Name:
Core Practice #1: Getting Results in the Assigned Initiative Area/_________________
Unsatisfactory:
Leader’s actions or impact of
leader’s actions relevant to
this core practice are
minimal or are not occurring,
or are having an adverse
impact.
New or current initiatives
are not supported nor are
there specific plans, actions,
feedback, collaboration or
monitoring.
Needs Improvement:
Leader’s actions or impact of
leader’s actions relevant to this
core practice are evident but are
inconsistent or of insufficient
scope or proficiency.
Effective:
Leader’s actions or impact of
leader’s actions relevant to this
core practice are sufficient and
appropriate reflections of quality
work with only normal variations.
Highly Effective:
Leader’s actions or impact of leader’s
actions relevant to this core practice
include and exceed effective levels
and constitute models of proficiency
for other leaders.
In order to implement new
initiatives and/or maintain current
initiatives, there is limited
planning and goal setting and
collaboration is sporadic.
In order to implement new
initiatives and/or maintain current
initiatives, there is evidence of
planning, goal setting and
collaboration.
1.2
Student
growth/achievement is not
considered and stakeholders
are not aware of any
correlation between the
two. Monitoring is not
completed.
Student growth/achievement
(direct or indirect) is considered but
plays a role in the setting of
initiative related goals/benchmarks,
the correlation between the two is
provided but only some
stakeholders understand the
correlation, both are monitored.
1.3
Initiative expectations are
not appropriately
benchmarked.
Student growth/achievement and
initiative related
goals/benchmarks are considered
as two separate sources of
information. A correlation exists
and is presented, but stakeholders
do not understand the correlation
between the two. Monitoring is
done separately.
Initiative expectations are
benchmarked to the performance
of the target group.
1.4
There are no monitoring
systems for benchmarked
expectations.
Monitoring systems fail to
appropriately monitor the
benchmarked expectations.
1.5
Monitoring is not focused on
stakeholder proficiency in
the initiative area.
Monitoring practices are
consistently implemented in a
supportive and constructive
manner.
1.6
Feedback is rare,
nonspecific, and not
constructive.
The manner in which monitoring is
conducted is not generally
perceived by stakeholders as
supportive of their improvement
in the initiative area.
Feedback is viewed as a linear
process; something provided to
stakeholders rather than a
collegial exchange.
In order to implement new initiatives
and/or maintain current initiatives,
there is evidence of quality planning
and goal setting and routine
collaboration with other
stakeholders (sharing of ideas,
coaching, and technical assistance).
Student growth/achievement (either
direct or indirect) is examined and
used when setting initiative related
goals/benchmarked expectations, a
correlation between the two is
presented to and understood by
stakeholders, and both are
monitored in conjunction with each
other.
Initiative expectations are
benchmarked to the performance of
comparable stakeholder groups
three-four levels beyond the target
group (i.e. nation and world).
Monitoring systems are created in
collaboration with stakeholders,
completed frequently, and
stakeholders are empowered to
complete their own monitoring of
the benchmarked expectations.
Monitoring systems are routinely
shared with appropriate stakeholders
to support the assigned initiative.
1.7
The district administrator
has not taken decisive action
to change time, resources or
support to stakeholders in
the assigned initiative.
Problem solving efforts are
unskillfully used to provide
adequate time, resources, and
support to stakeholders in the
assigned initiative.
Problem solving is implemented to
provide adequate time, resources,
and support to stakeholders in the
assigned initiative.
1.8
When the target group is not
successful in the initiative
area, problem solving efforts
or not employed to address
the needs of the target
group.
When the target group is not
successful in the initiative area,
problem solving results in
solutions that do not adequately
address the needs of the target
group.
1.9
The district administrator
rarely or does not
hold/attend meetings
and/or professional
development. Meeting
topics do not focus on
standards, target group’s
work, target group’s needs,
etc.
Meetings and professional
development are attended and/or
held, but are not always timely or
relevant to the target group.
Initiative standards and
achievement information are
accessible, but are not typically
the focus of the meeting. Target
group’s work is collected and
available, but not used.
When the target group is not
successful in the initiative area,
problem solving is employed to
identify and implement
supplemental supports (data
based interventions and progress
monitoring.)
