Bishop Thomas Grant School
The Key Stage 4 Curriculum
Options Information Pack
2015-2016
T/Staff Resources/Office/Kelly/Options 2015-2016/Options Booklet 2015-2016
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The Way Ahead – Options Choices for Year 9
Contents
Letter from Mr Desa to all Year 9 students …………………………………… 3
The Key Stage 4 Curriculum …………………………………………………… 4-7
Jargon Dictionary ………………………………………………………………... 8
Core Curriculum ……………………............................................................ 9
English and English Literature …………………………………………………. 10-11
Mathematics …………………………………………………………………….. 12
Additional Mathematics ………………………………………………………….13
Triple Science …………………………………………………………………… 14
Science A and Additional Science …………………………………………….. 15
Religious Studies ………………………………………………………………... 16
Option Choices ………………………………………………………………… 17
Art and Design …………………………………………………………………… 18
Art Textiles ……………………………………………………………………….. 19
Design and Technology ………………………………………………………… 20
Music ……………………………………………………………………………… 21
Drama ……………………………………………………………………………. 22
Physical Education and Sport ……………………………………………….... 23-25
Geography ……………………………………………………………………….. 26
History …………………………………………………………………………….. 27
French …………………………………………………………………………….. 28
German …………………………………………………………………………… 29
Spanish …………………………………………………………………………… 30
Latin……………………………………………………………………………… 31
Computing ………………………………………………………………………... 32
IT Certificate……………………………………………………………………… 33
GCSE ICT (Double Award) …………………………………………………….. 34-35
Economics …………………………………………………………………………36
Business BTEC ………………………………………………………………….. .37
Health and Social Care BTEC ………………………………………………… ..38
Travel and Tourism BTEC ………………………………………………………..39
Child Development ……………………………………………………………… .40
Hospitality BTEC…………………………………………………………………...41
Contact details for staff ………………………………………………………… .42
Examination Boards …………………………………………………………….. 43
Options Form …………………………………………………………………….. .45-46
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Dear Student,
Up until this stage in your education, the subjects you have studied have been chosen for you. This is
now changing as you can choose to study certain subjects at GCSE in Years 10 and 11. Some
subjects you select will be ones you have taken before but there is also an opportunity to follow new
subjects.
This means that you will continue to study the core subjects of English, Mathematics, Science and
R.E. You can then decide the other subjects that will eventually make up your Year 10 and 11
curriculum. You will be able to choose from within Languages, Technology, Creative Arts, PE, ICT
and Vocational Studies.
This booklet is part of the process to help you make sensible and considered decisions. Making your
choice is important and you should make the most of the opportunities available to you in the next few
weeks to ensure you make the right decisions.
There is considerable freedom over the GCSE subjects you can choose. Whilst this greater choice
will enable you to choose more of your favourite subjects, we would advise you to think very carefully
before coming to any final decision.
Remember, a broad and balanced range of subjects will enable you to be more flexible in your career
or education path at 16 and later.
There will be an Options Day on Wednesday 14 January 2015 when you and your parents can find
out more about the courses available. This is an opportunity for you to ask teachers questions about
their subject and to see the sort of work that you will do.
During the next two weeks, Miss Tesfageorgis, our Careers adviser will speak to you in tutor time to
discuss your options and what you might like to do in the future. It is important to consider what
subjects you may need to go on to the career that you wish to pursue. Miss Tesfageorgis will be at
the Options Day to answer your questions and both you and your parents can see her for further
careers advice throughout your time at Bishop Thomas Grant School.
You will also have the opportunity in the next week to see presentations from different subjects about
why you might want to choose their subject. Listen very carefully to these teachers. It is important that
you choose subjects that you can be successful in and that suit the type of learner that you are.
At the back of this booklet is an OPTIONS FORM, to be completed and returned to school by
Monday 26 January 2015. The form has been designed to give you a broad academic education and
therefore certain subjects are compulsory.
Your parents and your teachers want to help you to make the right choices. You must think carefully
about what you want to study and why you want to study it. We wish you the very best today and
every day and ask you to reflect on the book of proverbs:
Let the wise hear and increase in learning, and the one who understands obtain guidance.
(Proverbs 1:5)
Mr Louis Desa
Headteacher
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The Key Stage 4 Curriculum
Introduction
Bishop Thomas Grant School provides a broad and balanced curriculum which engages and
challenges our pupils so that they achieve the best possible range of qualifications to enable their
future aspirations to be fulfilled. The curriculum is designed to offer pupils a diverse and coherent
choice of courses and learning experiences so that they develop skills and knowledge that remain
with them long after examinations. This enables pupils to leave school as confident and independent
life-long learners, equipped with the transferable skills needed to thrive in a changing world.
Qualifications and Assessment
In the last few years, the Government have made some changes to the way that qualifications are
assessed. The most significant change is that GCSE courses have returned to a linear assessment
system where all examinations take place at the end of the course. This replaces the modular system
where examinations could be taken throughout the course and resits taken when needed. This
means that pupils starting Year 10 in September 2015 will be sitting all of their examinations at the
end of Year 11. There may be some exceptions in BTECs where the exam element may be taken at
an earlier point during the course and can be retaken.
The other main form of assessment in GCSE courses is called controlled assessment. Controlled
assessment is essentially coursework completed in class in Year 10 and/or Year 11. In the past,
students were allowed to complete this at home but all students are now required to do this under
teacher supervision within school. Students cannot take controlled assessments home to redraft and
improve. Coursework in its traditional form remains in the ‘international’ GCSE offered by the History
department. Coursework can be completed at home and redrafting is permitted.
This year, new specifications for Mathematics, English Language and English Literature have been
introduced for students who will sit the “new” GCSE qualifications. The “new” GCSEs in Mathematics,
English Language and English Literature have no coursework or controlled assessment and students
will be assessed entirely by examination.
No other subjects have new specifications this year although younger students in the school will
experience changes to specifications as they travel up the school since these new GCSE
specifications are being phased in with different year groups. The grades awarded for the “new”
GCSEs in Mathematics, English Language and English Literature are awarded numerical grades from
1 to 9 with Grade 9 being the highest grade. All other GCSEs will continue to award letter grades from
A* to G. BTECs and other vocational courses will award using Pass, Merit, Distinction and
Distinction*.
The Core Curriculum
All pupils will follow the core curriculum until the end of Year 11. The core curriculum consists of
English, Maths, Science and RE. All students study these subjects regardless of their ability.
There are some variations to the core curriculum which are dependent upon ability.
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The students in the top set for Mathematics may also study Additional Mathematics FSMQ
(Freestanding Maths Qualification) in Year 11 if they are working at A* level by the end of
Year 10.
All students study RE GCSE.
All students continue to have PE lessons and some students also may choose GCSE PE as
one of their options subjects
All students study both English Language and English Literature GCSEs.
Students have already started their Key Stage 4 Science courses in Year 9. The most able students
in the top 2 Science sets will study the separate sciences of Biology, Chemistry and Physics. The
Headteacher, Deputy Headteacher (Curriculum) and the Head of Science will select the students who
are eligible for Triple Science following an analysis of the end of year examinations in Year 9 and all
assessments completed in Science during Year 9. Triple Science is not an option subject. The
students in the top two sets will be covering 3 additional modules to gain a third GCSE in the same
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amount of time that other students will study 2 GCSEs in Science. It is therefore only suited to the
most able students in the year group.
Setting
Students will be placed into one of two bands for Mathematics, English and RE. There will be two
sets in the Express band and 5 sets in the X band. In Science, all students are placed into one block
and will be taught at the same time. This will enable the most able Scientists to study separate
Sciences irrespective of their Mathematics or English set. Option subjects are only set when there is
more than one class within a subject being taught at the same time.
Following a review of student progress at the end of Year 9, we will set the year group. The Express
Stream will have the top 2 sets and students will study Mathematics, English and RE in this band.
Students in the Express Stream will study an additional GCSE in Latin. Students who have been
placed in this stream and who have not studied Latin will have the opportunity to study a modern
foreign language as an extra subject. Latin is not offered in the option blocks and is only available to
students in the 2 Express groups in Year 10.
Option Subjects
After the core subjects, pupils have 3 choices from a wide range of courses found in this booklet. It is
strongly recommended that most pupils should study a balanced curriculum which includes subjects
from different areas to help keep their options open after Year 11. The school also recommends that
one of these options subjects should be from the ‘facilitating’ subjects of History, Geography, Modern
Foreign Languages or Computing. These subjects are highly regarded by universities and employers
and offer progression at A Level. (Students who are sitting a mother tongue language do not need to
select a further ‘facilitating’ subject.)
Some pupils may have specific interests and strengths together with a clear idea of what they would
like to do after Year 11. Such pupils may benefit from doing more than one subject in a particular
area. This is why we do not have a rule limiting pupils to choosing only one subject from each area.
Pupils may choose up to two Expressive Arts subjects, two Humanities subjects or two Languages.
Pupils should also remember the following four questions to help them choose the best
combination of courses:
1. What am I good at and what courses will I succeed in?
Recent tracking and scores in assessments will help pupils to identify their areas of strength. If pupils
are unsure about their ability to succeed in a particular course, they should ask their subject teacher
or a subject specialist at the Year 9 Options day.
2. What am I interested in and what do I enjoy?
Most pupils can quickly identify their favourite lessons but it is important to make sure pupils choose a
course because they find the subject interesting rather than just because they like the teacher or the
group of friends in their current Year 9 class. It is unlikely that pupils will have the same teacher or
group in a particular subject next year.
3. What learning style enables me to do my best?
There are many different preferred styles of learning. Some pupils learn best through vocational
