University of Ottawa - Faculty of Education
EDU6426 Course Syllabus; Spring 2015: Citizenship and Global Education
Douglas Fleming, PhD., Associate Professor
e-mail: [email protected]
Office Location: LMX 472
Website: http://douglasfleming.weebly.com
Office Hours: Tuesdays 3:00-5:00 pm, Thursdays 4:00-5:00 pm or by appointment
Telephone: (613) 562-5800 ex. 4151
Class Location: LMX 445
Class Times: Tuesdays and Thursdays 5:30-8:30 pm
Calendar Course Description
Theories of citizenship, global education and their related pedagogies.
Course Objectives
This course will critically examine how education is informed and practiced in relationship to
theories and contemporary imaginings of citizenship and national identity in the context of
globalization.
By the end of the course, you will be expected to be able to:
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demonstrate an understanding of the range and diversity of societal and pedagogical
responses to notions of citizenship in relation to questions of nationalism,
globalization and identity (race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation and social class).
This diversity includes historical and contemporary responses representing a range
of models and concepts, including assimilation, integration, multiculturalism, antiracism, multiple identities, and differentiated citizenship;
demonstrate an understanding of the implications of changing meanings of
citizenship in globalized contexts and in regards to what is referred to in Ontario
curriculum documents as character education;
demonstrate an understanding of the value and importance of differing sources in
this area, both primary and secondary, as they bear on particular issues through the
preparation of “reading notes” to be posted on the course blog (see criteria below);
demonstrate an understanding of the interpretations of important related educational
issues through a seminar presentation and the facilitation of subsequent discussion
(see criteria below);
write a literature review term paper on a significant educational issue related to
citizenship and globalization (see criteria below);
participate in seminar discussions.
Attendance
Regular attendance is mandatory. Of course, circumstances may occasionally arise which make
attendance impossible. In the event that you must be absent or late for class, you must inform
me by telephone or e-mail either prior to the class or as soon after the class as possible. Students
who exhibit a pattern of irregular attendance will be brought to the attention of the graduate
program director.
Course Materials
The course pack is available at Rytec (404 Dalhousie Street, 1 block south of Rideau). It’s a good
idea to phone ahead to see when copies are available: (613) 241-2679.
The lecture ppts and additional material (including writing guidelines) can be found on my
website, the address for which is noted above. See me for the password.
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Expectations
All of us in the class are professionals and deserve to be treated as colleagues. I want to stress
that mutual respect as paramount. Language or behavior that is racist, sexist, or otherwise not
inclusive will not be tolerated and will be brought to the attention of the Dean or his designates.
Respect should be shown both in-class and within blog contributions.
Course Schedule and Required Readings
All readings, with the exception of electronic sources, are contained in the course pack in the
order listed below. Additional activities, on-line readings, videos and lectures will be added as
needed or as time permits. Changes to this schedule may be made, as circumstances require.
You will be expected to have thoroughly read and be prepared to discuss the required readings
(or excerpts thereof) from the course pack in advance for each week’s class.
Class 1
May 5
Class 2
May 7
Class 3
May 12
Basic Concepts: Citizenship
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Course introduction and syllabus

Ice-breaker

‘Mini-lecture’ 1: Jus Sanguinis and Jus Soli Conceptions of Citizenship
Basic Concepts: Globalization
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‘Mini-lecture’ 2: Competing Notions of Globalization
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Readings to be discussed:

Pike, G. (2008). Peddling humbug and false piety: Reflections on the road to educating
global citizens. In A. Abdi & G. Richardson (Eds.). Decolonizing democratic education
(pp.77-86). Rotterdam: Sense.

Robertson, S. (2007). Globalization, rescaling and citizenship regimes. In K. Roth & N.
Burbules (Ed.), Changing notions of citizenship education in contemporary nation-states
(pp.136-150). Rotterdam: Sense.

Castels, M. (2011). Communication power. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
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Hardt, M. & Negri, A. (2000). Empire. Harvard: Harvard University Press.

Beck, K. (2013). Making sense of internationalization: A critical analysis. In Hébert, Y. &
Abdi, A. (Eds.), Critical perspectives on international education (pp. 43-60). Rotterdam:
Sense.

Tully, J. (2008). Two meanings of global citizenship: Modern and diverse. In Peter, M.
Britton, A. & Blee, H. (Eds.), Global citizenship education. Rotterdam: Sense.

In-class time for groupings and schedules
Nationalism and Patriotism

‘Mini-lecture’ 3: Competing Notions of Nation-States, Post-colonialism and
Internationalism
3
Class 4
May 14
Class 5
May 19
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Readings to be discussed:
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Anderson, B. (1983). Imagined communities: Reflections on the origins and spread of
nationalism. Verso: London.
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Pinar, W. (2008). The subjective violence of decolonization. In A. Abdi & G. Richardson
(Eds.). Decolonizing democratic education (pp.35-46). Rotterdam: Sense.