Attends relevant meetings and/or
holds professional development
that focus on the initiative’s
standards and target group’s
performance, and the target
group’s work is examined but may
not always result in modification in
the initiative.
1.1
Self-Assessment
1
Initiative expectations are
benchmarked to the performance
of comparable stakeholder groups
one-two levels beyond the target
group (i.e. district and state).
Monitoring systems are created and
implemented to monitor the level
of benchmarked expectations.
Corrective and positive feedback is
provided to the targeted group
based on the initiative’s goals and is
used to improve the performance
of the targeted group.
Feedback to appropriate
stakeholders is timely, focused and
specific, illustrating a clear vision of
the initiative’s priority goals.
Feedback is based on stakeholder
input and collegial exchange.
Problem solving is skillfully
implemented (e.g., conceptualizing,
applying, analyzing, synthesizing,
and/or evaluating information) and
completed in collaboration with
others to ensure stakeholders have
adequate time and support.
When the target group is not
successful in the initiative area,
creative problem solving is employed
and traditional barriers overcome in
order to meet the unique needs of
the targeted group.
Attends relevant meetings and/or
holds appropriate professional
development, anticipates the target
group’s needs, focuses on the
initiative’s standards and the target
group’s achievement of standards,
and routinely reviews the target
group’s work to evaluate and modify
the initiative’s progress.
Core Practice #2: Continuous Improvement of the Initiative Area /_______________
2.1
2.2
2.3
2.4
2.5
2.6
2.7
2.8
2.9
Unsatisfactory:
Leader’s actions or impact of
leader’s actions relevant to
this core practice are
minimal or are not occurring,
or are having an adverse
impact.
The leader expects teachers
and school-level leaders to
provide their own support in
accessing, interpreting, and
making use of evidence for
their decisions about
teaching and learning.
Is conspicuously absent from
schools. All of the interaction
occurs at district meetings.
Needs Improvement: Leader’s
actions or impact of leader’s
actions relevant to this core
practice are evident but are
inconsistent or of insufficient
scope or proficiency.
Effective:
Leader’s actions or impact of
leader’s actions relevant to this
core practice are sufficient and
appropriate reflections of quality
work with only normal variations.
Highly Effective:
Leader’s actions or impact of leader’s
actions relevant to this core practice
exceed effective levels and
constitute models of proficiency for
other leaders.
Provide assistance for teachers
and school-level leaders in
accessing, interpreting, and
making use of evidence for their
decisions about teaching and
learning.
Provide professional development
in accessing, interpreting, and
making use of evidence for their
decisions about teaching and
learning for teachers and schoollevel leaders.
Using school-based data and
evidence, district personnel provides
specific support for decision making
that impacts and engages educators
in enhancing teaching and learning.
Rarely visits stakeholders. Most of
the interaction occurs at district
meetings.
Anticipates the need for visits and
sustains them for the duration of the
initiative.
Time-management at the
schools supervised provides
inadequate time for
professional learning.
Has some knowledge of the
initiative but cannot
communicate it to others.
Time-management at the schools
supervised provides inconsistent
scheduling of adequate time for
professional learning.
Able to communicate the
initiative.
Visits stakeholders several times
throughout the year. Uses visits as
well as district meetings to help
build confidence in the initiative
area.
Time-management for the target
group provides time for
professional learning.
Able to clarify and communicate the
initiative information.
Talks about the importance
of collaborating but have yet
to provide time to do so.
Talks about the need for
professional development
opportunities stakeholders
but have yet to provide.
Inconsistently provides
opportunities for stakeholders to
collaborate on initiative.
Provides professional
development opportunities for
stakeholders but they are loosely
aligned to the district’s initiatives.
Unaware of the support
needed in providing
stakeholders in the
delegation of leadership
roles.
Does not gather data about
how well district policies are
working at the school level.
Sporadically supports stakeholders
in the delegation of leadership
roles that build on existing
strengths.
Gather data about how well
district initiatives are working but
has yet to use the results to
improve practice.
Gather data about how well district
initiatives are working. Progress
monitors district policies,
procedures, and practices aimed at
guiding and supporting the district‘s
initiatives.
Does not understand the
need to coordinate support
for initiatives across different
departments at the district
level but has yet to act on
this need.
Understands the need to
coordinate support for initiatives
across different departments at
the district level but has yet to act
on this need.
