students
the difference between analogue and
digital display.
You can tell the pupils about
micrometers, but it would be better
to wait until Year 10 to discuss zero
error and how to read them with
skill.
Explain to the students to measure a
cylinder like a test-tube it is easier to use to
wooden blocks and a ruler to measure its
diameter.
Simple activities such as wrapping a length
of thread 10 times round a boiling tube,
measuring the length of thread and then
calculating the circumference of the tube,
working out the thickness of paper by the
thickness of the stack and timing 20
swings of a pendulum to find the period.
Stress the importance of reliable, precise
and accurate results.
Assessment
2 lessons
Describe an experiment to
determine the density of a liquid
and of a regularly shaped solid and
make the necessary calculation.
Simple experiments measuring mass and
volume of a liquid and calculating density.
Using a solid, finding volume from height,
width and depth.
Describe the determination of the
density of an irregularly shaped
solid by the method of
displacement and make the
necessary calculation.
Extend to the displacement method (e.g.
plasticine of different shapes in a
measuring cylinder with water).
You have now done enough physics
to introduce Paper 6 questions to
the students. This can either be
done as part of a lesson or as a
homework. Remember that the
students will have the past paper
books at home which will contain
the answers as well.
Stress the importance of reliable, precise
and accurate results. This is a good
opportunity to do some investigative
work. This would be a good planning
opportunity.
End of unit test
1.2 Speed, Velocity and acceleration
Time
Frame
Topic
Cur ref
2 lessons
Mass
/Weight
1.3
objectives
Activities
Resources
Show familiarity with the idea of the
mass of a Body. State that weight is a
force. Demonstrate understanding that
weights (and hence masses) may be
compared using a balance.
It is useful to ensure that students
have a feeling for the sizes of forces
(in N) by asking them to estimate
(e.g. weight of a laboratory stool,
force required to open a drawer)
and then to measure using a spring
(Newton) balance. Similarly,
estimation and measurement of
masses (in g and kg).
Use some ‘novelty’ demonstrations
(e.g. pulling a sheet of paper from
under a mass, without moving the
mass) to show the idea of inertia.
Work with trolleys using ticker tape
or light gates to produce speed/time
graphs for constant speed and
constant acceleration.
There is much on this
site about gravity,
particularly to stretch
the more able students.
http://www.curtin.edu.
au/curtin/dept/physsci/gravity/index2.htm
Demonstrate an understanding that mass
is a property which ‘resists’ change in
motion. Describe, and use the concept
of, weight as the effect of a gravitational
field on a mass.
6 lessons
Speed and
Acceleration
1.2
W = mg
Define speed and calculate speed from
total distance/ total time
plot and interpret a speed/time graph
recognise from the shape of a
speed/time graph when a body is
(a) at rest,
(b) moving with constant speed,
(c) moving with changing speed calculate
the area under a speed/time graph to
determine the distance travelled for
motion with constant acceleration
demonstrate some understanding that
acceleration is related to changing speed
This is a good opportunity to
reinforce graph drawing skills.
Although not specifically part of the
syllabus work on thinking distance
and braking distance of cars related
to safety is useful and relevant here.
Internet research project and
PowerPoint presentations on road
safety.
State that the acceleration of free fall
for a body near to the Earth is
constant.
Distinguish between speed and
velocity Recognise linear motion for
which the acceleration is constant and
calculate the acceleration.
Light gates and a data logger can be
used to demonstrate free fall.
Worksheets and
PowerPoint’s available
on the S-drive.
Data loggers to be used
with trolleys as a Demo
and data used by
students to produce
graphs on Excel.
Some good work on
velocity and
acceleration with
animations for student
use.
http://www.fearofphysi
cs.com/Xva/xva.
Make your own space
shuttle.
http://school.discovery.
com/lessonplans/ Click
on Physical Science,
then Forces and Motion
PowerPoint
presentations
Boardworks
Education Using
Assessment
1 lesson
F = ma
2 lessons
Scalars and
vectors
1 lesson
Circular
motion
1.5e
Recognise motion for which the
acceleration is not constant.
PowerPoint
(S-Drive)
Describe qualitatively the motion of
bodies falling in a uniform
gravitational field with and without air
resistance (including reference to
terminal velocity).
