Unit 11 Practice Test
Multiple Choice
Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question.
____
1. The ability to learn from experience, solve problems, and use knowledge to adapt to new situations
is known as
a. divergent thinking.
b. neural plasticity.
c. intelligence.
d. validation.
e. aptitude.
____
2. Because intelligence is defined according to the attributes that enable success in a culture,
psychologists consider intelligence to be
a. neurologically determined.
b. socially constructed.
c. based on brain structure.
d. a form of neural plasticity.
e. genetically predetermined.
____
3. Joni claims that she is intellectually gifted because she “possesses” an IQ of 145. She is most clearly
committing the error known as
a. heritability.
b. the Flynn effect.
c. reification.
d. the naturalistic fallacy.
e. savant syndrome.
____
4. The Stanford-Binet, WAIS, and WISC tests are all types of
a. personality tests.
b. factor analysis tests.
c. achievement tests.
d. multiple intelligence tests.
e. general intelligence tests.
____
5. Factor analysis has been used to assess whether
a. intelligence is determined primarily by heredity or by experience.
b. intelligence is a single trait or a collection of distinct abilities.
c. intelligence scores remain stable over the life span.
d. differences in intellectual ability exist between groups of individuals.
e. differences between academic achievement and intellectual ability are significant.
____
6. Spearman's g factor refers to
a. the internal consistency of an intelligence test.
b. the genetic contribution to intelligence.
c. a general intelligence that underlies successful performance on a wide variety of
tasks.
d. a highly developed skill or talent possessed by an otherwise retarded person.
e. the ability to understand and regulate emotions.
____
7. Investigators detected a tendency for those who excelled in one of Thurstone's seven primary mental
abilities to also demonstrate high levels of competence in other abilities. This provided some
evidence of
a. neural plasticity.
b. standardization.
c. emotional intelligence.
d. general intelligence.
e. predictive validity.
____
8. The characteristics of savant syndrome most directly suggest that intelligence is
a. a diverse set of distinct abilities.
b. largely unpredictable and unmeasurable.
c. a culturally constructed concept.
d. dependent upon the speed of cognitive processing.
e. accurately measured by the general intelligence factor g.
____
9. Psychological tests show that 18-year-old Isaiah has an intelligence score of 65. Nevertheless, Isaiah
can, with a few seconds of mental calculation, accurately tell the day of the week on which
Christmas falls for any year in this century. It would be fair to conclude that
a. the intelligence test Isaiah was given has no validity.
b. intelligence tests are generally good measures of verbal but not of mathematical
intelligence.
c. Isaiah is a person with savant syndrome.
d. Isaiah excels in inductive reasoning.
e. the intelligence test Isaiah was given has no reliability.
____ 10. Those who define intelligence as academic aptitude are most likely to criticize
a. Terman's concept of innate intelligence.
b. Spearman's concept of general intelligence.
c. Binet's concept of mental age.
d. Gardner's concept of multiple intelligences.
e. Sternberg's concept of analytical intelligence.
____ 11. Robert Sternberg distinguished among analytical, practical, and ________ intelligence.
a. intrapersonal
b. creative
c. spatial
d. musical
e. physical
____ 12. Which of the following persons best illustrates Sternberg's concept of practical intelligence?
a. Jamal, a student who quickly recognizes the correct answers to multiple-choice test
questions
b. Gareth, a graduate student who generates many creative ideas
c. Shelley, a newspaper reporter who has established a large network of information
sources
d. Cindy, a young mother who prefers cleaning her house to supervising her children
e. Lola, who can instantly recognize and adapt to the emotional states of others
____ 13. Emotional intelligence is a critical component of
a. creativity.
b. social intelligence.
c. analytical intelligence.
d. convergent thinking.
e. factor analysis.
____ 14. Although Nicole scored well above average on the SAT, she frequently loses her temper and
needlessly antagonizes even her best friends. Her behavior best illustrates a low level of
a. reliability.
b. validity.
c. the g factor.
d. mental age.
e. emotional intelligence.
____ 15. The concept of emotional intelligence is most likely to be criticized for
a. lacking definitional clarity.
b. being indistinguishable from analytical intelligence.
c. being difficult to measure reliably.
d. extending the definition of intelligence to an overly broad range of skills.
e. sacrificing content validity for predictive validity.