Routinely coordinates support for
initiatives across different
departments.
Is visible, articulate, and works with
others beyond the stakeholders so
that they understand and support
the initiative.
Anticipates and schedules
collaboration opportunities based on
identified needs.
Provide a wide range of intensive,
unique, opportunities for
stakeholders to develop the
capacities they need to accomplish
the district’s initiatives.
Consistently supports target group,
particularly team members new to
the initiative, in the delegation of
leadership roles that build on existing
strengths.
The district administrator routinely
gathers data and shares professional
learning success stories as well as
missteps to continually to progress
monitor district policies, procedures,
and practices aimed at guiding,
supporting, or adjusting the district‘s
initiatives.
Anticipate and ensure coordination
and coherence in support for
initiatives across different
departments.
Self-Assessment
2
Consistently provides opportunities
for stakeholders to collaborate on
the initiative.
Provide a range of professional
development opportunities for
stakeholders to develop their
capacity to accomplish the district’s
initiatives.
Support stakeholders in the
delegation of leadership roles that
build on existing strengths.
Provides maximum, scheduled time
for professional learning
Core Practice #3: Building School Leaders’ Sense of Efficacy for School Improvement
Initiative ____________________
Unsatisfactory:
The district administrator’s
actions or impact of the
district administrator’s
actions relevant to this core
practice are minimal or are
not occurring, or are having
an adverse impact.
3.1
3.2
3.3
3.4
Evaluation Focus: The
district administrator’s
influence on stake-holders
generates inconsistent
results in achieving high
energy positive attention by
a majority of those leaders
to school improvement
priorities focused on district
initiatives, school conditions,
and student learning and
corrective action plans to
change those conditions are
not evident. Attributes of
the district administrator
unsatisfactory on this core
practice include:
 Feedback not given.
 Does not have feedback
or awareness of school
improvement plans. Does
not support school
improvement efforts of
schools.
 Does not have a process
to monitor school
improvement efforts.

Rarely provides
individualized support
for representative
stake-holders,
depending upon the
challenges they face.
Self-Assessment
Needs Improvement: The district
administrator’s actions or impact
of the district administrator’s
actions relevant to this core
practice are evident but are
inconsistent or of insufficient
scope or proficiency.
Effective:
The district administrator’s actions
or impact of the district
administrator’s actions relevant to
this core practice are sufficient and
appropriate reflections of quality
work with only normal variations.
Highly Effective:
The district administrator’s actions or
impact of the district administrator’s
actions relevant to this core practice
exceed effective levels and constitute
models of proficiency for other
leaders.
Evaluation Focus: The district
administrator’s influence on stakeholders generates inconsistent
results in achieving high energy
positive attention by a majority of
those leaders to school
improvement priorities focused on
district initiatives, school
conditions, and student learning.
Attributes of the district
administrator needing
improvement on this core practice
include:
Evaluation Focus: The district
administrator’s influence on stakeholders results in high energy
positive attention by those leaders
to school improvement priorities
focused on district initiatives,
school conditions, and student
learning. Attributes of the effective
district administrator on this core
practice include:
Evaluation Focus: The district
administrator’s influence on all
stake-holders results in high energy
positive attention by those leaders to
school improvement priorities
focused on district initiatives, school
conditions, and student learning.
Attributes of the highly effective
district administrator on this core
practice include:
 Provides feedback on school
improvement plans, but
feedback lacks specificity and
relevance to initiative areas.
 Provides timely feedback on
school improvement plans related
to initiatives.
 Has feedback and awareness of
school improvement plans, but
support to schools
inconsistently implemented.
 Uses feedback given to schools
and knowledge of school
improvement plans to actively
support school improvement
efforts at schools.
 Provides timely and specific
feedback that aligns directly to
major district initiatives and/or
district administrator specific
initiatives.
 Uses feedback and knowledge of
school improvement plans to align
school improvement efforts with
other district initiatives, resources,
professional development, etc.
 Develops a process to monitor
initiative specific school
improvement efforts and
provides support to schools in
school improvement efforts but
both are sporadic rather than
systematic.
 Develops and maintains a
process to monitor initiative
specific school improvement
efforts and provides support to
schools in school improvement
efforts.