Smith, S. (2007). Deliberating publics of citizens: post-national citizenship amidst global
public spheres. In K. Roth & N. Burbules (Ed.), Changing notions of citizenship
education in contemporary nation-states (pp.30-50). Rotterdam: Sense.

Kymlicka, W. & Norman, W. (Eds.)(2000). Citizenship in culturally diverse societies:
Issues, contexts and concepts. New York: Oxford.

In-class time for group presentation prep
Representation and Language

‘Mini-lecture’ 4: Ideology, the Hidden Curriculum and a “Complicated Conversation” with
the Canadian Language Benchmarks

Readings to be discussed:

Hall, S. (2003). Representation, meaning and language in S. Hall (Ed.), Representation:
Cultural representations and signifying practices (pp.15-64). London: Sage.15-64.

Isin, E. & Wood, P. (1999). Redistribution, recognition and representation. Citizenship
and identity. London, Sage.

Ramanathan, V. (Ed.)(2013). Language policies and (dis)citizenship. Bristol, UK:
Multilingual Matters Publishing.

Pennycook, A. & Mitchell, T. (2009). Hip-hop as dusty footprint: In H. S. Alim, A. Ibrahim
& A. Pennycook (Eds.), Global linguistic flows. (pp.25-42). New York: Routledge.

Fleming, D. & Morgan, B. (2012). Discordant anthems: ESL and critical citizenship
education: Citizenship Education Research Collection, 1, 28-40. Available online at
http://douglasfleming.weebly.com/selected-publications.html

In-class time for group presentation prep
Specific Features of the Canadian Context

‘Mini-lecture’ 5: Citizenship Education and Critical Multiculturalism in the Canadian
Context
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Readings to be discussed:
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Cairns,
A., Courtney, J.,
MacKinnon, P.,
Michelmann, H.
&
Smith, D. (Eds.) (1999).
Citizenship, diversity
and
pluralism: Canadian and comparative
perspectives.
Montreal
and
Kingston: McGill Queen’s University Press.
4
Class 6
May 21
Class 7
May 26

Rudin, R. (2002). From the nation to the citizen: Quebec historical writing and the
shaping of identity. In R. Adamoski, D. Chunn & R. Menzies (Eds.), Contesting Canadian
citizenship: Historical readings (pp.95-111). Toronto: Broadview Press.

Gidney, R. (1999). The completion of the Separate School System. In R. Gidney (Ed.),
From hope to Harris: The reshaping of Ontario’s schools. (pp. 124-141). Toronto:
University of Toronto Press.

Bouchard, G. & Taylor, C. (2008). Building the future: A time for reconciliation.
Government of Quebec. Available online at
https://www.mce.gouv.qc.ca/publications/CCPARDC/rapport-final-integral-en.pdf

In-class time for group presentation prep
The Teaching and Community Contexts

‘Mini-lecture’ 6: Character Education In Ontario Schools

Readings to be discussed:
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Markoulis, D. & Dikalou, M. (2008). Being involved: Theoretical and research
approaches. In F. Oser & W. Veugelers (Eds.), Getting involved: Global citizenship
development and the sources of moral values (pp.75-88). Rotterdam: Sense

Hyslop-Margison, E. & Thayer, J. (2009). Teaching democracy: Citizenship education as
critical pedagogy. Rotterdam: Sense.

Westheimer, J. (2008). On the relationship between political and moral engagement. In
F. Oser & W. Veugelers (Eds.), Getting involved: Global citizenship development and the
sources of moral values (pp.17-30). Rotterdam: Sense.

Carr, P. (2011). Does your vote count? Critical pedagogy and democracy. New York:
Peter Lang

Latzko, B. (2008). No morality without autonomy: The role of emotional autonomy in
moral development. In F. Oser & W. Veugelers (Eds.), Getting involved: Global
citizenship development and the sources of moral values (pp.119-130). Rotterdam:
Sense.

Banks, J. (2008). Citizenship education and diversity: Implications for teacher education.
In Peter, M. Britton, A. & Blee, H. (Eds.), Global citizenship education (pp. 317-332).
Rotterdam: Sense.

In-class time for group presentation prep
Bilingualism and Multiculturalism
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Readings to be discussed:

Kymlicka, W. (2007). Disentangling the debate. In J. Stein, D. Cameron, J. Ibbitson, W.
Kymlicka, J. Meisel, H. Siddiqui & M. Valpy (Eds.), Uneasy partners: Multiculturalism and
rights in Canada (pp.137-156). Waterloo, ON: Wilfred Laurier University Press.

