Guidance for Specialist Thematic Panels 2014
Criteria for Placement at Speech and Language Enhanced Mainstream
Provisions ( EMP)
1. The child’s primary difficulty is a significant and specific speech and / or language
disorder, or a speech / language delay, which is inconsistent with other abilities.
This might include:
 a speech disorder
 a phonological disorder
 an expressive language disorder
 a receptive language disorder
 a pragmatic disorder
Enhanced Mainstream Provision
2. The speech and / or language disorder has a significant impact in several of the
following arrears, particularly relating to the extent to which the difficulties impede the
pupil’s access to the National Curriculum and / or the impact upon social and
emotional well-being:
 difficulties with speech production which severely limit participation in
classroom activities and social development
 considerable difficulties in meeting the language demands of ordinary learning
activities, such as following instructions or using abstract concepts
 difficulties communicating with peers which lead to social isolation and / or
apparent emotional and / or behavioural difficulties
 frustration by the pupil at an inability to participate in the classroom, interact
with peers and to express wishes and feelings
 low rates of progress in many areas of the curriculum except, perhaps, in very
specific areas of strength
 difficulties in following instruction, classroom routines and in maintaining
attention on task, making it impossible for the pupils to participate in most
ordinary classroom activities without a high level of support and structure
 inappropriate social behaviour leading to rejection by peers and social
isolation
 measurable speech and language behaviours which are significantly below
those of the majority of peers (in the first or second centile in some
standardised language assessments)
 School is able to evidence a costed provision map of at least £6000 and that it
has a SEN Support Plan in place as described in SEN Planning tool
 Early Years settings have followed the Early Years Planning tool and are able
to show relevant and purposeful action including advice from a Speech and
Language Therapist.
3. The child requires provision which includes:
 opportunities to access Intensive Speech and Language Therapy
 regular opportunities to work in a Mainstream setting and opportunities to
work in small groups
 access to specialist teaching for pastoral and curriculum support
 access to a curriculum modified according to the child’s communication needs
 direct liaison between school staff and Speech and Language Therapists
 access to support from peers with similar difficulties
 oversight by a specialist, Senior Educational Psychologist
 annual review
Criteria for Exit from Language Enhanced Mainstream Provisions (EMP)
Any change of placement should be discussed and recorded at the SEN Support
Plan or Statutory Annual Review of Education Health and Care Plan.
Decisions for a change of placement will be discussed with County Hall Statutory
Casework Team.
Children would no longer fit the criteria for the following reasons:
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They have made excellent progress and no longer require additionally
resourced provision
Some progress has been made, but speech and language skills are identified
as being commensurate with general cognitive and learning abilities
They may have only residual difficulties in pragmatic skills. Other areas of
speech and language difficulty have been resolved
Decisions about placement will be determined by the County Council based on the
evidence provided, including any recommendations from the review and parental
preferences.
Criteria for Placement at ENHANCED MAINSTREAM PROVISION FOR AUTISM
Pupil Characteristics
Consideration of placement should be needs focused rather than based on
described difficulty. As noted below, it is anticipated that the child will be
experiencing significant needs relating to their autism, and will not be progressing as
expected within a mainstream environment. It would be expected that
children/young people accessing the provision would usually have a diagnosis of
autism/autism spectrum.
Children referred for consideration are likely to have a complex presentation which
includes an ability to make progress with the national curriculum within the broad
range expected for a pupil of their age. However, their wellbeing, participation and
progress in school are impacted on significantly as a consequence of their autism
related sensory /social/communication/anxiety needs.
Children will have an SEN Support Plan and there should be evidence of reviews
(person centred reviews) from 2014. An EHC Plan is not a requirement to access
this provision.
EMP in context- a continuum of provision
When considering placement at EMP it should be born in mind that this provision is
part of a range of provision available within the Local Authority to meet the needs of
pupils who are on the autism spectrum. It is intended to support pupils whose needs
are not typically catered for within our special schools for children with complex
learning needs or complex social, emotional and mental health needs
Suggested distinctions between mainstream provision and EMP
EMPs can offer:
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Access to a managed physical and sensory environment (in addition to some
mainstream experiences) for flexible periods of time across the school week
and over the school year. The amount and balance of time in the different
parts of the school will be determined by the presenting needs of the pupil in
discussion with the young person, their family, and relevant professionals
A full range of mainstream experiences, including curriculum access and
accreditation as appropriate, alongside more specialist support
arrangements; and access to additional curriculum elements focussing on
social communication needs, developing safe and positive relationships,
emotional awareness and regulation, and self-help and independence skills,
Continuity of support strategies and interventions across the school context
Higher than usual levels of adult support including access to individual
support, small group support and some independent access to school life
according to individual needs.
There should be a staff pupil ration not exceeding 1:4 within the managed
element of the provision
Children accessing this provision may have an EHC plan, may be undergoing
consideration for one, or may not need one.
Suggested distinctions between EMP and Special School Provision
Special schools can offer:
 National curriculum access but with substantial modifications, particularly in
terms of pace, to support children with generalised learning difficulties
 Access to a smaller than usual class group across the school week
 All children attending a special school will have an EHC plan or be in the
process of being assessed for one.
ENHANCED MAINSTREAM PROVISION – Proposed Criteria
In order to ensure a good experience for children accessing the provision, the
following need to be taken into consideration. These criteria will be applied taking
into account context and individual circumstances.
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Current arrangements within the mainstream school, even with high levels of
support, are not allowing for the full and safe participation of the child.
