Course Number: SPCH 1315
Course Title: Public Speaking
Semester Hours: 3
Foundational Component Area:
In this course, considerable time is devoted to both the instruction, as well as student
presentation of persuasive arguments. Techniques for using evidence and logic effectively, as
well as recognizing fallacious arguments are covered. The course requires the use of credible
sources in defense of a controversial topic. Preparation for this assignment includes analysis of
audience, as well as consideration of ethos, pathos, and logos in constructing the argument.
Students also receive instruction in, and demonstrate the ability to select the most appropriate
organizational patterns, and visuals to support their persuasive arguments.
Multiple oral presentations involving analysis of subject, occasion and audience are requirements
of this course. Additional requirements include the development of and implementation of aural
skills in evaluating professional presentations, as well as peer presentations. Students must
demonstrate the following skills: presenting information in a formal fashion to an audience;
creating a coherent outline through invention, organization, drafting, and revision; and selecting
the most effective visual for the subject, occasion and audience.
Core Objectives:
A. Critical Thinking, Aspect 1: “Students will demonstrate creative thinking and
innovation.”
Assignments in this course require the student to select an appropriate topic within the
constraints of the assignment guidelines, and follow through by selecting credible source
materials which not only add validity, proof and support, but also interest to the development
of the specific purpose of the presentation. Development of these skills requires the student
to engage in extensive scholarly research towards the creation of a well-organized, coherent
outline which includes thoughtful incorporation of credible source material (See Appendix
B-D).
Impromptu speaking assignments require students to draw on their skills of innovation and
creativity, as they formulate an organized speech with only a few minutes of preparation.
Once students have mastered organizing material for an informative message, they are
required to defend and support controversial ideas in a persuasive argument.
Students interact with the speaker after the persuasive and group speeches. They must use
critical thinking skills in framing thoughtful questions or making statements pertinent to the
topic being discussed (See Appendix A).
B. Critical Thinking, Aspect 2: “Students will demonstrate effective inquiry strategies.”
Students must use formal reasoning in order to refine argumentative positions, as well as produce
analytical writing. Students utilize analysis, synthesis, and evaluation throughout the speech
preparation process. Students are required to critically consider topics and problems, read
critically and locate appropriate sources, present argument and/or analysis in unified, developed,
clear, and coherent speeches, and critically reflect on topics presented during class discussion
Students must effectively utilize research to support and lend credibility to their arguments.
They will research a variety of topics and will have access to written, oral, and visual resources
and will subsequently evaluate the credibility of these sources (See Appendix A-D).
C. Communication, Aspect 1: “Students will demonstrate effective development,
interpretation, and expressions of ideas through written communication.”
Students analyze events, ideas, and processes in order to understand them and explain them to
their audience, as well as synthesize source materials in order to convey the unique combinations
to others and to create original speeches. Students must utilize the writing process in order to
create clear written responses.
A portion of the speech preparation process involves the creation of a coherent outline, which
infuses the ideas of the student and scholarly research, as well as the selection, or creation of,
impactful visuals is a requirement of the course (See Appendix B-C).
D. Communication, Aspect 2: “Students will demonstrate effective development,
interpretation, and expressions of ideas through oral communication.”
Students analyze events, ideas, and processes in order to understand them and explain them to
their audience, as well as synthesize source materials in order to convey the unique combinations
to others and to create original oral texts. Students must respond orally to a variety of topics
presented through aural, oral, visual, and written texts.
Students in this course are required to present information and opinion in formal fashion to a live
audience using appropriate verbal and nonverbal extemporaneous techniques. Selection of a
relevant, interesting topic is based on audience analysis and inquiry (See Appendix A and
Appendix D).
E. Communication, Aspect 3: “Students will demonstrate effective development,
interpretation, and expressions of ideas through visual communication.”
Students analyze events, ideas, and processes in order to understand them and explain them to
their audience, as well as synthesize source materials in order to convey the unique combinations
to others and to create original visual texts. Students must respond to a variety of topics
presented through aural, oral, visual, and written texts.
