West Valley College
Institutional
Self Evaluation
Report
In support of Reaffirmation of Accreditation
Submitted by:
West Valley College
14000 Fruitvale Avenue
Saratoga, CA 95070
To:
Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges
Western Association of Schools and Colleges
Certification of the Institutional Self Evaluation Report
[ West Valley College Self Evaluation Report]
March 2014
| Table of Contents 4
[ West Valley College Self Evaluation Report]
March 2014
Table of Contents
Certification of the Institutional Self Evaluation Report ......................................... 3
Introduction ............................................................................................................ 7
History .................................................................................................................. 7
Area Demographic................................................................................................ 8
Service Area Labor Market ................................................................................. 10
Student Enrollment Data.................................................................................... 11
Organization of the Self-Study and Timeline ................................................. 18
Organizational Information .............................................................................. 22
Function Map ........................................................................................................ 24
Actionable Improvement Plans.............................................................................47
Certification of Continued Institutional Compliance with Eligibility Requirements74
Certification of Continued Institutional Compliance with Commission Policies .. 82
Responses to Recommendations from the Most Recent Educational Quality and
Institutional Effectiveness Review ..................................................................... 86
Recommendation 1: ........................................................................................... 86
Recommendation 2 ............................................................................................ 91
Recommendation 3 ............................................................................................ 96
Recommendation 4 ............................................................................................ 99
Recommendation 5 .......................................................................................... 105
Standard I: Institutional Mission and Effectiveness ............................................ 108
Standard IA: Mission ........................................................................................ 108
Standard IB: Improving Institutional Effectiveness .......................................... 115
Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services ........................................ 132
Standard IIA: Instructional Programs ............................................................... 132
Standard IIB: Student Support Services .......................................................... 201
Standard IIC: Library and Learning Support Services ....................................... 254
Standard III: Resources........................................................................................ 280
Standard IIIA: Human Resources ..................................................................... 280
| Table of Contents 5
[ West Valley College Self Evaluation Report]
March 2014
Standard IIIB: Physical Resources..................................................................... 322
Standard IIIC: Technology Resources............................................................. 348
Standard IIID: Financial Resources................................................................. 377
Standard IV: Leadership and Governance ......................................................... 432
Standard IVA: Decision-Making Roles and Processes..................................... 432
Standard IVB: Board and Administrative Organization .................................. 453
| Table of Contents 6
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report]
March 2014
Introduction
History
West Valley College is a public California Community College located on the west
side of Silicon Valley, in the foothills of the Santa Cruz Mountains, 50 miles south of
San Francisco. Continuing a nearly 50-year tradition, West Valley College offers
dynamic career programs for today’s job market, professional certificates, and
degree programs with exceptional preparation for transfer to four-year colleges and
universities.
The first public meeting convened to address the formation of the West Valley Joint
Community College District was held in July 1962. In October of that year, the
California State Board of Education approved the District’s formation, and in
January 1963, the voters residing within the Campbell, Los Gatos-Saratoga, and
Santa Clara High School Districts established the District.
The District’s first college, West Valley Junior College, became operational in
September 1964, at the 12½ acre remodeled Campbell Grammar School. The 19641965 academic year began with an enrollment of 3,203 students. One hundred
courses were offered that first year. The following year the name was changed to
West Valley College.
In 1964, the 143-acre Fruitvale-Allendale site in Saratoga was purchased. Funding
from the State Junior College Construction Act was obtained, and between 1964
and 1974 the campus was developed.
Historically, West Valley College has served the geographic areas surrounding
Saratoga, Los Gatos, and Campbell. These traditional feeder communities comprise
the majority of the college’s enrollment; however, with the Highway 85 corridor
well-established, large numbers of students come to West Valley College from
Blossom Valley, Almaden Valley, eastern and southern San Jose, and from as far
away as Salinas and Marin Counties.
The college originally embraced a traditional curriculum with a primary focus on the
transfer of students to statewide and local four-year colleges and universities.
Today, the college is a leader in the delivery of education in a variety of modes to a
broad range of students in Silicon Valley and beyond.
| Introduction 7
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report]
March 2014
Area Demographic
West Valley College is located in Santa Clara County, the largest county in the San
Francisco Bay Area. The county measures approximately 1,316 square miles and is
located at the southern end of the San Francisco Bay. According to California’s
Department of Finance, Santa Clara County is home to more than 1.8 million
persons and by the year 2020, is projected to total almost 2 million residents. The
county is the largest of the nine Bay Area counties (Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin,
Napa, San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Solano, and Sonoma). Santa Clara
County is the fifth most populous county in California, with approximately 24
percent of the Bay Area’s total population living within its jurisdiction.
Between 1990 and
2000, the county grew
by 185,008, or 12
percent. From 2000 to
2010,
the
county's
population
increased
from
1,682,585
to
1,781,642, an almost 6%
increase
in
population. According
to the Association of Bay
Area
Governments
Projection 2009, by 2020, Santa Clara County's population is projected to increase
to 2,063,100.
Between 2000 and 2010, most of the population growth in Santa Clara County
occurred in San Jose and in the North Valley cities (Campbell, Cupertino, Los Altos,
Los Altos Hills, Los Gatos, Milpitas, Monte Sereno, Mountain View, Palo Alto, San
Jose, Santa Clara, Saratoga, and Sunnyvale). Although, North Valley cities
experienced a larger increase in population numbers, the Southern Valley cities
(Morgan Hill and Gilroy) experienced a larger percentage increase in population.
Household and Demographic Characteristics
As of 2010, there were 604,204 households in Santa Clara County. This is a 6.7%
increase in the number of households from 2000. The number of people living in
each household decreased slightly from 2.92 persons per household in 2000, to
2.90 in 2010. Homeowner vacancy rates have stayed steady at 1.4% since
| Introduction 8
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report]
March 2014
2000. Rental vacancy rates have risen from 1.8% in 2000 (at the height of the
dot.com boom) to 4.3% in 2010.
Race and Ethnicity Characteristics
Santa Clara County is made up of people from diverse cultures, nationalities, and
racial groups. As of 2010, the Hispanic or Latino population (from all races)
comprises 26.9% of the total population. The rest of the population (not ethnically
Hispanic) includes 35.2% Whites, 31.7% Asians, 2.4% Black, 0.4% Native Hawaiian or
Pacific Islander, and 3.2% of the population was of some other race or two or more
races.
Many people bring diverse cultures into Santa Clara County from places outside of
the United States. In 2009, approximately 36% of the population in Santa Clara
County was born outside of the United States.
Income Characteristics
Santa Clara County has one of the highest personal income levels in the Bay Area
and in the State of California. In 1999, Santa Clara County had the second highest
median household
(people living together
whether related or not)
income ($85,215) of all
California
counties. Additionally,
Santa Clara County had
the third highest
median family income
($97,669) and fourth
highest per capita
income ($37,598) of all
California counties.
Socio-economic data
| Introduction 9
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report]
March 2014
Service Area Labor Market
Regional Trends
Region
● San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, CA (41940)
● State
2012 Jobs
915,140
14,958,396
2013 Jobs
943,337
15,281,022
% Change
3.1%
2.2%
Growing/Declining Occupations
Occupation
Janitors and Cleaners, Except Maids and Housekeeping Cleaners (37-2011)
Software Developers, Applications (15-1132)
Software Developers, Systems Software (15-1133)
Postal Service Mail Carriers (43-5052)
Aerospace Engineers (17-2011)
Farmworkers and Laborers, Crop, Nursery, and Greenhouse (45-2092)
Change in Jobs
(2012-2013)
1,067
1,012
963
-87
-92
-95
| Introduction 10
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report]
March 2014
Growing/Declining Industries
Industry
Electronic Computer Manufacturing (334111)
Custom Computer Programming Services (541511)
Other Scientific and Technical Consulting Services (541690)
Guided Missile and Space Vehicle Manufacturing (336414)
Telephone Apparatus Manufacturing (334210)
Instrument Manufacturing for Measuring and Testing Electricity and Electrical Signals (334515)
Change in Jobs
(2012-2013)
2,880
1,838
1,275
-391
-512
-691
Largest Openings/Completions Gaps
Occupation
Market Research Analysts and Marketing Specialists (13-1161)
Computer Systems Analysts (15-1121)
Network and Computer Systems Administrators (15-1142)
Sales Engineers (41-9031)
Database Administrators (15-1141)
Related Completions
(2012)
96
66
5
0
12
Annual Openings
(2013)
451
325
192
108
86
Student Enrollment Data
Student enrollment trends have seen a steady decline since 2009. The state
financial crisis from 2009-2011 included a workload reduction that led to a drop in
some enrollment metrics.
| Introduction 11
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report]
March 2014
Most students at West Valley
College are 20 to 24 years of age;
although there is a large
population of older adults (50+)
and teenagers (19 years of age or
less)
A little more than half of the 10,288
students are female.
Of the students enrolled, 84%
attended classes on campus as
opposed
to
using
distance
education (online) courses.
| Introduction 12
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report]
March 2014
The majority of West Valley Students
attend on a part time basis. In fall 2012,
the greatest percentage of students
(25%) enrolled in 3 – 6 units for the
semester.
Fall 2012 Units of Enrollment
Most West Valley Students attend the
college with the goal of transferring to a
four-year institution.
The newly enacted Student Success Initiative
should result in a decline in undecided or
unreported goals as now every student will
be required to declare a course of study
while
completing
the
mandated
matriculation process.
| Introduction 13
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report]
March 2014
| Introduction 14
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report]
March 2014
West Valley College Persistence from 2008-2013
West Valley College Students taking at least 30 units
| Introduction 15
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report]
March 2014
West Valley College Student Success Rate from 2008-2013
West Valley College Completion/SPAR from 2008-2013
| Introduction 16
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report]
March 2014
West Valley College’s 6 year Transfer Velocity from 2008-2013
| Introduction 17
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Organization of the Self-Study
Standard 1 Institutional Mission and Effectiveness
Standard 3: Resources
Co-Chairs:
Writing Committee Members
Co-Chairs:
John Hannigan (faculty)
Jean Finch (faculty)
Pat Fenton (administrator)
Inge Bond (Administrator)
Rebecca Wong (faculty)
Stephanie Kashima (administrator)
Standard 3A: Human Resources
Cathy Aimonetti (classified)
Co-chairs:
Writing Committee Members
Paula Flynn (classified)
Stacy Hopkins (faculty)
Diane Hurd (faculty)
Herlisa Hamp (classified)
John Vlahos (faculty)
Standard 2: Student Learning Programs and Services
Co-Chairs:
Michael Burke (associate faculty)
Kuni Hay (administrator)
Heidi Diamond (faculty)
Standard 2A: Instructional Programs
Standard 3B: Physical Resources
Co-chairs:
Writing Committee Members
Co-chairs:
Writing Committee Members
Kuni Hay (administrator)
Peggy Mathieson (faculty)
Frank Kobayashi (administrator)
Soroush Ghahramani (faculty)
Heidi Diamond (faculty)
Cheryl Miller (faculty)
Steve McCann (faculty)
Betsy Sandford (faculty)
Star Underwood (classified)
Sandy Dinh (classified)
Standard 2B: Student Support Services
Standard 3C: Technology Resources
Co-chairs
Writing Committee Members
Co-chairs
Writing Committee Members
Victoria Hindes (administrator)
Gretchen Ehlers (faculty)
Fred Chow (administrator)
Melissa Ceresa (faculty)
Carol Pavan (faculty)
Elise Johnson (faculty)
Scott Ludwig (classified)
Kelly Cooper (faculty)
Vicky Kalivitis (faculty)
Michelle Donohue-Mendoza (classified)
Joe McDevitt (classified)
Elizabeth Ochoa (classified )
Standard 2C: Library and Learning Resources
Standard 3D: Financial Resources
Co-chairs
Writing Committee Members
Co-chairs
Writing Committee Members
Maryanne Mills (faculty)
Rachel Sandoval (faculty)
Pat Fenton (administrator)
Becky Perelli (faculty)
Michelle Francis (faculty)
Tanya Hanton (classified)
Stephanie Kashima (administrator)
Rebecca McConnell (classified)
Standard 4 : Leadership and Governance
Co-Chairs:
Writing Committee Members
Lance Shoemaker (faculty)
Cynthia Reiss (faculty)
| Introduction 18
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Laurel Kinley (classified)
Nichola Gutierrez (faculty)
Brenda Rogers (classified)
| Introduction 19
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
West Valley College
Accreditation Self Study Preparation Timeline
2012-2013
August
 All College
Day
presentation
on
Accreditation
, Integrated
Planning and
Resource
Allocation,
and Student
Success Act
September
 Reconvene
Steering
committee
(SC)
 Writing
process begins
 SC Co-chairs
reconvene
writing teams,
begin writing
process
 Student and
Employee
survey results
inclusion in
the document
 Identify
district-wide
committee
reports and
confirm status
October
 Transfer
outline
contents to
writing
template
 10/19: First
draft due in
Angel
 10/26:
Steering
Committee
review
 Editor
begins editing
across
standards for
consistency and
evidence
organization
November
 Writing by
writing
team and
review by
the
Steering
committee
 Continue
Evidence
organizati
on online
continues
December
 Draft check
via Steering
Committee
 Prepare for
campus-wide
draft
 Ensure all
necessary
reports on
campus and
district-wide
to be in good
shape review
January
 Editing
continues
 Evidence
organizatio
n continues
February
 Campuswide draft
review and
feedback
March
April
 Editing and
evidence
organization
continues
 Editing and
evidence
organizatio
n continues
 Editing
continues
including
campuswide
feedback
 Prepare for
President’s
review of
the draft
 DisJoint
continues
| Introduction 20
 May ask
College
Council
for initial
review
May
 ”Snap Shot”
taken
 Editing and
evidence
organizatio
n continues
June
 Editing
and
evidence
organizati
on
continues
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
West Valley College
Accreditation Self Study Preparation Timeline
2013-2014
July


Finetune
editing
and
Evidence
link
check
Identify
and plan
for
Accredit
ation
team
room
and
evidence
room set
up
August

Finalize
editing

All
College
Day
Campu
s-wide
review
September

College
Council
(1st
review)
October

College
Council
(final
approval)

President’s
approval
November


Evidence
link
check,
hard
evidence
organiza
tion
Report
submitte
d to
Chancell
or and
the
Board of
Trustees
(?) First
reading
December

Printed
docum
ents
and
CDs are
ready

All
distanc
elearnin
g
course

Board of
Trustees
final
approva
l (?)
access
check
January

Submission
to ACCJC (8
weeks
prior to
the visit)