experiences where they can see how their learning applies directly to the world of work. Kinaesthetic
learners have a preference for learning through some sort of physical activity, such as carrying out
practical experiments in Science, making a product in DT or performing in dance. Auditory learners
find it easiest to learn through listening and speaking, for example aural activities in French and
Spanish. Visual learners have a preference for learning through studying pictures, images and
diagrams, such as map work in Geography. All courses are designed to have a variety of activities
that appeal to pupils with different learning preferences, although some courses may be particularly
well suited to certain types of learner. Therefore, pupils should aim to choose a combination of
subjects that contain at least one or two courses that match their preferred learning style.
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4. What subjects do I need for my future?
At this stage, many pupils will not know exactly what career they want to pursue so it is important to
choose a broad and balanced combination of courses to keep their future options open. However, it is
important that pupils think ahead as much as possible and find out what qualifications they may need
for their desired post-16 education.
Progression routes post-16
As part of the Education and Skills Act in 2008, the minimum age at which young people in England
can leave learning has been raised. This requires them to continue in education or training until the
end of the academic year in which they turn 17 years old from 2013 and until their 18th birthday from
2015. Raising the participation age means that young people must continue to learn through one of
the following routes:
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Continue with full-time education in school or college
Work-based learning, such as an Apprenticeship
Continue with part-time education or training for at least 20 hours a week if they are
employed.
English Baccalaureate
The much publicised English Baccalaureate (E-Bacc) is a performance measure in school league
tables that was introduced in 2010. The measure recognises those pupils who achieve a GCSE grade
A*-C in English, Mathematics, two sciences, (one of which can be Computer Science,) a modern or
ancient foreign language and either Geography or History. It is not a qualification in itself and is
currently not certificated for pupils achieving the E-Bacc combination of subjects. The purpose of the
E-Bacc, as stated by the Government, is to encourage pupils to achieve a broad set of academic
GCSE qualifications. At Bishop Thomas Grant, pupils have always been able to study the E-Bacc
combination of subjects and this will continue as it is consistent with our longstanding advice to pupils
to choose a broad range of subjects at Key Stage 4. For many, this may include the E-Bacc subjects
but for other pupils a different combination of subjects may be better suited to their strengths and
interests and the requirements of their post-16 route. Therefore, it is not compulsory for pupils to
study the E-Bacc combination of subjects.
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Many students at Bishop Thomas Grant take a GCSE in their mother tongue language.
Students who do this are not required to take a further Language in order to gain the E-Bacc.
To gain the English Baccalaureate, you must secure A*-C grades in all of the E-Bacc subjects.
Sixth Form and then university, employment and/or training
The vast majority of our pupils progress to Bishop Thomas Grant Sixth Form after Year 11. To do so,
pupils will need at least 5 A*-C GCSE grades, including English and Maths, and preferably A*-B
grades in the same or similar subjects that they wish to study at A-level. After the Sixth Form, nearly
all of our students progress to university.
It is strongly recommended, but not compulsory, that most pupils aspiring to university should
consider choosing a modern foreign language and a humanities subject at GCSE as these subjects
are highly regarded and may help to strengthen a university application. A small number of
universities may require a modern foreign language at least at GCSE level for entry to any course.
For example, University College London has now introduced this as a requirement for entry.
Games Afternoon
In Year 10, the Games Afternoon will take place once a fortnight. This will enable students to have
additional curriculum time for Mathematics and English where the new specifications are more
challenging.
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Completing the Options form
Forms should be completed, signed and given to pupils’ tutors no later than Monday 26 January
2015.
Please make a copy of your form and keep this for your own records before handing it in.
We always do our best to maximise the number of pupils who are able to do their first choice courses
and in most years the vast majority of pupils’ choices are met. However, we can never guarantee that
pupils will get their first choices until all of the option choices are analysed and the timetable structure
is in place. Sometimes, we are unable to give pupils a place on a course because:
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There are too few pupils to make a viable class
There are too many pupils given the teachers and resources available
A pupil has opted for a course or combination of courses which may not be well suited to them
in the view of staff at school.
In the small number of cases that we are unable to offer pupils their first choice options or their
reserve choices, we will contact the pupil and parents to discuss suitable alternative courses.
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JARGON DICTIONARY
GCSE
General Certificate of Secondary Education: a system of examinations, with a scale of grades A* - G.
COURSEWORK AND CONTROLLED ASSESSMENT
Those parts of your work which are done during Years 10 and 11 and which count towards your
GCSE Examination. Controlled Assessments are completed in controlled conditions in school.
Coursework is only offered in iGCSE History and can be completed at home. Coursework can also be
redrafted at home but Controlled Assessments cannot be redrafted.
LEVELS OF TIERED ENTRY
In some subjects the examination is split into levels of ability, with different papers for each level, and
different grades awarded to each level.
MODULES
Units of work which are complete in themselves. If they are part of an examination course, there is a
separate assessment for each module, which contributes to the final grade.
ACCREDITATION
When a course, or part of a course, is given credit or certification by an examining body.
KEY STAGE 4 (KS4)
This is the National Curriculum term for work usually completed in Years 10 and 11.
VOCATIONAL COURSES
BTEC courses that are based upon specific career/vocation areas such as Business or ICT. There is
a greater focus on continuous assessment and students must complete assignments across the two
years which will all count towards the final grade.
ENGLISH BACCALAUREATE
The name given to the combination of subjects the government would like to encourage more
students to take – English, Maths, double or triple Science (including Computer Science), a Humanity
(Geography or History) and a modern Foreign language. The E-Bacc is not compulsory.
LINEAR
Linear assessment is when the examination is taken at the end of the 2 year course. Modular
assessment (where exams are taken in January, March and June across the 2 years) is no longer
available at GCSE.
LEVEL 2 COURSE
A Level 2 course is a GCSE or equivalent to GCSE.
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The GCSE Core
Curriculum:
 Mathematics
 English
 Science
 RE
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All students study Mathematics, RE, English and English Literature GCSEs.
All students will study Science and will gain 2 GCSEs in Core Science and Additional Science.
Students in the top 2 Science sets will study the separate Sciences and gain 3 GCSEs.
Students in the top set in Maths may also study Additional Maths FSMQ (Freestanding Maths
Qualification) in Year 11 if they are working at A* level by the end of Year 10.
English Language and Literature GCSE 2015
(AQA)
All students in Year 10 and 11 will follow the AQA English Language and English Literature GCSE
specification
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GCSE English Language
All texts in this examination will be unseen
Paper 1: Explorations in Creative Reading and Writing
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1 hour 45 minutes
80 Marks
50% of GCSE
Section A - Reading
Students answer a range of questions in response to a fiction text
Section B – Extended Writing
Students must produce a sustained piece of descriptive or narrative writing
Paper 2: Writers’ Viewpoints and Perspectives
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1 hour 45 minutes
80 Marks
50% of GCSE
Section A - Reading
Students answer a range of questions in response to one non-fiction text and one literary non-fiction
text
Section B – Extended Writing
Students must produce a sustained piece of writing expressing a viewpoint/opinion
Non-examination Assessment: Spoken Language
Students are assessed on
 Presenting
 Responding to questions and feedback
 Use of Standard English
This component is endorsed separately from the GCSE Award
Grading:
The qualification will be graded and certificated on a nine-grade scale from 9 to 1 using the total
marks across all three papers where 9 is the highest grade.
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GCSE English Literature
All examinations are closed book
Paper 1: Shakespeare and the 19th Century Novel
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Written exam 1 hour 45 minutes
64 Marks
40% of GCSE
Section A Shakespeare
Students will answer one question on their chosen play. They will be required to write in detail about
an extract from the play and then to write about the play as a whole.
Section B The 19th Century Novel
Students will answer one question on their chosen novel. They will be required to write in detail about
an extract from the novel and then to write about the novel as a whole.
Paper 2: Modern Texts and Poetry
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Written exam 2 hours 15 minutes
96 Marks
60% of GCSE
Section A Modern Texts
Students will answer one essay question from a choice of two on their studied modern prose or
drama text.
Section B Poetry
Students will answer one comparative question on one named poem printed on the paper and one
other poem from their Anthology Cluster.
Section C Unseen Poetry
Students will answer one question on one unseen poem and one question comparing this poem with
a second unseen poem
Grading:
The qualification will be graded and certificated on a nine-grade scale from 9 to 1 using the total
marks across all three papers where 9 is the highest grade.
For further details, please contact Mr D Parchot - [email protected]
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GCSE (9-1) Mathematics
(Edexcel)
Course Content:
The assessments will cover the following content headings:
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5.
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Number
Algebra
Ratio, proportion and rates of change
Geometry and measures
Probability
Statistics
Two tiers are available: Foundation and Higher
Assessment:
 Throughout the course you will be assessed half termly and constructive advice will be given to
help you to make progress.
 For the final external assessment you will either be entered for the Higher or Foundation Tiers
depending on your mathematical capability and achievements.
 The qualification consists of three equally-weighted examination papers at either Foundation
tier or higher tier.
 Each paper will cover all the assessment objectives.
Assessment objectives:
AO1 – Use and apply standard techniques
Accurately recall facts, terminology and definitions
AO2 – Reason, interpret and communicate mathematically
Make deductions, inferences and draw conclusions from mathematical information
