Second Grade Scoring Scale Third Quarter
Operations and Algebraic Thinking
L
P
Limited Progress toward Progressing toward
Grade Level Standard
Grade Level Standard
M
Meets Grade Level
Standard
E
Exceeds Grade
Level Standard
2.OA.1 Use addition and subtraction
within 100 to solve two-step word
problems involving situations of adding
to, taking from, putting together, taking
apart and comparing within unknowns in
all positions.
Is unable to use addition
and subtraction within
100 to solve two-step
word problems involving
situations of adding to,
taking from, putting
together, taking apart
and comparing within
unknowns in all positions.
Inconsistently uses
addition and subtraction
within 100 to solve twostep word problems
involving situations of
adding to, taking from,
putting together, taking
apart and comparing
within unknowns in all
positions.
Consistently uses
addition and subtraction
within 100 to solve twostep word problems
involving situations of
adding to, taking from,
putting together, taking
apart and comparing
within unknowns in all
positions.
Students use addition
and subtraction within
300 to solve two-step
word problems
involving situation of
adding to, taking from,
putting together,
taking apart and
comparing within
unknowns in all
positions.
2.OA.2 Fluently add and subtract within
20 using mental strategies.
Is unable to fluently add
and subtract within 20
using mental strategies.
Inconsistently is able to
fluently add and subtract
within 20 using mental
strategies.
Consistently is able to
fluently add and subtract
within 20 using mental
strategies.
Students are able to
fluently add and
subtract within 30
using mental
strategies.
2.OA.4 Use addition to find the total
number of objects arranged in
rectangular arrays with up to 5 rows and
up to 5 columns; write an equation to
express the total as a sum of equal
addends
Is unable to use addition
to find the total number
of objects arranged in
rectangular arrays with
up to 5 rows and up to 5
columns; unable to write
an equation to express
the total as a sum of
equal addends.
Inconsistently uses
addition to find the total
number of objects
arranged in rectangular
arrays with up to 5 rows
and up to 5 columns;
inconsistently writes an
equation to express the
total as a sum of equal
addends.
Consistently uses
addition to find the total
number of objects
arranged in rectangular
arrays with up to 5 rows
and up to 5 columns;
writes an equation to
express the total as a
sum of equal addends.
Student is able to use
multiplication to find
the total number of
objects arranged in
rectangular arrays with
up to 5 rows and up to
5 columns. Writes an
equation to express
the multiplication
statement.
Number and Operations in Base Ten
L
Limited Progress toward
Grade Level Standard
P
Progressing toward
Grade Level Standard
M
Meets Grade Level
Standard
E
Exceeds Grade Level
Standard
2.NBT.1 Understand that the three
digits of a three-digit number
represent amounts of hundreds,
tens, and ones; e.g., 706 equals 7
hundreds, 0 tens, and 6 ones
Minimal understanding of
the value of digits in a
three digit number.
With support, student
shows some
understanding that the
three digits of a three-digit
number represent
amounts of hundreds,
tens, and ones.
Demonstrates
understanding that the
three digits of a three-digit
number represent
amounts of hundreds,
tens, and ones.
2.NBT.2 Count within 1000; skipcount by 5s, 10s and 100s
Is unable to count within
1000. Does not skip count
by 5s and 10s or 100 past
100.
Inconsistently counts
within 1000. May be able
to skip count by 5s or 10s,
but not within 1000.
Consistently counts within
1000. Student is able to
skip-count by 5s, 10s, and
100s within 1000.
2.NBT.3 Read and write numbers to
1000 using base-ten numerals,
number names, and expanded form.
Is unable to read and write
numbers up to 1,000 using
base-ten numerals,
number names, and
expanded form.
Inconsistently reads and
write numbers up to 1,000
using base-ten numerals,
number names, and
expanded form.
Consistently reads and
write numbers up to 1,000
using base-ten numerals,
number names, and
expanded form.
Meets quarterly
expectation and
demonstrates
understanding that the
numbers 100, 200, 300,
400, 500, 600, 700, 800,
900 refer to one, two,
three, four, five, six,
seven, eight, or nine
hundreds (and 0 tens
and 0 ones). and that
“100” is the same
amount as 10 groups of
ten as well as 100 ones.
