Students:
Dates:
First Nations Guided Reading Lesson
Book Title: Métis by J. Howse
Level: N
Strategy Focus: Nonfiction text features
Context: Historical
Text Type:
Word Count: N/A
Nonfiction
Cultural Connection: Traditional ways of life
Not all text will be read
Cross Curricular Connection: Social Studies
Supports:
Challenges:
Non-fiction text features
Book Vocabulary
This text lends itself to the glossary text feature.
Activation/ Previewing Activity
“What are some non-fiction text features you know?”
“How do nonfiction text features help us?”
Before Lesson: (3-5 minutes)
Book Introduction/ Title/Author/ Summary/Picture Walk
During your picture walk:
Page 3 – table of contents
Page 4 – fact link
Page 6 – heading
Page 8 & 9 – labeled diagram
Page 10 & 11 – captions
Page 15 – fact box
Page 24 – Glossary and Index
Introduce the strategy: (3-5 minutes)
“We will use nonfiction text features to better understand the text.”
Students:
Dates:
During the Lesson:
Teacher prompt:
Page 4 – The People
“What other nonfiction text feature helps you to understand the bolded words?”
Note: The teacher needs to ensure the Glossary text feature is linked to the bolded words
text feature.
Page 8 & 9 - Métis Clothing
“How do these text features (a labeled diagram) help you understand the
topic?”
Page 15 – Moving from Place to Place
“How do the three text features on the page help you understand the text: the
words, the picture, and the fact box?”
Note: Nonfiction text features are often not used in isolation.
Teacher role:
Teacher listens to children read and records observations.
Teacher is working with children one at a time (prompting, listening, assessing).
Student role:
All students are reading simultaneously.
When students have completed their first reading, they should continue to read.
After the Lesson:
After reading, the teacher revisits the purpose for reading and the strategy focus with the
students.
Teacher encourages self reflection.
Teacher Prompt:
Prompts:
“What nonfiction text feature best helped you read the nonfiction text?”
Students:
Dates:
Follow Up Activities:
Teachers can decide upon and provide applicable information to further address the focus.
Assessment and Reflection:
Teacher assesses comprehension.
Teacher reflects on the lesson and determines key points to guide further instructional
practice.
Métis Literature Links
Bouvier, R.E. (2008). Better That Way. Gabriel Dumont Institute of Native Studies and Applied
Research: Saskatoon.
Burton, W. & Fleury, N. (2009). Dancing In My Bones: La daans daan mii zoo. Gabriel Dumont
Institute of Native Studies and Applied Research: Saskatoon.
Dorion, L & Fleury, N. (2009). The Giving Tree: A Retelling of a Traditional Metis Story. Gabriel
Dumont Institute of Native Studies and Applied Research: Saskatoon.
Fauchon, J., Fleury, N. & Mauvieux, S. (2009). The Metis Alphabet Book. Gabriel Dumont
Institute of Native Studies and Applied Research: Saskatoon.
Howse, J., (2011). Métis. Weigl Educational Publishing: Calgary, Alberta.
Murray, B. & Flamand, R. (2004). Li Saennchur Fleshii di Michif= Thomas and the Metis sash.
Pemmican Publications: Winnipeg, Manitoba.
Patton, A., Burton, W. & Fleury, N. (2007). Fiddle Dancer= Li Daanseru di Vyaeloon. Gabriel
Dumont Institute of Native Studies and Applied Research: Saskatoon.
Pelletier, J. & Panas, J. (2007). The Story of the Rabbit Dance. Gabriel Dumont Institute of
Native Studies and Applied Research: Saskatoon.
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Students: Dates: First Nations Guided Reading Lesson Book Title