AO3 – Solve problems within mathematics and in other contexts
Translate problems in mathematical or non- mathematical contexts into a process or a series of
mathematical processes.
Examinations:
 Paper 1 Non-Calculator 1 hour and 30 minutes (80 marks)
 Paper 2 Calculator
1 hour and 30 minutes (80 marks)
 Paper 3 Calculator
1 hour and 30 minutes (80 marks)
Grading:
The qualification will be graded and certificated on a nine-grade scale from 9 to 1 using the total
marks across all three papers where 9 is the highest grade. Individual papers are not graded.
Foundation Tier: grades 1 to 5
Higher tier: grades 4 to 9 ( grade 3 allowed)
Progression:
 You can progress from this course onto AS and A Level Mathematics.
 You can proceed to University to take a degree in Mathematics, Accountancy, Engineering,
Medicine and Architecture.
 Mathematics helps you to think smart and critically, gives you the ability to use logical
thought and increase your ability to make decisions from assumptions. Those who go on to
qualify in Mathematics are in the fortunate position of having a wide range of career
opportunities like IT, Statistics, Accountancy, Teaching, Investment Banking and
Engineering.
For further details please contact: Ms T Matimba – [email protected]
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FSMQ Advanced Level
Additional Mathematics
(OCR)
This Free Standing Mathematics Qualification is suitable for pupils whose targets are mainly A* in
GCSE Mathematics and are intending to study Mathematics and Further Mathematics at A Level.
It is not a GCSE or GCE qualification but carries UCAS points which count towards your overall
points at the end of Year 13.
Course Content:
1. All the algebra topics and techniques needed for A/A* at GCSE Mathematics.
2. Algebra 3 and 4 which include: The factor and remainder theorems, binomial expansion and
distributions.
3. Co-ordinate geometry and its applications.
4. Applications of trigonometry.
5. Calculus-differentiation and integration
6. Calculus- applications to kinematics.
Assessment:
Throughout the course you will be assessed half termly and constructive advice will be given to help
you to make progress.
There is one final examination: A calculator paper of 2 hours.
Progression:
You can progress to AS or A Level Mathematics. Some topics from the first and second core modules
are already covered so students find it is very easy when they start those modules at AS Level.
You can proceed to University to take a degree in Mathematics, Accountancy, Engineering, Medicine,
Architecture and many more.
For further details please contact: Ms T Matimba – [email protected]
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Triple Science: GCSE Biology, Chemistry and Physics (3 GCSEs)
(AQA)
Course Content:
Over the course of Year 10 and Year 11 you will study a variety of Biology, Chemistry and
Physics topics. You will carry out practical investigations as well as ICT-based research.
Studying separate Science GCSEs will provide you with an extended understanding of many
scientific ideas.
Assessment: You will sit three 1-hour written examinations for each separate Science at the end
of Year 11 (9 exams in total). The examinations have a Higher tier and a Foundation tier and you
will be entered for the most appropriate tier for your ability. Each examination will count for 25%
of your overall GCSE grade in each Science. A controlled assessment - called an Investigative
Skills Assessment (ISA) – will count for the final 25% of your grade for each of the 3 Sciences (1
ISA per GCSE, 3 in total).
Progression: Studying separate Science GCSEs will give you the opportunity to study AS and
A2 Biology, Chemistry and Physics if you achieve the necessary GCSE grades in the GCSE
courses.
Studying Science at AS and A2 level can lead to the careers in the following: medicine, dentistry,
nursing, pharmacology, physiotherapy, radiotherapy, veterinary care, forensic science, scientific
research, social care, child care, care for the elderly and many other science-related areas.
For further details, please contact Mr M Todd – [email protected]
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GCSE Science A (Core) and Additional Science (2 GCSEs)
(AQA)
Course Content:
Over the course of Year 10 and Year 11 you will study a variety of Biology, Chemistry and Physics
topics. You will carry out practical investigations as well as ICT-based research.
Studying Science A and Additional Science will provide you with a solid understanding of core
scientific ideas.
Assessment: You will sit three 1-hour written examinations for each GCSE at the end of Year 11 (6
exams in total) – two in Biology, two in Chemistry and two in Physics. The examinations have a
Higher tier and a Foundation tier and you will be entered for the most appropriate tier for your ability.
Each examination will count for 25% of the relevant GCSE. A controlled assessment - called an
Investigative Skills Assessment (ISA) – will count for the final 25% of your grade for each GCSE.
Progression: Studying GCSE Science A and Additional Science will give you the opportunity to
study AS and A2 Biology, Chemistry and Physics if you achieve the necessary GCSE grades in both
GCSE courses.
Studying Science at AS and A2 level can lead to the careers in the following: medicine, dentistry,
nursing, pharmacology, physiotherapy, radiotherapy, veterinary care, forensic science, scientific
research, social care, child care, care for the elderly and many other science-related areas.
For further details, please contact Mr M Todd – [email protected]
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GCSE Religious Studies
(WJEC SPECIFICATION A)
Course Content:
Unit 2 Christianity Through The Gospels
Pupils will study the Gospels in order to get a knowledge and understanding of the key events in
Jesus’ life.
 They will be expected to evaluate the impact of Jesus’ teachings on the lives of believers.
 They will be expected to describe, explain and analyse the significance and impact of the
Christian sense of community and mission.
 They will be expected to use knowledge and understanding through the study of the Gospels
to what it mean to be a Christian in a multi-faith society.
 They will be expected to use knowledge and understanding through a study of the Gospels of
Christian beliefs about the nature of God, sanctity of human life and death.
Unit 3 Roman Catholicism 1
Pupils will study Roman Catholicism within the broader context of Christianity.
 They will be expected to evaluate the impact of Catholic teachings on the lives of believers.
 They will be expected to evaluate the practicality and significance of these beliefs and
practices in everyday life.
 They will be expected to evaluate the different personal responses to the expression of faith.
 They will be expected to evaluate the role of Roman Catholicism in a multi-faith society.
 Finally, they will be expected to explain and evaluate how people’s differences in belief may
lead to differences in the responses made to religious and moral issues.
Assessment:
 Pupils will sit two written papers at the end of Year 11
 Homework is set weekly. It may take the form of completing classwork, preparing for the next
lesson, researching a given topic, and learning for a test or timed essay. All pupils are
expected to produce a high standard of both classwork and homework.
Progression:
 Religious Studies is an extremely well-respected academic subject. You can progress from
this course onto AS and A2 Level Ethics and Philosophy of Religion
 If you are looking at a career in Law, Medicine, Social Work, Teaching or any other job that
involves working with people, Religious Studies is the subject to do
For further details, please contact Mr D O’ Donovan - [email protected]
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GCSE Option
Choices
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Art and Design
Art Textiles
Design and Technology
Music
Drama
PE GCSE and Sport BTEC
Geography
History
French
German
Spanish
Computing
IT Certificate
ICT GCSE
Economics
Business BTEC
Health and Social Care BTEC
Travel and Tourism BTEC
Child Development
Hospitality BTEC
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All students can choose 3 options.
GCSE Art & Design
(Edexcel)
Course Content:
GCSE Art is made up of 2 Units. Unit 1 is coursework which is worth 60% of the overall grade.
Throughout Year 10 pupils are given the theme ‘The City’. Pupils will explore different aspects of the
city using various mediums and techniques. Pupils will work in their sketchbooks but also create 4
final pieces using the following techniques: drawing, collage, painting, printing and sculpture. In Year
11, pupils will begin a new coursework project that allows them more freedom to pursue the ideas
and mediums they choose.
Unit 2 is the External Assignment. This is based on a theme decided by the exam board. Pupils have
10 weeks to plan and prepare for the 10 hour practical exam which is spread across 2 days.
Assessment:
Throughout the two units, pupils must cover the following assessment criteria:
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Developing ideas through research
Experimenting with a range of materials and refining techniques
Recording information including observational drawing and information on artists
Creating successful final pieces that connect with the previous research and development.
In Year 10 and 11, there is a 10 hour controlled assessment in which a final piece will be completed.
At the end of the Unit 2, there is also a final 10 hour exam.
Progression:
By taking Art & Design GCSE you open up opportunities into many creative fields of industry and can
potentially be a highly lucrative career. Britain’s creative economy currently accounts for 10% of our
GDP and employs 1.5 million people. Anything you see or own such as the house you live in, the
clothes you wear, the phone you own, the computer games you play, everything has been designed
by someone with a background in Art & Design. If you choose GCSE Art & Design you are interested
in pursuing it at 6th form you can choose between a range of courses including: A-Level Art & Design,
A-Level Photography or choose a more vocational route and complete the BTEC Diploma in Art &
Design. All routes will enable you to progress further onto Higher Education. The Art department at
Bishop Thomas Grant School has many strong links with Universities which is why 100% of students
who have applied to University to study Art related courses have all successfully gained a place.
If you choose to study GCSE Art & Design you also have the opportunity to visit the prestigious
university of the Arts and meet university tutors, lecturers and students. As part of this wonderful
experience you also gain a Level 2 Drawing qualification to compliment your GCSE course
GCSE Art & Design is a fun and creative subject that offers pupils a more rounded educational
experience as well as encouraging independent thinking and learning. (Please note that students
cannot take both Art and Art Textiles GCSEs).
For further details, please contact Miss R Partleton - [email protected]
18
GCSE Art Textiles
(AQA)
Course Content:
GCSE Art Textiles is made up of 2 Units. Unit 1 is coursework which is worth 60% of the overall
grade. Year 10 pupils are given the theme ‘Urban Life’ to explore. Pupils will experiment with
different aspects of urban life using various mediums and techniques. Pupils will work in their
Sketchbooks to complete observational drawings, paintings, collage and photographs which they will
then respond to by creating textile samples using the following techniques: Printing, Fabric Dyeing,
Machine and Hand Sewing, Felting, Fabric Manipulation and Weaving. In Year 11 pupils will begin a
cultural project that allows them more freedom to develop ideas and experiment with a range of
different textile mediums whilst developing their knowledge of different cultures.
Unit 2 is the External Assignment. This is based on a theme decided by the exam board. Pupils have
10 weeks to plan and prepare for the 10 hour practical exam which takes place across two school
days.
Assessment:
Throughout the two units pupils must cover the following assessment criteria:





Developing ideas through research
Experimenting with a range of materials and refining textile techniques
Recording information such as creating textile samples
Observational work and written information on textile artists/ designers
Creating successful textile final pieces that connect with the previous research and
development.
In Year 10 and 11 there is a 10 hour controlled assessment in which a final piece will be completed.
At the end of the Unit 2, there is also a final 10 hour exam.
Progression:
Art Textiles is a fun and creative subject that offers pupils a more rounded educational experience, as
well as encouraging independent thinking and learning. An education in Art Textiles is not just an
enjoyable experience and a change from more formal academia but can also help start a career with
potentially high earnings. Once a pupil has successfully completed the GCSE course they can then
progress onto either A-Level or BTEC Art & Design or Textiles and then apply for various courses at
Art College or a BA course. Future career prospects include Design. This could be Fashion Design,
Textile Design or a career in manufacturing. (Please note that students cannot take both Art and Art
Textiles GCSEs).
For further details, please contact Mrs K Jackson-Perry - [email protected]
19
GCSE Design and Technology
(AQA)
Course Content:
GCSE Design and Technology has two units:
Unit 1 Written Examination worth 40% of the marks. It is a 2 hour examination this builds on the
knowledge and understanding gained from following different design briefs throughout Year 10. It
has two sections, one that has a design question based on the context given by the exam board. The
second section covers all the content on the specification.
Unit 2 Controlled Assessment worth 60% of the marks. It is completed in Year 11. The Project Briefs
are set by the exam board and the students choose one from the choices given. The pupils have 45
hours to complete their design and make the project.
Assessment:
Pupils will cover the following assessment criteria:
 Developing their' design and technological capability through a flexible and broad-based,
balanced approach to interest them.
 Appraise products’ performance and work with a range of materials and ICT.
 Promote discussion and research using existing products.
The pupils will experience being a client, designer, maker, manager and user. They will consider the
relationship between Design and Technology and society, relating their work to industrial practices
and the application of systems and control. Then in Year 11, unit 2 will be a controlled assessment
task. This will last for 45 hours. Unit 1 is the 2 hour examination at the end of the year.
The specification allows candidates to work in one of the following focus areas:
Graphic Products, Resistant Materials or Product Design.
(Textiles is also available and has a separate entry in the Options booklet under Art Textiles.)
The main difference between all of these options is the outcome:
GRAPHICS – they will design and make prototype products, point of sale displays, promotional
materials or corporate identity.
RESISTANT MATERIALS - they will design and make products that could be storage for small items,
lighting, furniture or children’s toys.
PRODUCT DESIGN – they will design and make a variety of commercial products from point of sale
displays, promotional materials, corporate identity but they can use a range of any suitable material
based on the product.
Progression:
Design and Technology offers a unique opportunity to identify and solve real problems by designing
and making products in a wide range of contexts relating to their personal interests. It helps develop
interdisciplinary skills, all six key skills and imaginative, innovative thinking, creativity and
independence.
Design and Technology involves using a combination of knowledge and
understanding in order to design and make quality products. Once completed pupils can go on to an
A level in Product Design which has several career pathways in Graphics, Interior, Architectural,
Industrial, Furniture, Textiles or Vehicle design.
If you choose Design and Technology as one of your options, please rank your preference for which
area you would most like to study from Graphic Products, Resistant Materials or Product Design by
writing this in the comments box at the end of the form)
For further details, please contact Miss R Partleton – [email protected]
20
GCSE Music
(OCR)
Course Content:
GCSE Music is an enjoyable yet challenging course which develops the intelligent musician. To do this
course you need to have an interest in broadening your musical horizons, listening to and learning about
many different kinds of music. If you are a musician who has been having lessons for a while, or a singer
who is good at theory and listening, this option is for you. You need to be prepared to work hard, and an
open mind is essential.
Assessment:
 Integrated Tasks - 1 solo performance, 1 composition, 1 commentary (30%)
 Practical Portfolio -1 group performance, 1 composition, 1 commentary, composition log (30%)
 Creative Task - A timed composition/improvisation task lasting 45 mins (20%)
 Listening Examination - A listening paper lasting 1hr 30 minutes in which you are asked to
answer questions on the pieces being played. You will have studied all the different styles (20%)
The great thing about this course is the emphasis that is placed on your own music. You will:
 Receive free music lessons on the instrument or voice of your choice
 Have regular opportunities to perform both in lessons and in concerts
 Take part in groups and ensembles provided for your development in the music department
 Be able to go on to study AS Level Music
The programme of study is based on the four different areas. These are:
My Music: You focus on your own instrument, writing songs/compositions for it, as well as
developing your performance skills.
Shared Music: You focus on group and ensemble music, bands, choirs etc.
Dance Music: You will learn about different styles of dance music across the ages – from Waltz to
Disco!
Descriptive Music: You will learn about Programme Music and Film Music.
Progression:
 Music is considered equal to History, Geography and Languages by Cambridge University. It
is therefore an excellent choice if you are considering an academic route and would like to
follow an Arts subject.
 It could lead to career paths in any number of areas including the music business, law,
teaching, accountancy and so on.
 You can continue study with A/S level, A level or a combined Performing Arts course with
dance and drama.
 From A level you can continue up to degree level
 Your GCSE Music will provide you with a stepping stone to virtually every field of the music
industry – from music teaching, music therapy to music production and recording. You could
study further to become a professional musician in an orchestra, band, the theatre,
television. Depending on your self-motivation, commitment and talent, the possibilities in the
field of music are tremendous
 If you are not considering a career in music, having the GCSE will always strengthen your
CV in showing your artistic nature as well as the self-discipline necessary to master a
musical instrument.
 On a personal level you will have a clearer understanding and a deeper appreciation of all
music, whatever the style and genre.
For further details please contact Mrs S Poole - [email protected]
21
GCSE Drama
(Edexcel – 2 DRO1)
Course Content:
Unit 1: Drama Exploration
Exploration of creative and structural aspects of Drama:
 Forms of stimuli
 Explorative strategies
 Drama medium
 Elements of drama.
Unit 2: Exploring Play Texts
Exploration of a play text chosen by the centre involving:
 Exploration of character
 Interpretation of the play
 Design implications of the play.
 Visit to a live theatre performance.
Unit 3: Drama Performance
A devised or scripted play performed to an audience including a visiting examiner. Students may
offer:
 Acting skills, or
 Performance support and design skills
Assessment:
Unit 1: Drama Exploration (30%)
Controlled assessment:
 Six hour practical exploration
 Documentary evidence – maximum 2000 words
Unit 2: Exploring Play Texts (30%)
Controlled assessment:
 Six hour practical exploration based on a play
 Documentary response – maximum 1000 words.
Written response to live theatre – maximum 2000 words
Unit 3: Drama Performance (40%)
Controlled assessment:
 Performance of a play, devised or scripted, to a visiting examiner.
Progression:
 You can progress from this course to AS and A Level Drama or Performing Arts.
 You will gain confidence which will enhance other career paths.
 You will show any prospective employer that you have the ability to work as a member of a
team.
 You will show awareness of sensitive and serious issues that you will explore on the course.
 Creative and imaginative powers, and the practical skills for communicating and expressing
ideas, feelings and meanings in Drama.
 Investigative, analytical, experimental and interpretative capabilities, aesthetic understanding
and critical skills.
 Understanding of Drama forms and awareness of contexts in which they operate.
 Knowledge and understanding of Drama within a social, cultural and historical context.
Please note that students cannot take both Drama and Performing Arts GCSEs.
For further details, please contact Miss C Lingham – [email protected]
22
GCSE Physical Education
(Edexcel)
Course Outline
The GCSE PE course is an academic sporting course that is equivalent to one GCSE.
GCSE PE is assessed via a theory examination (40% of overall mark), Assessment of Performance
(12% of overall mark), and practical performance (48% of overall mark).
For their practical performance, students can choose whether they would like to be assessed as a
performer, coach or official in four chosen sports. For the duration of the course students have the
opportunity to experience a range of additional sporting activities studied at KS3 such as rock
climbing, archery, and track cycling as well as their own chosen sporting activities.
In addition to this GCSE PE students are expected to play competitively in at least one sport either
inside or outside of school.
Theoretically students will study 9 units which will include:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Sports physiology
The benefits of sport
Sports nutrition
Contemporary sporting issues and policy,
Training and performance in sport
Body systems and their impact on sports performance
Students will learn:
•
•
•
•
•
•
The relationship between health-related exercise and performance in physical activity, and
how an individual’s skill-related fitness can be affected by health-related exercise
How performance in physical activity is linked to skill-related fitness
How exercise can achieve desired effects on health, fitness and performance, and how rest
and physical activity in combination contribute to a healthy lifestyle. They will develop this
theme further by planning the targeted selection of physical activity in order to maximise its
effects. This should give students the knowledge and understanding to plan their own
sustainable involvement in physical activity
The importance of diet, work and rest in relation to physical activity and a healthy lifestyle.
That, although they can be looked at separately, body systems do not work in isolation and
that good physical and mental health depends on the interaction of all these body systems
during exercise and physical activity. This will inform students’ own practical performance and
general wellbeing
About the impact of physical activity and exercise on the cardiovascular, respiratory, muscular
and skeletal systems (over the short and long term), and also how lifestyle choices (such as
exercise, diet, rest and drugs) affect those systems, fitness levels and the mind and body in
general
How a lifestyle that contributes positively to physical, mental and social wellbeing, and which
includes regular exercise and physical activity in conjunction, is what makes a healthy, active
lifestyle.
For their coursework students will adopt the role of a sports analyst and critically review performance
whilst designing a 6 week training programme to improve an athlete’s performance.
The students also have the privilege of attending many trips throughout the two years which include
an outward bounds trip to Devon.
23
Key Skills
As well as covering advanced level study of Physical Education, this course will enable you to
develop some key skills, which will be essential to you whatever you go on to do afterwards. The key
skills you can develop during this course are:
•
Communication
•
Application of number
•
Information Technology
•
Working with others
•
Improving own learning and performance
•
Problem solving
•
Thinking Skills
Career Value
This course suits students who are dedicated to sport and may wish to continue the study of Physical
Education at key stage 5. A Physical Education qualification can lead to further and higher education,
careers in the leisure industry, journalism, sponsorship, media, coaching and teaching. Many
universities look favourably on students who have studied GCSE and A-Level PE. Examples of
university courses pursued by those who have undertaken AS/AL PE include:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Physiotherapy
Sports Science and Physiology
Physical Education (teaching)
Engineering
Sports Management
Media/Communications
Assessment
1 Theory Exam (40% of overall mark),
Coursework: Assessment of Performance (12% of overall mark)
Practical Performance in 4 sporting activities (48% of overall mark).
Entry Requirements
Candidates should have a keen interest in sport and be playing at least one sport at club level. Other
competencies include experience of other roles in the sporting arena(i.e. official/ referee/ umpire or
coach/leader). Candidates will be assessed on their ability to perform, analyse and evaluate the
execution of core skills and techniques. A great deal of the course requires independent study,
presentation of research and contribution to classroom discussions.
If you require further details please contact: [email protected],lambeth.sch.uk
24
BTEC Level 2 First Certificate in Sport
(Edexcel)
Course Content:
The BTEC Level 2 is worth 1 GCSE at A*-C and is marked at 4 levels, Pass, Merit, Distinction &
Distinction *.
Pupils have to complete a recommended 120 hours of guided learning and 4 units of work through
internal assignments
The units taught are:

Fitness for sport and exercise

Practical sports performance

The sports performer in action

The mind and sports performance
The course is structured to:







Encourage personal development through practical participation and performance in a range
of sports and exercise activities
Give learners a wider understanding and appreciation of health-related fitness, sports and
exercise through a selection of optional specialist units
Encourage learners to develop their people, communication, planning and team-working skills
by having the opportunity to select from optional units available in the qualification structure
Provide education and training for sport, leisure and recreation employees
Give opportunities for sport, leisure and recreation employees to achieve a nationally
recognised level 1 or level 2 vocationally-specific qualification
Provide learners with the opportunity to progress to other vocational qualifications, such as the
Edexcel BTEC Level 3 Nationals in Sport or Sport and Exercise Sciences, or on to GCE AS or
A level, and, in due course, to enter employment in the sport and active leisure sector
Give learners the opportunity to develop a range of skills and techniques, personal skills and
attributes essential for successful performance in working life.
Assessment:
Assignments are internally marked and externally verified. All pupils must successfully complete all
units.
Progression (BTEC Level 2 and your future career)
BTEC Level 2 is an alternative entry level course into the field of sports and leisure. It is an excellent
course for people interested in coaching and working in the sports industry.
Pupils will be able to progress onto BTEC Level 3 qualifications, where they can continue to degree
level and follow a career in PE, Sports, Sports Science or teaching
For further details, please contact Mr R Shedwick - [email protected]
25
GCSE Geography
(AQA A)
Course Content:
Students study 2 distinct themes:
Unit 1 - Physical Geography
Unit 2 - Human Geography
Specific topics covered are: Restless Earth, Living World, The Coastal Zone, Population Change,
Changing Urban Environments and Globalisation. These topics, drawn from the list of available
options allow students to focus on geographical processes that shape our world at local, national and
global levels.
Unit 3 - Local Fieldwork Investigation
Students undertake a fieldwork assignment drawn from a list of task options provided in advance by
AQA. Candidates will demonstrate a variety of skills in the preparation of this work which is then
submitted as an extended piece of work prepared under strictly controlled conditions.
Assessment:
At the end of each topic within unit 1 and 2, students will be tested using past paper exam questions.
Both Units 1 and 2 are examined in an external written paper over 1hr 30 mins, worth 75 marks.
Together, Units 1 and 2 are worth 75% of the overall GCSE and have two levels of assessment,
Foundation and Higher. The GCSE course is linear, which means both Unit 1 and Unit 2 exams are
taken at the end of Year 11.
The controlled assignment takes place under a variety of controlled conditions over a set period of
time within school. The title of the assignment is taken from a selection of statements provided by
AQA, which are based on the units studied within the specification. This means that students will be
able to study in detail at a local level an issue they have been working on. The controlled assignment
makes up the remaining 25% of the GCSE. Students complete this work at the end of Year 10.
Progression:
Studying Geography allows students the opportunity to develop graphical and map skills,
interpersonal skills through debate and discussion, problem solving skills and the technological skills
such as ICT and GIS. The study of modern Geography embraces key ideas and debates such as
climate change, globalisation, economic progress, urban regeneration and management of world
resources. Progression to “A” Level and Degree courses in Geography can lead to careers in diverse
fields such as journalism, tourism, scientific environmental research and local government. The
ability to make sense of the world around us in a critical and analytical fashion is one which is
desirable to many employers.
The study of Geography builds on students own experiences of the world and should inspire them to
become global citizens. Each one of us has a responsibility to be a Geographer.
For further details, please contact Miss E Wilson – [email protected]
26
iGCSE History
(Cambridge)
Course Content:
Year 10
The 20th Century: International Relations 1945-1991



Who was to blame for the Cold War?
How effectively did the USA contain the spread of Communism?
How secure was the USSR’s control over Eastern Europe, 1948-1989
German Depth Study 1918-1945




Was the Weimar Republic doomed from the start?
Why was Hitler able to dominate Germany by 1934?
How effectively did the Nazis control Germany, 1933-45?
What was it like to live in Nazi Germany
Year 11
The 20th Century: International Relations 1900-1939 (revision of Year 9 curriculum)




What caused the First World War?
Were the peace treaties of 1919-23 fair?
To what extent was the League of Nations a success?
Why had international peace collapsed by 1939?
Assessment:
Coursework: ‘In the area of Civil Rights, Martin Luther King was a very significant figure.’ How
far do you agree with this statement?
Work begins on this in the final half term of Year 10 and is completed by the October half term of
Year 11. It is worth 27% of the overall grade.
Paper 1: International Relations 1900-1991 with the German Depth Study 1918-1945
It is 2 hours long and is taken in the June of Year 11. It is worth 40% of the overall grade.
Paper 2: A 20th Century topic
It is 2 hours long and is taken in the June of Year 11. It is worth 33% of the overall grade.
Progression:
History is a very well regarded subject that is highly sought after by both top universities and
employers. History develops a wide range of transferable skills, which are useful, both in higher
education as well as in the work place. Such skills include:





The ability to independently research information from a variety of sources
The ability to recognise, explain and evaluate different interpretations of the past.
The ability to make inferences from a variety of historical sources and make judgments on
how useful they are.
The ability to cross-reference information.
The ability to construct arguments using Historical evidence
Popular professions for students who have studied History include journalism, media, publishing,
politics, law, administration, management, teaching, sales, accountancy and marketing.
For further details, please contact Mr J Croucher – [email protected]
27
GCSE French
(AQA 4658)
Course Content:
 You will study four main themes: Leisure, Work and Education, Lifestyle and Home and the
Environment. Within each theme, there are a number of sub-topics, giving you the opportunity
to read and listen to a variety of material in your chosen language, including authentic
material.
 You will learn how to communicate with native speakers in a variety of situations and research
different cultural aspects from target-language countries.
 Throughout the course, you will be expected to use a range of resources to assist you with
your language-learning, including the internet, magazine and newspaper articles, videos as
well as authentic listening materials. You should welcome opportunities to practise your
speaking skills with native speakers and you will learn how to cope with unexpected language
and situations. You will be expected to attend regular lunchtime and after-school sessions with
the Foreign Language Assistant (FLA).
 You will produce your own language in spoken and written form, completed under controlled
conditions.
Assessment:
 Your progress will be measured according to the four language skills (listening, speaking,
reading and writing) throughout the course and you are expected to actively participate in all
of these.
 Each lesson aims to provide an equal balance of all the above and you will be assessed on a
regular basis through marked class work and homework.
 Throughout KS4 (Year 10 and 11) you will complete a number of pieces of speaking and
writing Controlled Assessments from which two of each will be chosen. This will account for
60% of the total mark (30% each). The speaking exam will be marked by the teacher and
moderated by AQA. The writing exam will be marked by AQA.
 At the end of KS4 you will be assessed in the other two skills in a listening and a reading
exam.
The course has four parts to the assessment:
Listening (Unit 1) = 20%
Reading (Unit 2) = 20%
Speaking (Unit 3) = 30%
Writing (Unit 4) = 30%
Progression:
 You can progress from this course onto AS and A2 level.
 You will have refined your literacy skills, which are highly relevant to any future course and /or
qualification.
 You will have gained insight into other people’s lives and cultures.
Languages are important in a number of different industries, including business and finance, travel
and tourism and translating and interpreting.
For further details, please contact Mr S Lindsey-Noble – [email protected]
28
GCSE German
(AQA 4668)
Course Content:
 You will study four main themes: Leisure, Work and Education, Lifestyle and Home and the
Environment. Within each theme, there are a number of sub-topics, giving you the opportunity
to read and listen to a variety of material in your chosen language, including authentic
material.
 You will learn how to communicate with native speakers in a variety of situations and research
different cultural aspects from target-language countries.
 Throughout the course, you will be expected to use a range of resources to assist you with
your language-learning, including the internet, magazine and newspaper articles, videos as
well as authentic listening materials. You should welcome opportunities to practise your
speaking skills with native speakers and you will learn how to cope with unexpected language
and situations. You will be expected to attend regular lunchtime and after-school sessions with
the Foreign Language Assistant (FLA).
 You will produce your own language in spoken and written form, completed under controlled
conditions.
Assessment:
 Your progress will be measured according to the four language skills (listening, speaking,
reading and writing) throughout the course and you are expected to actively participate in all
of these.
 Each lesson aims to provide an equal balance of all the above and you will be assessed on a
regular basis through marked class work and homework.
 Throughout KS4 (Year 10 and 11) you will complete a number of pieces of speaking and
writing Controlled Assessments from which two of each will be chosen. This will account for
60% of the total mark (30% each). The speaking exam will be marked by the teacher and
moderated by AQA. The writing exam will be marked by AQA.
 At the end of KS4 you will be assessed in the other two skills in a listening and a reading
exam.
The course has four parts to the assessment:
Listening (Unit 1) = 20%
Reading (Unit 2) = 20%
Speaking (Unit 3) = 30%
Writing (Unit 4) = 30%
Progression:
 You can progress from this course onto AS and A2 level.
 You will have refined your literacy skills, which are highly relevant to any future course and /or
qualification.
 You will have gained insight into other people’s lives and cultures.
Languages are important in a number of different industries, including business and finance, travel
and tourism and translating and interpreting.
For further details, please contact Mr S Lindsey-Noble – [email protected]
29
GCSE Spanish
(AQA 4698)
Course Content:
 You will study four main themes: Leisure, Work and Education, Lifestyle and Home and the
Environment. Within each theme, there are a number of sub-topics, giving you the opportunity
to read and listen to a variety of material in your chosen language, including authentic
material.
 You will learn how to communicate with native speakers in a variety of situations and research
different cultural aspects from target-language countries.
 Throughout the course, you will be expected to use a range of resources to assist you with
your language-learning, including the internet, magazine and newspaper articles, videos as
well as authentic listening materials. You should welcome opportunities to practise your
speaking skills with native speakers and you will learn how to cope with unexpected language
and situations. You will be expected to attend regular lunchtime and after-school sessions with
the Foreign Language Assistant (FLA).
 You will produce your own language in spoken and written form, completed under controlled
conditions.
Assessment:
 Your progress will be measured according to the four language skills (listening, speaking,
reading and writing) throughout the course and you are expected to actively participate in all
of these.
 Each lesson aims to provide an equal balance of all the above and you will be assessed on a
regular basis through marked class work and homework.
 'Throughout KS4 (Year 10 and 11) you will complete a number of pieces of speaking and
writing Controlled Assessments from which two of each will be chosen. This will account for
60% of the total mark (30% each). The speaking exam will be marked by the teacher and
moderated by AQA. The writing exam will be marked by AQA.
 At the end of KS4 you will be assessed in the other two skills in a listening and a reading
exam.
The course has four parts to the assessment:
Listening (Unit 1) = 20%
Reading (Unit 2) = 20%
Speaking (Unit 3) = 30%
Writing (Unit 4) = 30%
Progression:
 You can progress from this course onto AS and A2 level.
 You will have refined your literacy skills, which are highly relevant to any future course and /or
qualification.
 You will have gained insight into other people’s lives and cultures helping you to become a
more aware and tolerant person.
Languages are important in a number of different industries, including business and finance, travel
and tourism and translating and interpreting.
For further details, please contact Mr S Lindsey-Noble – [email protected]
30
WJEC Level 2 Certificate in
Latin Language
The WJEC Level 2 Certificate in Latin Language is recognised in the English Baccalaureate (EBacc)
performance measure. A Level 2 Qualification in Latin (equivalent to GCSE) is a distinctive
qualification and we are fortunate in being able to offer it at Bishop Thomas Grant School.
.
Course Content:
 Fundamentals of Latin grammar and syntax including:
o Nouns and cases, singular and plural.
o Adjectives and comparison.
o Adverbs and comparison.
o Verbs in six tenses, active and passive, and deponents and subjunctive.
o Prepositions and their cases.
o Direct and indirect statements, questions and commands.
o Participles and the ablative absolute.
o Gerund/gerundive.
o Purpose and result clauses.
o Conditions.
o Verbs of fearing.
o Relative clauses.
 Latin vocabulary based on a prescribed list.
 Translation and comprehension work into Latin and into English.
 Cultural and literary information.
Assessment:
 Unit 9521: Core Latin Language. This exam comprises a passage of Latin for
comprehension and lasts 1hour and 15 minutes.
 Unit 9524: Additional Latin Language. This is a further exam passage of Latin of greater
complexity with comprehension and translation questions and lasts 45 minutes.
Is this option for you?
If you enjoy studying Latin now, you are certain to find the course stimulating. This subject is
for you if you enjoy studying for exams rather than completing Controlled Assessments. It is
also a good choice if you enjoy problem solving, you are analytical and want to study a subject
which is stimulating and which encourages you to think for yourself. If you want to
make yourself stand out from the thousands of other applicants to the top universities then
Latin can help you do that as it is a subject that not everyone has the chance to study. If you
enjoy a challenge and are ready to work hard, and most importantly have a good sense of
humour and fun, then Latin is for you.
Progression:
 You can progress from this course onto AS and A2 Level Latin.
 You can progress from this course onto AS and A2 Level Classical Civilisation
 Latin complements all manner of A-level subjects, degree or career choices such as Law,
Philosophy, History, Archaeology, Languages, Religious studies, English Literature,
Medicine and many more.
This course will be offered to students in the Express Stream as an additional GCSE and does not
need to be selected on the options form.
For further details, please contact Dr E Sini-Spencer - [email protected]
31
GCSE Computing
(OCR J275)
Course Content:
Unit A451 Computer systems and programming
This unit covers the body of knowledge about computer systems on which the examination will be
based.
Unit A452 Practical investigation
This unit is designed to provide students with an opportunity to carry out a practical investigation into
a computing issue and engage them with computing in the real world.
Unit A453 Programming project
Students will need to create suitable algorithms which will provide a solution to the stated problem
then code their solutions in a suitable programming language. The solutions must be tested at each
stage to ensure they solve the stated problem using a suitable test plan with appropriate test data.
The code must be suitably annotated to describe the process. Test results should be annotated to
show how these relate to the code, the test plan and the original problem. Students will need to
provide an evaluation of their solution based on the test evidence.