Student is able to count
and skip count within
1000 and is able to
explain patterns in skip
counting or is able to
count by other numbers
such as 3s or 4s.
Student is able to read
and write numbers
beyond 1,000 using
base-ten numerals,
number names, and
expanded form.
2.NBT.4 Compare two three-digit
numbers based on meanings of the
hundreds, tens, and ones digits,
using symbols >, = and <, to record
the results of comparisons.
Is unable to compare two
three-digit numbers based
on meanings of the
hundreds, tens, and ones
digits, using >, = and <
symbols to record the
results of comparisons.
Inconsistently is able to
compare two three-digit
numbers based on
meanings of the hundreds,
tens, and ones digits, using
>, = and < symbols to
record the results of
comparisons.
Consistently is able to
compare two three-digit
numbers based on
meanings of the hundreds,
tens, and ones digits, using
>, = and < symbols to
record the results of
comparisons.
2.NBT.5 Fluently add and subtract
within 100 using strategies based on
place value, properties of
operations, and/or the relationship
between addition and subtraction.
Is unable to fluently add
and subtract within 100
using strategies based on
place value, properties of
operations, and/or the
relationship between
addition and subtraction.
Inconsistently is able to
fluently add and subtract
within 100 using strategies
based on place value,
properties of operations,
and/or the relationship
between addition and
subtraction.
Consistently is able to
fluently add and subtract
within 100 using strategies
based on place value,
properties of operations,
and/or the relationship
between addition and
subtraction.
Student is able to
compare two four-digit
numbers based on
meanings of the
thousands, hundreds,
tens, and ones digits,
using >, = and < symbols
to record the results of
comparisons.
Student is able to
fluently add and
subtract within 300
using strategies based
on place value,
properties of
operations, and/or the
relationship between
addition and
subtraction.
2.NBT.6 Add up to four two-digit
numbers using strategies based on
place value and properties of
operations.
Is unable to add up to four
two-digit numbers using
strategies based on place
value and properties of
operations.
Inconsistently adds up to
four two-digit numbers
using strategies based on
place value and properties
of operations.
Consistently adds up to
four two-digit numbers
using strategies based on
place value and properties
of operations.
Student is able to add
up to four three-digit
numbers using
strategies based on
place value and
properties of
operations.
2.NBT.7 Add and subtract within
1000, using concrete models or
drawings and strategies based on
place value, properties of
operations, and/or the relationship
between addition and subtraction;
relate the strategy to a written
method. Understand that in adding
or subtracting three-digit numbers,
one adds or subtracts hundreds and
hundreds, tens and tens, ones and
ones; and sometimes it is necessary
to compose or decompose tens or
hundreds.
 Student is unable to
solve addition and
subtraction problems
within 1,000.
 Student has minimal
understanding of adding or
subtracting groups of 10s
and 100s.
 Inconsistently solves
addition and subtraction
problems within 1,000.
 Uses one or two
strategies to solve
problems but may have
errors or occasional
mistakes in computation. .
 Student is unable to
explain answers through
reasoning.
 Correctly solves addition
and subtraction problems
within 1,000.
 Successfully uses
strategies such as place
value, properties of
operations,
compose/decompose
hundreds/tens/ones,
and/or mentally
adds/subtracts 10s and
100s.
 Explanations are logical,
accurate and illustrate
strategies used.
 Student meets
quarterly expectation
and is able to argue
multiple methods of
solving the same
problem.
 Student can design
and illustrate his or her
own word problem and
solve.
2.NBT.8 Mentally add 10 or 100 to a
given number 100–900, and
mentally subtract 10 or 100 from a
given number 100–900.
Is unable to mentally add
100 to a given number
100-900, and mentally
subtract 100 from a given
number 100-900.
Inconsistently is able to
mentally add 100 to a
given number 100-900,
and mentally subtract 100
from a given number 100900.
Consistently is able to
mentally add 100 to a
given number 100-900,
and mentally subtract 100
from a given number 100900.
Student is able to
mentally add 100 to a
given number beyond
900, and mentally
subtract 100 from a
given number beyond
900.