Video 36
Science in Focus
‘Forces and Motion’
Recap the idea of resultant forces.
Introduce inertia. Define the Newton.
The calculation F = ma
Demonstrate an understanding of the
difference between scalars and vectors
and give common examples. Add vectors
by graphical representation to determine
a resultant. Determine graphically a
resultant of two vectors.
Centripetal force and the idea that
velocity changes but not speed.
Data loggers to be used
with trolleys as a Demo
and data used by
students to produce
graphs on Excel.
Past paper questions on scale
drawing
Worksheets and
PowerPoint’s available
on the S-drive.
Demonstration: The ball attached to
the force meter.
Worksheets and
PowerPoint’s available
on the S-drive.
End of Unit
Test
1.5 Effect of Forces
Time
Frame
Topic
Cur ref
2 lessons
Effects of
Forces
1.5a
objectives
Activities
Go over the importance of balanced forces.
State that a force may produce a change in
size and shape of a body. Plot
extension/load graphs and describe the
associated experimental procedure.
Describe the ways in which a force may
change the motion of a body. Find the
Hooke’s Law experiment.
This is a good opportunity to
reinforce graph drawing skills.
resultant of two or more forces acting along the
same line
recall and use the expression F = kx
Resources
This site provides a
biographical sketch of
Isaac Newton, with links
to other scientists
relevant to this and
other areas of the
syllabus.
http://www.treasuretroves.com/bios/Newto
n.html
Worksheets and
PowerPoint’s available
on the S-drive.
6 lessons
Forces –
Turning
effects
1.5 (b)
1.5 (c)
1.5 (d)
Describe the moment of a force as a
measure of its turning effect and give
everyday examples describe, qualitatively,
the balancing of a beam about a pivot.
Experiments involving balancing a
rule on a pivot with a variety of
different weights should be used
here.
Worksheets and
PowerPoint’s available
on the S-drive.
Apply the idea of opposing moments to
simple systems in equilibrium.
State that, when there is no resultant force
and no resultant turning effect, a system is
in equilibrium
Perform and describe an experiment to
determine the position of the centre of mass
of a plane lamina. Describe qualitatively the
effect of the position of the centre of mass
on the stability of simple objects
Video on the network
‘Machines and
Moments’
Centre of mass
A variety of shapes of lamina should
be used in experiments to find the
centre of mass. Standard shapes
(circle, square, etc.) can be used first
and then ‘non-standard’ shapes for
which the position of the centre of
mass is not so obvious. Extension
students can be challenged with a
lamina that has its centre of mass in
a space (e.g. hole in the lamina).
Assessment
2 lessons
1-2 lesson
Pressure
Gas
pressure
and
volume
1.7
Relate (without calculation) pressure to
force and area, using appropriate examples
• Describe the simple mercury barometer
and its use in measuring atmospheric
pressure
• Relate (without calculation) the pressure
beneath a liquid surface to depth and to
density, using appropriate examples
• Use and describe the use of a manometer
• Recall and use the equation p = F/A
• Recall and use the equation p = hρg
Relate the change in volume of a gas to
change in pressure applied to the gas at
constant temperature.
Use p1v1=p2v2
They should have already covered
p1/T1=p2/T2 so should be able to use
p1v1/T1=p2v2/T2
Understanding of the Kelvin scale and
absolute zero.
Calculate the pressure various
objects exert
Demonstrate the peeing can.
Worksheets and
PowerPoint’s available
on the S-drive.
Demonstrate a barometer/
manometer.
If you have not already you can show
the collapsing can using a vacuum
pump or collapsing soft drink can
using steam and cold water.
A direct measuring Boyle’s Law
apparatus can be used here. Useful
graph plotting
If you have not already you can show
the collapsing can using a vacuum
pump or collapsing soft drink can
using steam and cold water.
This is a good opportunity to
reinforce graph drawing skills.
Worksheets and
PowerPoint’s available
on the S-drive.
Use of data loggers to
record data from demos
and students to use
data in Excel to produce
graphs.
A good simulation on
PHETT Physics on the
network to get ideal
results.
End of Unit
Test
1.6 Work , Energy and Power
1 lesson
Types of
energy and
energy
transfers
1.6a
1-2 lessons
3 lessons
Kinetic and
potential
energy
1.6a
These three lessons are to
introduce energy.