Students must create outlines that effectively and correctly communicate their arguments as a
part of the speech writing and planning process. Students must also select and utilize appropriate
visual aids for their specific speeches (See Appendix A and Appendix D).
F. Teamwork: “Students will demonstrate the ability to consider different points of view
and to work effectively with others to support a shared purpose or goal.”
Students are required to participate in peer evaluation at various stages of the speech writing
process. Through these experiences, students work together to improve not only their own oral
communication skills, but also those of their peers. Through the review process, students are
exposed to opinions and judgments that are often different than their own. This may also occur
when students read various assigned texts or when evaluating visual texts during class
discussions or when working in groups (See Appendix A).
Students are required to use Dewey’s reflective-thinking process for group problem-solving
exercises, as well as develop a group project on a topic agreed upon by all group members. All
group members must share an equal part of the final presentation. Group members are required
to evaluate and analyze scholarly research in the selection of a topic. Students participate by
contributing ideas, and listening analytically to the ideas of others as part of the process of
developing a group presentation (See Appendix A and Appendix B).
G. Personal Responsibility: “Students will demonstrate the ability to connect choices, actions,
and consequences to ethical decision-making.”
Students in this course are taught ethical speaking practices. Because speakers carry the
responsibility of influencing others, they are required to use ethical, credible research methods in
their search for truth. They receive instruction in research methods to aid them in avoiding
plagiarism, and are required to credit the words and ideas of others (See Appendix C and
Appendix D).
Questions of ethics are addressed when evaluating persuasive messages such as whether a course
of action or policy is moral or immoral, just or unjust. Persuasive arguments can be based on a
question of fact (true or false), or a question of value (right or wrong). Students in this course
must identify the type of argument to develop, and ensure that their goals are ethically sound.
Students practice ethical decision-making by avoiding fallacious arguments, preparing
thoroughly for their speeches, and listening attentively to their classmates’ speeches. The role of
listener is a critical aspect of the speech class, as well as the role of speaker. Students have an
ethical obligation to provide a supportive, attentive audience to their classmates, because of the
influence they exert over the speaker’s confidence. This course is based on the free and open
exchange of ideas which requires students to carefully select their messages, and to respond
ethically to the ideas of others.
Students benefit from knowing how to ethically research, organize, and present their ideas, and
society benefits from their ethical behavior in their academic careers, in their community, and in
their profession (See Appendix A and Appendix D).
Appendix A
SPCH 1315 Group Presentation
Your group must choose a scholarly topic.
You will be assigned to a group of 4 to 6 persons. Your group will select a controversial topic
(must be approved by instructor) on which you will present a report and then lead the class in a
discussion.
When you select a topic, subdivide the topic and assign different areas to group members. Your
presentation must begin with a history of the topic, and you must have a summary section (3045 seconds). The group member who presents the history should also present the summary.
You must present both the pro and con sides of the controversy and then lead the class in a
discussion of your topic. Invite us to ask questions, agree or disagree with you, or share
information we may have. Be prepared to field questions based on the research you’ve done. It
is your responsibility to start the discussion.
I want to hear each of you cite three different research sources in your reports. These cites (such
as, “An article entitled ‘The Bermuda Triangle Revisited’ in the July 29, 2002 issues of Time
magazine states that . . . .”) must be cited (said) along with the material supportrd.
Use visual aids and/or handouts, as appropriate.
Because your reports are subdivisions of the topic, you may not need an introduction and
conclusion as you would in an informative or persuasive speech. Let your topic dictate what you
need, but be sure that what you say makes sense and is supported by credible research. You will
need to have introductory and concluding sentences. Your presentations may be informative
and/or persuasive, depending on your subtopic.
DO NOT READ!!! Rehearse your presentation enough that you can speak to us from notes, with
the exception of any quotes and cite information you may have. If you read, the best grade you
can expect is a D.
Your group will have one class period (50 minutes) for the presentation, and each of your
members must speak a total of 5 - 6 minutes—excluding the class discussion. Grades will be
individual, not group.