 Provides support for
representative stake-holders,
depending upon the challenges
they face.
Provides minimal
individualized support for
representative stake-holders,
depending upon the
challenges they face.
3
 Develops and maintains a
systematic process to monitor
initiative specific school
improvement efforts, anticipates
school needs and provides
aligned, relevant and timely
support (resources, time,
professional development,
information, etc.) of school
improvement efforts.
 Provides individualized support
for schools, depending upon the
challenges they face.
Core Practice #4: Using Data as a Problem Solving Strategy in the Assigned
Initiative Area __________________________
Unsatisfactory:
Leader’s actions or impact
of leader’s actions
relevant to this core
practice are minimal or
are not occurring, or are
having an adverse impact.
Needs Improvement: Leader’s
actions or impact of leader’s
actions relevant to this core
practice are evident but are
inconsistent or of insufficient
scope or proficiency.
Effective:
Leader’s actions or impact of
leader’s actions relevant to this
core practice are sufficient and
appropriate reflections of quality
work with only normal variations.
Highly Effective:
Leader’s actions or impact of leader’s
actions relevant to this core practice
include and exceed effective levels and
constitute models of proficiency for other
leaders.
4.1
Gathering and analyzing
of assessment data from
multiple available sources
is not evident.
Rudimentary gathering of
assessment data from state,
district, school, and/or
classroom.
Analysis is basic and not
consistently used in decision
making.
Assessment data generated at the
state, district, school and/or
classroom level is gathered and
analyzed. Proficient gathering of
data within the initiative area from
multiple available sources is evident
with analysis and goal setting a
regular basis. Results on
accomplished goals are used to
maintain gains and stimulate future
goal setting. Examples of
professional development efforts,
curriculum alignment and
recommended interventions exist.
4.2
Leader does not use
assessment data from
state, district, school, and
classroom, whether
unaware of or indifferent
to the data about student
and adult performance, or
fails to use such data as a
basis for making
decisions.
Awareness of state and district
results is evident and discussion
of those results with others
occurs, but there is no evidence
of specific decisions linked to
the data. Strengths and
challenges are not identified
and targeted.
Explicit use of previous data to
focus on improving performance,
and systematic examination of data
at the subscale level to find
strengths and challenges. Use of
data is evident in decision making
to improve student learning
outcomes.
Gathering of Evidence:
Assessment data generated at the
national, state, district, school and/or
classroom level is consistently gathered
and analyzed. Leader is highly skilled at
researching and accessing data
independently. Examples of decisions
impacting teaching, curriculum alignment
with standards, assessment alignment
with standards, professional
development supports aligned to
personnel evaluation results, or
interventions that have been made on
the basis of problem solving using data
analysis are specifically documented.
Use of data:
Explicit use of previous data indicating a
focus on improving performance is
apparent. In areas of previous success,
there is evidence of the leader
aggressively identifying new challenges,
moving proficient performance to the
exemplary level. Where new challenges
emerge, the need is highlighted and
effective interventions are implemented.
4.3
Little knowledge and/or
skills of assessment
literacy and data analysis
demonstrated in the
routine performance of
initiative area tasks.
Systematically seeks, synthesizes,
and applies knowledge and skills of
assessment literacy and data
analysis.
4.4
Little or no evidence of
sharing knowledge of
assessment data within
the initiative area with
individual stakeholders of
collegial groups with the
goal of increasing student
achievement or teacher
or administrator
performance.
There is little or no
evidence of interaction
with other administrators,
principals and teachers
concerning data on
student and adult
performance.
Haphazardly application of
rudimentary knowledge and
skills of assessment literacy and
does not routinely demonstrate
knowledge of how to build
knowledge and develop skills of
assessment literacy and data
analysis.
Inconsistently shares
knowledge of assessment data
within the initiative area with
individual stakeholders or
collegial groups to increase
student achievement or
teacher or administrator
performance.
An understanding of data on
student and adult performance
and its use in decision making is
evident, but that knowledge is
seldom shared with teaching
and administrative staff.
Empowers teaching and
administrative staff to determine
priorities using data on student and
adult performance. Data insights
are regularly included as part of
meetings and professional
development sessions.
All
4.5
Self-Assessment
Routinely shares knowledge of
assessment data with individual
stakeholders or collegial groups
within the initiative area to increase
student achievement or teacher or
administrator performance.