Progress and/or well-being is giving substantial cause for concern given the
child’s learning potential.
There is evidence over time of the consideration and implementation of
universal and targeted support and provision as outlined in the SEN planning
tool.
Evaluated (assess-plan-do-review) intervention over at least 3 terms in the
mainstream school context indicates medium to long term need. A detailed
and costed provision map and reviewed SEN Support Plan is available.
Professional involvement and assessment evidence suggests complex
medium to longer term needs arising as a consequence of the pupil’s autism
which requires intensive intervention and support based on access to a
flexible approach to curriculum access and delivery, and modifications to the
physical, sensory and social environment.
The child is not presenting with primary needs relating to significant learning
or social, emotional, mental health needs (the needs of these children should
be considered through alternative provision pathways).
Where there are indications of home related needs, there is a willingness by
the parents / carers to work with the school staff and relevant others to
address these.
The following factors need to be taken into consideration:
o Travel time should be kept to a minimum
o Gender mix should wherever possible be balanced
o Age mix should support effective teaching and learning
Criteria for Exit from an Enhanced Mainstream Provision Autism
Children’s needs will change over time. The review process should allow for this to
inform ongoing SEN Support Planning. This must be done in full consultation with
the child, family and involved professionals. Any resultant proposal for a change of
placement will need to be discussed with the Statutory Casework Team.
Indications that a child may be ready for mainstream reintegration could include:
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Their ability to cope with normal levels of classroom support for most of the
week
Progress which suggests that they are now attaining in line with school
predicted expectations
Indications that they are resilient within the context of everyday situations
Criteria for Placement at ENHANCED MAINSTREAM PROVISION for children
with difficulties in Social, Emotional and Mental health
Pupil Characteristics
Consideration of placement should be needs focused rather than based on
described difficulty. As noted below, it is anticipated that the child will be
experiencing significant medium to longer term SEMH needs, and will not be
progressing as expected within a mainstream environment.
Children referred for consideration are likely to have some resilience factors which
may include their potential for learning or underlying social and emotional skills, and
these should be profiled in addition to the difficulties and needs. There should be a
stated family commitment to work with the EMP to address identified needs through
home support.
Children will have an SEN Support Plan and person centred review process in place.
An EHC Plan is not a requirement to access this provision.
EMP in context- a continuum of provision
When considering placement at EMP it should be born in mind that this provision
falls on a continuum from mainstream to special school. It can be helpful to refer to
the distinctions outlined below to support decision making.
Suggested distinctions between mainstream and EMP
EMPs can offer:
 Access to a managed environment (in addition to mainstream experiences)
for typically between 25-75% of the week- may be higher during initial
induction period
 A full range of mainstream experiences alongside more specialist support
arrangements; and access to a flexible and extended curriculum
 Continuity of support strategies within the school context
 Access to named specialist professionals from EPS, CAMHS, SALT and OT
 Family support and intervention e.g. through links to a keyworker or PSA/FSW
 1:4 ratio of support
 Children accessing this provision may have an EHC plan, may be undergoing
consideration for one, or may not need one.
Suggested distinctions between EMP and Special School Provision
Special schools can offer:
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Extended day provision and residential
Access to a managed environment for 100% of the school week
Access to alternative education packages and curricula reflecting complex
learning difficulties and disabilities
Access to a range of external specialist professionals
Access to a range of onsite intervention, either group or individualised.
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All children attending a special school will have an EHC plan or be in the
process of being assessed for one.
ENHANCED MAINSTREAM PROVISION – Proposed Criteria
In order to ensure a good experience for children accessing the provision, the
following need to be taken into consideration. These criteria will be applied taking
into account context and individual circumstances.
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
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Current arrangements within the mainstream school, even with high levels of
support, are not allowing for the full and safe participation of the child
Progress is not satisfactory given the child’s social and learning potential
Evidenced consideration and implementation of universal and targeted
support and provision outlined in the SEN planning tool and Indicative
Provision Guidance
Evaluated (assess-plan-do-review) intervention over at least 3 terms in the
mainstream school context indicates medium to long term need – detailed and
costed provision map and reviewed SEN Support Plan available
Professional involvement and assessment evidence suggests complex
medium to longer term SEMH needs requiring intensive intervention and
support based on smaller group, nurture and restorative principles.
The child is not presenting with significant learning or social communication
needs (the needs of these children should be considered through alternative
provision pathways)
Where there are indications of home related needs, there is a willingness by
the parents / carers to work with the school staff and relevant others to
address these
The following factors need to be taken into consideration:
o Travel time should be kept to a minimum
o Gender mix should wherever possible be balanced
o Age mix should support effective teaching and learning
Criteria for Exit from an Enhanced Mainstream Provision SEMH
Children’s needs will change over time. The review process should allow for this to
inform ongoing SEN Support Planning. This must be done in full consultation with
the child, family and involved professionals. Any resultant proposal for a change of
placement will need to be discussed with the Statutory Casework Team.
Indications that a child may be ready for mainstream reintegration could include:
 Their ability to cope with normal levels of classroom support for most of the
week
 Progress which suggests that they are now attaining in line with school
predicted expectations
 Indications that they are resilient within the context of everyday situations
Indications that a child may require consideration for special school provision could
include:
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Access to managed environment for 90-100% of the week over an extended
period, with no obvious evidence to suggest this is a time limited need
Curriculum needs that are beyond what can typically be provided by a
mainstream setting
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Guidance for Specialist Thematic Panels 2014