Appendix B
Library Scavanger Hunt
For this activity, you may go to the NCTC library here on campus or to the NCTC library
databases through a computer of your choice. None of your citations may be .org or .com. This
will be due by 8:00 a.m. February 10. When you have finished this assignment, submit it in the
Library Scavanger Hunt Drop Box on ANGEL.
1. Find and fully cite an article on vampires.
2. Find and fully cite an article on the environment using Academic Search Complete.
3. Find and fully cite an article on the economic status of the U.S.
4. Find and fully cite a newspaper article on the Dallas Cowboys using the Dallas Morning News
Archive.
5. Find and fully cite a scholarly article on the U.S. space program.
Appendix C
MLA Citation Assignment
1. Go to the NCTC homepage (www.nctc.edu). Select Library/LRC.
2. If you are on campus, Select Research Databases. If off-campus, login to http://my.nctc.edu
a. Go to MY NCTC (http://my.nctc.edu)
b. Enter your Network ID (aka Angel ID) as your User Name and your Student ID as your Password.
c. Follow the Library Resources/Library Databases links to the Online Library Databases list.
3. Select the Academic Search Complete database.
4. Enter your search term. Search for any topic that would be appropriate for a speech. (You are
not required to use this material in an actual speech.)
5. Select Full Text under the Heading Limit Your Results.
6. Select the Print icon to print your article.
7. Select MLA format from the dropdown box under Citation Format. Select print.
8. Copy and paste the MLA citation into your final document before printing the article.
9. Create a document in Microsoft Word, and entitle it “Works Cited” (without the quotation
marks, of course). Using MLA format, cite this article on your Works Cited sheet.
If you use a word processing program other than Microsoft Word, make certain that you convert
the document to an "rtf" document. Do this by Selecting "Save As" and "rtf".
10. Include an active link to the article in the URL of the MLA citation (e.g.,
http://web.ebscohost.com )
12. Submit the document to the drop box below. Click on the link to the drop box then select the
"Attachments", then "Browse", and when your find your document, click "Upload File".
13. Once you have uploaded the file, select "Finish". This takes you back to the previous screen,
where you select the "Submit" Button.
14. For help in correctly formatting your citations you may go to Purdue's Online Writing Lab
http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/747/01/
You can find a sample Works Cited sheet at http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/747/12/
15. Look in the Speech Documents and Supporting Information Folder (inside Weekly
Assignments folder; Works Cited folder) for sample MLA citations.If you have submitted your
document correctly you will receive a message that reads "Submission Complete", and you will
see your document listed under the submit button.
Appendix D
Demonstration Speech
Time Requirement: 5-7 minutes
Value: 60 points
General Purpose: To Inform
Specific Purpose: After hearing my speech, the audience will know how
__________________________________________________________.
Requirements:
1. Present an informative demonstration/process speech. The demonstration must be
tangible. Do not choose “how to write a resume” or “how to avoid food poisoning.”
2. This speech requires that something actually be demonstrated, but the demonstration does
not have to be completed. You may need to perform a modified demonstration with
certain steps in the process already completed. For example, "how to make a quilt."
3. The test of an effective demonstration speech is that the majority of the audience should
be able to do something they did not know how to do before. In other words, they should
be able to return demonstrate.
4. Do not choose a trivial topic or a simple recipe such as Rice Krispy Treats.
5. One source (internet, scholarly journal article, magazine article, or book) is required. A
copy of your source must be attached to your outline. Highlight the information you use
in your presentation. Only include the pages of the source you used in preparing your
speech, i.e., you do not have to copy the entire book. This source material should be
visible on your outline. For example, (Ref #1). See pp. 172-3 in your text for an
example.
6. Include a Works Cited page with your outline using MLA format. Use your College
Handbook, MLA guide on reserve in the library, EBSCO, the MLA link under the
Syllabus/Resources Tab in ANGEL, or Purdue’s Online Writing Lab website http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/747/01/.