4
Understanding of Assessment Literacy:
Consistently applying the knowledge and
skills of assessment literacy, data
analysis, and the use of state, district,
school, and classroom assessment data to
improve student achievement or teacher
or administrator performance are
implemented consistently.
Sharing of Data: Provides understanding
for others in data related to initiative
area
Consistently implements a variety of
creative ways to provide professional
learning for individual and collegial
groups within the initiative area relative
to assessment data, to improve student
achievement or teacher or administrator
performance.
Professional Development/Stakeholder
involvement:
Leads others to improve their data
analysis skills and to inform instructional
decision making within the initiative area,
by empowering teaching and
administrative staff to determine
priorities using student and adult data.
Routinely shares examples of effective
learning goals that are associated with
improved student achievement or
teacher or administrator performance.
4.6
4.7
4.8
4.9
4.10
Rating Rubric: SOME
Unsatisfactory:
Leader’s actions or impact
of leader’s actions
relevant to this core
practice are minimal or
are not occurring, or are
having an adverse impact.
There is minimal or no
coordination of
assessment practices in
schools to provide ongoing data about student
progress toward academic
standards in the initiative
area.
Needs Improvement: Leader’s
actions or impact of leader’s
actions relevant to this core
practice are evident but are
inconsistent or of insufficient
scope or proficiency.
Effective:
Leader’s actions or impact of
leader’s actions relevant to this
core practice are sufficient and
appropriate reflections of quality
work with only normal variations.
Highly Effective:
Leader’s actions or impact of leader’s
actions relevant to this core practice
include and exceed effective levels and
constitute models of proficiency for other
leaders.
Formative assessment practices
are inconsistently employed in
schools as part of the
instructional program within
the initiative area.
Formative assessment practices are
employed routinely in schools as
part of the instructional program in
the initiative area.
Use of formative or interim assessments
in gathering data for decision making
Formative assessment practices are part
of the district culture and interim
assessment data is routinely used to
review and adapt plans and priorities in
the targeted initiative area.
Limits opportunities for all
students to meet high
expectations by allowing
or ignoring practices in
curriculum, instruction,
and assessment that are
culturally, racially, or
ethnically insensitive
and/or inappropriate.
It is evident that student
subgroups do not
perceive the school or
district as focused on or
respectful of their
learning needs or cultural,
linguistic and family
background.
No data is collected on
curricular and/or extracurricular student
involvement.
No processes are in use to
analyze standards and
identify assessment
priorities. There are
minimal or no leadership
practices to monitor
tracking of student
progress on priority
learning goals.
Inconsistently acts on the belief
that all students can learn at
high levels by sometimes
leading curriculum, instruction,
and assessment that reflect and
respect the diversity of
students and staff.
Systematically acts on the belief
that all students can learn at high
levels by leading curriculum,
instruction, and assessment that
reflect and respect the diversity of
students and staff.
Power (high priority) standards
are developed, but not widely
known or used, and/or are not
aligned with assessment data
on student progress.
Power (high priority) standards are
widely shared with principals and
teachers and are promoted
throughout the district.
Assessments on student progress
on them are a routine event.
Inconsistently applies the
process of inquiry and/or
has enabled only limited
efforts to develop of
processes that generate
greater understanding of
the district’s current
systems and their impact
on sub-group academic
achievement.
Inconsistently applies the
process of inquiry and/or has
enabled only limited efforts to
develop of processes that
generate greater understanding
of the district’s current systems
and their impact on sub-group
academic achievement.
Usually applies the process of
inquiry and/or has enabled only
limited efforts to develop of
processes that generate greater
understanding of the district’s
current systems and their impact on
sub-group academic achievement.
Processes to minimize achievement
gaps within all impacted subsgroups are employed.
High Expectations for Student
Achievement
Shares with others throughout the
district strategies to put into action the
belief that all students can learn at high
levels by leading curriculum, instruction,
and assessment that reflect and respect
the diversity of students and staff.
Respect for students’ cultural, linguistic,
and family background is evident in the
leader’s conduct and expectations for
students and faculty. Policies and
implementation reflect that climate of
respect.