Demonstrate an understanding that
an object may have energy due to
its motion or its position, and that
energy may be transferred and
stored. Give examples of energy in
different forms, including kinetic,
gravitational, chemical, strain,
nuclear, internal, electrical, light
and sound. Give examples of the
conversion of energy from one
form to another and of its transfer
from one place to another. Apply
the principle of energy
conservation to simple examples.
Go over with the students that we
generate electricity using fossil
fuels. At that with these running
out we require alternative sources
of energy e.g. solar, wind, etc.
Introduce the Sankey diagram to
the students.
A number of devices which convert
energy from one form to another e.g.
loudspeaker, steam engine, solarpowered motor, candle etc. can be used.
A circus of simple experiments can be set
up for students to identify the energy
conversions.
Use the terms kinetic and
potential energy in context.
Recall and use the expressions
k.e.= 1/2mv2 and p.e. = mgh
Some heavy maths here that some
students find difficult.
Worksheets and
PowerPoint’s available on
the S-drive.
Some unusual and fun energy
change experiments
http://littleshop.physics.colos
tate.edu/ click on ideas for
teachers changes in energy
Download .pdf document now
Go over the very basic structure of a
power station.
Practice rearranging both equations.
Investigation of the speed of a marble
leaving a ramp (altering the height of the
ramp) related to the horizontal distance
travelled.
GPE (at top) = KE (at bottom)
Students can word process lab report.
Worksheets and
PowerPoint’s available on
the S-drive.
Good questions in Physics
for You (SS14)
PPTs available in
Boardworks and Education
using PowerPoint
Video 23a
‘Science in
Action’ is a
good video
on energy
changes.
3 lessons
Energy
Resources
1.6b
Describe how electricity or other
useful forms of energy may be
obtained from (i) chemical
energy stored in fuel (ii) water,
including the energy stored in
waves, in tides and in water
behind hydroelectric dams (iii)
geothermal resources (iv)
nuclear fission (v) heat and light
from the Sun.
Show an understanding that
energy is released by nuclear
fusion in the Sun Show a
qualitative understanding of
efficiency.
Important discussions here to
consolidate the students’
understanding of energy processes
both in physical and environmental
impact terms.
A good opportunity for independent
internet research and PowerPoint
presentations here to provide
students with a complete set of
notes.
A detailed idea of how electricity is
generated in a power station.
Worksheets and
PowerPoint’s available on
the S-drive.
This site provides a useful
investigation into alternative
energy. http://ericir.syr.edu/
This site gives much
interesting information about
different types of power
stations and includes a virtual
tour of a power station.
http://www.ergon.com.au/
Click on EnergyEd, EnergyEd
An excellent site.
www.alternativeenergy.com
3 lessons
Work and
power
1.6c
1.6d
Relate, without calculation;
work done to the magnitude of
a force and distance moved.
Recall and use work done = Fd =
energy transformed. Describe
energy changes in terms of work
done.
In this and the following sections it
may be useful to calculate (although
only required for the extension
paper) personal work done and
power. For example, by walking up
steps, recording the student’s weight,
the vertical height climbed and the
time taken.
Worksheets and
PowerPoint’s available on
the S-drive.
Relate, without calculation,
power to work done and time
taken, using appropriate
examples.
Recall and use the equation P =
E/t in simple systems.
They also need an appreciation
of efficiency.
End of Unit
Test
Term 2
2 Thermal Physics
Time
Frame
Topic
2 lesson
Thermal
Physics
States of
matter
2 lessons
Cur ref
objectives
2.1a
State the distinguishing properties of
solids, liquids and gases.
2.1b
Describe qualitatively the molecular
structure of solids, liquids and gases.
Interpret the temperature of a gas in
terms of the motion of its molecules.
Describe qualitatively the pressure of a
gas in terms of the motion of its
molecules. Describe qualitatively the
effect of a change of temperature on the
pressure of a gas at constant volume.
Show an understanding of the random
motion of particles in a suspension as
evidence for the kinetic molecular model
of matter. Describe this motion
(sometimes known as Brownian motion)
in terms of random molecular
bombardment.