____ 16. The lower region of the ________ lobe is a center for processing mathematical and spatial
information.
a. frontal
b. parietal
c. occipital
d. temporal
e. ventral
____ 17. Postmortem brain analyses reveal that highly educated people have ________ when they die than do
their less educated counterparts.
a. less neural plasticity
b. more synapses
c. less gray matter
d. more reification
e. larger neurons
____ 18. Brain size (adjusted for body size) is ________ correlated with intelligence. The speed of taking in
perceptual information is ________ correlated with intelligence.
a. not; negatively
b. negatively; positively
c. positively; positively
d. negatively; not
e. negatively; negatively
____ 19. Studies suggest that there is a positive correlation between intelligence and the
a. brain's rate of glucose consumption.
b. brain's production of endorphins.
c. neural processing speed in the brain.
d. the brain's ability to process language in the right rather than the left hemisphere.
e. size of the brain's synaptic gaps.
____ 20. The speed with which people retrieve information from memory has been found to be a predictor of
their ________ intelligence.
a. verbal
b. practical
c. emotional
d. spatial
e. creative
____ 21. Who attempted to assess intellectual strengths by measuring muscular power, sensory acuity, and
body proportions?
a. Lewis Terman
b. Alfred Binet
c. Charles Spearman
d. Francis Galton
e. Howard Gardner
____ 22. Binet used the term mental age to refer to
a. the average chronological age of children who completed a particular grade in
school.
b. the years of formal education successfully completed by a child.
c. the total number of items correctly answered on an intelligence test divided by the
respondent's chronological age.
d. the chronological age that most typically corresponds to a given level of
intelligence test performance.
e. the approximate maturational age of brain neurons as measured by processing
speed.
____ 23. Lewis Terman's widely used American revision of Binet's original intelligence test was the
a. WISC.
b. WAIS.
c. Stanford-Binet.
d. Scholastic Assessment Test.
e. American College Testing Exam.
____ 24. A 6-year-old who responded to the original Stanford-Binet with the proficiency typical of an average
8-year-old was said to have an IQ of
a. 75.
b. 85.
c. 100.
d. 125.
e. 133.
____ 25. Twelve-year-old Norman has an IQ of 75 on the original version of the Stanford-Binet. His mental
age is
a. 8.
b. 9.
c. 10.
d. 12.
e. 16.
____ 26. The eugenics movement would have been most likely to encourage
a. selective breeding of highly intelligent people.
b. creation of special education programs for intellectually inferior children.
c. construction of culturally and racially unbiased tests of intelligence.
d. use of factor analysis for identification of various types of intelligence.
e. identification of lower IQ students in order to target more specific tutoring help.
____ 27. In the early twentieth century, the U.S. government developed intelligence tests to evaluate newly
arriving immigrants. Poor test scores among immigrants who were not of Anglo-Saxon heritage
were attributed by some psychologists of that day to
a. stereotype threat.
b. innate mental inferiority.
c. savant syndrome.
d. divergent thinking.
e. language barriers.
____ 28. Tests designed to assess what a person has learned are called ________ tests.
a. factor analysis
b. aptitude
c. standardized
d. achievement
e. ability
____ 29. Aptitude tests are specifically designed to
a. predict ability to learn a new skill.
b. compare an individual's abilities with those of highly successful people.
c. assess learned knowledge or skills.
d. assess the ability to produce novel and valuable ideas.
e. measure educational achievement.
____ 30. Molly has just taken a test of her capacity to learn to be a computer programmer. This is an example
of a(n) ________ test.
a. validity
b. achievement
c. interest
d. aptitude
e. factor analysis
____ 31. The WAIS consists of separate ________ subtests.
a. intelligence and creativity
b. aptitude and achievement
c. practical and analytic
d. verbal and performance
e. emotions and reasoning
____ 32. Twenty-two-year-old Bernie takes a test that measures such diverse abilities as digit span,
vocabulary, and object assembly. Bernie has completed the
a. WAIS.
b. SAT.
c. Stanford-Binet.
d. GRE.
e. WISC.
____ 33. The Flynn effect best illustrates that the process of intelligence testing requires up-to-date
a. factor analyses.
b. standardization samples.
c. reliability indices.
d. heritability estimates.
e. intelligence quotients.