Data is collected from schools and
community regarding curricular and/or
extra-curricular student involvement to
assure equal opportunity for student
participation. Example include but are
not limited to academic fairs, teams, or
contests.
Address student improvement through
standards based assessment
Power (high priority) standards are
widely shared with principals and
teachers and are promoted throughout
the district. Assessments on student
progress on them are a routine event,
with established leadership practices to
monitor tracking of student progress on
priority learning goals.
Specifically address performance of
subgroups in data
Consistently applies the process of
inquiry and/or has enabled development
of processes that generate greater
understanding of the district’s current
systems and their impact on sub-group
academic achievement. Processes to
minimize achievement gaps within all
impacted sub-groups are employed.
Some actions to minimize
the gaps have been
implemented but either
do not reach all sub-group
students or have
inconsistent or minimal
results.
Self-Assessment
A climate of respect for students’
cultural, linguistic, and family
background is encouraged by the
administrator.
Data is collected on curricular
and/or extra-curricular student
involvement to assure equal
opportunity for student
participation.
Some practices promote
respect for students’ cultural,
linguistic, and family
background, but there are
discernible subgroups who do
not perceive the school or
district climate as supportive of
their needs.
Some data is collected on
curricular and/or extracurricular student involvement.
No changes in practices or
processes have been
implemented under the
leader’s direction that are
designed to address
achievement gaps.
5
Core Practice #5: Harnessing Family and Community Energies for School /_________
Improvement
Unsatisfactory:
Leader’s actions or impact
of leader’s actions
relevant to this core
practice are minimal or
are not occurring, or are
having an adverse impact.
5.1
Evaluation Focus:
Communications to
stakeholders provide
infrequent or ineffective
opportunities for sharing
information focused on
understanding of priority
school needs and priority
improvement initiatives
and few or no
opportunities for
engagement in support for
their success. Attributes of
the district administrator
unsatisfactory on this core
practice include:
Communication:
The district
administrator’s actions
demonstrate a lack of
understanding of the
importance of engaging
schools, families and the
community.
5.2
Accessibility & Visibility:
The district administrator
is not visible or accessible
to schools and/or families
and/or the community.
5.3
Use of Technology:
The district administrator
avoids or delegates the
use of all technology to
expand access to
stakeholders and
involvement of
stakeholders.
Self-Assessment
Needs Improvement: Leader’s
actions or impact of leader’s
actions relevant to this core
practice are evident but are
inconsistent or of insufficient
scope or proficiency.
Effective:
Leader’s actions or impact of
leader’s actions relevant to this
core practice are sufficient and
appropriate reflections of quality
work with only normal variations.
Highly Effective:
Leader’s actions or impact of
leader’s actions relevant to this core
practice exceed effective levels and
constitute models of proficiency for
other leaders.
Evaluation Focus: Communications
to stakeholders provide occasional
opportunities for passive
information focused on
understanding of priority school
needs and priority improvement
initiatives and limited
opportunities for engagement in
support for their success.
Attributes of the district
administrator needing
improvement on this core practice
include:
Evaluation Focus:
Communications to stakeholders
provide recurring opportunities
for deepening understanding of
priority school needs and
engagement in priority
improvement initiatives and
engagement in support for their
success. Attributes of the
effective district administrator on
this core practice include:
Evaluation Focus: Communications
to stakeholders provide frequent
opportunities in multiple forms for
active engagement in deepening
understanding of school needs and
improvement initiatives and
engagement in support for their
success. Attributes of the highly
effective district administrator on
this core practice include:
Communication:
The district administrator designs a
system of open communication
that provides for the timely,
responsible sharing of information
with schools, families and
community on meaningful school,
family and community
engagement, but it is
inconsistently implemented.
Accessibility & Visibility:
The district administrator’s actions
to be visible and accessible to
schools and/or families and/or the
community are inconsistent or
limited in scope.
Communication:
The district administrator utilizes
a system of open communication
that provides for the timely,
responsible sharing of
information with schools and the
community using a variety of
media in order to maximize
school, family and community
engagement.
Accessibility & Visibility:
The district administrator is
consistently visible and accessible
to the schools and/or families
and/or the community focusing
attention on the importance of
school, family and community
engagement.
Communication:
The district administrator initiates
media processes that promotes
access to all information and
delivers a strong voice advocating
for meaningful school, family and
community engagement.