Evaporation
2.1c
Describe evaporation in terms of the
escape of more-energetic molecules
from the surface of a liquid. Relate
evaporation and the consequent cooling.
Demonstrate an understanding of how
temperature, surface area and draught
over a surface influence evaporation.
Activities
Resources
Use examples of phenomena that
are explained by the particle theory
to build up understanding e.g.
diffusion in liquids, diffusion of gases
(bromine in air – fume cupboard
required), crystal structure etc.
Students should observe Brownian
motion e.g. using the ‘smoke cell’
experiment. Models should be used
to illustrate as much as possible (e.g.
crystal model).
Worksheets and
PowerPoint’s available
on the S-drive.
This needs to be set-up beforehand.
Simple demo: Acetone (propanone)
on the skin.
An investigation into the factors
affecting rate of evaporation.
This is a good opportunity to do
some investigative work. This would
be a good planning opportunity.
Mention how refrigerators use the
cooling effect of evaporation.
Assessment
This site has a good
JAVA Applet that shows
diffusion.
http://www.geocities.c
om/piratord/browni/Di
fus.html Brownian
motion is well
illustrated on this site.
http://www.phys.virgin
ia.edu/classes/109N/m
ore_stu ff/Applets/
Click on Einstein's
Explanation of
Brownian Motion.
Worksheets and
PowerPoint’s available
on the S-drive.
Lab report
1 lesson
Heating gases
2.1d
Relate the change in temperature of a
gas to change in pressure applied to the
gas at constant volume.
The use of p1/T1=p2/T2
Understanding of the Kelvin scale and
absolute zero.
3 lessons
Thermal
expansion of
solids, liquids
and gases
Measurement
of
Temperature
2.2(a)
2.2(b)
Describe qualitatively the thermal
expansion of solids, liquids and gases.
Identify and explain some of the
everyday applications and consequences
of thermal expansion. Describe
qualitatively the effect of a change of
temperature on the volume of a gas at
constant pressure.
Show an appreciation of the relative
order of magnitude of the expansion of
solids, liquids and gases.
Demonstrate understanding of
sensitivity, range and linearity. Describe
the structure of a thermocouple and
show understanding of its use for
measuring high temperatures and those
which vary rapidly.
You could demonstrate temperature
and volume change using a round
bottom flask (containing air) and a
capillary tube (containing a small
amount of coloured liquid). Warm
the air and the coloured liquid will
rise. Or you can turn it upside down,
so the capillary tube is in the water
and you can see bubbles in the
water.
This is a good opportunity to
reinforce graph drawing skills.
Worksheets and
PowerPoint’s available
on the S-drive.
Experiments to show expansion of a
metal rod and the ‘bar breaker’
demonstration. Bi-metallic strips. A
large round bottom flask filled with
(coloured) water and fitted with a
long glass tube shows expansion of
the water when heated gently. The
‘fountain’ experiment shows the
expansion of air and brings in good
discussion of the effect of pressure
difference to stretch the more able
students.
Worksheets and
PowerPoint’s available
on the S-drive.
The calibrating a thermometer using
ice and steam as a class practical.
A simple thermocouple can be
constructed and used.
Use of data loggers to
record data from demos
and students to use
data in Excel to produce
graphs.
A good simulation on
PHETT Physics on the
network to get ideal
results.
Video 13a on network
‘Heat and Temperature’
2 lessons
Specific heat
capacity
2.2c
Describe an experiment to measure the
specific heat capacity of a substance.
Use the equation Q=mc∆T
2 lessons
Melting/boilin
g and latent
heat
2.2d
State the meaning of melting point and
boiling point. Describe condensation and
solidification.
Distinguish between boiling and
evaporation Use the term latent heat and
give a molecular interpretation of latent
heat. Describe an experiment to measure
specific latent heats for steam and for
ice.
Use E=Lm
This can be extended to a
quantitative determination of
specific heat capacity. A good
practical is finding the specific heat
capacities of different metal blocks
using an electric heating element.
The pupils will need voltmeters and
ammeters to work out the power.
They will also need a stopwatch so
they can calculate the energy
supplied.
A good opportunity to analyse
results.
Heating and cooling curves can be
plotted from experimental readings
using data loggers. Stress the
advantages of using them.