2.NBT.9 Explain why addition and
subtraction strategies work, using
place value and the properties of
operations.
Is unable to explain why
addition and subtraction
strategies work, using
place value and the
properties of operations.
Inconsistently is able to
explain why addition and
subtraction strategies
work, using place value
and the properties of
operations.
Consistently is able to
explain why addition and
subtraction strategies
work, using place value
and the properties of
operations. Example:
23+14 “I have two tens and
another ten which is 3 tens
or 30. I have 3 ones and 4
more ones. I have 30+7 =
37.”
Student is able to
explain the addition and
subtraction strategies in
multiple ways and uses
these strategies easily.
Measurement and Data
L
Limited Progress toward
Grade Level Standard
P
Progressing toward
Grade Level Standard
M
Meets Grade Level
Standard
E
Exceeds Grade
Level Standard
2.MD.6 Represent whole numbers
as lengths from 0 on a number line
diagram with equally spaced points
corresponding to the numbers 0, 1,
2 …, and represent whole-number
sums and differences within 50 on a
number line diagram
Unable to create a number
line with evenly spaced
points and does not
understand how to
appropriately use this to
represent or find sums and
differences.
Able to create a number
line with evenly spaced
points, but does not
understand how to
appropriately use this to
represent or find sums and
differences.
Consistently creates
number lines with evenly
spaced points
corresponding to the
numbers to solve addition
and subtraction problems
to 50. Recognizes the
similarities between a
number line and a ruler.
Student uses a number
line to solve addition
and subtraction
problems by creating a
number line to count
on or count back up to
100.
2.MD.7 Tell and write time from
analog and digital clocks to the
nearest five minutes, using a.m. and
p.m.
Is unable to tell and write
time from analog and
digital clocks to the
nearest five minutes, using
a.m. and p.m.
Inconsistently is able to tell
and write time from
analog and digital to the
nearest five minutes, using
a.m. and p.m. May be able
to tell time to the half
hour.
Consistently is able to tell
and write time from analog
and digital clocks to the
nearest five minutes, using
a.m. and p.m. Student is
able to tell and write time
from analog and digital
clocks to the nearest five
minutes, using a.m. and
p.m.
Student is able to tell
and write time from
analog and digital
clocks to the nearest
five minutes, using
a.m. and p.m.
2.MD.8 Solve word problems
involving dollar bills and coins using
the dollar and cent sign
appropriately.
 E.g. If you have 2 dimes and 3
pennies, how many cents do you
have?
Is unable to solve word
problems involving dollar
bills and coins using the
dollar and cent sign
appropriately.
appropriately. E.g. Making
change; $1.25 etc.
Inconsistently solves word
problems involving dollar
bills and coins using the
dollar and cent sign
appropriately.
Consistently solves word
problems involving dollar
bills and coins using the
dollar and cent sign
appropriately.
Student is able to solve
word problems
involving dollar bills
and coins using the
dollar sign, cent sign
and decimal sign
appropriately. E.g.
Making change; $1.25
etc.
Describe shares using the
words halves, thirds, half
of, a third of, etc., and
describe the whole as two
halves, three thirds, four
fourths. Recognize that
equal shares of identical
wholes need not have the
same shape.
Consistently partitions
circles and rectangles
into two, three, or four
equal shares, describes
the shares using the
words halves, thirds,
half of, a third of, etc.,
and describe the whole
as two halves, three
thirds, four fourths.
Recognizes that equal
shares of identical
wholes need not have
the same shape.
Geometry
2.G.3 Partition circles and rectangles
into two, three, or four equal shares,
describe the shares using the words
halves, thirds, half of, a third of, etc.,
and describe the whole as two
halves, three thirds, four fourths.
Recognize that equal shares of
identical wholes need not have the
same shape.
Unable to describe the
shares using the words
halves, thirds, half of, a
third of, etc., and describe
the whole as two halves,
three thirds, four fourths.
Does not recognize that
equal shares of identical
wholes need not have the
same shape.
Inconsistently describes
the shares using the words
halves, thirds, half of, a
third of, etc., and describe
the whole as two halves,
three thirds, four fourths.
Inconsistently recognizes
that equal shares of
identical wholes need not
have the same shape.