Use of Technology:
There is a limited use of
technology to expand access to
stakeholders and to expand
involvement of stakeholders.
Use of Technology:
Stakeholders have access to the
administrators office via
technology tools (e.g., emails,
websites & social networking
such as Facebook, Instagram and
Twitter)
Use of Technology:
The district administrator mentors
stakeholders on using technologies
to expand the impact of
communication.
6
Accessibility & Visibility:
The district administrator is
consistently visible and accessible
and takes the initiative with sharing
ideas, coaching, and providing
technical assistance to implement
successful new initiatives to support
school leaders’ efforts in maximizing
contributions from the schools
and/or families and/or the
community in improving student
learning.
Core Practice #6: Engaging in Professional Learning to Improve Leadership
Practices and Student Learning Outcomes _________________________
Unsatisfactory:
Leader’s actions or impact of
leader’s actions relevant to
this core practice are
minimal or are not
occurring, or are having an
adverse impact.
6.1
Evaluation Focus: The
district administrator has no
to minimal engagement in
deliberate practice growth
targets directly related to
job responsibilities
Attributes of the district
administrator unsatisfactory
on this core practice include:
The district administrator
might attend a professional
learning, but has yet to
participate in the learning
activities along with key
district leaders.
6.2
The district administrator
does not attend professional
learning required of
principals.
6.3
The district administrator is
not aware of research based
high effect size practices.
6.4
The district administrator
does not seek out feedback
from principals to improve
their own practices.
Self-Assessment
Needs Improvement: Leader’s
actions or impact of leader’s
actions relevant to this core
practice are evident but are
inconsistent or of insufficient
scope or proficiency.
Effective:
Leader’s actions or impact of leader’s
actions relevant to this core practice
are sufficient and appropriate
reflections of quality work with only
normal variations.
Highly Effective:
Leader’s actions or impact of
leader’s actions relevant to this
core practice exceed effective levels
and constitute models of
proficiency for other leaders.
Evaluation Focus: The district
administrator has limited
engagement in deliberate practice
growth targets directly related to
job responsibilities but has limited
focus on improvements in the
schools supervised. Attributes of
the district administrator needing
improvement on this core practice
include:
The district administrator
participates in professional
learning communities, but the
learning experiences tend to be
more individual than collective in
addressing the strategic needs of
the organization.
The district administrator attends
professional learning for
principals, but fails to actively
engage becoming distracted with
other responsibilities
Evaluation Focus: The district
administrator is engaged in
deliberate practice growth targets
directly related to capacity to
support improvements in the schools
supervised. Attributes of the
effective district administrator on
this core practice include:
Evaluation Focus: The district
administrator is engaged in multidimensional deliberate practice
growth targets directly related to
capacity to support improvements
in the schools supervised.
Attributes of the highly effective
district administrator on this core
practice include:
The district administrator actively
participates in professional learning
communities in which key district
leaders have common learning
experiences aligned to district
priorities and organizational needs.
The district administrator
approaches and attends relevant
professional learning opportunity
with a view toward impacting all
stakeholders.
The district administrator personally
attends and actively participates in
the professional learning required of
principals as appropriate.
The district administrator is aware
of the research on high effect size
practices, but has yet to apply
them to improve their personal
leadership effectiveness.
The district administrator seeks
out feedback from principals, but
may or may not regularly use the
data to differentiate their
leadership for individual schools.
The district administrator
implements prioritized researched
based high effect size practices to
improve personal leadership
effectiveness.
The district administrator actively
seeks out and strategically utilizes
feedback from principals to direct
differentiated leadership for schools.
As a result of attending professional
learning the knowledge and skills
are shared throughout the
organization, including principals
and with other departments in the
district.
The district administrator monitors
their use of research based high
effect size practices and uses the
data to support the learning of
other district leaders.
The district administrator utilizes
multiple sources of data and seeks
feedback from school leaders to
differentiate support based on
prioritized needs.
7
Core Practice #7: Providing Quality Support Services to Principals and
Teachers and Contributing to the Success of All Schools
(Universal to all Central Office including non-instructional central leaders) __________________
Unsatisfactory: Leader’s
actions or impact of
leader’s actions relevant to
this core practice are
minimal or are not
occurring, or are having an
adverse impact.