____ 34. Researchers assess the correlation between scores obtained on two halves of a single test in order to
measure the ________ of a test.
a. validity
b. reliability
c. standardization
d. normal distribution
e. factor analysis
____ 35. Melinda completed the Computer Programming Aptitude Test when she applied for a position with
Beta Electronics. Six months later, she took the same test when she applied for a position with
another company. The fact that her scores were almost identical on the two occasions suggests that
the test has a high degree of
a. content validity.
b. reliability.
c. predictive validity.
d. standardization.
e. stability.
____ 36. A test has a high degree of validity if it
a. measures or predicts what it is supposed to measure or predict.
b. yields consistent results every time it is used.
c. produces a normal distribution of scores.
d. has been standardized on a representative sample of all those who are likely to take
the test.
e. assesses aptitude and achievement accurately.
____ 37. If a road test for a driver's license adequately samples the tasks a driver routinely faces, the test is
said to
a. be reliable.
b. have a normal distribution.
c. have content validity.
d. be standardized.
e. have predictive validity.
____ 38. After learning about his low score on the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale, Gunter complained, “I
don't believe that test is a measure of intelligence at all.” Gunter's statement is equivalent to saying
that the WAIS lacks
a. standardization.
b. reliability.
c. validity.
d. a normal distribution.
e. factor analysis.
____ 39. If both depressed and nondepressed individuals receive similar scores on a diagnostic test for
depression, it suggests that the test
a. has not been standardized.
b. is not valid.
c. is not reliable.
d. has not been factor-analyzed.
e. does not produce scores that form a normal distribution.
____ 40. Why does the predictive validity of general aptitude tests decrease as the educational experience of
the students who take them increases?
a. More educated students have taken aptitude tests so frequently that for them such
tests are no longer pure measures of aptitude.
b. Comparisons of mental age with chronological age are inadequate for assessing the
aptitude of older and more educated students.
c. There is a relatively restricted range of aptitude test scores among students at
higher educational levels.
d. Among more educated students, motivation has a much greater effect on academic
success than does aptitude.
e. predictive validity depends on a “non-normal” distribution of scores, and scores of
students with more educational experiences do not fall on the normal curve.
____ 41. Individuals with Down syndrome are
a. unlikely to show obvious signs of intellectual disability.
b. intellectually disabled due to neglect during infancy.
c. intellectually disabled, except for one specific ability in which they excel.
d. born with an extra chromosome.
e. born with low average numbers of neurons.
____ 42. Mr. and Mrs. Linkletter are parents of an intellectually disabled child. It is most likely that their
child
a. is a female rather than a male.
b.
c.
d.
e.
is unusually creative.
was born with an extra chromosome.
will have difficulty adapting to the normal demands of independent adult life.
is a direct result of ill-advised parenting practices.
____ 43. A condition involving intellectual disability caused by an extra chromosome in one's genetic makeup
is known as
a. the Flynn effect.
b. functional fixedness.
c. Down syndrome.
d. savant syndrome.
e. autism.
____ 44. Hanan, a 22-year-old, has an intellectual disability. Although not fully self-supporting, she earns
some money by working in a sheltered workshop. She has been able to master basic skills equivalent
to those of a second-grader. Hanan's intelligence test score is most likely between
a. 5 and 19.
b. 20 and 34.
c. 35 and 49.
d. 50 and 69.
e. 70 and 130.
____ 45. Over the past 50 or so years, children with an intellectual disability have increasingly been likely to
a. have difficulty adapting to the normal demands of independent living.
b. be diagnosed as having a chromosomal abnormality.
c. demonstrate symptoms of savant syndrome.
d. be mainstreamed into regular school classrooms.
e. receive medications to compensate for learning disabilities.
____ 46. Terman observed that children with IQ scores over 135 are likely to
a. be athletically uncoordinated.
b. be academically successful.
c. have a high degree of practical intelligence.
d. be socially isolated.
e. have low emotional intelligence.
____ 47. The similarity between the intelligence test scores of identical twins raised apart is
a. less than that between children and their biological parents.
b. equal to that between identical twins reared together.
c. equal to that between fraternal twins reared together.
d. greater than that between ordinary siblings reared together.
e. equal to that between adopted siblings reared together.