Begin
preparatio
n for the
team visit,
logistic
arrangeme
nts

Steering
Committee
team visit
orientation

Campuswide
visiting
team
orientation
| Introduction 21
February

Hotel and
other
arrangem
ents
ready for
the team

Evidence
check
March

Team
visit
Week
of
3/17/
14
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Organizational Information
| Introduction 22
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
| Introduction 23
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Function Map
Standard I: Institutional Mission and Effectiveness
A. MISSION
The institution has a statement of mission that defines the institution’s broad educational purposes, its intended student
population, and its commitment to achieving student learning.
College
District
1. The institution establishes student learning programs and services aligned with its purposes,
P
S
its character, and its student population.
2. The mission statement is approved by the governing board and published.
SH
SH
3. Using the institution's governance and decision-making processes, the institution reviews its
mission statement on a regular basis and revises it as necessary.
4. The institution’s mission is central to institutional planning and decision-making.
P
S
P
S
B. IMPROVING INSTITUTIONAL EFFECTIVENESS
The institution demonstrates a conscious effort to produce and support student learning, measures that learning, assesses
how well learning is occurring, and makes changes to improve student learning. The institution also organizes its key
processes and allocates its resources to effectively support student learning. The institution demonstrates its effectiveness
by providing 1) evidence of the achievement of student learning outcomes and 2) evidence of institution and program
performance. The institution uses ongoing and systematic evaluation and planning to refine its key processes and improve
student learning.
College
| Function Map 24
District
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
1. The institution maintains an ongoing, collegial, self-reflective dialogue about the continuous
improvement of student learning and institutional processes.
P
S
2. The institution sets goals to improve its effectiveness consistent with its stated purposes. The
institution articulates its goals and states the objectives derived from them in measurable
terms so that the degree to which they are achieved can be determined and widely discussed.
The institutional members understand these goals and work collaboratively toward their
achievement.
P
S
3. The institution assesses progress toward achieving its stated goals and makes decisions
regarding the improvement of institutional effectiveness in an ongoing and systematic cycle of
evaluation, integrated planning, resource allocation, implementation, and re-evaluation.
Evaluation is based on analyses of both quantitative and qualitative data.
P
S
The institution provides evidence that the planning process is broad-based, offers
opportunities for input by appropriate constituencies, allocates necessary resources, and
leads to improvement of institutional effectiveness.
P
S
5. The institution uses documented assessment results to communicate matters of quality
assurance to appropriate constituencies.
P
S
6. The institution assures the effectiveness of its ongoing planning and resource allocation
processes by systematically reviewing and modifying, as appropriate, all parts of the cycle,
including institutional and other research efforts.
P
S
7. The institution assesses its evaluation mechanisms through a systematic review of their
effectiveness in improving instructional programs, student support services, and library and
other learning support services.
P
S
4.
| Function Map 25
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services
A. INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAMS
The institution offers high-quality instructional programs in recognized and emerging fields of study that culminate in
identified student outcomes leading to degrees, certificates, employment, or transfer to other higher education
institutions or programs consistent with its mission. Instructional programs are systematically assessed in order to assure
currency, improve teaching and learning strategies, and achieve stated student learning outcomes. The provisions of this
standard are broadly applicable to all instructional activities offered in the name of the institution.
1. The institution demonstrates that all instructional programs, regardless of location or
means of delivery, address and meet the mission of the institution and uphold its
integrity.
a. The institution identifies and seeks to meet the varied educational needs of its students
through programs consistent with their educational preparation and the diversity,
demographics, and economy of its communities. The institution relies upon research and
analysis to identify student learning needs and to assess progress toward achieving stated
learning outcomes.
b. The institution utilizes delivery systems and modes of instruction compatible with the
objectives of the curriculum and appropriate to the current and future needs of its
students.
c. The institution identifies student learning outcomes for courses, programs, certificates,
and degrees; assesses student achievement of those outcomes; and uses assessment
results to make improvements.
| Function Map 26
College
District
P
S
P
S
P
S
P
S
College
District
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
2. The institution assures the quality and improvement of all instructional courses and programs
offered in the name of the institution, including collegiate, developmental, and pre-collegiate
courses and programs, continuing and community education, study abroad, short-term
training courses and programs, programs for international students, and contract or other
special programs, regardless of type of credit awarded, delivery mode, or location.
P
S
a. The institution uses established procedures to design, identify learning outcomes for,
approve, administer, deliver, and evaluate courses and programs. The institution recognizes
the central role of its faculty for establishing quality and improving instructional courses and
programs.
P
S
b. The institution relies on faculty expertise and the assistance of advisory committees when
appropriate to identify competency levels and measurable student learning outcomes for
courses, certificates, programs including general and vocational education, and degrees. The
institution regularly assesses student progress towards achieving those outcomes.
P
S
c. High-quality instruction and appropriate breadth, depth, rigor, sequencing, time to
completion, and synthesis of learning characterize all programs.
P
S
d. The institution uses delivery modes and teaching methodologies that reflect the diverse
needs and learning styles of its students.
P
S
e.
The institution evaluates all courses and programs through an on-going systematic
review of their relevance, appropriateness, achievement of learning outcomes, currency,
and future needs and plans.
P
S
College
District
| Function Map 27
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
f. The institution engages in ongoing, systematic evaluation and Integrated Planning and
Resource Allocation to assure currency and measure achievement of its stated student
learning outcomes for courses, certificates, programs including general and vocational
education, and degrees. The institution systematically strives to improve those outcomes
and makes the results available to appropriate constituencies.
P
S
g. If an institution uses departmental course and/or program examinations, it validates their
effectiveness in measuring student learning and minimizes test biases.
P
S
h. The institution awards credit based on student achievement of the course’s stated learning
outcomes. Units of credit awarded are consistent with institutional policies that reflect
generally accepted norms or equivalencies in higher education.
P
S
i.
The institution awards degrees and certificates based on student achievement of a
program’s stated learning outcomes.
P
S
3. The institution requires of all academic and vocational degree programs a component of general
education based on a carefully considered philosophy that is clearly stated in its catalog. The
institution, relying on the expertise of its faculty, determines the appropriateness of each course
for inclusion in the general education curriculum by examining the stated learning outcomes for
the course. General education has comprehensive learning outcomes for the students who
complete it, including the following:
P
S
a. An understanding of the basic content and methodology of the major areas of
knowledge: areas include the humanities and fine arts, the natural sciences, and the
social sciences.
P
S
College
| Function Map 28
District
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
b. A capability to be a productive individual and lifelong learner: skills include oral and
written communication, information competency, computer literacy, scientific and
quantitative reasoning, critical analysis/logical thinking, and the ability to acquire
knowledge through a variety of means.
P
S
c. A recognition of what it means to be an ethical human being and effective citizen:
qualities include an appreciation of ethical principles; civility and interpersonal skills;
respect for cultural diversity; historical and aesthetic sensitivity; and the willingness to
assume civic, political, and social responsibilities locally, nationally, and globally.
P
S
P
S
P
S
P
S
4. All degree programs include focused study in at least one area of inquiry or in an established
interdisciplinary core.
5. Students completing vocational and occupational certificates and degrees demonstrate
technical and professional competencies that meet employment and other applicable
standards and are prepared for external licensure and certification.
6. The institution assures that students and prospective students receive clear and accurate
information about educational courses and programs and transfer policies. The institution
describes its degrees and certificates in terms of their purpose, content, course
requirements, and expected student learning outcomes. In every class section students
receive a course syllabus that specifies learning objectives consistent with those in the
institution’s officially approved course outline.
| Function Map 29
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
College
District
a. The institution makes available to its students clearly stated transfer-of-credit policies in
order to facilitate the mobility of students without penalty. In accepting transfer credits
to fulfill degree requirements, the institution certifies that the expected learning
outcomes for transferred courses are comparable to the learning outcomes of its own
courses. Where patterns of student enrollment between institutions are identified, the
institution develops articulation agreements as appropriate to its mission.
P
S
b. When programs are eliminated or program requirements are significantly changed, the
institution makes appropriate arrangements so that enrolled students may complete
their education in a timely manner with a minimum of disruption.
P
S
c. The institution represents itself clearly, accurately, and consistently to prospective and
current students, the public, and its personnel through its catalogs, statements, and
publications, including those presented in electronic formats. It regularly reviews
institutional policies, procedures, and publications to assure integrity in all
representations about its mission, programs, and services.
P
S
7. In order to assure the academic integrity of the teaching-learning process, the institution uses
and makes public governing board- adopted policies on academic freedom and responsibility,
student academic honesty, and specific institutional beliefs or worldviews. These policies
make clear the institution’s commitment to the free pursuit and dissemination of knowledge.
P
S
a. Faculty distinguishes between personal conviction and professionally accepted views in a
discipline. They present data and information fairly and objectively.
P
S
b. The institution establishes and publishes clear expectations concerning student academic
honesty and the consequences for dishonesty.
P
S
| Function Map 30
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
c. Institutions that require conformity to specific codes of conduct of staff, faculty,
administrators, or students, or that seek to instill specific beliefs or worldviews, give clear
prior notice of such policies, including statements in the catalog and/or appropriate
faculty or student handbooks.
8. Institutions offering curricula in foreign locations to students other than U.S. nationals
operate in conformity with standards and applicable Commission policies.
P
S
N/A
N/A
B. STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES
The institution recruits and admits diverse students who are able to benefit from its programs, consistent with its mission.
Student support services address the identified needs of students and enhance a supportive learning environment. The entire
student pathway through the institutional experience is characterized by a concern for student access, progress, learning, and
success. The institution systematically assesses student support services using student learning outcomes, faculty and staff
input, and other appropriate measures in order to improve the effectiveness of these services.
College
District
1. The institution assures the quality of student support services and demonstrates that these
services, regardless of location or means of delivery, support student learning and enhance
achievement of the mission of the institution.
P
S
2. The institution provides a catalog for its constituencies with precise, accurate, and current
information concerning the following: a. General Information, b. Requirements, c. Major
Policies Affecting Students, d. Locations or publications where other policies may be found.
P
S
3. The institution researches and identifies the learning support needs of its student population
and provides appropriate services and programs to address those needs.
P
S
| Function Map 31
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
College
a. The institution assures equitable access to all of its students by providing appropriate,
comprehensive, and reliable services to students regardless of service location or
delivery method.
b. The institution provides an environment that encourages personal and civic
responsibility, as well as intellectual, aesthetic, and personal development for all of its
students.
c. The institution designs, maintains, and evaluates counseling and/or academic advising
programs to support student development and success and prepares faculty and other
personnel responsible for the advising function.
District
P
S
P
S
P
S
d. The institution designs and maintains appropriate programs, practices, and services that
support and enhance student understanding and appreciation of diversity.
P
S
e. The institution regularly evaluates admissions and placement instruments and practices
to validate their effectiveness while minimizing biases.
P
S
P
S
P
S
f. The institution maintains student records permanently, securely, and confidentially,
with provision for secure backup of all files, regardless of the form in which those files
are maintained. The institution publishes and follows established policies for release of
student records.
4. The institution evaluates student support services to assure their adequacy in meeting
identified student needs. Evaluation of these services provides evidence that they contribute
to the achievement of student learning outcomes. The institution uses the results of these
evaluations as the basis for improvement.
| Function Map 32
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
C. LIBRARY AND LEARNING SUPPORT SERVICES
Library and other learning support services for students are sufficient to support the institution’s instructional
programs and intellectual, aesthetic, and cultural activities in whatever format and wherever they are offered. Such
services include library services and collections, tutoring, learning centers, computer laboratories, and learning
technology development and training. The institution provides access and training to students so that library and other
learning support services may be used effectively and efficiently. The institution systematically assesses these services
using student learning outcomes, faculty input, and other appropriate measures in order to improve the effectiveness
of the services.
College
District
1. The institution supports the quality of its instructional programs by providing library and
other learning support services that are sufficient in quantity, currency, depth, and
variety to facilitate educational offerings, regardless of location or means of delivery.
P
S
a. Relying on appropriate expertise of faculty, including librarians and other learning
support services professionals, the institution selects and maintains educational
equipment and materials to support student learning and enhance the achievement of
the mission of the institution.
P
S
b. The institution provides ongoing instruction for users of library and other learning
support services so that students are able to develop skills in information
competency.
P
S
c. The institution provides students and personnel responsible for student learning
programs and services adequate access to the library and other learning support
services, regardless of their location or means of delivery.
P
S
d. The institution provides effective maintenance and security for its library and other
learning support services.
P
S
| Function Map 33
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
e. When the institution relies on or collaborates with other institutions or other sources
for library and other learning support services for its instructional programs, it
documents that formal agreements exist and that such resources and services are
adequate for the institution’s intended purposes, are easily accessible, and utilized. The
performance of these services is evaluated on a regular basis. The institution takes
responsibility for and assures the reliability of all services provided either directly or
through contractual arrangement.
P
S
2. The institution evaluates library and other learning support services to assure their
adequacy in meeting identified student needs. Evaluation of these services provides
evidence that they contribute to the achievement of student learning outcomes. The
institution uses the results of these evaluations as the basis for improvement.
P
S
Standard III: Resources
A. HUMAN RESOURCES
The institution employs qualified personnel to support student learning programs and services wherever offered and by
whatever means delivered, and to improve institutional effectiveness. Personnel are treated equitably, are evaluated regularly
and systematically, and are provided opportunities for professional development. Consistent with its mission, the institution
demonstrates its commitment to the significant educational role played by persons of diverse backgrounds by making positive
efforts to encourage such diversity. Human resource planning is integrated with institutional planning.
1. The institution assures the integrity and quality of its programs and services by employing
personnel who are qualified by appropriate education, training, and experience to provide
and support these programs and services.
| Function Map 34
College
District
P
S
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
a. Criteria, qualifications, and procedures for selection of personnel are clearly and
publicly stated. Job descriptions are directly related to institutional mission and goals
and accurately reflect position duties, responsibilities, and authority. Criteria for
selection of faculty include knowledge of the subject matter or service to be
performed (as determined by individuals with discipline expertise), effective teaching,
scholarly activities, and potential to contribute to the mission of the institution.
Institutional faculty play a significant role in selection of new faculty. Degrees held by
faculty and administrators are from institutions accredited by recognized U.S.
accrediting agencies. Degrees from non- U.S. institutions are recognized only if
equivalence has been established.
a. The institution assures the effectiveness of its human resources by evaluating all
personnel systematically and at stated intervals. The institution establishes written
criteria for evaluating all personnel, including performance of assigned duties and
participation in institutional responsibilities and other activities appropriate to their
expertise. Evaluation processes seek to assess effectiveness of personnel and
encourage improvement. Actions taken following evaluations are formal, timely, and
documented.
b. Faculty and others directly responsible for student progress toward achieving stated
student learning outcomes have, as a component of their evaluation, effectiveness in
producing those learning outcomes.
c. The institution upholds a written code of professional ethics for all of its personnel.
| Function Map 35
SH
SH
College
District
SH
SH
P
S
SH
SH
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
2. The institution maintains a sufficient number of qualified faculty with full-time
responsibility to the institution. The institution has a sufficient number of staff and
administrators with appropriate preparation and experience to provide the administrative
services necessary to support the institution’s mission and purposes.
P
S
3. The institution systematically develops personnel policies and procedures that are
available for information and review. Such policies and procedures are equitably and
consistently administered.
S
P
a. The institution establishes and adheres to written policies ensuring fairness in
all employment procedures.
S
P
b. The institution makes provision for the security and confidentiality of personnel
records. Each employee has access to his/her personnel records in accordance with
law.
S
P
College
District
SH
SH
SH
SH
SH
SH
SH
SH
4. The institution demonstrates through policies and practices an appropriate understanding
of and concern for issues of equity and diversity.
a. The institution creates and maintains appropriate programs, practices, and services that
support its diverse personnel.
b. The institution regularly assesses its record in employment equity and diversity
consistent with its mission.
c. The institution subscribes to, advocates, and demonstrates integrity in the treatment of
its administration, faculty, staff and students.
| Function Map 36
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
5. The institution provides all personnel with appropriate opportunities for continued
professional development, consistent with the institutional mission and based on
identified teaching and learning needs.
a. The institution plans professional development activities to meet the needs of its
personnel.
b. With the assistance of the participants, the institution systematically evaluates
professional development programs and uses the results of these evaluations as the
basis for improvement.
6. Human resource planning is integrated with institutional planning. The institution
systematically assesses the effective use of human resources and uses the results of the
evaluation as the basis for improvement.
| Function Map 37
P
S
P
S
P
S
P
S
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
B. PHYSICAL RESOURCES
Physical resources, which include facilities, equipment, land, and other assets, support student learning programs and
services and improve institutional effectiveness. Physical resource planning is integrated with institutional planning.
College
District
SH
SH
SH
SH
SH
SH
2. To assure the feasibility and effectiveness of physical resources in supporting institutional
programs and services, the institution plans and evaluates its facilities and equipment on a
regular basis, taking utilization and other relevant data into account.
P
S
a. Long-range capital plans support institutional improvement goals and reflect
projections of the total cost of ownership of new facilities and equipment.
SH
SH
b. Physical resource planning is integrated with institutional planning. The institution
systematically assesses the effective use of physical resources and uses the results of
the evaluation as the basis for improvement.
P
S
1. The institution provides safe and sufficient physical resources that support and assure the
integrity and quality of its programs and services, regardless of location or means of
delivery.
a. The institution plans, builds, maintains, and upgrades or replaces its physical resources
in a manner that assures effective utilization and the continuing quality necessary to
support its programs and services.
b. The institution assures that physical resources at all locations where it offers courses,
programs, and services are constructed and maintained to assure access, safety,
security, and a healthful learning and working environment.
| Function Map 38
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
C. TECHNOLOGY RESOURCES
Technology resources are used to support student learning programs and services and to improve institutional effectiveness.
Technology planning is integrated with institutional planning.
College
District
SH
SH
S
P
b. The institution provides quality training in the effective application of its information
technology to students and personnel.
SH
SH
c. The institution systematically plans, acquires, maintains, and upgrades or replaces
technology infrastructure and equipment to meet institutional needs.
SH
SH
d. The distribution and utilization of technology resources support the development,
maintenance, and enhancement of its programs and services.
SH
SH
2. Technology planning is integrated with institutional planning. The institution systematically
assesses the effective use of technology resources and uses the results of evaluation as the
basis for improvement.
P
S
1. The institution assures that any technology support it provides is designed to meet the
needs of learning, teaching, college-wide communications, research, and operational
systems.
a. Technology services, professional support, facilities, hardware, and software are
designed to enhance the operation and effectiveness of the institution.
| Function Map 39
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
D. FINANCIAL RESOURCES
Financial resources are sufficient to support student learning programs and services and to improve institutional effectiveness.
The distribution of resources supports the development, maintenance, and enhancement of programs and services. The
institution plans and manages its financial affairs with integrity and in a manner that ensures financial stability. The level of
financial resources provides a reasonable expectation of both short-term and long-term financial solvency. Financial resource
planning is integrated with institutional planning.
College
District
P
S
a. Financial planning is integrated with and supports all institutional planning.
P
S
b. Institutional planning reflects realistic assessment of financial resource availability,
development of financial resources, partnerships, and expenditure requirements.
P
S
SH
SH
P
S
P
S
1. The institution relies upon its mission and goals as the foundation for financial planning.
c. When making short-range financial plans, the institution considers its long-range
financial priorities to assure financial stability. The institution clearly identifies and
plans for payment of liabilities and future obligations.
d. The institution clearly defines and follows its guidelines and processes for financial
planning and budget development, with all constituencies having appropriate
opportunities to participate in the development of institutional plans and budgets.
2. To assure the financial integrity of the institution and responsible use of financial
resources, the financial management system has appropriate control mechanisms and
widely disseminates dependable and timely information for sound financial decision
making.
| Function Map 40
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
College
District
a. Financial documents, including the budget and independent audit, reflect appropriate
allocation and use of financial resources to support student learning programs and
services. Institutional responses to external audit findings are comprehensive, timely,
and communicated appropriately.
SH
SH
b. Appropriate financial information is provided throughout the institution.
P
S
S
P
P
S
P
S
SH
SH
P
S
P
S
c. The institution has sufficient cash flow and reserves to maintain stability, strategies for
appropriate risk management, and realistic plans to meet financial emergencies and
unforeseen occurrences.
d. The institution practices effective oversight of finances, including management of
financial aid, grants, externally funded programs, contractual relationships, auxiliary
organizations or foundations, and institutional investments and assets.
e. All financial resources, including those from auxiliary activities, fund-raising efforts,
and grants are used with integrity in a manner consistent with the mission and goals of
the institution.
f. Contractual agreements with external entities are consistent with the mission and
goals of the institution, governed by institutional policies, and contain appropriate
provisions to maintain the integrity of the institution.
g. The institution regularly evaluates its financial management processes, and the results
of the evaluation are used to improve financial management systems.
3. The institution systematically assesses the effective use of financial resources and uses the
results of the evaluation as the basis for improvement.
| Function Map 41
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Standard IV: Leadership and Governance
A. DECISION-MAKING ROLES AND PROCESSES
The institution recognizes that ethical and effective leadership throughout the organization enables the
institution to identify institutional values, set and achieve goals, learn, and improve.
College
District
1. Institutional leaders create an environment for empowerment, innovation, and
institutional excellence. They encourage staff, faculty, administrators, and students, no
matter what their official titles, to take initiative in improving the practices, programs,
and services in which they are involved. When ideas for improvement have policy or
significant institution-wide implications, systematic participative processes are used to
assure effective discussion, planning, and implementation.
P
S
2. The institution establishes and implements a written policy providing for faculty, staff,
administrator, and student participation in decision- making processes. The policy
specifies the manner in which individuals bring forward ideas from their constituencies
and work together on appropriate policy, planning, and special-purpose bodies.
P
S
P
S
P
S
a. Faculty and administrators have a substantive and clearly defined role in institutional
governance and exercise a substantial voice in institutional policies, planning, and
budget that relate to their areas of responsibility and expertise. Students and staff
also have established mechanisms or organizations for providing input into
institutional decisions.
b. The institution relies on faculty, its academic senate or other appropriate faculty
structures, the curriculum committee, and academic administrators for
recommendations about student learning programs and services.
| Function Map 42
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
College
District
3. Through established governance structures, processes, and practices, the governing
board, administrators, faculty, staff, and students work together for the good of the
institution. These processes facilitate discussion of ideas and effective communication
among the institution’s constituencies.
SH
SH
4. The institution advocates and demonstrates honesty and integrity in its relationships with
external agencies. It agrees to comply with Accrediting Commission standards, policies,
and guidelines, and Commission requirements for public disclosure, self-evaluation and
other reports, team visits, and prior approval of substantive changes. The institution
moves expeditiously to respond to recommendations made by the Commission.
P
S
5. The role of leadership and the institution’s governance and decision-making structures
and processes are regularly evaluated to assure their integrity and effectiveness. The
institution widely communicates the results of these evaluations and uses them as the
basis for improvement.
SH
SH
B. BOARD AND ADMINISTRATIVE ORGANIZATION
In addition to the leadership of individuals and constituencies, institutions recognize the designated responsibilities of the
governing board for setting policies and of the chief administrator for the effective operation of the institution. Multicollege districts/systems clearly define the organizational roles of the district/system and the colleges.
1. The institution has a governing board that is responsible for establishing policies to assure
the quality, integrity, and effectiveness of the student learning programs and services and
the financial stability of the institution. The governing board adheres to a clearly defined
policy for selecting and evaluating the chief administrator for the college or the
district/system.
| Function Map 43
College
District
S
P
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
College
District
S
P
S
P
c. The governing board has ultimate responsibility for educational quality, legal matters,
and financial integrity.
S
P
d. The institution or the governing board publishes the board bylaws and policies
specifying the board’s size, duties, responsibilities, structure, and operating
procedures.
S
P
S
P
S
P
S
P
S
P
College
District
a. The governing board is an independent policy-making body that reflects the public
interest in board activities and decisions. Once the board reaches a decision, it acts as
a whole. It advocates for and defends the institution and protects it from undue
influence or pressure.
b. The governing board establishes policies consistent with the mission statement to
ensure the quality, integrity, and improvement of student learning programs and
services and the resources necessary to support them.
e.
The governing board acts in a manner consistent with its policies and bylaws. The
board regularly evaluates its policies and practices and revises them as necessary.
f. The governing board has a program for board development and new member
orientation. It has a mechanism for providing for continuity of board membership and
staggered terms of office.
g. The governing board’s self-evaluation processes for assessing board performance are
clearly defined, implemented, and published in its policies or bylaws.
h.
The governing board has a code of ethics that includes a clearly defined policy for
dealing with behavior that violates its code.
| Function Map 44
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
i.
The governing board is informed about and involved in the accreditation process.
S
P
j.
The governing board has the responsibility for selecting and evaluating the
district/system chief administrator (most often known as the chancellor) in a multicollege district/system or the college chief administrator (most often known as the
president) in the case of a single college. The governing board delegates full
responsibility and authority to him/her to implement and administer board policies
without board interference and holds him/her accountable for the operation of the
district/system or college, respectively. In multi-college districts/systems, the
governing board establishes a clearly defined policy for selecting and evaluating the
presidents of the colleges.
S
P
2. The president has primary responsibility for the quality of the institution he/she leads.
He/she provides effective leadership in planning, organizing, budgeting, selecting and
developing personnel, and assessing institutional effectiveness.
P
S
P
S
College
District
a.
The president plans, oversees, and evaluates an administrative structure organized
and staffed to reflect the institution's purposes, size, and complexity. He/she delegates
authority to administrators and others consistent with their responsibilities, as
appropriate.
| Function Map 45
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
b. The president guides institutional improvement of the teaching and learning
environment by the following:
 establishing a collegial process that sets values, goals, and priorities;
 ensuring that evaluation and planning rely on high quality research and analysis
on external and internal conditions;
 ensuring that educational planning is integrated with resource planning and
distribution to achieve student learning outcomes; and
 establishing procedures to evaluate overall institutional planning and
implementation efforts.
c. The president assures the implementation of statutes, regulations, and governing
board policies and assures that institutional practices are consistent with institutional
mission and policies.
P
S
P
S
P
S
e. The president works and communicates effectively with the communities served by
the institution.
P
S
3. In multi-college districts or systems, the district/system provides primary leadership in
setting and communicating expectations of educational excellence and integrity
throughout the district/system and assures support for the effective operation of the
colleges. It establishes clearly defined roles of authority and responsibility between the
colleges and the district/system and acts as the liaison between the colleges and the
governing board.
S
P
d. The president effectively controls budget and expenditures.
| Function Map 46
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
College
District
a. The district/system clearly delineates and communicates the operational
responsibilities and functions of the district/system from those of the colleges and
consistently adheres to this delineation in practice.
S
P
b. The district/system provides effective services that support the colleges in their
missions and functions.
S
P
c. The district/system provides fair distribution of resources that are adequate to support
the effective operations of the colleges.
S
P
d. The district/system effectively controls its expenditures.
S
P
e. The chancellor gives full responsibility and authority to the presidents of the colleges
to implement and administer delegated district/system policies without his/her
interference and holds them accountable for the operation of the colleges.
S
P
f. The district/system acts as the liaison between the colleges and the governing board.
The district/system and the colleges use effective methods of communication, and
they exchange information in a timely manner.
S
P
g. The district/system regularly evaluates district/system role delineation and governance
and decision-making structures and processes to assure their integrity and
effectiveness in assisting the colleges in meeting educational goals. The district/system
widely communicates the results of these evaluations and uses them as the basis for
improvement.
S
P
| Function Map 47
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
At A Glance Actionable Improvement Plans
Standard I: Institutional Mission and Effectiveness
Standard Text
Self-Evaluation Status
Actionable Improvements, if any
Mission:
The institution has a
statement of mission that defines the
institution’s
broad
educational
purposes, its intended student
population, and its commitment to
achieving student learning.
Met
None
IA.1 The institution establishes student
Met
None
Met
None
Met
None
Met
None
IA
learning programs and services
aligned with its purposes, its
character, and its student population.
IA.2 The mission statement is approved by
the governing board and published.
IA.3 Using the institution's governance and
decision-making
processes,
the
institution reviews its mission
statement on a regular basis and
revises it as necessary.
IA.4 The institution's mission is central to
institutional planning and decision
making.
IB
Improving Institutional Effectiveness:
The institution demonstrates a
conscious effort to produce and
support student learning, measures
that learning, assesses how well
learning is occurring, and makes
changes to improve student learning.
The institution also organizes its key
processes and allocates it resources to
effectively support student learning.
The institution demonstrates its
effectiveness by providing 1) evidence
of the achievement of student
learning outcomes and 2) evidence of
institution and program performance.
The institution uses ongoing and
systematic evaluation and planning to
refine its key processes and improve
student learning.
| At A Glance Actionable Improvement Plans 48
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
IB.1 The institution maintains an ongoing,
Met
None
Met
None
Met
None
Met
None
Met
None
Met
None
collegial, self-reflective dialogue about
the continuous improvement of
student learning and institutional
processes.
IB.2 The institution sets goals to improve
its effectiveness consistent with its
stated purposes.
The institution
articulates its goals and states the
objectives derived from them in
measurable terms so that the degree
to which they are achieved can be
determined and widely discussed.
The institutional members understand
these goals and work collaboratively
toward their achievement.
IB.3 The institution assesses progress
toward achieving its stated goals and
makes decisions regarding the
improvement
of
institutional
effectiveness in an ongoing and
systematic evaluation, integrated
planning,
resource
allocation,
implementation and re-evaluation.
Evaluation is based on analyses of
both quantitative and qualitative data.
IB.4 The institution provides evidence that
the planning process is broad based,
offers opportunities for input by
appropriate constituencies, allocates
necessary resources, and leads to
improvement
of
institutional
effectiveness.
IB.5 The institution uses documented
assessment results to communicate
matters of quality assurance to
appropriate constituencies.
IB.6 The
institution
assures
the
effectiveness of its ongoing planning
and resource allocation processes by
systematically
reviewing
and
modifying, as appropriate, all parts of
the cycle, including institutional and
other research efforts.
| At A Glance Actionable Improvement Plans 49
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
IB.7 The institution assesses its evaluation
Met
None
mechanisms through a systematic
review of their effectiveness in
improving instructional programs,
student support services, and library
and other learning support services.
Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services
Standard Text
Self - Evaluation
Status
Actionable Improvements, if any
IIA
Instructional Programs:
The
institution
offers
high-quality
instructional
programs
in
recognized and emerging fields of
study that culminate in identified
student outcomes leading to
degrees, certificates, employment,
or transfer to other higher
education institutions or programs
consistent
with
its
mission.
Instructional
programs
are
systematically assessed in order to
assure currency, improve teaching
and learning strategies, and achieve
stated student learning outcomes.
The provisions of this standard are
broadly
applicable
to
all
institutional activities offered in the
name of the institution.
IIA.1
The institution demonstrates that
all
instructional
programs,
regardless of location or means of
delivery, address and meet the
mission of the institution and
uphold its integrity.
Met