Jones, B. (2000). Multiculturalism and citizenship: The status of ‘visible minorities’ in
Canada. Educating Citizens for a Pluralistic Society, May, 143-160.
5
Class 8
May 28

Biles, J, Burstein, M. Frideres, J. Tolley, E. & Vineberg, R., &. (2011). The integration
and inclusion of newcomers and minorities across Canada. Montreal
and
Kingston:
McGill‐Queen's
University
Press.

Haque, E. (2012). Multiculturalism within a bilingual framework. Toronto: Toronto
University Press.

Presentation(s)
Race, Ethnicity, Social Class, Feminism and Queer Theory
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Readings to be discussed:
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Stockden, E. (2001). Pluralism, corporatism, and educating citizens. In R. Bruno-Jofre &
N. Aponiuk (Eds.). Educating citizens for a pluralistic society (pp. 71-93). Calgary:
Canadian Ethnics Studies.

Macintosh, L. & Loutzenheiser, L. (2006) Queering citizenship. In G. Richardson & D.
Blades (Eds.), Troubling the canon of citizenship education. (pp.95-102). New York:
Peter Lang.

Tupper, J. (2008). Feminism confronts democracy: Challenging universal citizenship and
democratic education. In A. Abdi & G. Richardson (Eds.). Decolonizing democratic
education (pp.67-76). Rotterdam: Sense.

Stanley, T. (2000). Why I Killed history: Towards an anti-racist history in Canada,”
Histoire sociale/Social History, XIII, 79-103.

Mahtani, M. (2008). How are immigrants seen and what do they want to see? In Biles, J.,
Burstein, M. & Frideres, J. (Eds.), Immigration and integration in Canada (pp. 211-230).
Montreal
and
Kingston: McGill Queen’s University Press.

Presentation(s)
Reading
week
No classes held during the Canadian Society for the Study of Education conference (held on
campus this year!): May 30-June 5 You’re encouraged to attend!
Class 9
June 9
First Nations

Readings to be discussed:

Wall, S. (2005). Totem poles, teepees, and token traditions: “Playing Indian” at Ontario
summer camps, 1920-1955. The Canadian Historical Review 86, 513-544. Available
online https://muse.jhu.edu/journals/canadian_historical_review/v086/86.3wall.html

Daschuk, J. (2013). Clearing the plains: Disease, the politics of starvation and the loss of
aboriginal life. Regina: University of Regina Press.

Francis, D. (1992). The imaginary Indian. Vancouver: Arsenal Press.

King, T. (2012). The inconvenient Indian. Toronto: Anchor Press.