____ 48. The intelligence test scores of adopted children are LEAST likely to be positively correlated with the
scores of their adoptive siblings during
a. early childhood.
b. middle childhood.
c. early adolescence.
d. middle adolescence.
e. early adulthood.
____ 49. Today's researchers have identified many different chromosomal regions important to intelligence.
This indicates that intelligence is
a. related to neural plasticity.
b. dependent on environmental factors.
c. a polygenetic trait.
d. independent of neural processes.
e. sensitive to stereotype threat.
____ 50. Mr. and Mrs. Goldberg can best predict their newborn daughter's future intellectual aptitude by
a. carefully assessing the infant's sensory and reflexive responses.
b. observing their daughter's general level of emotional reactivity.
c. obtaining information about their own levels of intelligence.
d. monitoring the age at which their child first walks and talks.
e. encouraging her to use flashcards to start speaking at an early age.
____ 51. The heritability of intelligence is greatest among
a. genetically identical individuals who have been raised in similar environments.
b. genetically similar individuals who have been raised in dissimilar environments.
c. genetically dissimilar individuals who have been raised in similar environments.
d. genetically dissimilar individuals who have been raised in dissimilar environments.
e. genetically identical individuals who have been raised in dissimilar environments.
____ 52. The “Mozart effect” refers to the now-discounted finding that cognitive ability is boosted by
a. hybrid vigor.
b. nutritional supplements.
c. Head Start programs.
d. listening to classical music.
e. studying a second language.
____ 53. Research indicates that Head Start programs
a. contribute to dramatic and enduring gains in the participants' intelligence test
scores.
b. yield the greatest benefits for participants coming from intellectually stimulating
home environments.
c. reduce the likelihood that participants will repeat grades or require special
education.
d. generally are not cost effective in improving student achievement.
e. improve analytical intelligence but not practical intelligence.
____ 54. Males are most likely to outnumber females in a class designed for high school students highly
gifted in
a. reading.
b. speech.
c. math problem solving.
d. a foreign language.
e. creativity.
____ 55. Research on racial differences in intelligence indicates that
a. Black Americans typically receive higher scores than White Americans on
nonverbal intelligence test questions.
b. there is currently no difference in the average academic aptitude test scores
received by Black and White Americans.
c. on average, Black Americans perform less well than White Americans on
intelligence tests.
d. among Black Americans, those with the most African ancestry receive the highest
intelligence scores.
e. stereotype threat affects students of all races equally.
____ 56. Research on racial and ethnic differences in intelligence indicates that
a. desegregation has actually decreased the academic achievement of black American
children.
b. the average mathematics achievement test scores of Asian children are notably
higher than those of North American children.
c. among American Blacks, those with African ancestry receive the highest
intelligence test scores.
d. the Black-White difference in SAT scores has increased since 1979.
e. the average vocabulary achievement test scores of North American and Asian
children are about the same.
____ 57. Experts who defend intelligence tests against the charge of being culturally biased and
discriminatory would be most likely to highlight the ________ of intelligence tests.
a. factor analysis
b. content validity
c. predictive validity
d. reliability
e. cultural filters
____ 58. Blacks have been found to score lower on tests of verbal aptitude when tested by Whites than when
tested by Blacks. This best illustrates the impact of
a. standardization.
b. savant syndrome.
c. emotional intelligence.
d. stereotype threat.
e. the Flynn effect.
____ 59. Jim, age 55, plays basketball with much younger adults and is concerned that his teammates might
consider his age to be a detriment to their game outcome. His concern actually undermines his
athletic performance. This best illustrates the impact of
a. the Flynn effect.
b. predictive validity.
c. the normal curve.
d. stereotype threat.
e. reliability.
____ 60. Psychologists would be likely to agree that intelligence tests have
a. greater predictive validity for males than for females.
b. comparable predictive validity for Whites and Blacks.
c. less predictive validity for poor students than for rich students.
d. greater impact when used as achievement tests, not aptitude tests.
e. practical impact on student achievement and self-concept.