IIA.1.a
The institution identifies and seeks
to meet the varied educational
needs of its students through
programs consistent with their
educational
preparation
and
diversity,
demographics
and
economy of its communities. The
institution relies upon research and
analysis to identify student learning
needs and to assess progress
toward achieving stated learning
outcomes.
Met
None
IIA.1.b
The institution utilizes delivery
systems and modes of instruction
Met
 Develop a technology infrastructure
Continue to address and complete the
curriculum recency inventory.
| At A Glance Actionable Improvement Plans 50
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
compatible with the objectives of
the curriculum and appropriate to
the current and future needs of its
students.
plan with the District’s Information
Technology department to ensure that
their operational capacity supports
steady increase of smart and
technology-mediated classrooms and
offices.
IIA.1.c
The institution identifies student
learning outcomes for courses,
programs, certificates, and degrees;
assesses student achievement of
those
outcomes;
and
uses
assessment results to make
improvements.
Met
None
IIA.2
The institution assures the quality and
improvement of all instructional
courses and programs offered in the
name of the institution, including
collegiate, developmental and precollegiate courses and programs,
continuing and community education,
study abroad, short-term training
courses and programs, programs for
international students, and contract
or other special programs, regardless
of type of credited awarded, delivery
mode or location.
Met

IIA.2.a
The institution uses established
procedures to design, identify
learning outcomes for, approve,
administer, deliver and evaluate
courses and programs.
The
institution recognizes the central
role of its faculty for establishing
quality and improving instructional
courses and programs.
Met
The institution relies on faculty
expertise and the assistance of
advisory
committees
when
appropriate to identify competency
levels and measurable student
learning outcomes for courses,
certificates, programs including
general and vocational education,
and degrees.
The institution
regularly assesses student progress
towards achieving those outcomes.
Met
IIA.2.b
Expand enhanced non-credit courses
(in progress)
 As planned, ensure a successful and
timely establishment of the Budget and
Resource Advisory Council (BRAC) as
part of the college’s Integrated
Planning and Resource Allocation
process.
None
| At A Glance Actionable Improvement Plans 51
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
• Complete approval process with the
High-quality
instruction
and
appropriate breadth, depth, rigor,
sequencing, time to completion,
and
synthesis
of
learning
characterize all programs.
Met
IIA.2.d
The institution uses delivery modes
and teaching methodologies that
reflect the diverse needs and
learning styles of its students.
Met
None
IIA.2.e
The institution evaluates all courses
and programs through an on-going
systematic
review
of
their
relevance,
appropriateness,
achievement of learning outcomes,
currency, and future needs and
plans.
Met
• The Academic Directions Committee
IIA.2.f
The institution engages in ongoing,
systematic
evaluation
and
integrated planning to assure
currency and measure achievement
of its stated student learning
outcomes for courses, certificates,
programs including general and
vocational education, and degrees.
The institution systematically strives
to improve those outcomes and
makes the results available to
appropriate constituencies.
Met
None
IIA.2.g
If an institution uses departmental
course
and/or
program
examinations, it validates their
effectiveness in measuring student
learning and minimizes test biases.
Met
None
IIA.2.h
The institution awards credit based
on student achievement of the
course's stated learning outcomes.
Units of credit awarded are
consistent with institutional policies
that reflect generally accepted
norms or equivalencies in higher
education.
Met
None
IIA.2.i
The institution awards degrees and
certificates based on student
achievement of a program's stated
learning outcomes.
Met
IIA.2.c
Faculty Association (ACE) and the
District on online evaluation.
was formed by the Academic Senate in
January 2013 to review struggling
programs and help viable programs
with an action plan to improve their
enrollment and completion rate.
None
| At A Glance Actionable Improvement Plans 52
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
IIA.3
The institution requires all academic
and vocational degree programs a
component of general education
based on a carefully considered
philosophy that is clearly stated in
its catalog. The institution, relying
on the expertise of its faculty,
determines the appropriateness of
each course for inclusion in the
general education curriculum by
examining the stated learning
outcomes for the course.
Met
None
IIA.4
All degree programs include
focused study in at least one area of
inquiry or in an established
interdisciplinary core.
Met
None
IIA.5
Students completing vocational and
occupational
certificates
and
degrees demonstrate technical and
professional competencies that
meet employment and other
applicable standards and are
prepared for external licensure and
certification.
Met
None
IIA.6
The institution assures that
students and prospective students
receive
clear
and
accurate
information about educational
courses and programs and transfer
policies. The institution describes
its degrees and certificates in terms
of their purpose, content, course
requirements,
and
expected
student learning outcomes.
In
every class section students receive
a course syllabus that specifies
learning objectives consistent with
those in the institution's officially
approved course outline.
Met
 Continue to review syllabi for
consistency with appropriate standards
as part of SLO/A assessment scheduled
activities.
| At A Glance Actionable Improvement Plans 53
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
IIA.6.a The institution makes available to its
students clearly stated transfer-ofcredit policies in order to facilitate
the mobility of students without
penalty.
In accepting transfer
credits
to
fulfill
degree
requirements,
the
institution
certifies that the expected learning
outcomes for transferred courses
are comparable to the learning
outcomes of its own courses.
Where
patterns
of
student
enrollment between institutions are
identified, the institution develops
articulation
agreements
as
appropriate to its mission.
Met
None
IIA.6.b When programs are eliminated or
program
requirements
are
significantly changed, the institution
makes appropriate arrangements so
that
enrolled
students
may
complete their education in a timely
manner with a minimum of
disruption.
Met
None
IIA.6.c The institution represents itself
clearly, accurately, and consistently
to prospective and current students,
the public, and the personnel
through the catalogs, statements,
and publications, including those
presented in electronic formats. It
regularly
reviews
institutional
policies,
procedures,
and
publications to assure integrity in all
representations about its mission,
programs, and services.
Met
None
IIA.7
Met
None
In order to assure the academic
integrity of the teaching-learning
process, the institution uses and
makes public governing boardadopted policies on academic
freedom and responsibility, student
academic honesty, and specific
institutional beliefs or worldviews.
These policies make clear the
institution's commitment to the free
pursuit and dissemination of
knowledge.
| At A Glance Actionable Improvement Plans 54
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
IIA.7.a Faculty
distinguish
between
personal
conviction
and
professionally accepted views in a
discipline. They present data and
information fairly and objectively.
Met
None
IIA.7.b The institution establishes and
publishes
clear
expectations
concerning
student
academic
honesty and the consequences for
dishonesty.
Met
None
IIA.7.c Institutions that require conformity
to specific codes of conduct of staff,
faculty, administrators, or students,
or that seek to instill specific beliefs
or worldviews, give clear prior
notice of such policies, including
statements in the catalog and/or
appropriate faculty or student
handbooks.
Met
None
IIA.8
IIB
Institutions offering curricula in
foreign locations to students other
than U.S. nationals operate in
conformity with standards and
applicable Commission policies.
Student Support Services:
The
institution recruits and admits
diverse students who are able to
benefit
from
its
programs,
consistent with its mission. Student
support services address the
identified needs of students and
enhance a supportive learning
environment. The entire student
pathway through the institutional
experience is characterized by a
concern
for
student
access,
progress, learning and success. The
institution systematically assesses
student support services using
student learning outcomes, faculty
and staff input, and other
appropriate measures in order to
improve the effectiveness of these
services.
Not Applicable
Met
None
| At A Glance Actionable Improvement Plans 55
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
IIB.1
The institution assures the quality of
student
support
services
and
demonstrates that these services,
regardless of location or means of
delivery, support student learning and
enhance achievement of the mission of
the institution.
Met