7. You may prepare food or drink, but you must provide enough for everyone to have a
taste. Wear food-handling gloves if appropriate, and be prepared to clean up after your
speech.
8. If you prepare food or drink, please include a copy of the recipe. You should have one
source in addition to the recipe. See the NCTC Library/LRC website link “Reference
Resources” then “Speech” for cooking sources. The website www.howstuffworks.com
can be a helpful source for demonstration speeches. You may also want to browse the
NCTC library list under the SPEECH tab.
9. No illegal objects. No references to or encouragement of illegal activities (including
underage drinking). No firearms or alcohol. No fire. No raw meat or raw poultry.
10. A visual aid is required.
11. Read pp 250-253 in your textbook for more information on this type of speech. See p.
262 for topic ideas.
12. You will lose one point on your speech grade for every minute you go over or under 5-7
minutes.
Demonstration Topic Due:
Demonstration Outline Due:
Demonstration Speech Due:
/w EPDw ULLTE2N
TENTATIVE SYLLABUS - SPCH 1315 - Spring 2013
North Central Texas College
SPCH 1315 – Public Speaking
Instructor Dee Ann McFarlin
Office Phone (940) 498-6205 Office Room #202
Office Hours TR: 7:30-9:30 a.m.
Email [email protected] or ANGEL email (preferred)
Required Text: Cheryl Hamilton. Essentials of Public Speaking, 5th Ed. Wadsworth
Publishing, 2012.
Course Description
The process of oral communication and its relation to communication in general. Emphasis
is placed on developing the student’s abilities in organization and presentation of ideas.
Suggested activities include group discussion, oral interpretation of literature and
extemporaneous speaking. There is evaluation of both listening and speaking experiences.
Course Objectives
Upon successful completion of the course, the student will be able to:
1. Demonstrate the ability to present information and opinion in formal fashion to an
audience.
2. Create a coherent outline.
3. Defend and support controversial ideas.
4. Demonstrate the ability to make effective contributions to a small group discussion.
5. Report a lower level of communication apprehension
6. Integrate credible source material in support of a speech topic.
7. Compose an appropriate Works Cited using MLA format.
Tentative Schedule: See Daily Schedule.
Grading Policy
All assignments are due as specified on the daily schedule. If it is necessary to change a due
date, that information will be given in class. Failure to know of an assignment due date
announced in class due to absence or any other reason will NOT be excused. The instructor
is not obligated to allow make-up speeches (possible only if times permits). Required
outlines, reports, and/or research , if late, will be downgraded by 10 points each of the five
days of the work week (M-F). That process will continue until an F is recorded for the
assignment. The student, however, must still attempt the assignment. A student must
attempt the persuasive speech in order to receive a passing semester grade in this course.
Presentations, outlines, and research will be prepared using techniques presented in lecture.
When there is a discrepancy between the textbook and instructor, use the instructor’s
methods. The textbook is an information resource, but not necessarily what the instructor
expects on assignments for the class.
All outlines and works cited sheets are due on the first scheduled speaking day. All outlines
are to be typed and STAPLED OR PAPER-CLIPPED. If an outline is not fastened with a staple
or paper clip, points will be deducted from the outline. DO NOT ask to use the instructor’s
stapler. It is your responsibility as a student to have all materials necessary to satisfactorily
turn in an assignment. The instructor will not return written material to the student until
after the student’s presentation.
All assignments are due as specified on the daily schedule. If it is necessary to change a due
date, that information will be given in class. Failure to know of an assignment due date
announced in class due to absence or any other reason will NOT be excused. The instructor
is not obligated to allow make-up speeches (possible only if times permits). Required
outlines, reports, and/or research will be downgraded by 10 points each of the five days of
the work week (M-F). That process will continue until an F is recorded for the assignment.
The student, however, must still attempt the assignment. A student must attempt the
persuasive speech in order to receive a passing semester grade in this course.
Presentations, outlines, and research will be prepared using techniques presented in lecture.
When there is a discrepancy between the textbook and instructor, use the instructor’s
methods. The textbook is an information resource, but not necessarily what the instructor
expects on assignments for the class.