Unit 11 Practice Test
Answer Section
MULTIPLE CHOICE
1. ANS:
REF:
TOP:
2. ANS:
REF:
TOP:
3. ANS:
REF:
TOP:
4. ANS:
REF:
TOP:
5. ANS:
REF:
TOP:
MSC:
6. ANS:
REF:
TOP:
MSC:
7. ANS:
REF:
TOP:
MSC:
8. ANS:
REF:
TOP:
9. ANS:
REF:
TOP:
10. ANS:
REF:
TOP:
11. ANS:
REF:
TOP:
12. ANS:
REF:
TOP:
13. ANS:
REF:
TOP:
14. ANS:
REF:
C
PTS: 1
DIF: Easy
Page 524 | Section- Testing and Individual Differences
OBJ: 1
What is intelligence?
MSC: Factual | Definitional
B
PTS: 1
DIF: Medium
Page 524 | Section- Testing and Individual Differences
OBJ: 1
What is intelligence?
MSC: Factual | Definitional
C
PTS: 1
DIF: Difficult
Page 524 | Section- Testing and Individual Differences
OBJ: 1
What is intelligence?
MSC: Conceptual | Application
E
PTS: 1
DIF: Easy
Page 524 | Section- Testing and Individual Differences
OBJ: 1
What is intelligence?
MSC: Factual | Definitional
B
PTS: 1
DIF: Medium
Page 524 | Section- Testing and Individual Differences
OBJ: 2
Is intelligence one general ability or several specific abilities?
Factual | Definitional
C
PTS: 1
DIF: Easy
Page 524 | Section- Testing and Individual Differences
OBJ: 2
Is intelligence one general ability or several specific abilities?
Factual | Definitional
D
PTS: 1
DIF: Medium
Page 524 | Section- Testing and Individual Differences
OBJ: 2
Is intelligence one general ability or several specific abilities?
Factual | Definitional
A
PTS: 1
DIF: Medium
Page 525 | Section- Testing and Individual Differences
OBJ: 3
Theories of multiple intelligences MSC: Factual | Definitional
C
PTS: 1
DIF: Medium
Page 525 | Section- Testing and Individual Differences
OBJ: 3
Theories of multiple intelligences MSC: Conceptual | Application
D
PTS: 1
DIF: Medium
Page 526 | Section- Testing and Individual Differences
OBJ: 3
Theories of multiple intelligences MSC: Conceptual
B
PTS: 1
DIF: Medium
Page 527 | Section- Testing and Individual Differences
OBJ: 3
Theories of multiple intelligences MSC: Factual | Definitional
C
PTS: 1
DIF: Difficult
Page 527 | Section- Testing and Individual Differences
OBJ: 3
Theories of multiple intelligences MSC: Conceptual | Application
B
PTS: 1
DIF: Medium
Page 528 | Section- Testing and Individual Differences
OBJ: 4
emotional intelligence
MSC: Factual | Definitional
E
PTS: 1
DIF: Medium
Page 528 | Section- Testing and Individual Differences
OBJ: 4
TOP:
15. ANS:
REF:
TOP:
16. ANS:
REF:
TOP:
17. ANS:
REF:
TOP:
18. ANS:
REF:
TOP:
19. ANS:
REF:
TOP:
20. ANS:
REF:
TOP:
21. ANS:
REF:
TOP:
22. ANS:
REF:
TOP:
23. ANS:
REF:
TOP:
24. ANS:
REF:
TOP:
25. ANS:
REF:
TOP:
26. ANS:
REF:
TOP:
27. ANS:
REF:
TOP:
28. ANS:
REF:
TOP:
29. ANS:
REF:
TOP:
30. ANS:
REF:
TOP:
Emotional intelligence
MSC: Conceptual | Application
D
PTS: 1
DIF: Medium
Page 529 | Section- Testing and Individual Differences
OBJ: 4
Emotional intelligence
MSC: Factual | Definitional
B
PTS: 1
DIF: Medium
Page 530 | Section- Testing and Individual Differences
OBJ: 5
Is intelligence neurologically measurable?
MSC: Factual | Definitional
B
PTS: 1
DIF: Medium
Page 530 | Section- Testing and Individual Differences
OBJ: 5
Is intelligence neurologically measurable?
MSC: Factual | Definitional
C
PTS: 1
DIF: Difficult
Page 529 | Section- Testing and Individual Differences
OBJ: 5 | 6
Is intelligence neurologically measurable?