7.1
Evaluation Focus: Use
practices that interfere
with school leaders’
consistent attention to
school improvement
priorities. Attributes of the
leader unsatisfactory on
this core practice include:
Guidelines related to
promptness, timeliness and
courteousness when
responding to schools are
not followed.
Needs Improvement: Leader’s
actions or impact of leader’s
actions relevant to this core
practice are evident but are
inconsistent or of insufficient
scope or proficiency.
Effective: Leader’s actions or
impact of leader’s actions relevant
to this core practice are sufficient
and appropriate reflections of
quality work with only normal
variations.
Evaluation Focus: Practices are
used that distract school leaders
from consistent attention to
school improvement priorities.
Attributes of the leader needing
improvement on this core
practice include:
Evaluation Focus: Enabling leaders
to prioritize time and capacities on
school improvement priorities.
Attributes of the effective district
administrator on this core practice
include:
Guidelines related to
promptness, timeliness and
courteousness when responding
to schools are inconsistent.
Guidelines related to promptness,
timeliness and courteousness are
developed and followed when
responding to schools.
Guidelines related to promptness,
timeliness and courteousness are
followed when responding to schools,
and demonstrates the ability to
anticipate as well as respond to, schools’
needs and requests. Leader maintains
this emphasis through ongoing training
and monitoring.
In order to provide quality support
services, there is evidence that the leader
communicates with others on their
expectations for school sites, establishes
practical priorities, coordinates due
dates, implements, monitors and if
needed, works to adjust district
expectations in order to accommodate
teacher and principal learning priories at
the school site.
Others call upon this leader for sharing
ideas, coaching, and providing technical
assistance to implement successful new
initiatives supported by quality planning
and goal setting to support school
leaders’ efforts in improving teaching and
learning.
The link between district and school
needs and the support, delivered by the
leader, is in alignment with the district’s
improvement plan (DIAP) which the
leader contributes.
Leader’s role in supporting teaching and
learning in schools is clearly defined and
impact of expertise, knowledge and
qualifications needed in order to provide
consistent quality support are evident.
Initiative area are followed through with
monitoring and fidelity.
Knowledge of school needs and school
issues are evident and specific practices
and/or differentiated support services
that have been effective in helping
district or school leaders focus on
teaching and learning are routinely
shared. Leader maintains open lines of
communication from and to schools in
order to continuously monitor and
update quality support services.
7.2
Established priorities and
communication in order to
improve support services
for schools are not evident.
In order to provide quality
support services, there is limited
evidence of communication, and
setting priorities with others to
improve support services for
schools.
In order to provide quality support
services, there is evidence that
district administrator
communicates with others on
their expectations for school sites,
establish practical priorities,
coordinate due dates and
implements to accommodate
teacher and principal learning
priories at the school site.
7.3
The support, delivered by
the leader, is not in
alignment to the DIAP.
7.4
Leader’s role, expertise,
knowledge and
qualifications needed in
order to provide quality
support to schools are not
evident.
7.5
Knowledge of school needs,
school issues and
communication to and
from schools are lacking.
The link between district and
school needs and the support,
delivered by the leader, has
limited alignment to the district’s
improvement plan (DIAP).
Leader’s roles in supporting
teaching and learning in schools
is vague and there is limited
evidence of expertise, knowledge
and qualifications needed in
order to provide consistent
quality support.
Knowledge of school needs,
school issues and communication
to and from schools are limited.
The link between district and
school needs and the support,
delivered by the leader, is in
alignment with the district’s
improvement plan (DIAP).
Leader’s role in supporting
teaching and learning in schools is
clearly defined and displays of
expertise, knowledge and
qualifications needed in order to
provide consistent quality support,
are evident.
Knowledge of school needs and
school issues are evident and
leader maintains open lines of
communication from and to
schools in order to continuously
monitor and update quality
support services.
Self-Assessment
8
Highly Effective: Leader’s actions or
impact of leader’s actions relevant to this
core practice include and exceed
effective levels and constitute models of
proficiency for other leaders.
Evaluation Focus: Enabling leaders to
maximize time and capacities on school
improvement priorities. Attributes of the
highly effective district administrator on
this core practice include:
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Core Practice #1: Getting Results in the