This course is recommended for students who have been studying Computing as part of their
Year 9 ICT lessons this year.
Assessment:
Unit A451 Computer systems and programming
Written paper:
Candidates answer all questions.
1.5 hours
80 marks
40% of the qualification
Unit A452 Practical investigation
Controlled assessment
An investigative task
Approx 20 hours
45 marks
30% of the qualification
Unit A453 Programming project
Controlled assessment
Approx 20 hours
45 marks
30% of the qualification
Progression:


The course will give learners a real, in-depth understanding of how computer technology
works.
The course provides excellent preparation higher study and employment in the field of
Computer Science.
For further details, please contact Ms L Odewale – [email protected]
32
Certificate in IT Application Skills
(BCS Level 2 ECDL)
Course Content:
This course replaces the BTEC ICT course previously offered by the school. It is a more practical
course suited towards students who wish to develop their IT skills for employment. It is a Level 2
course which means that it is equivalent to a GCSE and can lead to the Level 3 ICT BTEC course in
the Sixth Form.
The units indicated below form the fixed units packaged for the purpose of obtaining the BCS Level 2
ECDL Certificate in IT Application Skills qualification.
There is no specific order for completion of the units.
Course Units:
Word Processing
Spreadsheet Software
Presentation Software
Improving Productivity using IT
Assessment:
All units within this qualification are tested with the choice of using either automated or manual
testing. One of the automated tests will be externally assessed.
The pass mark across all units, with the exception of Improving Productivity using IT, is 75% and
each assessment is pass/fail. The Improving Productivity using IT unit carries a pass mark of 55%
Progression:
The BCS Level 2 ECDL provides successful students with a potential stepping stone towards entering
employment in positions such as IT technical sales specialist, DTP operator or computer service
technician.
It is also possible to move on to a higher level qualification such as a Level 3 BTEC National
Certificate specialising in your preferred field.
For further details, please contact Ms L Odewale – [email protected]
33
GCSE ICT (Double Award)
(Edexcel 2IT02)
Course Content:
Single Award (1 GCSE)
Unit 1 - Living in a Digital World
In this unit, students explore how digital technology impacts on the lives of individuals, organisations
and society. Students learn about current and emerging digital technologies and the issues raised by
their use in a range of contexts (learning and earning, leisure, shopping and money management,
health and wellbeing, and on the move). They develop awareness of the risks that are inherent in
using ICT and the features of safe, secure and responsible practice.
Unit 2 - Using Digital Tools
This is a practical unit. Students broaden and enhance their ICT skills and capability. They work with
a range of digital tools and techniques to produce effective ICT solutions in a range of contexts.
Students learn to reflect critically on their own and others’ use of ICT and to adopt safe, secure and
responsible practice. They put into practice what they learn about digital technology in Unit 1 to
produce their own ICT solutions.
Double Award (2 GCSEs)
Unit 3 - Exploring Digital Design
In this unit students explore the design of interactive digital products such as websites, computer
games and databases. They learn how to interpret and produce design documentation. They
investigate the properties of different types of digital content and features of the user interface. They
develop knowledge and understanding of the legal, and other constraints on the production and use
of digital content.
Unit 4 - Creating Digital Products
This is a practical unit. Students apply the knowledge and understanding of digital design they
acquire in Unit 3 to produce an interactive digital product for others to use. They can choose what
sort of product to design and make, but it must include an appropriate user interface and user input
must determine the outputs that are produced.
Assessment:
Single Award
Living in a Digital World
 Externally assessed 90 minutes examination paper.
 The examination paper is a question and answer booklet consisting of five compulsory
questions.
 Variety of question styles: multiple-choice, short answer and extended writing.
Using Digital Tools
 Internally assessed under controlled conditions Controlled Assessment Brief (CAB)
 Students have 40 hours to work on the CAB.
 The CAB is an interactive onscreen document.
Living in a Digital World - 40% of final grade
Using Digital Tools - 60% of final grade
Double Award
Exploring Digital Design
 Externally assessed 90 minutes examination paper. The examination paper is a question and
answer booklet consisting of five compulsory questions.
 Variety of question styles: multiple-choice, short answer and extended writing.
34
Creating Digital Products
 Internally assessed under controlled conditions Controlled Assessment Brief (CAB).
 Students have 40 hours to work on the CAB.
 The CAB is an interactive onscreen document which is downloaded from the Edexcel website.
Living in a Digital World Using Digital Tools Exploring Digital Design Creating Digital Products -
20% of the final grade
30% of the final grade
20% of the final grade
30% of the final grade
Progression:
This qualification supports progress to further study, including A levels, BTECs and Diplomas in IT,
Computing and related subjects.
For further details, please contact Ms L. Odewale – [email protected]
35
GCSE Economics
(OCR – J320)
Course Content:
GCSE Economics is an extremely well-regarded, tough and challenging subject inviting students to
engage in abstract, theoretical thought and then to apply it to the real world by interpreting and
analysing data.
During the course, students will learn about the basic economic problem, competitive markets,
government objectives, the national budget as well as monetary, fiscal and supply-side policies. They
will also investigate international trade, globalisation, exchange rates, the European Union, the euro
and developing countries.
It is essential that students on this course take an active interest in the world around them, reading
and listening to news about economic events that are currently taking place. They must keep very
organised notes and manage their time effectively for revision.
This is an academic course and students will develop higher-order skills of analysis, evaluation,
independent learning, critical reflection, research and abstract reasoning.
Assessment:
All work is assessed through exams at the end or year 11. There is no coursework.
Unit 1 – 25%: 1 hour exam.
Unit 2 – 25%: 1 hour exam.
Unit 3 – 50%: 1.5 hour exam.
Progression:
Economics is a highly regarded discipline that will open doors to the top universities and careers.
These do not just include business, banking and accountancy, but also journalism, development,
research and many more, This GCSE will clearly be an advantage to pupils wishing to progress to Alevel Economics. It will also help those opting for A-level Business or A-level Accounting.
For further details, please contact Mr S Hirjee – [email protected]
36
BTEC First Award in Business
(Edexcel)
Course Content:
The BTEC First Award in Business is a comprehensive and well-rounded vocational qualification
which is assessed mostly by coursework. It is equivalent to one GCSE and covers the key business
areas of finance, enterprise, marketing and the working environment. Students will learn about
essential business topics such as profit, how businesses grow, sales and what makes good
employees.
In this vocational course, students will learn about real businesses and carry out current research to
develop examples in their work. Students gain skills of communication, note-taking, presentation,
research, analysis and independent learning, valued by employers and academic institutions alike.
Assessment:
This qualification is assessed mainly through coursework (75%). There is also one exam (25%).
Year 10: One unit of coursework and one exam
Unit One: Enterprise in the Business World (Coursework)




Explore business theory
The development of their entrepreneurial skills and to apply to their own business idea.
To develop their own realistic business models
This unit will be internally assessed through coursework.
Unit Two: Finance for Business (Examination)




The essential financial principles that underpin a successful business.
Types of business costs. These could include; start-up costs to ongoing daily expenditure.
Financial planning tools (budgeting, cash flow forecasting)
How to measure the results using financial statements e.g. (profit & loss, balance sheet).
Year 11: Two units of coursework
Unit Three: Promoting a Brand
Unit: Four: Principles of Marketing
There will be a further optional unit to cover during year 11.
Progression:
The BTEC First Award in Business will allow students to progress to the sixth form to study the BTEC
National Subsidiary Diploma in Business or A-Level Business. It will also be an advantage when
applying for jobs if the student wishes to leave education after sixteen, providing universal business
skills that can be used in all careers.
For further details, please contact Mr A McCarthy - [email protected]
37
BTEC First Award in Health and Social Care
(Edexcel)
Course Content:
The BTEC First Award in Health and Social Care is a comprehensive and well-rounded vocational
qualification which is assessed through coursework and one external exam and is equivalent to one
GCSE. The course combines elements of sociology, biology, psychology and nutrition and gives
students a firm understanding of the skills needed to work in the health and social care sector.
Students will learn about essential health and social care topics such as human lifespan
development, the values needed to work in health and social care and the importance of public health
campaigns in changing public opinions and behaviour towards a current health care issue.
Through coursework and practical activities students gain skills of communication, note-taking,
presentation, research, analysis and independent learning, which are valued by employers and
academic institutions alike.
Assessment:
75% coursework and 25% exam (60 minute, paper-based).
Year 10:
Unit 1: Human Lifespan Development (Exam)
 Explore human growth and development from infancy to later adulthood.
 Investigate factors that affect human growth and development and how they are interrelated.
Unit 2: Health and Social Care Values (Coursework)
 Explore the care values that underpin current practice in health and social care.
 Investigate ways of empowering individuals who use health and social care services.
Year 11:
Unit 4: Social influences on Health and Wellbeing (Coursework)
 Understand the influences that relationships have on health and wellbeing.
 Explore the effects of socialisation and the effects of social factors on health and wellbeing.
Unit 5: Promoting Health and Wellbeing (Coursework)
 Explore the purpose, types and benefits of health promotion.
 Investigate how health risks can be addressed through developing your own health promotion
campaign.
Progression:
The BTEC First Award in Health and Social Care will allow students to progress to the sixth form to
study the BTEC National Subsidiary Diploma in Health and Social Care. It will also provide students
with the skills needed to go directly into an apprenticeship or employment.
For further details, please contact: Miss E Fisher-Smith –
[email protected]
38
BTEC First Award in Travel and Tourism
(Edexcel)
Course Content:
The BTEC First Award in Travel and Tourism is a comprehensive and well-rounded vocational
qualification which is assessed mostly by coursework. It is equivalent to one GCSE and covers the
key tourism areas which include marketing and the working environment. Students will learn about
essential Travel and Tourism topics such as the importance of tourism to the UK and how the
different tourist sectors interrelate.
In this vocational course, students will learn about real Travel and Tourism and carry out current
research to develop examples in their work. Students gain skills of communication, note-taking,
presentation, research, analysis and independent learning, valued by employers and academic
institutions alike.
Assessment:
This qualification is assessed mainly through coursework (75%). There is also one exam (25%).
Year 10: One unit of coursework and one exam
Unit One: The UK Travel and Tourism Sector (Exam)