This is a good opportunity to
reinforce graph drawing skills.
Experimental determination of
latent heat of ice. This is a good
opportunity to do some investigative
work. This would be a good planning
opportunity. The pupils will need
voltmeters and ammeters to work
out the power. They will also need a
stopwatch so they can calculate the
energy supplied.
Worksheets and
PowerPoint’s available
on the S-drive.
Worksheets and
PowerPoint’s available
on the S-drive.
A good point to
give practice in
paper 3
question4
4 lessons
Conduction,
convection
and radiation
2.3a
2.3b
2.3c
2.3d
Describe experiments to demonstrate
the properties of good and bad
conductors of heat.
Give a simple molecular account of the
heat transfer in solids.
Relate convection in fluids to density
changes and describe experiments to
illustrate convection.
Identify infra-red radiation as part of the
electromagnetic spectrum.
Describe experiments to show good and
bad emitters/absorbers of radiation.
Identify and explain some of the
everyday applications and consequences
of conduction, convection and radiation.
Simple experiments to compare
thermal conductivity e.g. using metal
conductivity rods, ice cube on
metal/insulator.
Thermometers wrapped in foil, black
paper and white paper.
Ice cube in the bottom of a boiling
tube that doesn’t melt if heated
from the top.
Stress the importance of reliable,
precise and accurate results.
Students could evaluate all the
different experiments.
Potassium permanganate demo.
Lesley’s cube
Use data loggers. Stress the
advantages of using them.
A thermos flask is a good example
here.
How houses are insulated against
heat loss
Worksheets and
PowerPoint’s available
on the S-drive.
Education using
PowerPoint has some
good animations and
everyday examples.
End of Unit test
3.3 Sound
Time
Frame
Topic
3 lessons
sound
Cur ref
3.3
objectives
Describe the production of sound
by vibrating sources. Describe the
longitudinal nature of sound
waves. State the approximate
range of audible frequencies.
Show an understanding that a
medium is required in order to
transmit sound waves. Describe an
experiment to determine the
speed of sound in air. Relate the
loudness and pitch of sound waves
to amplitude and frequency.
Describe compression and
rarefaction
1-2 lesson
Uses of sound
Basic idea of resonance
Describe how the reflection of
sound may produce an echo. –
Sonar
Ultrasound
Activities
Resources
Use a variety of musical instruments
to introduce this section. A signal
generator and loudspeaker can be
used to investigate the range of
audible frequencies. A bell in a bell jar
that can be evacuated can be used to
show that a medium is required for
the transmission of sound (at the
same time showing that light travels
through a vacuum). Use of a C.R.O.
and microphone gives a visual picture
of amplitude and frequency.
Extension candidates can analyse the
C.R.O. traces in more detail.
Worksheets and
PowerPoint’s available on
the S-drive.
You could take the students
outside to measure the speed of
sound using an echo.
Worksheets and
PowerPoint’s available on
the S-drive.
This site contains much
interesting work on
resonance including a video
of the Tacoma Narrows
Bridge disaster.
http://www.enm.bris.ac.uk/
This site about sound waves
is informative and includes
audio!
http://library.thinkquest.or
g/26585/index.html
Assessment
3.1 Wave properties
Time
Frame
Topic
Cur ref
6 lessons
Reflection,
Refraction,
3.2a
Total
Internal
Reflection
3.2b
objectives
Activities
Resources
Describe the formation, and give the
characteristics, of an optical image by a
plane mirror. Use the law angle of incidence
= angle of reflection.
Use simple experiments with optical
pins to find the position of the image
in a plane mirror. Use ray box
experiments to investigate angle of
incidence = angle of reflection.
Worksheets and
PowerPoint’s available
on the S-drive.
Describe an experimental demonstration of
the refraction of light.
Use the terminology for the angle of
incidence i and angle of refraction r and
describe the passage of light through
parallel-sided transparent material give the
meaning of critical angle.
Describe internal and total internal
reflection.
Recall and use definition of refractive index
n in terms of speed. Recall and use the
equation sin i/sin r = n. Describe the action
of optical fibres.
Use rectangular transparent blocks
(Perspex or glass) with optical pins or
ray boxes to investigate refraction.