IIB.2
The institution provides a catalog for its
constituencies with precise, accurate,
and current information concerning the
following:
Met
None
a)
Continue
to
execute
an
implementation of online CCC
apply application in collaboration
with the District’s Information
Technology department.
General Information
b) Requirements
c)
Major policies affecting students
d) Location or publications where
other policies may be found
IIB.3
The institution researches and identifies
the learning support needs of its student
population and provides appropriate
services and programs to address these
needs.
Met
None
IIB.3.a
The institution assures equitable access
to all of its students by providing
appropriate, comprehensive, and reliable
services to students regardless of service
location or delivery model.
Met

Consistent with the college’s
Student Success and Support
Program implementation plan,
expand
online
course
support/workshops

Develop a plan for Adult
Education Consortium Program
(SB 86) offerings.
IIB.3.b
The institution provides an environment
that encourages personal and civic
responsibility, as well as intellectual,
aesthetic, and personal development for
all of its students.
Met
None
IIB.3.c
The institution designs, maintains and
evaluates counseling and/or academic
advising programs to support student
development and success and prepares
faculty and other personnel responsible
for the advising function.
Met
None
IIB.3.d
The institution designs and maintains
appropriate programs, practices, and
services that support and enhance
student understanding and appreciation
Met
None
| At A Glance Actionable Improvement Plans 56
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
of diversity.
IIB.3.e
The institution regularly evaluates
admissions and placement instruments
and practices to validate their
effectiveness while minimizing biases.
Met
IIB.3.f
The institution maintains student records
permanently,
securely,
and
confidentially, with provision for secure
backup of all files, regardless of the form
in which those files are maintained. The
institution publishes and follows
established policies for release of
student records.
Met
IIB.4
The institution evaluates student support
services to assure their adequacy in
meeting identified student needs.
Evaluation of these services provides
evidence that they contribute to the
achievement of student learning
outcomes.
The institution uses the
results of these evaluations as the basis
for improvement.
Met
IIC
Library and Learning Support Services:
Library and other learning support
services for students are sufficient to
support the institution's instructional
programs and intellectual, aesthetics,
and cultural activities in whatever format
and wherever they are offered. Such
services include library services and
collections, tutoring, learning centers,
computer laboratories, and learning
technology development and training.
The institution provides access and
training to students so that library and
other learning support services may be
used effectively and efficiently. The
institution systematically assesses these
services
using
student
learning
outcomes, faculty input, and other
appropriate measures in order to
improve the effectiveness of the services.
IIC.1
The institution supports the quality of its
instructional programs by providing
library and other learning support
services that are sufficient in quantity,
currency, depth, and variety to facilitate
educational offerings, regardless of
Met
None
None
None

Plan for Library and LRC/Tutorial
Programs and Services building
design based on the teaching and
learning, support services, and
pedagogical needs that ensure
| At A Glance Actionable Improvement Plans 57
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
location or means of delivery.
student success.
IIC.1.a
Relying on appropriate expertise of
faculty, including librarians and other
learning support services professionals,
the institution selects and maintains
educational equipment and materials to
support student learning and enhance
the achievement of the mission of the
institution.
Met
None
IIC.1.b
The institution provides ongoing
instruction for users of library and other
learning support services so that
students are able to develop skills in
information competency.
Met
IIC.1.c
The institution provides students and
personnel responsible for student
learning programs and services adequate
access to the library and other learning
support services, regardless of their
location or means of delivery.
Met
None
IIC.1.d
The institution provides effective
maintenance and security for its library
and other learning support services.
Met
None
IIC.1.e
When the institution relies on or
collaborates with other institutions or
other sources for library and other
learning support services for its
instructional programs, it documents
that formal agreements exist and that
such resources and services are adequate
for the institution's intended purposes,
are easily accessible, and utilized. The
performance of these services is
evaluated on a regular basis.
The
institution takes responsibility for and
assures the reliability of all services
provided either directly or through
contractual arrangement.
Met
None
IIC.2
The institution evaluates library and
other learning support services to assure
their adequacy in meeting identified
student needs. Evaluation of these
services provides evidence that they
contribute to the achievement of student
learning outcomes. The institution uses
Met
None

The college plans to address how
best to infuse information
competency into an overall
teaching and learning context to
ensure that students learn such
skills and knowledge.
| At A Glance Actionable Improvement Plans 58
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
the results of these evaluations as the
basis for improvement.
Standard III: Resources
SelfEvaluation
Status
Standard Text
Actionable Improvements, if
any
III A
Human Resources: The institution employs
qualified personnel to support student learning
programs and services wherever offered and
by whatever means, delivered, and to improve
institutional effectiveness.
Personnel are
treated equitably, are evaluated regularly and
systematically, and are provided opportunities
for professional development. Consistent with
its mission, the institution demonstrates its
commitment to the significant educational role
played by persons of diverse backgrounds by
making positive efforts to encourage such
diversity.
Human resource planning is
integrated with institutional planning.
III A.1
The institution assures the integrity and quality
of its programs and services by employing
personnel who are qualified by appropriate
education, training, and experience to provide
and support these programs and services.
Met
None
III A.1.a
Criteria, qualifications, and procedures for
selection of personnel are clearly and publicly
stated. Job descriptions are directly related to
institutional mission and goals and accurately
reflect position duties, responsibilities, and
authority. Criteria for selection of faculty
include knowledge of the subject matter or
service to be performed (as determined by
individuals with discipline expertise), effective
teaching, scholarly activities, and potential to
contribute to the mission of the institution.
Institutional faculty play a significant role in
selection of new faculty. Degrees held by
faculty and administrators are from institutions
accredited by recognized U.S. accrediting
agencies. Degrees from non-U.S. institutions
are recognized only if equivalence has been
established.
Met

III A.1.b The institution assures the effectiveness of its
human resources by evaluating all personnel
systematically and at stated intervals. The
institution establishes written criteria for
evaluating
all
personnel,
including
Met
None
Continue to review associate
faculty hiring process and
implement new process by fall
2014.
| At A Glance Actionable Improvement Plans 59
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
performance of assigned duties and
participation in institutional responsibilities
and other activities appropriate to their
expertise. Evaluation processes seek to assess
effectiveness of personnel and encourage
improvement.
Actions taken following
evaluations
are
formal,
timely,
and
documented.
III A.1.c
Faculty and others directly responsible for
student progress toward achieving stated
student learning outcomes have, as a
component of their evaluation, effectiveness in
producing those learning outcomes.
Met
None
III A.1.d The institution upholds a written code of ethics
for all of its personnel.
Met
None
III A.2
Met

Integrated
Planning
and
Resource Allocation Team and
College Council ensure that the
BRAC process as part of the
Integrated
Planning
and
Resource Allocation works
effectively in making resource
allocation decisions in spring
2014.

Complete the FAIT 2014-2015
budget
reduction
and
organization
restructuring
process by mid spring 2014
semester.
The institution maintains a sufficient number
of qualified faculty with full-time responsibility
to the institution. The institution has a
sufficient number of staff and administrators
with appropriate preparation and experience
to provide the administrative services
necessary to support the institution's mission
and purposes.
III A.3
The institution systematically develops
personnel policies and procedures that are
available for information and review. Such
policies and procedures are equitably and
consistently administered.
III A.3.a
The institution establishes and adheres to
written policies ensuring fairness in all
employment procedures.
III A.3.b The institution makes provision for the security
and confidentiality of personnel records. Each
employee has access to his/her personnel
records in accordance with law.
Met
None
Met
None
| At A Glance Actionable Improvement Plans 60
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
III A.4
The institution demonstrates through policies
and practices an appropriate understanding of
and concern for issues of equity and diversity.
Met

Successfully operationalize the
Student Success Team in spring
2014 with a newly appointed
faculty
Coordinator
and
evaluate its work on equitable
student success among our
diverse student population.

Continue to monitor a new
implementation of the director
of Student Equity and Success
starting in 2014-2015 and
increasing number of diverse
students and their success
Explore
opportunities
to
increase funding for diversity
programs on campus.
The institution creates and maintains
appropriate programs, practices, and services
that support its diverse personnel.
Met

III A.4.b The institution regularly assesses its record in
employment equity and diversity consistent
with its mission.
Met
None
III A.4.c
The institution subscribes to, advocates, and
demonstrates integrity in the treatment of its
administration, faculty, staff and students.
Met
None
III A.5
The
institution
provides
appropriate
opportunities to all categories of staff for
continued
professional
development,
consistent with the institution's mission and
based on identified teaching and learning
needs.
III
A.5.a
The institution plans professional development
activities to meet the needs of its personnel.
Met

Explore
opportunities
to
maximize staff development,
utilizing data-driven decision
on focused-topics, during times
of constrained budget.

Conduct
streamlined
and
strategic leadership training for
the Division chairs and
Department chairs

Continue to offer an ongoing
new faculty orientation in
spring 2014
III A.4.a
| At A Glance Actionable Improvement Plans 61
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
III A.5.b With the assistance of the participants, the
institution
systematically
evaluates
professional development programs and uses
the results of these evaluations as the basis for
improvement.
Met

WVC
Professional
Development Committee and
All College Day Committee
work to increase synergy
between these committees to
streamline efforts to provide
strong
professional
development activities for the
campus community.
III A.6
Human resource planning is integrated with
institutional planning.
The institution
systematically assesses the effective use of
human resources and uses the results of the
evaluation as the basis for improvement.
Met

Assess BRAC role and
responsibilities in spring 2014.
III B
Physical Resources: Physical resources, which
include facilities, equipment, land, and other
assets, support student learning programs and
services
and
improve
institutional
effectiveness. Physical resource planning is
integrated with institutional planning.
Met
None
III B.1
The institution provides safe and sufficient
physical resources that support and assure the
integrity and quality of its programs and
services, regardless of location or means of
delivery.
Met

Under the leadership of the
Vice President of
Administrative Services in
conjunction with the district
Information Systems (IS)
department, complete
installation of the Ad Astra
software for instructional
schedule planning for room
allocation.

Plan for revision of Educational
and Facilities Master Plan
district-wide.
III B.1.a
The institution plans, builds, maintains, and
upgrades or replaces its physical resources in a
manner that assures effective utilization and
the continuing quality necessary to support its
programs and services.
Met
 Coordinate planning processes
of the District IS and college’s
IT in regards to needs of
equipment and software.
III B.1.b
The institution assures that physical resources
at all locations where it offers courses,
programs, and services are constructed and
maintained to assure access, safety, security,
and a healthful learning and working
environment.
Met
 District and the colleges
commit to develop a
comprehensive Emergency
Preparedness process.
| At A Glance Actionable Improvement Plans 62
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
III B.2
To assure the feasibility and effectiveness of
physical resources in support of institutional
programs and services, the institution plans
and evaluates its facilities and equipment on a
regular basis, taking utilization and other
relevant data into account.
Met
 Continue planning for the
Educational and Facilities
Master Plan 2009 revision with
the district.
III B.2.a
Long-range capital plans support institutional
improvement goals and reflect projections of
the total cost of ownership of new facilities
and equipment.
Met
• Continue planning of
Educational and Facilities
Master Plan revision.
III B.2.b
Physical resource planning is integrated with
institutional planning.
The institution
systematically assesses the effective use of
physical resources and uses the results of the
evaluation as a basis for improvement.
Met
III C
Technology Resources: Technology resources
are used to support student learning programs
and services and to improve institutional
effectiveness.
Technology planning is
integrated with institutional planning.
III C.1
The institution assures than any technology
support it provides is designed to meet the
needs of learning, teaching, college-wide
communications, research, and operational
systems.
Met
 Continue re-focusing of the
TAC and develop further
alignment with the integrated
planning process, particularly
with BRAC.
III C.1.a
Technology services, professional support,
facilities, hardware and software are designed
to enhance the operation and effectiveness of
the institution.
Met
 Based on the college’s
Instructional Technology
Strategy, develop a
comprehensive college
Technology Plan, coordinate its
effort with the district’s
Instructional Systems (IS)
Department and develop a
district-wide comprehensive
Technology Plan.
III C.1.b
The institution provides quality training in the
effective application of its information
technology to students and personnel.
Met
None

District
IS
department
reestablish the District-wide
Technology Committee.

The college develops and
completes
the
WVC
Technology Plan to include a
comprehensive, systemic, and
streamlined
plan
for
technology training.
| At A Glance Actionable Improvement Plans 63
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
III C.1.c
III C.1.d
III C.2
The institution systematically plans, acquires,
maintains, and upgrades or replaces
technology infrastructure and equipment to
meet institutional needs.
The distribution and utilization of technology
resources
support
the
development,
maintenance, and enhancement of its
programs and services.
Technology planning is integrated with
institutional planning.
The institution
systematically assesses the effective use of
technology resources and uses the results of
Met
Met
Met

Continue regular meetings
between college instructional
technology staff and district
operations/network staff to
plan
and
support
the
technology infrastructure at
the college.

Continue
to
work
on
developing synergy between
newly defined TAC and
Integrated
Planning
and
Resource Allocation.

Complete
the
college’s
Technology Plan via TAC.

District IS works with the
colleges
through
its
participatory
governance
process
to
develop
a
comprehensive District-Wide
Technology plan.

The college will develop a plan
for allocating facilities bond
Measure C technology refresh
funds through TAC and
participatory
governance
process.

The college will develop a
Technology Plan based on the
strategies identified in the
current
Instructional
Technology Strategic Plan.

The college will review and
analyze staff, funding, and
resource needs for the
Instructional Technology team
and secure necessary staff and
operational
funds
for
technology maintenance and
repair work.