Understand the UK travel and tourism sector and its importance to the UK
Economy
know about the industries, and key organisations, within the travel and tourism sector, their
roles and interrelationships
Understand the role of consumer technology in the travel and tourism sector.
Unit Two: UK Travel and Tourism Destinations (Coursework)
 Know UK travel and tourism destinations and gateways
 Investigate the appeal of UK tourism destinations for different types of visitors
 Plan UK holidays to meet the needs of different visitors.
Year 11: Two optional units of coursework
Progression:
The BTEC First Award in Travel and Tourism will allow students to progress to the sixth form to study
the BTEC National Subsidiary Diploma in Business or A-Level Business, we plan to have a level 3
Travel and Tourism course in place very soon. It will also be an advantage when applying for jobs if
the student wishes to leave education after sixteen, providing universal skills that can be used in all
careers.
For further details, please contact Mr A McCarthy - [email protected]
39
GCSE Child Development
(AQA)
Course Content:
The GCSE Child Development course offers many enrichment opportunities to prepare you for a
career in Child Care. The course will cover:






Preparing for a Family
Pregnancy
Child Development after Birth
Diet and Health
Provision for the Family
A Case Study & Research Project
Assessment:
The Child Development course has three units:
Unit 1: Unit 1 counts for 40% of the final GCSE grade and is assessed through one external
examination. The exam is 1 hour 30 minutes long and consists of 8-10 compulsory questions
comprised of short answers, structured questions and essay questions.
Unit 2: In Unit 2 you will be required to complete a research task that counts for 20% of the final
GCSE grade and is assessed by a controlled assessment. The tasks are set by AQA and involve
extensive planning, research, analysis, and evaluation activities.
Unit 3: In Unit 3 you will be required to undertake a child study that counts for 40% of the final GCSE
grade. It is a written report based on analysis of your observations of one particular child over a four
month period.
You will be expected to carry out approximately 20 hours of supervised observation of a child in a
home or child care setting over a period of four months. You will need to produce a portfolio
containing a variety of observational evidence about your interaction with the child. Your portfolio of
evidence will then be used to write a child study report under teacher supervision in the classroom.
Please note that it will be your responsibility to find a nursery, pre-school, family member/friend who
would be prepared to allow you to observe a child over a four month period. Your Child Development
teacher will provide the necessary paper work for the child’s parents to complete giving their full
consent for the Child Study to take place.
Progression:
A GCSE in Child Development is an excellent preparation for students who are interested in a career
in childcare or early years teaching.
For further details, please contact: Miss A Hilliard – [email protected]
40
BTEC First Award in Hospitality
(Edexcel)
Course Content:
The BTEC First Award in Hospitality is a comprehensive and well-rounded vocational qualification
which is assessed mostly by coursework. It is equivalent to one GCSE and covers the key Hospitality
areas of preparing food, Health and Safety, preparing for work and the working environment.
Students will learn about essential Hospitality topics such as food preparation and what makes good
employees in the Hospitality Industry.
In this vocational course, students will learn about real world Hospitality and carry out current
research to develop examples in their work. Students gain skills of communication, note-taking,
presentation, research, analysis and independent learning, valued by employers and academic
institutions alike.
Assessment:
This qualification is assessed mainly through coursework (75%). There is also one exam (25%).
Year 10: One unit of coursework and one exam
Unit One: Introducing the Hospitality Industry (Examination)



Understand the structure and service provision in the hospitality industry
Understand hospitality operations.
understand how current issues and trends impact on businesses within the
Hospitality industry
Unit Six: Planning, Preparing, Cooking and Finishing Food (Coursework)



Understand how to plan a nutritious meal.
Be able to prepare food in a safe and hygienic manner.
Be able to cook and finish food in a safe and hygienic manner.
Year 11: Two units of coursework
Unit Two: Working in the Hospitality Industry
Unit: Three: Food and Health and Safety in the Hospitality Industry.
.
Progression:
The BTEC First Award in Hospitality will allow students to progress to the sixth form to study a level
three BTEC in Hospitality or Business. It will also be an advantage when applying for jobs if the
student wishes to leave education after sixteen, providing universal skills that can be used for a
career in Hospitality.
For further details, please contact: Miss A Keane - [email protected]
41
Contact Details for Staff
YEAR 9 TUTOR TEAM
Tutor
Group
Form Tutor
Mr P Bennett – Head of Year
Ms A Cruzado-Sanders
Ms L Heaney
Mr C Pyke
Mr P Athans
Ms R Gardner
Ms K O’Brien
Mr R Shedwick
Ms S Dawson
9AP
9BD
9BE
9BR
9JF
9MC
9MP
9RL
Email address:
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
CONTACT DETAILS FOR HEADS OF DEPARTMENTS / KEY STAFF
Mrs Y Connolly
[email protected]
Ms M Murray
Ms R Partleton
Deputy Headteacher (with overall
responsibility for the Curriculum)
Deputy Headteacher (Pastoral)
Art, Design and Technology
Miss A Hilliard
Miss C Lingham
Child Development
Drama
[email protected]
[email protected]
Mr S Hirjee
Mr D Parchot
Economics
English
[email protected]
[email protected]
Miss E Wilson
Geography
[email protected]
Mr A McCarthy
[email protected]
Mr J Croucher
Health and Social Care BTEC,
Leisure and Tourism BTEC &
Business BTEC
History
Ms L Odewale
ICT
[email protected]
Dr E Sini-Spencer
Latin
Ms T Matimba
Mathematics
[email protected]
[email protected]
Mr S Lindsey-Noble
Modern Foreign Languages
Mrs S Poole
Music & Performing Arts
[email protected]
[email protected]
Mr R Shedwick
PE
[email protected]
Mr D O’Donovan
RE
[email protected]
Mr M Todd
Science
[email protected]
Mr P Porter
Special Educational Needs
[email protected]
Mrs K Jackson-Perry
Textiles
[email protected]
Miss S Tesfageorgis
Careers
Miss A Keane
Director of Vocational Education
[email protected]
[email protected]
42
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
Summary of Subjects and the specifications for GCSE
Subject
English Language
English Literature
Mathematics
Additional Mathematics
Triple Science (Biology, Chemistry &
Physics)
Science A and Additional Science
Religious Studies
Art
Art Textiles
Business BTEC
Child Development
Computing
Design and Technology
Drama
Economics
French
Geography
German
Health and Social Care BTEC
History (IGCSE)
Hospitality BTEC
IT Certificate
ICT GCSE
Latin
Music
PE
BTEC Sport
Spanish
Travel and Tourism BTEC

43
Exam Board
AQA
AQA
Edexcel
OCR
AQA
AQA
WJEC
Edexcel
AQA
Edexcel
AQA
OCR J275
AQA
Edexcel 2DRO1
OCR J320
AQA 4658
AQA A
AQA 4668
Edexcel
Cambridge
Edexcel
British Computing Society (ECDL)
Edexcel
OCR
OCR
Edexcel
Edexcel
AQA 4698
Edexcel
‘IGCSEs’ are international specifications sat by students across the world.
44
BISHOP THOMAS GRANT SCHOOL
Options Form for 2015
Name of Student:
________________________________________________
Tutor Group:
__________
Parent/Carer’s Name: __________________________________________
Contact Telephone Numbers for Parent/Carer:
Home: ________________________
Mobile: ________________________
Work: _________________________
Email for Parent/Carer: ________________________________
Option Choices – Students must choose one of the facilitating subjects for option choice 1. The
facilitating subjects include History, Geography, Modern Foreign Languages or Computing. (If you are
sitting a GCSE in a mother tongue language, you do not need to choose a ‘facilitating’ subject and
should choose another subject for option choice 1.)
It is important that students rank their choices and use their reserve slots on the form.
My Option choices in order of preference
are:
1)
2)
3)
Reserve 1)
Reserve 2)
Reserve 3)
Reserve 4)
Please write down any other languages spoken at home:
Are you taking a GCSE in your mother tongue language this year or would you like to
do this in Year 10 or 11?
If you have chosen Design and Technology GCSE, please rank your
preferences from Graphics, Resistant Materials or Product Design
below:
Design and Technology 1st choice)
Design and Technology 2nd choice)
Design and Technology 3rd choice)
45
Please record any comments you would like the school to take into consideration
with regard to your options. Please also record any questions that you require
clarification/advice on.
Signature of Student: _______________________
Parent/Carer Signature: ______________________ Date: ____________
46
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OCR English Year 10 and 11 Curriculum Information