MSC: Factual | Definitional
C
PTS: 1
DIF: Medium
Page 531 | Section- Testing and Individual Differences
OBJ: 6
Is intelligence neurologically measurable?
MSC: Factual | Definitional
A
PTS: 1
DIF: Difficult
Page 531 | Section- Testing and Individual Differences
OBJ: 6
Is intelligence neurologically measurable?
MSC: Factual | Definitional
D
PTS: 1
DIF: Difficult
Page 532 | Section- Testing and Individual Differences
OBJ: 7
The origins of intelligence testing MSC: Factual | Definitional
D
PTS: 1
DIF: Medium
Page 533 | Section- Testing and Individual Differences
OBJ: 7
The origins of intelligence testing MSC: Factual | Definitional
C
PTS: 1
DIF: Easy
Page 533 | Section- Testing and Individual Differences
OBJ: 7
The origins of intelligence testing MSC: Factual | Definitional
E
PTS: 1
DIF: Medium
Page 534 | Section- Testing and Individual Differences
OBJ: 7
The origins of intelligence testing MSC: Conceptual | Application
B
PTS: 1
DIF: Difficult
Page 534 | Section- Testing and Individual Differences
OBJ: 7
The origins of intelligence testing MSC: Conceptual | Application
A
PTS: 1
DIF: Difficult
Page 534 | Section- Testing and Individual Differences
OBJ: 7
The origins of intelligence testing MSC: Conceptual
B
PTS: 1
DIF: Easy
Page 534 | Section- Testing and Individual Differences
OBJ: 7
The origins of intelligence testing MSC: Factual | Definitional
D
PTS: 1
DIF: Easy
Page 535 | Section- Testing and Individual Differences
OBJ: 8
Modern tests of mental abilities
MSC: Factual | Definitional
A
PTS: 1
DIF: Medium
Page 535 | Section- Testing and Individual Differences
OBJ: 8
Modern tests of mental abilities
MSC: Factual | Definitional
D
PTS: 1
DIF: Medium
Page 535 | Section- Testing and Individual Differences
OBJ: 8
Modern tests of mental abilities
MSC: Conceptual | Application
31. ANS:
REF:
TOP:
32. ANS:
REF:
TOP:
33. ANS:
REF:
TOP:
34. ANS:
REF:
TOP:
35. ANS:
REF:
TOP:
36. ANS:
REF:
TOP:
37. ANS:
REF:
TOP:
38. ANS:
REF:
TOP:
39. ANS:
REF:
TOP:
40. ANS:
REF:
TOP:
41. ANS:
REF:
TOP:
42. ANS:
REF:
TOP:
43. ANS:
REF:
TOP:
44. ANS:
REF:
TOP:
45. ANS:
REF:
TOP:
46. ANS:
REF:
TOP:
47. ANS:
D
PTS: 1
DIF: Difficult
Page 535 | Section- Testing and Individual Differences
OBJ: 8
Modern tests of mental abilities (text and Figure 11.5)
MSC: Factual | Definitional
A
PTS: 1
DIF: Medium
Page 536 | Section- Testing and Individual Differences
OBJ: 8
Modern tests of mental abilities (Figure 11.5)
MSC: Conceptual | Application
B
PTS: 1
DIF: Difficult
Page 537 | Section- Testing and Individual Differences
OBJ: 9
Standardization
MSC: Factual | Definitional
B
PTS: 1
DIF: Medium
Page 538 | Section- Testing and Individual Differences
OBJ: 10
Reliability
MSC: Factual | Definitional
B
PTS: 1
DIF: Medium
Page 538 | Section- Testing and Individual Differences
OBJ: 10
Reliability
MSC: Conceptual | Application
A
PTS: 1
DIF: Easy
Page 538 | Section- Testing and Individual Differences
OBJ: 10
Validity
MSC: Factual | Definitional
C
PTS: 1
DIF: Medium
Page 538 | Section- Testing and Individual Differences
OBJ: 10
Validity
MSC: Factual | Definitional
C
PTS: 1
DIF: Medium
Page 538 | Section- Testing and Individual Differences
OBJ: 10
Validity
MSC: Conceptual | Application
B
PTS: 1
DIF: Medium
Page 538 | Section- Testing and Individual Differences
OBJ: 10