Continue to ensure that BRAC
process
serves
as
an
institutional
assessment
process
for
technology
| At A Glance Actionable Improvement Plans 64
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
evaluation as the basis for improvement.
planning.
III D
Financial Resources: Financial resources are
sufficient to support student learning programs
and services and to improve institutional
effectiveness. The distribution of resources
supports the development, maintenance, and
enhancement of programs and services. The
institution plans and manages its financial
affairs with integrity and in a manner that
ensures financial stability.
The level of
financial resources provides a reasonable
expectation of both short-term and long-term
financial solvency.
Financial resources
planning are integrated with institution
planning.
Met
None
III D.1
The institution relies upon its mission and goals
as the foundation for financial planning.
Met
None
III D.1.a Financial planning is integrated with and
supports all institutional planning.
Met
None
III D.1.b Institutional
planning
reflects
realistic
assessment of financial resources availability,
development
of
financial
resource,
partnerships and expenditures requirements.
Met
None
III D.1.c
When making short-range financial plans, the
institution considers its long-range financial
priorities to assure financial stability. The
institution clearly identifies and plans for
payment of liabilities and future obligations.
Met
None
III D.1.d The institution clearly defines and follows its
guideline and processes for financial planning
and
budget
development,
with
all
constituencies
having
appropriate
opportunities
to
participate
in
the
development of the institutional plans and
budgets.
Met

Continue an analysis of the
possibility of reinstating a
district-wide budget advisory
committee which has been
incorporated in the function of
the District Council.

Complete establishing the
college’s Budget and Resource
Advisory Council (BRAC) as part
of the Integrated Planning and
Resource Allocation Process by
the end of February 2014.
| At A Glance Actionable Improvement Plans 65
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
To assure the financial integrity of the
institution and responsible use of its resources,
the internal control structure has appropriate
control mechanisms and widely disseminates
dependable and timely information for sound
financial decision making.
Met
None
III D.2.a Financial documents, including the budget and
independent audit, have a high degree of
credibility and accuracy, and reflect
appropriate allocation and use of financial
resources to support student learning
programs and services.
Met
None
III D.2.b Institutional responses to external audit
findings are comprehensive, timely, and
communicated appropriately.
Met

III D.2.c
Appropriate financial is provided throughout
the institution in a timely manner.
Met
None
III D.2.d All financial resources, including short and long
term debt instruments (such as bonds and
certificates of participation), auxiliary activities,
fund-raising efforts, and grants are used with
integrity in a manner consistent with the
intended purpose of the funding source.
Met
None
III D.2.e The institution’s internal control systems are
evaluated and assess for validity and
effectiveness and the results of this
assessment are used for improvement.
Met
None
III D.3.a The institution has sufficient cash flow and
reserves to maintain stability, strategies for
appropriate risk management, and develops
contingency plans to meet financial
emergencies and unforeseen occurrences.
Met
None
III D.3.b The institution practices effective oversight of
finances, including management of financial
aid, grants, externally funded programs,
contractual
relationships,
auxiliary
organizations or foundations, and institutional
investments and assets.
Met
None
III D.2
III D.3
Continue effort to improve
accuracy and efficiency of data
entry by maintaining a monthly
meeting among the district’s
Information
Systems
department
and
college
Administrative Services and
Office of Instruction.
The institution has policies and procedures to
ensure sound financial practices and financial
stability.
| At A Glance Actionable Improvement Plans 66
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
III D.3.c
The institution plans for and allocates
appropriate resources for the payment of
liabilities and future obligations, including
Other Post-Employment
Benefits (OPEB),
compensated absences, and other employee
related obligations.
Met
None
III D.3.d The actuarial plan to determine Other PostEmployment Benefits (OPEB) is prepared, as
required by appropriate accounting standards.
Met
None
III D.3.e On an annual basis, the institution assesses
and allocates resources for the repayment of
any locally incurred debt instruments that can
affect the financial condition of the institution.
Met
None
III D.3.f
Institutions monitor and manage student Loan
default rates, revenue streams, and assets to
ensure compliance with federal requirements.
Met
None
III D.3.g Contractual agreements with external entities
are consistent with the mission and goals of
the institution, governed by institutional
policies, and contain appropriate provisions to
maintain the integrity of the institution.
Met
None
III D.3.h The institution regularly evaluates its financial
management processes, and the results of the
evaluation are used to improve financial
management systems.
Met
None
III D.4
Met
None
Financial Resource Planning is integrated with
institutional
planning.
The
institution
systematically assesses the effective use of
financial resources and uses the results of the
evaluation as the basis for improvement of the
institution.
Standard IV: Leadership and Governance
Standard Text
IV A
SelfEvaluation
Status
Actionable Improvements, if any
Decision-Making
Roles
and
Processes:
The institution
recognizes that ethical and effective
leadership
throughout
the
organization enables the institution
to identify institutional values, set
and achieve goals, learn, and
improve.
| At A Glance Actionable Improvement Plans 67
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
IV A.1
Institutional leaders create an
environment for empowerment,
innovation,
and
institutional
excellence. They encourage staff,
faculty, administrators, and students,
no matter what their official titles, to
take initiative in improving the
practices, programs, and services in
which they are involved. When ideas
for improvement have policy or
significant
institution-wide
implications, systematic participative
processes are used to assure
effective discussion, planning and
implementation.
Met

IV A.2
The institution establishes and
implements
a
written
policy
providing for faculty, staff, and
administrator in decision-making
processes. The policy specifies the
manner in which individuals bring
forward
ideas
from
their
constituencies and work together on
appropriate policy, planning, and
special-purpose bodies.
Met
None
IV A.2.a Faculty and administration have a
substantive and clearly defined role
in institutional governance and
exercise a substantial voice in
institutional policies, planning, and
budget that relate to their areas of
responsibility
and
expertise.
Students and staff also have
established
mechanisms
or
organizations for providing input into
institutional decisions.
Met
None
IV A.2.b The institution on faculty, its
academic
senate
or
other
appropriate faculty structures, the
curriculum committee, and academic
administrators for recommendations
about student learning programs and
services.
Met

Continue to fine-tune new faculty
orientation and department chairs
training.
Program
discontinuance
and/or
consolidation of programs, services and
positions may come under review if state
budget crisis worsens. The Academic
Directions Committee, under the purview
of Academic Senate, will take a
leadership role in facilitating the process.
| At A Glance Actionable Improvement Plans 68
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
IV A.3
Through established governance
structures, processes, and practices,
the governing board, administrators,
faculty, staff, and students work
together for the good of the
institution.
These processes
facilitate discussion of ideas and
effective communication among the
institution's constituencies.
Met
None
IV A.4
The institution advocates and
demonstrates honesty and integrity
in its relationships with external
agencies. It agrees to comply with
Accrediting Commission standards,
policies, guidelines, and Commission
requirements for public disclosure,
self-study and other reports, team
visits, and prior approval of
substantive changes. The institution
moves expeditiously to respond to
recommendations made by the
Commission.
Met
None
IV A.5
The role of leadership and the
institution's
governance
and
decision-making structures and
processes are regularly evaluated to
assure
their
integrity
and
effectiveness. The institution widely
communicates the results of these
evaluations and uses them as the
basis for improvement.
Met
IV B
Board
and
Administrative
Organization: In addition to the
leadership of individuals and
constituencies, institutions recognize
the designated responsibilities of the
governing board for setting policies
and of the chief administrator for the
effective operation of the institution.
Multi-college
districts/systems
clearly define the organizational
roles of the district/system and the
colleges.

The college continues to fine-tune the
participatory governance evaluation
process to be more systemic and
streamlined.
| At A Glance Actionable Improvement Plans 69
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
IV B.1
The institution has a governing board
that is responsible for establishing
policies to assure the quality,
integrity, and effectiveness of the
student learning programs and
services and the financial stability of
the institution. The governing board
adheres to a clearly defined policy
for the selecting and evaluating the
chief administrator for the college or
the district/system.
Met
None
IV B.1.a The governing board is an
independent policy-making body
that reflects the public interest in
board activities and decisions. Once
the board reaches a decision, it acts
as a whole. It advocates for and
defends the institution and protects
it from undue influence or pressure.
Met
None
IV B.1.b The governing board establishes
policies consistent with the mission
statement to ensure the quality,
integrity, and improvement of
student learning programs and
services and the resources necessary
to support them.
Met
None
IV B.1.c
The governing board has ultimate
responsibility for educational quality,
legal matters and financial integrity.
Met
None
IV B.1.d The institution or the governing
board publishes the board bylaws
and policies specifying the board's
size,
duties,
responsibilities,
structures,
and
operating
procedures.
Met
None
IV B.1.e The governing board acts in a
manner consistent with its policies
and bylaws. The board regularly
evaluates its policies and practices
and revises them as necessary.
Met
None
IV B.1.f
Met
None
The governing board has a program
development and new member
orientation. It has a mechanism for
providing continuity of board
membership and staggered terms of
office.
| At A Glance Actionable Improvement Plans 70
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
IV B.1.g The
governing
board's
selfevaluation processes for assessing
board performance are clearly
defined,
implemented,
and
published in its policies and bylaws.
Met
None
IV B.1.h The governing board has a code of
ethics that includes a clearly defined
policy for dealing with behavior that
violates its code.
Met
None
IV B.1.i
The governing board is informed and
involved in the accreditation process.
Met
None
IV B.1.j
The governing board has the
responsibility for selecting and
evaluating the district/system chief
administrator (most often known as
the chancellor) in a multi-college
district/system or the college chief
administrator (most often known as
the president) in the case of a single
college.
The governing board
delegates full responsibility and
authority to him/her to implement
and administer board policies
without board interference and hold
him/her accountable for the
operation of the district/system or
college respectively. In multi-college
district/systems, the governing board
establishes a clearly defined policy
for selecting and evaluating the
presidents of the college.
Met
None
IV B.2
The
President
has
primary
responsibility for the quality of the
institution he/she leads. He/she
provides effective leadership in
planning, organizing, budgeting,
selecting and developing personnel,
and
assessing
institutional
effectiveness.
Met
None
IV B.2.a The President plans, oversees, and
evaluates an administrative structure
organized and staffed to reflect the
institution's purposes, size, and
complexity.
He/she delegates
authority to administrators and
others
consistent
with
their
responsibilities, as appropriate.
Met

Continue to review and assess
organizational structure to increase
efficiency and effectiveness during the
restructuring effort.
| At A Glance Actionable Improvement Plans 71
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
IV B.2.b The President guides institutional
improvement of the teaching and
learning environment by the
following:
Met
None
The
President
assures
the
implementation
of
statutes,
regulations, and governing board
policies and assures that institutional
practices are consistent with
institutional mission and policies.
Met
None
IV B.2.d The President effectively controls
budget and expenditures.
Met
None
IV B.2.e The
President
works
and
communicates effectively with the
communities
served
by
the
institution.
Met
None
IV B.2.c
IV B.3

establishing a collegial process
that sets values, goals, and
priorities;

ensuring that evaluation and
planning rely on high quality
research and analysis on
external and internal conditions;

ensuring
that
educational
planning is
integrated with
resource
planning
and
distribution to achieve student
learning outcomes; and

establishing
procedures
to
evaluate overall institutional
planning and implementation
efforts.
In multi-college districts or systems,
the district/system provides primary
leadership
in
setting
and
communicating expectations of
educational excellence and integrity
throughout the district/system and
assures support for the effective
operation of the colleges.
IV B.3.a The district/system clearly delineates
and communicates the operational
responsibilities and functions of the
district/system from those of the
colleges and consistently adheres to
Met
None
| At A Glance Actionable Improvement Plans 72
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
this delineation in practice.
IV B.3.b The
district/system
provides
effective services that support the
colleges in their missions and
functions.
Met

IV B.3.c
The district/system provides fair
distribution of resources that are
adequate to support the effective
operations of the colleges.
Met
None
IV B.3.d The
district/system
effectively
controls its expenditures.
Met
None
IV B.3.e The
chancellor
gives
full
responsibility and authority to the
presidents of the colleges to
implement and administer delegated
district/system policies without
his/her interference and holds them
accountable for the operation of the
colleges.
Met
None
IV B.3.f
The district/system acts as the liaison
between the colleges and the
governing board. The district/system
and the colleges use effective
methods of communication, and
they exchange information in a
timely manner.
Met

IVB.3.g
The
district/system
regularly
evaluates
district/system
role
delineation and governance and
decision-making structures and
processes to assure their integrity
and effectiveness in assisting the
colleges in meeting educational
goals. The district/system widely
communicates the results of these
evaluations and uses them as the
basis for improvement.
Met
Deeply and critically examine and raise
the standard of operations within the
Information Systems (IS) unit at the
district.
Ensure that the Enrollment Management
Committee is institutionalized to provide
effective and continual advice to District
Council
regarding
enrollment
management issues.
None
| At A Glance Actionable Improvement Plans 73
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Certification of Continued Institutional Compliance with
Eligibility Requirements
Authority
West Valley College has the authority to operate as a degree-granting institution based
on its continuous accreditation by the Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior
Colleges of the Western Association of Schools and Colleges, an institutional accrediting
body recognized by the Council for Higher Education Accreditation and the U. S.
Department of Education. This authority is published accurately and fully on the title
page of the College Catalog and is on the college website in several places, including the
“About West Valley” page.
Mission
The current mission statement was revised through the shared governance process and
approved by the College Council on October 27, 2011. The mission statement is published
on the WVC website, in the College Catalog, and in the WVC student portal. Additionally,
the mission is displayed in various offices across the campus.
Governing Board
The West Valley Mission Community College District is governed by a Board of Trustees
that consists of seven members elected by Trustee areas and two non-voting student
trustee elected by the students of the two colleges in the district. The communityelected trustees represent the entire district and are elected for four-year staggered
terms. The student trustee serves a one-year term. The function of the board is to
determine policies, establish rules, regulations and procedures, and oversee the use of
financial and other resources to provide a sound educational program consistent with the
mission and goals of the district. The President of the Board of Trustees is one of the
community-elected trustees selected by the trustees on an annual basis.
The Board of Trustees invites public input by publishing agendas for its meetings several
days in advance of the meeting; they may be reviewed online or requested by phoning
(408) 741-2195. Every regular meeting agenda includes an item for Statements from the
Public on Non-Agenda items. Members of the Board of Trustees have no employment,
family, ownership or personal financial interests related to either the colleges or the
district. The Board has and enforces a conflict of interest policy (BP 2710).
|Certification of Continued Institutional Compliance with Eligibility Requirements 74
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Chief Executive Officer
The West Valley College President serves as chief executive officer for the college and has
the requisite authority for the development, implementation and evaluation of all college
programs and services and for the administration and operation of the college. (AP 2430)
and reports to the Chancellor. The president was appointed by the board in May 2013
following a nationwide search. The Accrediting Commission was informed promptly. The
President does not sit on the Board of Trustees for the District.
Administrative Capacity
The administrative staff size at West Valley College is adequate in number, experience,
and qualification to provide appropriate oversight. The administrative screening process
ensures that West Valley College administrators have appropriate preparation and
experience to provide the administrative services necessary to support the institution’s
mission and purpose. All staffing meet or exceed the minimum qualifications for their
positions in terms of education, training, and experience. Policy regarding administrative
employment is established in Board Policy 7240 and 7260, with processes outlined in
Administrative Procedure 7250.
Operational Status
West Valley College is fully operational and has been in continuous service since 1964.
The college has an unduplicated student headcount of 10,288 students, which includes
both credit and non-credit. West Valley College serves students who are actively pursuing
degree and certificate programs, and transfer preparation to a four-year university or
institution.
Degrees
West Valley College offers over 53 Associate of Arts and Associate of Science degrees, 15
Associate Degrees for Transfer, and 65 Certificate Programs. The degrees and majors
offered by West Valley College are listed in the College Catalog and online. Degrees are
earned upon satisfactory completion of 60 degree applicable units with a 2.0 grade
average or better. A minimum of 12 units must be in residence and a maximum of 20
“Pass” units may be applied toward the completion of the associate degree.
|Certification of Continued Institutional Compliance with Eligibility Requirements 75
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Educational Programs
West Valley degree programs are aligned with its mission, are based on recognized higher
education fields of study, and are of sufficient content, breadth and length. Instructors
teach to the standards of their disciplines and honor the official course outline of record,
both of which ensure that courses are conducted at levels of quality and rigor appropriate
to the degrees offered. Degree- and certificate-level learning outcomes are included in
the 2013-2014 College Catalog.
Academic Credit
West Valley College awards academic credit as established in California Education Code
Title 5. Per Administrative Procedure 4020, “A “credit hour” is one hour of classroom or
direct faculty instruction and a minimum of two hours of out of class student work (15
weeks for one semester or trimester hour of credit) or the equivalent amount of work over
a different amount of time.” The equivalent amount of work for other academic activities
includes laboratory work, internships, practica, or studio work.
The college awards academic credit based on work represented in intended learning
outcomes and verified by evidence of student achievement. The award of academic credit
for each course is clearly delineated in the West Valley College Catalog.
Student Learning and Achievement
West Valley College defines learning outcomes at the institutional, program, course,
service and administrative level. Through an Integrated Planning and Resource Allocation
and budgeting process, these outcomes are defined and assessed annually, and form the
basis for program improvement, college goals, decision-making and resource allocation.
The Course Catalog contains a comprehensive statement of educational purpose and
objectives for each of the academic programs offered. Additionally, institutional,
program, and course-level learning outcomes are published, implemented and assessed.
The 2013- 2014 Course Catalog includes published program learning outcomes.
General Education
General education courses have the required breadth to promote intellectual inquiry.
These courses require demonstrated competence in writing and computational skills and
serve as an introduction to major areas of knowledge pursuant to Title 5 of the California
Code of Regulations, §55806. The general education component of programs conforms
to Title 5 §55063 requirements for the Associate Degree and meets the California State
|Certification of Continued Institutional Compliance with Eligibility Requirements 76
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
University General Education breadth requirements and the University of California
Intersegmental General Transfer Curriculum (IGETC) requirements.
The college’s general education curriculum is founded on the college’s institutional
learning outcomes:
Institutional Learning Outcomes:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
Critical Thinking and Information Literacy
Quantitative and Qualitative Reasoning
Effective Communication
Technological Competency
Personal Responsibility
Social Responsibility
Global Awareness and Diversity
Creative Problem Solving
All degree programs require a minimum of 25 units of general education to ensure
breadth of knowledge and to promote intellectual inquiry. Mathematics and writing
requirements are also stipulated in the above requirements. The institution’s general
education program is scrutinized for rigor and quality by the College Curriculum
Committee.
Academic Freedom
The college’s faculty and students are free to examine and test all knowledge appropriate
to their discipline or area of major study as ensured by the Board Policy and
Administrative Procedures 4030 on academic freedom. The policy is also contained in the
College Catalog in the Rights and Responsibilities section. West Valley maintains a
collegial climate in which academic freedom exists in the service of student learning.
Faculty
The college employs 167 full-time contract faculty who are qualified under statemandated minimum qualifications to conduct the institution’s programs. Faculty duties
and responsibilities are clearly outlined in the Association of College Educators
Agreement. In addition, the college employs approximately 219 adjunct faculty. The hire
date, name, subject area and degrees of all full-time faculty are published in the West
Valley College Catalog.
|Certification of Continued Institutional Compliance with Eligibility Requirements 77
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Student Services
Student services are comprehensive and accessible to all students. The array of services is
provided based on the college mission and on the assessment of student needs. The
college maintains a comprehensive list of services in its catalog and on its website.
Admissions
West Valley College maintains an open door admissions policy. This policy is consistent
with the college mission statement, the Education Code, Title 5 regulations, and the
statewide mission for the California Community Colleges.
Outreach and Student recruitment is guided by well-qualified and trained staff whose
position is clearly specified. Awards of grants or scholarships are offered to recognize
accomplishments and to provide tangible encouragement to students who have
demonstrated academic achievement, leadership, community service, and financial need.
Information and Learning Resources
West Valley College is committed to enhancing its learning resources, regardless of
location or delivery method, and continues to improve services to its diverse student
populations. The library collection consists of over 100,000 volumes, 15,000 audiovisual
items, and 81 current subscriptions. The library provides 24/7 access to more than 12
full-text databases/electronic resources and over 13,000 electronic books (e-books)
accessible through the online catalog. Additionally student and staff have access to 18
million titles, 25 million items through the Link+ Consortium. Research guides,
instructional videos, and other information is available on the library website including
“The Last Resort” email research help. West Valley also offers multiple instructional
computer labs for students in specific disciplines.
Financial Resources
The college maintains and documents a funding base, financial resources, and plans for
financial development that are adequate to support student learning programs and
services, to improve institutional effectiveness, and to assure financial stability. The
district maintains reserve funds to protect against financial emergency, and the college
and district maintain conservative fiscal policies to ensure stability.
|Certification of Continued Institutional Compliance with Eligibility Requirements 78
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Financial Accountability
Annual financial audits are conducted by externally contracted certified public
accountants. The Board of Trustees reviews these audit reports on an annual basis. The
Board may refer audit, budget, and finance matters to the Audit and Budget Oversight
Committee for thorough discussion.
The Audit and Budget Oversight Committee has the following charge:

Ensuring timely completion of the Annual District Audit;
 Overseeing the timely and effective response to outstanding audit findings;
 Ensuring that management maintains adequate internal controls over financial
reporting and minimizing fraud, waste and abuse;
 Maintaining compliance with district policies related to audit or budget;
 and Advising the Board on other fiscal, budget, and operations issues as
necessary.
The financial audit and management responses to any exceptions are reviewed and
discussed in public sessions.
Institutional Planning and Evaluation
West Valley College is committed to creating a culture of evidence as it evaluates and
publicizes how well it is accomplishing its purposes via its mission statement. It has
evidence of planning for improvement in all areas through the campus-wide program
review and student learning outcome assessment processes. The institution assesses the
progress it has made in achieving its goals and uses an evaluation cycle and planning tied
to resource allocation to make decisions for improvement. The culture of evidence
includes but is not limited to:










Goals and Objectives
Student Success Scorecard
Program Review
Student Learning Outcomes
Student Survey
Employee Survey
WVC Fact Book
Student Success (Matriculation) Plan
Student Equity Plan
Student Services Point of Service Survey
|Certification of Continued Institutional Compliance with Eligibility Requirements 79
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014

College Council Agendas and Minutes
Furthermore, West Valley College has an employee dedicated to institutional research
and planning who is responsible for accessing and analyzing data to inform decision
makers about planning, student success, and institutional effectiveness. This data is used
to create the aforementioned reports; there is also a wealth of information available on
the Research and Planning webpage.
Public Information
Regularly updated information about all aspects of a West Valley College education,
including both onsite and distance education, are available to the public through the
West Valley College website, annually published College Catalog, and class schedules
published for each semester. Information includes:


















Official name, address, telephone number(s), and website address of the
institution (See College Catalog, website homepage)
Institutional mission (See College Catalog - p. 3)
Admission requirements and procedures (See College Catalog— p. 174)
Academic calendar and program length (See College Catalog—p.2)
Available learning resources (See College Catalog—p.189)
Course, program, and degree offerings (See College Catalog—p.10, 13-14, 19, 22171)
Degrees, certificates, graduation, and transfer requirements (See College
Catalog—4, 7, 13-17, 22-171)
Names and degrees of administrators and faculty (See College Catalog—194-203)
Campus Map of facilities—including current temporary housing and construction
updates (Class Schedule and online)
Academic Regulations and Rights and Responsibilities, including academic honesty
Academic freedom statement (See College Catalog—p. 174-181)
Student fees and other financial obligations (See College Catalog—p. 173)
Available student financial aid (See College Catalog—p.190)
Refund of fees (See College Catalog—p. 180)
Acceptance of transfer credits (See College Catalog—p.4)
Nondiscrimination policy (See College Catalog—p. 177, 188)
Sexual harassment policy (See College Catalog—p. 172, 188)
Grievance and complaint procedures (See College Catalog—p.185-86, 188)
Names of governing board members (See College Catalog—p.1)
|Certification of Continued Institutional Compliance with Eligibility Requirements 80
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014

Accredited status of the institution; program accreditation or certification (see
College Catalog—p.1)
Relations with the Accrediting Commission
West Valley College adheres to the eligibility requirements, the accreditation standards,
and the policies of the Commission. The college fully agrees to disclose any and all
information required by the Commission (Board Policy 3200, Administrative Procedure
3200). The disclosure of the college to the Commission is always honest, timely, and
accurate in accordance with Commission policy. West Valley College maintains contact
with the Commission through its Accreditation Liaison Officer (ALO).
|Certification of Continued Institutional Compliance with Eligibility Requirements 81
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Certification of Continued Institutional Compliance with
Commission Policies
Policy on Distance Education and Correspondence Education
WVC integrates technology-mediated instruction and support services to deliver
rigorous education online and to enrich hybrid and face-to-face courses. Courses
are developed using the WVC Standards and Criteria for Distance Learning. Distance
Education courses offered meet the mission of the college, have clearly defined
student learning outcomes, and are regularly evaluated through the SLO/A
assessment and program review processes; Distance Education goals are
enumerated in the WVC Strategic Plan for Distance Learning. Student work is
authenticated through a secure log-in and password, or other uses of best practices
(e.g. exam proctoring, plagiarism detection services, writing comparisons from
different sources, etc.). Support for faculty and students are available online at the
eLearning webpage. West Valley College informs the Commission of any new
delivery modes, or new degrees, programs, or certificates which 50% or more of
courses are via distance education through the substantive change process.
Policy on Institutional Compliance with Title IV
West Valley College monitors students who receive financial aid to meet the
compliance requirements under Title IV. Information on the WVC Standard of
Academic Progress is available from the Financial Aid Office and also presented at
Orientation.
Policy on Institutional Advertising, Student Recruitment, Representation
of Accredited Status
Regularly updated information about all aspects of a West Valley College education,
including both onsite and distance education, are available to the public through
the West Valley College website, annually published course catalogues, and class
schedules published for each semester. See Public Information for a complete list.
Student recruitment is guided by well qualified staff whose position is clearly
defined. All Outreach activities and materials are aligned with the college mission,
regularly reviewed for accuracy of information, and delivered with integrity.
West Valley College scholarships are designed to recognize accomplishments and to
provide tangible encouragement to students who have demonstrated academic
|Certification of Continued Institutional Compliance with Commission Policies 82
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
achievement, leadership, community service, and financial need. Both internal and
external scholarship information is available through the Financial Aid Office.
Policy on Institutional Degrees and Credits
West Valley College awards academic credit as established in California Education
Code Title 5. Per Administrative Procedure 4020, “A “credit hour” is one hour of
classroom or direct faculty instruction and a minimum of two hours of out of class
student work (15 weeks for one semester or trimester hour of credit) or the
equivalent amount of work over a different amount of time.” The equivalent
amount of work for other academic activities includes laboratory work, internships,
practice, or studio work.
The college awards academic credit based on work represented in intended
learning outcomes and verified by evidence of student achievement. The award of
academic credit for each course is clearly delineated in the West Valley College
Catalog.
Degrees are earned upon satisfactory completion of 60 degree applicable units with
a 2.0 grade average or better. A minimum of 12 units must be in residence and a
maximum of 20 “Pass” units may be applied toward the completion of the associate
degree. West Valley Colleges offers both major specific and liberal arts associate
degrees. Certificates are awarded upon successful completion of courses specific
courses needed to meet industry standards of the desired field of study.
Policy on Integrity and Ethics
West Valley College upholds and protects the integrity of its practices. The college
provides and responds to requests by ACCJC with accurate, complete, and readily
available information. Public information on all aspects of the college is clear,
accurate, and available to all who seek it. This information includes, but is not
limited to: educational programs; admission requirements; student services
offered; athletics programs; tuition and fees; financial aid programs; policies related
to transcripts, transfer of credit, and refunds of tuition and fees; and accreditation
status. Interactions by college-wide personnel with students and prospective
students are conducted with professionalism and integrity.
Administrative Procedures 3050 outlines the Code of Ethics for the district and
college. The Board of Trustees maintains a Conflict of Interest Policy (AP 2710)
which outlines violation resolutions. In addition, the District also holds policies on
Employee Complaints (AP 7355) and Whistleblower Procedures (AP 7700) to assure
|Certification of Continued Institutional Compliance with Commission Policies 83
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
the campus community of a confidential due process of any violations without
retribution. The Student Code of Conduct contains information and consequences
for academic dishonesty, behavior expectations, attendance, and grievance policies
among others.
West Valley College maintains professional and ethical integrity in its site visits by
collegially cooperating with site team members and maintaining an open and
committed external evaluation process; this is achieved by assisting the peer
evaluators efficiently and effectively in performing their duties while providing
accurate readily available evidence of compliance with all policies, eligibility
requirements, and accreditation standards.
Contractual Relationships with Non-regionally Accredited Organizations
Not applicable to West Valley College.
|Certification of Continued Institutional Compliance with Commission Policies 84
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
This page intentionally left blank
| 85
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Responses to Recommendations from the Most Recent
Educational Quality and Institutional Effectiveness Review
Recommendation 1:
The team recommends that West Valley College regularly update and publish collegewide goals, and state the objectives derived from them in measurable terms, so that the
degree to which they are achieved can be determined and widely discussed in order to
improve institutional effectiveness. The team further recommends that district goals be
established and regularly updated to guide the college in planning to continuously assure
the quality, integrity, and improvement of student learning programs and services. Both
levels of goals should be part of an ongoing and systematic cycle of evaluation,
integrated planning, resource allocation, implementation, and re-evaluation.
(I.B.1, I.B.2, I.B.3, I.B.4, I.B.5. II.A.2.e, II.A.2.f, III.A.6, III.B.2, III.B.2.b, III.C.2, III.D.3, V.B.1,
IV.B.1.b.)
Progress made since March 2011
West Valley College has taken deliberate and thoughtful steps to further respond to this
recommendation by reviewing and updating college goals and objectives at annual College
Council retreats in each fall semester. The college goals and objectives are presented and
discussed at the annual retreats and the final, prioritized goals and objectives are
summarized in a document that is circulated college-wide. (R1.1) The stated goals and
objectives are linked to the Educational and Facilities Master Plan (E&FMP) and pertinent
ACCJC Standards are identified in each section. Moreover, the goals and objectives are
quantifiable, responsible parties are assigned, and follow up on the status and
implementation of goals and objectives is shared periodically at College Council meetings.
The restructured methods that West Valley College has implemented since 2009 adhere to
the underlying E&FMP of 2009. College goal development is clearly linked to district goal
development and both processes are connected to a cyclical mechanism of evaluation, the
college’s integrated planning and resource allocation process, and re-evaluation.
The goal development process was institutionalized at West Valley College in the fall of
2009. Since 2009, the College Council has held annual retreat during which the goals and
objectives from the prior year were evaluated for progress made and the goals and
objectives
for
the
incoming
year
were
inaugurated.
During this same period it was recognized that the college’s goals were not impacting
district goals and priorities, but working in reverse. This was viewed as a distinct
shortcoming by the West Valley College President and the President of Mission College.
|Responses to Recommendations from the Most Recent Educational Quality and 86
Institutional Effectiveness Review
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Thus, the process of goal development at the district level was thoroughly revamped, as
explained in the next section. As a result of this revamping, the College Council determined
to carry its 2009-10 goals and objectives forward into the 2010-11 year, with minor
modification. Doing so allows a smooth transition to the recently revised district goal
development process and timeline. The planned integration of West Valley College goals
and objectives and those of the district are further explained in the final section of the
Response to Recommendation 1.
In the summer of 2012, West Valley College transitioned to an interim President who then
became the college’s permanent President in the summer of 2013. The President has
continued this effective practice of ongoing goal and objective development, assessment
thereof, and institutional priority development. He ensures that this process is vetted
through the participatory governance process as well as continuing the practice of
providing periodic updates of goal attainment and completion throughout the year.
Most recently, the College Council established college goals for 2014-15 at its retreat held
in November 2013. (R1.2) As is now established practice, these sets of goals and objectives
are informed by the 2009 Educational Initiatives drawn from the Educational and Facilities
Master Plan and the most recent set of annual program reviews from 2013. The next
annual program reviews are slated for completion during the latter stages of 2013. (R.1.3)
West Valley-Mission Community College District Goal Development Process
To help implement this annual review process and to stimulate the development of
measurable objectives for the District Goals, the Board established an ad hoc committee on
District Goals in 2009. The Ad Hoc Committee membership included two trustees, a
student trustee and a college president serving as staff to the committee. The Ad Hoc
Committee met several times over four months and developed the following Process and
Timeline for District objectives.
The Ad Hoc Committee then forwarded a recommended list of objectives and a timeline for
annual review to District Council for a first reading on April 29, 2009. District Council
approved the recommended objectives on May 13, 2009. The 2009/2010 District Goals and
Objectives were formally approved by the Board on July 16, 2009.
In 2010, the Board President appointed a Task Force composed of two trustees to review
implementation activities aligned to 2009/2010 District Goals and the District goal-setting
process. On June 28, 2010, the Task Force met with the Chancellor, the two College
presidents, and the Special Assistant to the Chancellor.
|Responses to Recommendations from the Most Recent Educational Quality and 87
Institutional Effectiveness Review
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
At that meeting, a report on activities undertaken by staff throughout the district to
implement District Goals was reviewed and discussed. Most goals of 2009-10 had either
been achieved or substantially met during the past year. (R1.4) The Task Force also
considered the process and timeline for annual development and review of District Goals.
The conclusion was that the schedule did not allow for the establishment of goals far
enough out to allow for real planning and implementation at the district and college level.
It was the recommendation of the Task Force that future District Goals development follow
the below timeline:
Process and Timeline for Annual Development
and
Review of District Goals/Objectives
November/December
 Colleges and District Services undertake process to develop
and approve goals for succeeding year.