All outlines and works cited sheets are due on the first scheduled speaking day. All outlines
are to be typed and STAPLED OR PAPER-CLIPPED. If an outline is not fastened with a staple
or paper clip, points will be deducted from the outline. DO NOT ask to use the instructor’s
stapler. It is your responsibility as a student to have all materials necessary to satisfactorily
turn in an assignment. The instructor will not return written material to the student until
after the student’s presentation.
There are no make-ups for missed exams, group activities, group presentations, popquizzes, pop-impromptu speeches, or class activities. There is no extra-credit work for
this class.
The final is mandatory. If a student does not take the final exam or participate in the final
exam exercise, his/her earned semester grade will be lowered by one letter grade.
CELL PHONES AND PAGERS are to be TURNED OFF BEFORE entering class. If your cell
phone/pager sounds during class, you will be warned the first time. If your cell phone/pager
sounds while the instructor is talking, you will be instructed to leave class and will be
counted absent for the day. If your cell phone/pager sounds during another student’s
speech, either: 1)you will leave, be counted absent, and your grade for that same speech
will be lowered by five points, whether or not you have already given your speech or 2)the
entire class will have a pop-quiz. If you leave class to answer a cell phone/pager, you will be
counted absent for the day. If you think you have extenuating circumstances that require
you to answer your phone/pager, talk to the instructor BEFORE class.
The instructor will not tolerate sleeping, doing homework, or other shows of nonparticipation in class. If any of these occur, the student will be counted tardy or absent for
the day (at the instructor’s discretion).
The speaker must be dressed appropriately for the presentation. Dress as if you were
teaching a college course for the day. This means: no hats, no shorts, a solid shirt (no
writing on the shirt), no sunglasses, no ripped jeans, no revealing clothing, etc. You eyes
must be visible. Pull back your hair if necessary. If in the instructor’s opinion you are not
appropriately dressed, 10 points will be deducted from your speech. If you have any
questions concerning dress, contact your instructor well before the day you are to deliver
your speech.
If you disagree with any posted grade, you have 48 hours from the time the grade is posted
to dispute the grade. Take the following steps:
· Request that I double-check that I did not make a recording error. If no recording error has
been made, you may dispute the grade. To do this, you must prepare a written defense of
your position by explaining how your submitted work meets ALL of the requirements for the
assignment as stipulated in the assignment materials, the syllabus, and other instructions
that may have been posted on ANGEL.
· When you have completed your written defense, send it to me in an email attachment with a
cover letter that announces what you are sending me. Use ANGEL’s internal email.
· I will confirm receipt, review your defense, and justify in writing my decision to keep or
change the grade.
All work and communication submitted--from an outline to an email--must be written using
all aspects of Standard English--capitalization, spelling, punctuation, grammar, syntax, etc.
This means you may not use emoticons. You will lose points on your assignment if you do
not use Standard English. If you email me using emoticons or text-messaging jargon, I will
return the email to you requesting that you resubmit it using Standard English.
The final grade will be determined by the following tentative point system.
90-100% = A; 80=89% = B; 70-79% = C; 60-69% = D; 0-59% = F
Tentative Assignments
Group discussion
Demonstration speech
Demo rough draft outline
Demonstration final outline
Informative speech
Informative final outline
Persuasive speech
Persuasive final outline
Introduce Another
Artifact Speech
Artifact outline
Impromptu speeches (1)
Speech Dos and Don’ts
Test
Exams
Final Exam
Class exercises / pop
quizzes
TENTATIVE TOTAL
Attendance Policy
70
70
40
60
85
70
100
40
25
20
10
5
20
90
30
??