Validity
MSC: Conceptual | Application
C
PTS: 1
DIF: Difficult
Page 538 | Section- Testing and Individual Differences
OBJ: 10
Validity
MSC: Factual | Definitional
D
PTS: 1
DIF: Easy
Page 542 | Section- Testing and Individual Differences
OBJ: 12
Extremes of intelligence
MSC: Factual | Definitional
D
PTS: 1
DIF: Easy
Page 542 | Section- Testing and Individual Differences
OBJ: 12
Extremes of intelligence
MSC: Conceptual | Application
C
PTS: 1
DIF: Easy
Page 542 | Section- Testing and Individual Differences
OBJ: 12
Extremes of intelligence
MSC: Factual | Definitional
C
PTS: 1
DIF: Difficult
Page 542 | Section- Testing and Individual Differences
OBJ: 12
Extremes of intelligence (Table 11.3)
MSC: Conceptual | Application
D
PTS: 1
DIF: Medium
Page 542 | Section- Testing and Individual Differences
OBJ: 12
Extremes of intelligence
MSC: Factual | Definitional
B
PTS: 1
DIF: Medium
Page 543 | Section- Testing and Individual Differences
OBJ: 12
Extremes of intelligence
MSC: Factual | Definitional
D
PTS: 1
DIF: Easy
48.
49.
50.
51.
52.
53.
54.
55.
56.
57.
58.
59.
60.
REF:
TOP:
ANS:
REF:
TOP:
ANS:
REF:
TOP:
ANS:
REF:
TOP:
ANS:
REF:
TOP:
ANS:
REF:
TOP:
ANS:
REF:
TOP:
ANS:
REF:
TOP:
ANS:
REF:
TOP:
ANS:
REF:
TOP:
ANS:
REF:
TOP:
ANS:
REF:
TOP:
ANS:
REF:
TOP:
ANS:
REF:
TOP:
Page 544 | Section- Testing and Individual Differences
OBJ: 13
Twin and adoption studies (text and Figure 11.11)
MSC: Factual | Definitional
E
PTS: 1
DIF: Difficult
Page 545 | Section- Testing and Individual Differences
OBJ: 13 | 14
Genetic and environmental influences on intelligence
MSC: Factual | Definitional
C
PTS: 1
DIF: Medium
Page 545 | Section- Testing and Individual Differences
OBJ: 13
Twin and adoption studies
MSC: Factual | Definitional
C
PTS: 1
DIF: Difficult
Page 545 | Section- Testing and Individual Differences
OBJ: 13
Twin and adoption studies
MSC: Conceptual | Application
C
PTS: 1
DIF: Difficult
Page 546 | Section- Testing and Individual Differences
OBJ: 13
Heritability MSC: Factual | Definitional
D
PTS: 1
DIF: Easy
Page 547 | Section- Testing and Individual Differences
OBJ: 14
Early environmental influences
MSC: Factual | Definitional
C
PTS: 1
DIF: Medium
Page 548 | Section- Testing and Individual Differences
OBJ: 14
Schooling and intelligence
MSC: Factual | Definitional
C
PTS: 1
DIF: Easy
Page 549 | Section- Testing and Individual Differences
OBJ: 15
Gender similarities and differences
MSC: Conceptual
C
PTS: 1
DIF: Medium
Page 552 | Section- Testing and Individual Differences
OBJ: 16
Ethnic similarities and differences MSC: Factual | Definitional
B
PTS: 1
DIF: Medium
Page 553 | Section- Testing and Individual Differences
OBJ: 16
Ethnic similarities and differences MSC: Factual | Definitional
C
PTS: 1
DIF: Difficult
Page 555 | Section- Testing and Individual Differences
OBJ: 17
The question of bias
MSC: Conceptual
D
PTS: 1
DIF: Easy
Page 555 | Section- Testing and Individual Differences
OBJ: 17
The question of bias
MSC: Factual | Definitional
D
PTS: 1
DIF: Medium
Page 555 | Section- Testing and Individual Differences
OBJ: 17
The question of bias
MSC: Conceptual | Application
B
PTS: 1
DIF: Medium
Page 555 | Section- Testing and Individual Differences
OBJ: 17
The question of bias
MSC: Factual | Definitional
Download

Unit 11 Practice Test