January
College and District participatory governance groups generate
and forward to the District Council recommendations on:
a) continuation of current District Goals/objectives into
succeeding year;
b) modification of current District Goals/objectives for
succeeding year; and/or
c) New District Goals for succeeding year.
 District Council establishes District Goals/objectives for
succeeding year. The goals developed by the Colleges and
District Services are used to inform the District Council in the
development of District Goals/objectives. First and second
reading of District Goals/objectives by District Council.
 First report to the Board of Trustees on progress to date on
current year District Goals/objectives.
February
 Board review and action to approve the District Goals/objectives
for the succeeding year.
 Approved District Goals/objectives are used to inform the
budget development process for the upcoming year.
June
 Final report to the Board of Trustees on progress to date on
current year District Goals/objectives.
The District Goal development process and timeline outlined above substantially supports
college accreditation standards by linking budget allocations to program planning and
|Responses to Recommendations from the Most Recent Educational Quality and 88
Institutional Effectiveness Review
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
strengthening the role of the Board of Trustees in the annual budget development process.
On an annual basis, in the late fall, the colleges and district commence the District Goaldevelopment process through participatory governance structures. Goal identification
starts with the review of current year goals with the objective of setting District Goals for
the succeeding fiscal/instructional year.
In the early spring, the District-level planning body, District Council, meets to develop the
first reading of proposed District Goals, which are based on the goals developed at each
college and District Services. A first report is made to the Board of Trustees on progress to
date on current year goals. At this time, the Board is also advised on the process and
tentative goals to be recommended for the succeeding year. In February, Board is
positioned to review and take an action to approve District Goals. Approved District Goals
become drivers for the district’s annual budget development process for the upcoming
fiscal year.
In June of each year, a final report on District Goals is presented to the Board. This process
now aligns program planning based on Program Review outcomes to budget allocations,
and links to distinct education, facilities and budget planning activities district-wide.
Further, this process enables early Board member participation in the initial conversations
on district’s goal identification and the final action on adopting District Goals.
The Board of Trustee’s degree of involvement in the district’s Goal development process is
clearly delineated. The Board may provide goals for consideration. Board members are
encouraged to participate at several stages of District Goal development process. First, in
the November/December stage, Board members may address current year goal attainment
challenges and/or the identification of succeeding year goals based on outcomes of
individual meetings with administration, members of participatory governance
committees, and/or Board’s town-hall meetings that occur once in each semester with the
district-wide employees at large. Second, in January of each year Board members are asked
to reflect on current year events and actions when the District Goals progress report is
made at a regular Board meeting. Third, the Board is asked to approve succeeding year
Goal statements in February. Finally, the Board-approved District Goals become a platform
for the annual Board Budget Study Session to be held in mid-February. Consequently, a
direct link is established for District Goals to be the driver for budget development and
revenue allocation to accomplish specified objectives. The Board of Trustees selfevaluation and the Chancellor’s goal are now framed by the District Goals. The revised
timeline for the development of the district goals e was accepted by the Board of Trustees
|Responses to Recommendations from the Most Recent Educational Quality and 89
Institutional Effectiveness Review
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
on August 3, 2010, providing a solid roadmap for the district-wide planning process which
was successfully enacted in time for the 2011-2012 academic year.
So as to ensure a quality, continuous, and data-driven district-wide planning process, the
district contracted with the College Brain Trust (CBT; formerly the California Collegiate
Brain Trust, or CCBT) (R1.4) to assist the district in the development of a Strategic Longrange Plan. The purpose of the plan is to further delineate the use of:



college-level program review and its inputs
the use of more comprehensive and data-intensive enrollment projections
and, the identification of specific instructional programs that may better serve the
projected student bodies of the colleges between 2011-12 through 2016-17
(including the roles of technology, facilities improvements, student services and the
resources needed to implement the identified instructional program opportunities
The Strategic Long-range Plan reviewed the array of goals and objectives and related
planning documents produced by the colleges and the district over the last several years.
In addition, the District’s Land Corporation policies that pertain to the support of the two
colleges, as well as each college’s Educational and Facilities Master Plans and educational
program planning documents were carefully reviewed by the College Brain Train Trust. For
example, roles of technology, facilities improvements needs and connection to teaching
and learning and student success, student services, and general resource needs, and
opportunities for instructional programs were some critical opportunities reviewed for the
district’s long-range strategic planning.
Integration of College and District Planning and Resource Allocation
The two restructured processes described above link development of college’s goal and
objectives to District Goal development. This now occurs as a systemic and ongoing
practice where the college goals from both West Valley College and Mission College inform
District goals. As a result, budget development and resource allocation at the district level
and the college level are framed by the District’s Goal development.
Parallel to the District’s Goal development process refinement, West Valley College
strengthened its overall institutional planning process by completing a clearly delineated
Integrated Planning and Resource Allocation process as part of the college’s Institutional
Effectiveness framework. Student Learning Outcome and its assessment information
along with Program Review data are now reviewed by the Budget Allocation Resource
Council (BRAC) which reports directly to the College Council beginning spring 2014. The
Integrated Planning and Resource Allocation process is further explained in relevant
|Responses to Recommendations from the Most Recent Educational Quality and 90
Institutional Effectiveness Review
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
sections of this Self Evaluation report. In summary, the college developed an ongoing and
systemic cycle of evaluation and improvement process. In collaboration with the district
and Mission College, the district also successfully addressed this recommendation.
Evidence
R1.1
WVC Goals and Objectives
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/
goals_objectives.html
R1.2
2014 – 15 Goals and Objectives
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/
2013/evidence/recommendations/Goals_Objectives_20
14-2015.pdf
R1.3
Master Program Review and
Assessment Calendar
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/
2013/evidence/recommendations/Master_Program_Re
view_and_SLO_Assessment_Schedule_01-072014_External.pdf
R1.4
College Brain Trust Report
http://www.westvalley.edu/commitees/Accreditation/2
013/evidence/1b/ccbt_report.pdf
Recommendation 2
The team recommends that West Valley College formally and systematically evaluate the
new program review process so that improvements can be made, as necessary, to ensure
the effectiveness of this ongoing planning and resource allocation process. The team
further recommends that developing and assessing student learning outcomes be
effectively evaluated through established means, such as the program review process.
(I.B.6, I.B.7, II.A.1.c, II.A.2.e, II.B.4, II.C.2)
Progress made since March 2011
Establishment and Inception of the Integrated Planning Process: Institutional
Effectiveness
Since the midterm recommendation, the college immediately began ensuring that the
Program Review and Student Learning Outcome and Assessment (SLO/A) processes are
clearly defined and established throughout the college. (R2.1, 2) The Program Review and
SLO/A committees met regularly and fine-tuned each process and ensured that ACCJC
required institutional performance for both areas were met by its deadlines. As a
consequence, the status West Valley College’s Program Review achieved the “Sustainable
Continuous Quality Improvement” level by fall 2012 and SLO/A reached the “Proficiency”
level by the same semester, followed by a successful submission to and score received by
ACCJC on the March 15, 2013 Annual SLO/A report. (R2.3)
|Responses to Recommendations from the Most Recent Educational Quality and 91
Institutional Effectiveness Review
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
The college continued its effort to formulate a systemic and formal planning process based
on the accomplishments made in the Program Review and SLO/A processes. During the
2012-13 academic year, the college created a formal Institutional Effectiveness
organizational framework (R2.4) and priority through the participatory governance process
where Integrated Planning and Resource Allocation is identified as one of the three major
priorities of the institution. Within this formal institutional framework, the college
established an Integrated Planning and Resource Allocation Leadership Team to further
develop an integrated institutional planning and resource allocation process. The
Integrated Planning and Resource Allocation Leadership Team, facilitated by the Vice
President of Instruction, consists primarily of key players/chairs from the Program Review
Committee, Student Learning Outcome/Assessment (SLO/A) Committee and Vice President
of Administrative Services. In addition, members who represent critically important
components to this planning process complete this leadership team including the Dean of
Instruction and Student Success and the Director of Institutional Research and Planning.
The Integrated Planning and Resource Allocation Leadership Team met semi-monthly
during spring 2012 and continues to meet, providing information to constituency groups
and soliciting feedback from them which led to a successful development and
implementation of a formal and systematic Integrated Planning and Resource Allocation
process for the college in fall 2013. The Integrated Master Program Review and SLO/A
Schedule (R2.5) for the college was developed in spring 2013, so each department,
program, and/or service can plan systemically their evaluation process based on the West
Valley College Integrated Planning and Resource Allocation Concept Map. (R2.6) In fall
2013, participatory governance and constituency groups endorsed the Budget and
Resources Advisory Council (BRAC) as part of the Integrated Planning and Resource
Allocation process who reports to the College Council. (R2.7) The BRAC completes the
college’s Integrated Planning and Resource Allocation process by reviewing and analyzing
SLO/A and Program Review data submitted using an established criteria, that is driven by
the college’s mission, goals and objectives, and priorities, and determine resource
allocation. Since fall 2011, the college prioritized the Integrated Planning and Resource
Allocation process development in conjunction with the Accreditation process resulting in
presentations to the entire college community at every All College Day (Flex day). (R2.8)
The Spring 2014 All College Day will focus solely on the preparation for the Accreditation
visit where the Integrated Planning and Resource Allocation process will take an important
part of the day. In February 2014, the Integrated Planning and Resource Allocation
Leadership Team, along with the Program Review and SLO/A/ A Committees and BRAC,
plans to have a robust orientation for the college community introducing and providing
direction, resources, and support for a successful evaluation process for the college.
|Responses to Recommendations from the Most Recent Educational Quality and 92
Institutional Effectiveness Review
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Program Review and Student Learning Outcome Assessment
In 2011, the Program Review Committee Chair (a faculty member) and the Program Review
Committee (faculty, classified staff, and administrators) revised the program review
evaluation and improvement process. These changes in the 2011-12, 2012-13, and 2013-14
program review questionnaires reflect the college’s focus on establishing the critical
connection between student learning outcome assessments, program reviews, budget
planning, and resource allocation decisions so programs can request and receive funds to
address important student learning instructional and service needs. (R2.9)
Previous to 2011, not all departmental faculty and student service members were actively
involved in the program review process.
However, since 2011, program review
questionnaires were sent to all faculty department chairs encouraging them to view
themselves as “program owners” and inviting them to engage collaboratively with
department faculty and staff members in completing program review questionnaires. As a
result of this departmental engagement, serious and thoughtful conversations about
course, program, and pedagogical improvements focused on student achievement and
success have occurred and results have been implemented. This productive dialogue
among department faculty, staff and administrators has fostered inclusiveness, collegiality,
and an internal peer review process. Upon completion of the submission process, Program
Review Committee members read all submissions, assess them for completeness and
substance, and provide feedback as needed. This iterative process continues to improve
program review content, thus leading to more relevant questions and dialogue for each
cycle.
In order to continue evaluating and refining the review process, the Program Review Chair
seeks ongoing feedback from constituency groups, such as the Academic Senate, the
Division Chair Council and the Program Review Committee. The feedback is reviewed and
incorporated into each subsequent round of program reviews.
The program review process enables departments to annually audit and review their
program’s course, program, and institutional level SLO/A and assessment activities.
The program review questionnaire asks program owners to answer specific questions
about their student learning outcome and assessment results. The Student Learning
Outcome and Assessment committee, in conjunction with the Office of Instruction and
with the support of the Academic Senate, assists faculty and staff members as they assess
course level, program level, and institutional level student learning outcomes. The Student
Learning Outcomes & Assessment leadership team provides periodic updates to the
|Responses to Recommendations from the Most Recent Educational Quality and 93
Institutional Effectiveness Review
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Academic Senate, consults with the Division Chair Council, and advises and receives
feedback from the Vice President of Instruction. Currently, the Program Review Committee
is in the process of revising the questions relative to resource need so as to create a strong
synergy with the newly established BRAC.
Curriculum Development and Student Learning Outcomes/Assessment
The college successfully keeps up with rapidly changing curriculum related legislative
mandates and Title 5 regulation changes. Whenever a new course or program is proposed,
or an existing course or program is revised, it is submitted to the Curriculum Committee for
approval prior to Board and state approval processes. All current and active courses are
housed in CurricuNet where each course outline of record (CORs) includes a clearly stated
student learning outcomes and assessments. (R2.10) Every new course that is submitted
through the Curriculum Committee review process is required to have clearly stated
student learning outcomes and assessments in its course outline of record and proceed
through the established course approval process per the California Community College
Program and Course Approval Handbook (PUCAH). (R2.11) The integrated Master Program
Review and SLO/A Schedule provides information for faculty concerning when an SLO/A
needs an update based on the assessment results and discussion held. The SLO/A review
process is also coordinated with the required two-year course revision for CTE courses and
five-year cycle for the non-CTE courses. Institutional Learning Outcomes (Institutional Core
Competencies) were approved by the Academic Senate in the spring of 2010 and have
been included in all subsequent catalogs. West Valley College’s Institutional Learning
Outcomes ILOs) indicate the college's core competencies, and they originate from the
college’s mission, values, and commitment to student learning and success. The ILOs
represent the outcomes a West Valley College student will achieve upon successfully
completing a West Valley College education.
The college submitted its March 15, 2013 ACCJC SLO/A report which demonstrated that the
college fulfilled the Proficiency Level for Institutional Effectiveness for SLO/As and
assessments. The report of March 2014 will demonstrate that the college has now
achieved the Sustainable Continuous Quality Improvement for SLO/As and assessments.
SLO/As and assessments are in place for all courses, programs, and degrees. Assessment
results are used to improve instructional and student service areas and to inform program
review, budget planning and resource allocation.

A new SLO/A & Assessment webpage developed by the SLO/A & A Committee
features easy to access course and program assessment tools, guiding questions for
|Responses to Recommendations from the Most Recent Educational Quality and 94
Institutional Effectiveness Review
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014