735+
You are expected to attend all classes. Your presence in class is as important when you are
a listener as it is when you are a speaker. You will, consequently, be penalized for excessive
absences. Three tardies equal one absence. If you are tardy, it is your responsibility to see
that the instructor marks you present before you leave class that day. Students who leave
class before being dismissed by the instructor will be counted absent or tardy (at the
discretion of the instructor). Those who leave at break will counted absent. Each absence
will affect the final grade. The absence limit varies with the day and meeting schedule of the
class. The limit is five (5) absences for classes meeting three (3) times a week (automatic F
for the course on the sixth (6) absence). The absence limit is three (3) for classes meeting
two (2) times a week (automatic F for the course on the fourth (4) absence). The limit for
classes meeting one time a week is two (2) absences (automatic F for the course on the
third (3) absence). No further warnings concerning absences will be given. It is the
student’s responsibility to remember absences. Students who exceed the absence limit may
or may not be dropped (at the discretion of the instructor). If you do not plan to continue
attending the class and want a ‘W’ for the semester, be sure to drop the class. Do not
assume that the instructor will do this for you.
Absences are sometimes excused. If you feel you have justification, then email your request
to the instructor. You will receive the answer by email. Email is the only means by which
absences may be excused in this class. Do not assume that smiling or nodding on the
instructor’s part is acknowledgment of an excused absence.
Academic Integrity
Scholastic dishonesty shall include, but not be limited to cheating on a test, plagiarism, and
collusion. See Student Handbook “Student Rights & Responsibilities: Student Conduct [FLB(LOCAL)]” #18.
18. Scholastic Dishonesty: Scholastic dishonesty shall constitute a violation of these rules
and regulations and is punishable as prescribed by Board policies. Scholastic dishonesty
shall include, but not be limited to, cheating on a test, plagiarism, and collusion.
“Cheating on a test” shall include:
a. Copying from another student’s test paper.
b. Using test materials not authorized by the person administering the test.
c. Collaborating with or seeking aid from another student during a test without permission from
the test administrator.
d. Knowingly using, buying, selling, stealing, or soliciting, in whole or in part, the contents of an
unadministered test.
e. The unauthorized transporting or removal, in whole or in part, of the contents of the
unadministered test.
f. Substituting for another student, or permitting another student to substitute for one’s self, to
take a test.
g. Bribing another person to obtain an unadministered test or information about an
unadministered test.
“Plagiarism” shall be defined as the appropriating, buying, receiving as a gift or obtaining by
any means another’s work and the unacknowledged submission or incorporation of it in
one’s own written work.
“Plagiarism” is further defined as any of the following:
a. Turning in someone else’s ideas, opinions, theories, or work as your own.
b. Copying words, ideas, or images from someone else without giving credit.
c. Failing to put a quotation in quotation marks.
d. Giving incorrect information about the source of a quotation or image.
e. Changing words but copying the sentence structure of a source without giving credit.
f. Copying so many words, ideas, or images from a source that it makes up the majority of your
work, whether you give credit or not.
Note: This definition was taken from plagiarism.ord with some modification.
“Collusion” shall be defined as the unauthorized collaboration with another person in
preparing written work for fulfillment of course requirements.
Disciplinary Actions [Student Handbook, p. 164, #5] “When cheating, collusion, or
plagiarism has occurred beyond any reasonable doubt, the instructor may give the student
or students involved an “F” on a particular assignment or in the course. [See Scholastic
Dishonesty FLB (Local)] The instructor shall make a written report of the incident and of the
planned action to his Department Chair. The Department Chair shall report the incident and
action to the appropriate instructional dean who shall review the case, notify the student
and, if necessary, take further action. This may involve either probation or suspension of
the student or students in question. If such disciplinary action is deemed necessary, the
Dean of Student Services shall be notified, and the action shall be taken through that
office.”
Disability Accommodations: The Office for Students with Disabilities (OSD)
provides accommodations for students who have a documented disability. A
disability is anything that can interfere with learning, such as a learning
disability,
psychological
challenge,
physical
illness
or
injury.
Accommodations may include extra time on tests, tests in a distraction
reduced environment, volunteer note taker in class, etc.
