Eng.IV.H./Br. Byrd/Second Semester Final Study Guide
Things to Study:
For one our major texts and one short story, you need to be able to identify main
characters, setting/situation, conflict/climax/resolution, genre, and theme/so what? For
the poetry, you’ll need to know things like situation, tone, and theme.
In addition, know the following:
Anglo-Saxon Period:
Language: Old English
Dates: 449-1066
Text:
Beowulf
Vocab:
Alliteration
Kenning
Banter
Epic Poem
Caesura
Fate
Medieval Period:
Language: Middle English
Dates: 1066-1485
Texts:
Arthurian Legends
Sir Gawain and the Green Knight
The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer (specifically “The Prologue,” “The
Pardoner’s Tale,” and “The Wife of Bath’s Tale.”
Vocab:
Quest
Damsel in Distress
Courtly Love
Courtesy
Chivalry
Relic
Pilgrimage
Allegory
Hypocrisy
Renaissance Period:
Language: Early Modern/Shakespearean
Dates: 1485-1660
Monarch: House of Tudor through Early House of Stuart (period ends with the end of the
Commonwealth era)
Texts:
Eng.IV.H./Br. Byrd/Second Semester Final Study Guide
Poetry by: Queen Elizabeth I, Sir Thomas Wyatt, Sir Walter Raleigh, Christopher
Marlowe, Edmund Spenser, William Shakespeare, Andrew Marvell, Robert Herrick, Richard
Lovelace
Sonnets
Hamlet
Macbeth
Othello
Vocab:
Logos, Pathos, Ethos
Monologue vs. Soliloquy
Tragedy
Humanism
Lyric
Elegy
Ode
Restoration and Enlightenment Period (Stuart and Early Georgian):
Language: Early Modern
Dates: 1660-1798
Monarchs: House of Stuart and House of Hanover (Charles II through George III)
Texts:
Excerpt from Paradise Lost by John Milton
Oroonoko by Aphra Behn
“A Modest Proposal” by Jonathan Swift
“A Vindication of the Rights of Women” by Mary Wollstonecraft
“A History of England” by Jane Austen
Lady Susan by Jane Austen
Vocabulary:
Amanuensis
Postlapsarian
Epic Poem
Iambic pentameter
Enjambment
Types of Irony: Verbal, Situational, Dramatic
Satire: Horatian/Juvenalian
Propaganda
Generalization
Parallelism
Romantic Period (Late Georgian):
Language: Modern
Dates: 1798-1832
Monarchs: George III-George IV
Texts:
Romantic poetry by Wordsworth, Shelley, Keats, Byron, Blake, Coleridge
Frankenstein by Mary Shelley
Eng.IV.H./Br. Byrd/Second Semester Final Study Guide
Vocab:
Chart of Romantic Elements
Galvanism
Frame Narrative
Epistolary Narrative
Gothic Novel
Novel of Manners
Victorian Period:
Language: Modern
Monarchs: Queen Victoria + Prince Albert (her husband)
Dates: 1837-1901
Texts we’ve studied:
Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte
The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde
Vocab:
Potboiler
Bildungsroman
Industrialization
British Empire
Comedy of Manners
Farce
Epigram
Dandy
Modern Period:
Language: Modern
Monarch: House of Windsor
Dates: 1901-1950
Texts we’ve studied:
Heart of Darkness Joseph Conrad
“The Odour of Chrysanthemums” by D.H. Lawrence
“The Dead” by James Joyce
“The Day They Burned the Books” by Jean Rhys
“The Garden Party” by Katherine Mansfield
Vocab:
Colonialism
Imperialism
Scramble for Africa
Contemporary Period:
Language: Contemporary English
Dates: 1950-Present
Monarchs: House of Windsor (George VI through Elizabeth II)
Texts we’ve studied:
“The Other Side of the Hedge” by E.M. Forster
Eng.IV.H./Br. Byrd/Second Semester Final Study Guide
Vocab:
“Dead Men’s Path” by Chinua Achebe
“A Woman on the Roof” by Doris Lessing
“Bedtime Stories for Yasmin” by Robert Shearman
“The Writer” by Ellis Sharp
“The Voyage” by Ellis Sharp
Stream of Consciousness
British Monarchy
House of Tudor (late 15th/16th/early 17th centuries):
A: Henry VII: First Monarch of the House of Tudor
B: Henry VIII: A’s son
C: Edward VI: B’s son
D: Lady Jane Grey (whose queenship is disputed, ‘cause it was so brief): A’s greatgranddaughter, C’s cousin
E: Queen Mary I: B’s daughter
F: Queen Elizabeth I: B’s daughter
House of Stuart (17th/early 18th centuries):
G: James I: Son of F’s cousin, Mary, Queen of Scots
H: Charles I: Son of G
Commonwealth/Protectorate
Restoration
I: Charles II: Son of H
J: James II: Son of H, Brother of I
Glorious Revolution of 1688
K: 1: William III (of House of Orange, Netherlands) & 2: Mary II: Daughter of J.
L: Anne: Daughter of J, Sister of K2.
House of Hanover (18th and 19th centuries):
M: George I: Great-grandson of H.
N: George II: Son of M.
O: George III: Grandson of N. (This is “mad king George”, the king the Americans rejected.)
P: George IV: Son of O. (He served as regent for his father during the king’s illness =
Regency Era.)
Q: William IV: Son of O, Brother of P.
R: Victoria: Niece of P & Q. (+ Prince Albert)
Houses of Windsor (20th and 21st Century):
S: Edward VII: Son of R. (Last Monarch of the House of Saxe-Coburg & Gotha)
T: George V: Son of S. (Changed name of house to House of Windsor)
U: Edward VIII: Son of T. (Abdicated throne to marry American divorcee, Wallace Simpson.)
V: George VI: Son of T, Brother of U. (The king in The King’s Speech.)
W: Elizabeth II: Daughter of V. (Current monarch, long may she reign. Husband = Prince
Philip. Children: Charles, Anne, Andrew, and Edward.)
Eng.IV.H./Br. Byrd/Second Semester Final Study Guide
Hamlet: There will be a portion of the exam dedicated to Hamlet.
MLA formatting: You will be given three types of information pages (book w/one author,
article from JSTOR, and an essay from an anthology). You will need to create a works cited
page.
Academic Interpretive Lenses: You will need to fill in the names of the A.I.L. next to their
descriptions. Study the sheet I gave you at the beginning of the year.
Oral Exam: (Last Week of Class)
To prepare for the oral exam, type up your answer to the following question: What have
you learned (from at least three) of the characters we have encountered in the texts for this
class? Please relate your response to the essential question (What is the role of the hero in
a hostile society?). For example, in what ways do you seek to be heroic? What are some of
the faults you share with characters? You will receive more points the more unlike your
response is from everyone else’s (so don’t ask your peers what they are writing). Time your
reading. You only have five minutes. You will lose points if you go over.