Develop this to experiments with a
semicircular transparent block to
investigate critical angle and total
internal reflection.
Internet research to produce own
notes on uses of fibre optics:
communication and medical
Extend the refraction work with the
rectangular block to include
quantitative use of sin i/sin r.
Encourage deeper thought with able
candidates by discussing refractive
index in terms of the speed of light
in different materials. Use
inexpensive ‘novelty’ light items to
demonstrate optical fibres.
Instructions for a
demonstration of total
internal reflection
http://www.learn.co.uk
/learnthings click on
enter, then KS4 science
foundation, then light
and colour, then total
internal reflection.
More details on further
experiments related to
total internal reflection
and much more
http://www.phys.virgin
ia.edu/Education/outre
ach click on 8thgrade
Physical Science Sol
Activities then PS.9 to
find total internal
reflection
PPTs available on
network
Boardworks
Video 25a has several
good 20min videos on
Light/Colour/Reflection
/and Refraction
Assessment
Consolidation
exercises from
Physics Matters
1 lesson
Colour
3.2
(d)
Give a qualitative account of the dispersion
of light as illustrated by the action on light of
a glass prism.
Use a simple experiment, or
demonstration, to show that white
light from a ray box or slide projector
is dispersed by a prism. A single slit
can be cut from a piece of stiff card
and inserted in the slide carrier of
the projector to produce a ray that
can be shone through the prism on
to a screen. Although not part of the
syllabus, students will find it
interesting to learn a little about
mixing coloured lights at this stage.
Worksheets and
PowerPoint’s available
on the S-drive.
Interactive colour
mixing (no need for a
colour mixing kit or
blackout)
http://www.phy.ntnu.e
du.tw/java/shadow/sha
dow.html
Term 3
3.2 Light
Time
Frame
Topic
Cur ref
4 lessons
lenses
3.2c
objectives
Activities
Resources
Describe the action of a thin converging lens
on a beam of light. Use the terms principal
focus and focal length. Draw ray diagrams to
illustrate the formation of a real image by a
single lens.
Investigate converging lenses by:
forming an image of a distant object
(e.g. a tree or building seen from the
laboratory window), bringing parallel
rays from a ray box to a focus
through a cylindrical lens, drawing
ray diagrams to scale to show the
formation of a real image.
Worksheets and
PowerPoint’s available
on the S-drive.
Draw ray diagrams to illustrate the
formation of a virtual image by a single lens.
Use and describe the use of a single lens as a
magnifying glass.
Extend the ray diagram work to
include the formation of a virtual
image and use a magnifying glass.
2 lessons
3 lessons
Wave
equation
EM
spectrum
Give the meaning of the term wave front.
Recall and use the equation v = f x. Interpret
reflection, refraction and diffraction using
wave theory.
This is a good opportunity to do
some investigative work. This would
be an evaluation opportunity. The
students could look at paper 6
questions and try the lens
experiments on them, so they can
evaluate them.
Use a set of ripple tank projection
slides to reinforce the ripple tank
work and focus on more detailed
discussion
Describe the main features of the
electromagnetic spectrum and state that all
e-m waves travel with the same high speed
in vacuum.
Include plenty of examples to show
students that they already have
much general knowledge regarding
the uses of electromagnetic waves
Use the term monochromatic
Assessment
There is a large amount
of information and
teaching on this site
http://www.physicsclas
sroom.com/Class/refrn/
U14L5a. html
Boardworks PPT shows
this clearly
Worksheets and
PowerPoint’s available
on the S-drive.
http://www.colorado.e
du/physics/2000/index.
pl
opportunity for
research project and
students to present
‘uses and dangers’ of
EM waves in ppt to
form class notes
End of Unit test
or End of year
exam
1-2 lessons
Revision for end of
Year 9 Exam
1-4 lessons
Start Radioactivity
General revision to remind Year 9
what has been covered this year.
Personal revision, revision tests,
making revision notes, open book
tests, revision posters and class
discussion.
Worksheets and
PowerPoint’s available on
the S-drive.
You should have enough time to
recap/introduce the structure of
the Atom. Alpha, Beta and
Gamma. See Year 10 Scheme of
work.
Worksheets and
PowerPoint’s available on
the S-drive.
End of year exam