On the Corinth Campus, go to room 170 or call 940-498-6207 or 940-4986224. On the Gainesville Campus, go to room 110 in the Administration
(100) Building or call 940-668-4209. Students on the Bowie, Graham,
Flower Mound, and online campuses should call 940-668-4209 to arrange for
an intake appointment with OSD.
North Central Texas College is on record as being committed to both the
spirit and letter of federal equal opportunity legislation, including the
Americans
with
Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990, ADA Amendments Act of 2009, and Section
504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (P.L. 93-112).
ACCESS and NETWORKS Program: The ACCESS Program provides accommodations for
students who have a documented disability. A disability is anything that can interfere with
learning, such as a learning disability, psychological challenge or physical illness or injury.
Accommodations may include extra time on tests, tests in a non-distracting environment,
note taker in class, etc. On the Corinth Campus, contact: Wayne Smith, ACCESS
Coordinator, at ([email protected]), 940-498-6207 or Penny Cogbill, Departmental
Assistant, at [email protected], 940-498-6212 or William Leija, Departmental Assistant, at
[email protected], 940-498-6224 in Suite 170. For the Gainesville, Bowie, or Graham
Campuses, contact Yvonne Sandmann, ACCESS Specialist, at ([email protected], (940)
668-7731 ext. 4321) in Room 110 on the Gainesville Campus.
NETWORKS is a childcare reimbursement program that may assist technical students with
partial childcare reimbursement for those that apply and qualify. Contact Yvonne
Sandmann, ACCESS Specialist, for more information.
Students can also access the Department of Student Success’ website by going to
www.nctc.edu and clicking on the Student Services link and Student Success or “Tutoring
and Other ACADEMIC SUPPORT SERVICES”, or by going directly to
http://www.nctc.edu/Student_Services/Access/AcademicandStudentSupportServices.htm
Student Success Center:
The Student Success Center is designed to help all students at NCTC develop tools to
achieve their academic goals. This program also links students to FREE tutoring, including a
Writing Center, a Math Lab, and free 24/7 online tutoring and helps new students acclimate
to college by providing computer lab services for prospective students. All students are
invited to visit the Student Success Center on the Corinth Campus go to rooms 170, 182, or
188; on the Gainesville Campus go to rooms 114 or 111; on the Flower Mound Campus go
to room 111, on the Bowie Campus go to room 124.
TRIO Program:
TRIO Programs are federally funded programs which offer services designed to assist
students in achieving their academic goals. Services include educational workshops,
academic advising, tutoring, personal counseling, career counseling, cultural enrichment,
and financial aid information. Students may be eligible for TRIO if they are currently
enrolled at North Central Texas College, have academic need, and meet at least ONE of
THREE criteria which include: 1) first generation status—neither parent has a degree from a
4 year college, 2) income level is within federal low income guidelines, and/or 3) has a
documented disability. TRIO is located in Room 170 on the Corinth Campus (Jessica
DeRoche ([email protected], 940-498-6212) and Room 114 on the Gainesville Campus. All
students are invited to visit the Counseling/Advising Center located in Admissions on the
Corinth Campus. For more information contact: Bill Caver ([email protected], 940-6684216)
Students can access our website by going to www.nctc.edu and clicking on the red button in
the middle of the page labeled “Tutoring and Other ACADEMIC SUPPORT SERVICES” or by
going directly to
http://www.nctc.edu/Student_Services/Access/AcademicandStudentSupportServices.htm
EEOC Statement
North Central Texas College does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national
origin, gender, religion, age, or disability in the employment or the provision of services.
Other Pertinent Information
Drops – The instructor will not drop students with excessive absences from this class. It is
the student’s responsibility to drop the class. The only verbal warning is given the first day
class meets. The last day to drop class with an automatic assignment of ‘W’ grade is, April
13, 2013.
Discipline – Speech class by its nature is loosely structured. The instructor does expect
everyone to treat all members of the class with respect at all times. Behavior that
negatively affects the overall participatory nature of the group will not be allowed. Students
who consistently break the rules or are disruptive in the class will be dropped from the
class. This is solely at the discretion of the instructor.
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SPCH 1315 - North Central Texas College