Presentation(s)
6
Class 10
June 11

Presentation(s)
Class 11
June 16
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Presentation(s)
Course evaluation
Class 12
June 18
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
Presentation(s)
Optional Social
Assignments
1. Blog Reading Note Critiques and Comments (30% of course grade)
You are to select six readings, one each for those assigned for Class 4, Class 5, Class 6, Class
7, Class 8 and Class 9. You will then prepare “reading notes” to be posted on the course blog at
least 24 hours before the beginning of each of the classes in which they are to be discussed. This
is for the purpose of stimulating discussion in class. This assignment’s purpose is to provide you
with experience in preparing for discussions in graduate seminars and to contribute to the insights
of your colleagues.
The reading notes must be no less than 500 words each. Don’t forget to put your name on the
posted notes and to include the names of the authors you discuss. Although the grading for these
reading notes will not be posted to your classmates, I intend to refer to them in class.
In addition, you are to post on the blog six brief comments (no word limit) on the reading notes
that your colleagues have prepared. Don’t forget to put your name on the comments!
You will be graded on the following:
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your summary of the main argument contained in the reading;
your summary of the evidence within the text used to support its argument;
your assessment of the reading’s strengths and weaknesses;
your critique of the article in terms of its usefulness and the questions it raises;
your completion of six comments on the reading notes prepared by your colleagues.
2. Group Class Presentation (30% of course grade)
You will prepare a 30-minute presentation in which you will discuss a specific topic related to
citizenship and education. Please talk to me about the topic you have in mind well ahead of your
presentation. The topic can be the same as the one upon which your final term paper is based.
Power point slides (or equivalents) must be prepared and posted to the course blog prior to your
presentation. Your posting should include references to works cited in your presentation.
You will be graded on the following:
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the clarity and coherence of your discussion and argument related to the topic;
your creativity in thought and presentation;
the completeness of your citations;
your summary of the educational implications of the issues related to your topic;
your ability to lead a subsequent class discussion so as to provide maximum involvement
and participation through the use of appropriate visuals, effective pacing and questioning
techniques.
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This assignment’s purpose is to help provide you with practice and feedback on presenting and
facilitating discussion within graduate seminars.
We will decide on groups and the schedule of presentations in Class 2. Groupings will be in pairs
and/or triads.
3. Term Paper in Literature Review Format (40% of course grade)
On the final day of class, you are to submit by email a written assignment of between 3000 and
5000 words that examines a topic of your own interest within the field. Papers submitted for other
courses will not be accepted.
The aim of this assignment is to give you an opportunity to produce a formal graduate level
academic paper that clarifies your critical reflections on a topic within citizenship and education
that you consider important. Please see me if you need help in clarifying the topic of your paper.
You will be graded on your ability to write a paper that:
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conforms to academic organizational writing standards (see my posted notes);
contains the logical progression of an argument;
demonstrates a clear relationship between summary and analysis;
outlines the links you make to concrete teaching practice;
conforms to formal academic APA referencing and citation style (or alternative)
A set of specific guidelines for writing literature reviews is posted on my website.
For examples and guidelines on current APA style, consult the University’s Academic Writing
Help Center at http://www.sass.uottawa.ca/writing/; or the on-line OWL/ Purdue Writing Lab at
//owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/01/
Late Assignment Policy
Assignments which are submitted after the due date without an agreed upon extension are
considered late assignments. The penalty on late assignments in all courses in the Faculty of
Education is a grade loss of 5% per day up to a maximum of 10 days, after which time
assignments will not be accepted.
Please see me if you need an extension on an assignment. Please ensure that extension
arrangements are confirmed in writing or by email.
Academic Fraud
Plagiarism is one type of academic fraud. A student found guilty of committing plagiarism will be
subject to sanctions, which range from receiving a mark F for the work in question to being
expelled from the University, and even the revocation of a degree, diploma, or certificate already
awarded. For more information about University regulations related to plagiarism and other types
of academic fraud, please see the section entitled “Academic Fraud” in the Teacher Education
Calendar, the Professional Development Programs Calendar, or the Faculty of Graduate and
Postdoctoral Studies Calendar. For useful guidelines, please consult
www.uottawa.ca/plagiarism.pdf
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Grading Scale
The following grading scale is used in Faculty of Education courses. Grading of assignments may be conducted using
number or letter grades. In either case, the description included below describes the expectations at each grade level.
A+
Exceptional
90-100%
An exceptional grade in a course or on an assignment is given for a response that demonstrates a
thorough knowledge of all relevant concepts and techniques. The response is complete in content and
presented in a clear, coherent and effective manner. In addition an exceptional response adds
something novel and original which distinguishes an A+ from an A. Exceptional responses are rarely
encountered as they are, by definition, outstanding among other responses.
A
Exemplary
85-89%
An exemplary grade in a course or on an assignment is given for a response that demonstrates a
thorough knowledge of all relevant concepts and techniques. The response is complete in its content,
with a clear and coherent presentation designed to communicate effectively.
AExcellent
80-84%
An excellent grade in a course or on an assignment is given for a response that demonstrates a
thorough knowledge of relevant concepts and techniques. The response is largely complete in its
content and clearly presented. However, some minor aspect of the assignment which may pertain to
content or effective communication is lacking.
B+
Very Good
75-79%
A very good grade in a course or on an assignment is given for a response that demonstrates
adequate knowledge of relevant concepts and techniques. The response is both informative and
clearly presented. However, the response is incomplete as some substantive aspect of the assignment
has been overlooked.
B
Good
70-74%
A good grade in a course or on an assignment is given for a response that demonstrates adequate
knowledge of relevant concepts and techniques. However, the response is incomplete as some
substantive aspect of the assignment has been overlooked. In addition, there are difficulties with
effective communication.
C+
Satisfactory
66-69%
A satisfactory grade in a course or on an assignment is given for a response that demonstrates basic
knowledge of relevant concepts and techniques. A substantive aspect of the assignment has been
overlooked. In addition, the difficulties with effective communication result in a lack of clarity such that
readers or listeners struggle to get the information.
C
Pass
60-65%
A pass grade in a course or on an assignment is given for a response that demonstrates incomplete
knowledge of relevant concepts and techniques. A substantive aspect of the assignment has been
overlooked. In addition, the difficulties with effective communication result in a lack of clarity such that
readers or listeners struggle to get the information.
D
55-59%
D+
50-54%
E
40-49%
Redeemable
Failure
F
0-49%
Non-redeemable
Failure
The category of redeemable failure demonstrates an unacceptable level of knowledge of concepts
and/or techniques to satisfy the requirements of an assignment or course. Teacher candidates
receiving a redeemable failure have the right to one supplemental examination in which they must
obtain 60% standing to be successful. Supplemental examinations consist of a written examination or
additional assignments.
A non-redeemable failure demonstrates an unacceptable level of knowledge of concepts and/or
techniques to satisfy the requirements of an assignment or course. No supplemental examination
and/or assignments are offered.
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