assessment discussions, and the Master Program Review and SLO/A & A schedule.
(R2.12)
The institutional dialogue about SLO/As and assessments is leading to effective
decision making, and resources are appropriately allocated to continue SLO/A
assessment processes and other college-wide improvements.
A Master Program Review and SLO/A Assessment schedule is posted on the SLO/A
webpage and this document informs faculty department chairs and student service
department chairs regarding which assessments need to be completed each
semester.
SLO/As are aligned with PLOs and ILOs so that all learning outcomes map to the
highest level of learning.
Program level outcomes and Institutional Learning Outcomes are published in the
college catalog in order to increase student awareness of course and program
purposes.
Substantive progress has been made since the March 2011 recommendation in regards to
Program Review, SLO/A, and establishment of the college’s Integrated Planning and
Resource Allocation process that is formal and systematic. Progress can also be confirmed
by the college’s successful achievements in meeting the ACCJC’s institutional performance
goals both for Program Review and SLO/A. The college requested of ACCJC for a scorecard
for the March 15, 2013 West Valley College Annual SLO/A report result which indicates
high scores on most of the categories and above average scores on other areas.
Evidence
R2.1
Program Review Committee
http://westvalley.edu/committees/program-review/
R2.2
Student Learning Outcomes and
Assessment Committee
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Student_Learn
ing_Outcomes/
R2.3
March 15, 2013 SLO/A Report
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/
2013/evidence/recommendations/March_15_2013_SLO
_Report_Final_Final.pdf
R2.4
Institutional Effectiveness
Framework
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/
2013/evidence/recommendations/Institutional_Effectiv
enss_SS_Team_11-6-12.pdf
R2.5
Master Program Review and SLO/A
Assessment Schedule
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/
2013/evidence/recommendations/Master_Program_Re
view_and_SLO_Assessment_Schedule_01-072014_External.pdf
|Responses to Recommendations from the Most Recent Educational Quality and 95
Institutional Effectiveness Review
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
R2.6
Integrated Planning and Resource
Allocation Diagram
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/i
ntegrated_planning_diagram.html
R2.7
Budget and Resource Advisory
Committee
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/
2013/evidence/recommendations/brac_12_17_13.pdf
R2.8
All College Day Presentation re:
Accreditation and Integrated
Planning and Resource Allocation
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/
2013/evidence/recommendations/ACD_Integrated_Pla
nning_Presentations/
R2.9
Program Review Questions
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/
2013/evidence/recommendations/fillable_pdf_docume
nt_instructional.pdf
R2.10
Course Outline of Record: Art 31 A
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/
2013/evidence/2a/art_31a_cor.pdf
R2.11
Program and Course Approval
Handbook
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/
2013/evidence/recommendations/Handbook_5thEd_B
OG_Approved.pdf
R2.12
Master Program Review and SLO/A
Assessment Schedule
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/
2013/evidence/recommendations/Master_Program_Re
view_and_SLO_Assessment_Schedule_01-072014_External.pdf
Recommendation 3
The team recommends that the college implement elements of program review to ensure
evaluation of distance learning courses and to ensure instruction is comparable to that of
traditional instruction.
Progress Made Since March 2011
State and Federal regulations relative to distance learning have drastically changed since
the mid-term recommendation was made. West Valley College addressed the assurance of
evaluation of distance learning courses in two primary ways: through a thorough and
stringent review and approval of a separate Distance Education section of the course
outlines and program review that include questions to help faculty assess effectiveness of
distance learning courses in terms of student success. (R3.1, 2) In addition, the college’s
Distance Learning Committee led the incorporation of the new regulations: the State
Chancellor's Office Distance Education Guidelines of 2008 and the U.S. Department of
Education (DOE), new “Program Integrity” regulation of 2010, into their goal and
developed a recommended resource guide – “check list” – as a mechanism to assure the
college’s distance learning course standard and rigor. (R3.3) The co-chairs and Distance
Learning Coordinator went through key participatory governance committees such as the
|Responses to Recommendations from the Most Recent Educational Quality and 96
Institutional Effectiveness Review
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Academic Senate, Curriculum Committee, Division Chairs Council and Student Services
Council and shared how the check list can be effectively used to ensure quality distance
learning instruction.
As part of the program review process, departments evaluate their distance education
courses and take steps to ensure that distance education instruction is comparable to that
of traditional instruction. The Distance Learning Committee leads quality assurance for
distance learning which is based on the state and federal regulation mandates: State
Authorization, Correspondence or Distance Education, Last Day of Attendance, and Student
Authentication. (R3.4)
State Authorization
According to the DOE's regulations for maintaining program integrity, colleges that offer
distance education to out-of-state students must acquire authorization from the state
where the DE student resides. This authorization is also required for the student to receive
financial aid. The college currently does not have a large number of our-of-state DE
learners; however, the college is in the process of reviewing and tracking data of out-ofstate students who have taken WVC DE courses and what possible State Authorization
Reciprocity Agreement (SARA) can be established with these states.
Correspondence vs. Distance Education
In response to the DOE's clear distinction between correspondence and distance
education, the college developed guidelines for faculty via the Distance Learning
Committee so that all WVC DE courses will fulfill requirements for regular and substantive
interaction between students and the instructor. The college has established the following
process for DE faculty to follow:
•
•
When a faculty designs or revises a course in CurricUNET, the course must fulfill
curriculum committee and DE coordinator requirements for regular and effective
student content. This is detailed in a the DE screen in CurricUNET (R3.5)
The DE committee has designed and disseminated an "Online Learning Checklist"
for all DE faculty members. The checklist was vetted at the Academic Senate and
the Division Chair Council in the fall of 2013. This comprehensive checklist guides
DE faculty on how to fulfill student authentication requirements, write an organized
syllabus with relevant course content, and provide a means for establishing regular
and substantive interaction with students. (R3.6)
|Responses to Recommendations from the Most Recent Educational Quality and 97
Institutional Effectiveness Review
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Last Day of Attendance
It is important for all faculty, and DE faculty in particular (due to the nature of online
instruction), to keep track of students' last day of attendance (LDA) for financial aid
purposes. DE faculty can comply with this requirement by monitoring students' activity
and ensuring students' regular and substantive engagement in the course. If a student has
stopped participating in a DE course, the DE faculty member informs the student that they
have five days to complete the missing work or they will be dropped from the course. If a
student fails to respond to this request, the faculty drops the student from the course and
the student cannot receive financial aid. (R3.7)
Student Authentication
The college complies with the Higher Education Opportunity Act of 2008 which requires
institutions to verify the identity of students who participate in courses by using a secure
login and pass code. The college's Angel Learning course management system has a
password protected login as well as the following statement for every student who signs in:
Through the entry of my username and password, I affirm that I am the
student who enrolled in this course. Furthermore, I affirm that I understand
and agree to follow the regulations regarding academic integrity and the
use of student data as described in the West Valley Mission District Student
Code of Conduct that governs student rights and responsibilities. Failure to
abide by the regulations may result in disciplinary action up to expulsion
from the college. (R3.8)
In addition to the 2011 recommendation, West Valley College took a significant leap to
proactively implementing recent state and federal regulations on distance learning as its
goals and primary focus for the college’s distance learning standard. Program Review,
Curriculum
process,
and
Distance
Education
Committee guidelines and checklist provide multiple opportunities for faculty to evaluate
the quality, rigor, and compliance of distance learning courses which are comparable to
face-to-face courses.
Evidence
R3.1
Distance Education Approval Form
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/
2013/evidence/2a/de_addendum_form.png
R3.2
Program Review; Instructional Form
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/programreview/documents/Documents_And_Files/2013/fillablepdf-document-instructional.pdf
|Responses to Recommendations from the Most Recent Educational Quality and 98
Institutional Effectiveness Review
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
R3.3
Online Learning Checklist
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/
2013/evidence/recommendations/Online_Learning_Che
cklist_inal_Nov.6-2013.pdf
R3.4
Current Hot Topics in California
Distance Education
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/
2013/evidence/recommendations/Hot_Topics_for_DE_
Conveying_the_Importance_Updated_12-10-2012.docx
R3.5
Distance Education Approval,
Course Outline of Record
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/
2013/evidence/2a/de_addendum_form.png
R3.6
Online Learning Checklist
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/
2013/evidence/recommendations/Online_Learning_Che
cklist_inal_Nov.6-2013.pdf
R3.7
Last Day of Attendance Policy
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/
2013/evidence/recommendations/2014_winterspring_schedule_pg17.pdf
R3.8
ANGEL Login
http://wvmccd.angellearning.com
Recommendation 4
The district and the College constituencies need to develop a plan to address the impact
of the reduction in fiscal resources caused by the apportionment penalty assessed on the
District this past year. Any fiscal impact that may affect the on-going ability of the
College to carry out its mission must be shared with the Accrediting Commission. (III.2.a,
III.2.d, E.R. 17)
Progress Made Since March 2011
As West Valley College nears its fiftieth anniversary, the college and the district continue to
exhibit solid fiscal health. Although the impact of the apportionment penalty caused by
“Hours by Arrangement” (HbA) was certainly significant, conservative planning at both the
district and college levels allowed operations to continue without significant disruption.
The apportionment penalty was fully resolved through the apportionment recalculation
report for Fiscal Year 2010-2011 and since that time has not proven to be an impediment.
The college has successfully cleared the state audit specifically on HbA to this date. (R4.1)
In addition, faculty, through the Curriculum Committee, removed all existing HbA portions
of instruction and replaced it with regularly scheduled lab work, revision of the entire
course outline to augment units, and/or simply decided to focus on existing lecture
instruction. As of spring 2013, the college has no courses with HbA instruction.
Of more relevant significance to the college’s budget was the serial reduction of state
funding from 2009 through 2012. Within the district, general apportionment revenue is
|Responses to Recommendations from the Most Recent Educational Quality and 99
Institutional Effectiveness Review
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
allocated via a model based upon SB361, with Mission College receiving approximately 47%
and West Valley College receiving 53%. Thus, any changes to the district’s overall revenue
proportionately affect both colleges. “Workload reduction” caused the college to reduce
FTES goals, and thus the associated apportionment revenues, affecting the number of
students served by the college through reductions in the number of class sections
scheduled. In Fiscal Year 2010-2011, the district’s FTES goal was reduced 6.20%, from
17,504 to 16,348. In FY2011-2012, another workload reduction of 2.10% further reduced
FTES to 16,098. Though, this was a statewide issue, not unique to West Valley College or to
the district, the college was able to maintain its commitment to the college’s mission by
continuous careful budget monitoring, expense reductions, and conservative fiscal
management.
Most recently as of the end of Fiscal Year 2012-2013, West Valley-Mission Community
College District (WVMCCD) has entered “Basic Aid” status. This change in fiscal status has
roots in several factors: very significantly, local property tax revenues have increased due
to the rebounding housing market and improving economy. Greater numbers of property
transfers and increasing housing values have pushed property taxes higher, and county
assessors are also able to reset their property tax rates under “Prop 13” rules.
Redevelopment Agency disbursements added to property tax revenues proved to be the
final factor allowing the district to achieve basic aid status in FY2012-2013.
Changes in the local economy also play a role in the district’s maintaining basic aid status.
Apparently common to our neighboring community college districts, West Valley College’s
FTES has been declining. Had the district not been in basic aid status, the district would
now be on “stability funding” as a result of FTES reported for Fiscal Year 2012-2013. The
district’s FTES goal had been set to 16,098 FTES for FY2011-2012 and FY2012-2013. For
FY2013-2014, the goal was reduced by 200 to 15,898 FTES; for FY2014-2105, the goal was
further reduced to 15,748 FTES.
The changes in FTES for the current and next fiscal years are very deliberate, reflecting the
realities of changing demographics in the communities served by the college. Accordingly,
the district and both colleges have, for approximately eighteen months, engaged in a fully
participatory dialog toward reorganizing the entire institution to be responsive to:
Reflecting the Student Success Act of 2012’s mandates to serve students; “Rightsizing” the
college and district operations reflecting the planned enrollment levels; and maintaining an
enrollment that results in a stable revenue stream and budget based upon retaining basic
aid status year-over-year.
|Responses to Recommendations from the Most Recent Educational Quality and 100
Institutional Effectiveness Review
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
In the February 23, 2009 Follow-up Report, West Valley College asserted that it did not
foresee a continuing fiscal impact to negatively affect the on-going ability to carry out its
mission. Today it can be said with certainty that the fiscal concern expressed in
Recommendation 4 has been resolved; the college and district are fiscally stable and able
to meet applicable accreditation standards. Continuing fiscal urgencies at the state level
are ever present. However, the college and district have developed improved strategies for
handling the vicissitudes and have a clear focus on strategically planning and managing
enrollment to maximize access to education while maintaining the college’s fiscal health.
The following sections detail the efforts the college has made to achieve these positive
results.
Recovery from the Apportionment Penalty
In 2009/10 and the first half of 2010/11 the college experienced substantial enrollment
increases. This was largely attributable to a combination of factors common throughout
California that drove students to the community colleges. These included double-digit
unemployment, large numbers of returning veterans and system-wide reductions within
the UC and CSU systems. Another important contributing factor at West Valley College and
Mission College was responsiveness to a set of California Collegiate Brain Trust (CCBT)
recommendations as to how the district could reduce its costs, while maximizing revenue
through a district wide organizational review. (R4.2) The review set into motion a number
of coordinated activities that resulted in curriculum revisions and enrollment management
practices that yielded better efficiency, concomitant with the enrollment increases. Both
Colleges successfully restored all enrollment funded through the state’s “stability funding”
mechanism and have had measurable growth in FY2010 to FY2011. This has occurred
despite the state’s implementation of “workload reduction” further described below.
The State Economy and Workload Reduction
As the college was preparing for the 2009-10 Academic year (FY10), the State underwent
serious fiscal challenges. The 2009-10 Budget Act required the State Chancellor’s Office to
adjust each district’s base workload measures commensurate with the reduction in general
apportionment revenues. Initially, districts were notified of workload reductions in August
2009 at the statewide budget workshops. Workload reduction estimates were based on
2008-09 P2 funded FTES figures. The State Chancellor’s calculation of the statewide
workload reduction equaled $192 million, which translated into a 3.39 percent reduction to
each district’s total computational revenue.
Additionally, many of the categorical programs underwent a series of budget reductions at
the state level (32% to 100%) with the expectation that they would be partially restored
|Responses to Recommendations from the Most Recent Educational Quality and 101
Institutional Effectiveness Review
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
with one-time federal backfill funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act
(ARRA). As the final budget came to fruition, most categorical programs were backfilled by
only a fraction of available ARRA funds. West Valley College was the beneficiary of
approximately $380,000 of the $35M distributed among the 112 colleges.
The college’s participatory governance councils maintained responsibility for
communicating information to constituent groups about the effects of the 3.39% workload
reduction and severe reductions to categorical programs. Most communications originated
from the President’s Office and via the College Council, which includes in its membership
the Academic Senate President, Classified Senate President, SEIU representative, the Vice
Presidents, delegates from the Division Chair Council, Student Services Council and the
Student Senate). The Student Services Council and the Division Chair Council were most
actively involved in the implementation of workload reduction and categorical fund
reductions and continuously relayed information to the College through posted meeting
minutes and updates made to the College Council.
The District’s Budget Reduction & Enrollment Restoration Plan
The district adopted implementation strategies from the college’s existing plan and
recommendations from the CCBT organizational review. Each college worked with the
Chancellor’s office to develop an overarching reorganization plan and implementation
matrix. The college’s vice presidents worked within the participatory governance structure
of the college to implement many of the strategies that helped the college increase
efficiencies in instructional and service areas. This is a brief summary of the process:
During the stability funded period for the district (FY09 and FY10), each college
implemented a curriculum revision process to ensure that attendance accounting methods
met the State Chancellor’s requirements. This process included working with the respective
Performance Goals Committee and training department and division chairs.
Each college developed rational, criteria-based processes for determining which vacant
positions should be restored. The college’s vice presidents and the participatory
governance bodies apply this system when deciding whether to restore or refill positions.
To the extent possible, job functions are reorganized to existing staff in order to avoid
reductions to critical service levels and the quality of instruction.
The district extended a rational and fiscally responsible early retirement plan to help
reduce costs. Furthermore, most of the District’s bargaining units assisted in reducing costs
by negotiating salary reductions and medical cost caps.
|Responses to Recommendations from the Most Recent Educational Quality and 102
Institutional Effectiveness Review
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Participatory governance groups at the college and district were regularly informed and
provided input about fiscal changes. The primary committees involved in this process were
the District Budget Advisory Committee, the District Council, the College Council, the
Division Chair Council, and the Student Services Council. These councils were provided
clear and consistent information from state, district, and college level perspectives and
helped regenerate the apportionment lost from disallowed enrollment in courses
containing To-Be-Arranged hours of instruction (TBA; also known in the WVMCCD as
“hours by arrangement” or HBA).
College Improvements in Course Scheduling & Budget Reduction Planning
During the end of FY2009 and FY2010, the College Council considered possible
implementation strategies in order to meet the CCBT organizational review
recommendations. The implementation strategies recommended by the College Council
were formulated from comments, suggestions, and ideas solicited throughout the campus
community. The strategies flowed up to the District Council as part of a district wide
planning matrix. From the matrix, each college was aware of the progress made in the
organization. These are the main strategies the college deployed:
College’s Performance Goals Committee (PGC)
The PGC is led by the vice president of instruction and the Vice President of Administrative
Services and is composed of the division chairs. This is the group responsible for
establishing the college’s enrollment goals and course offering plans for the academic year,
which coincides with the fiscal year. Through department and division chair training, the
PGC facilitated the restoration process by adopting a revised enrollment planning
worksheet that sets the enrollment plan for the following years. These plans took into
account the myriad of curricular revisions either made or in process in response to Title 5
regulations and other state advisories apropos to HBA. Since FY09, the work of the PGC has
helped the college and the district to meet and exceed enrollment goals in order to attain
restoration and efficiency goals in compliance with the district’s budget reduction plan.
Ongoing Processes & Planning for Staff Reductions during FY2009 to FY2011
The college reduced its operating budgets by carefully and thoughtfully reorganizing vacant
positions and functions within the college, while attempting to meet the needs of the
service areas and instructional programs. Functions once carried out by individuals in
vacant position were realigned to the highest priorities of need, or eliminated through
attrition. Several classified staff and one administrator at the college received layoff notices
in 2010, as a result of the budget reduction decisions made at the college or through the
|Responses to Recommendations from the Most Recent Educational Quality and 103
Institutional Effectiveness Review
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
exercise of reemployment rights most of those individuals have returned to employment.
In the end, the college’s costs were reduced, and the district’s budget was balanced in
FY2010 and FY2011.
College Council’s Budget Reduction Process for FY2011 Budget Development
As FY2010 progressed, the college restored its enrollment by following the CCBT
recommendations, responding to enrollment demands, and implementing the PGC
enrollment management plan. Once the college was fiscally at par with most other
districts, and as it was preparing to develop the FY11 Budget, the College Council had to
adopt a budget reduction plan for FY11 in order to deal with the State’s substantial fiscal
challenges.
Related Details Concerning the CCBT Organizational Review and Implementation
Plan Matrix
Based on the CCBT recommendations that had been published in late-2008, a
comprehensive organizational review was undertaken to identify ways for both colleges to
reduce costs while continuing to provide students with an excellent education. The review
resulted in over 130 recommendations that were assigned to each college vice president in
a planning “matrix.” Updates regarding the organizational review were provided
periodically, and throughout the process to District Council and other constituent and
leadership groups. By late 2010, nearly all of the recommendations had been addressed
and completed. At West Valley College the planning matrix focused on three main areas,
shown below.
Implementation Plan & Outcomes for Instruction- The basic implementation plan to
address the CCBT recommendations pertinent to instructional programs began by (a)
refining the collection and distribution of enrollment data; (b) reviewing the division chair
structure to see whether a “dean’s structure” would be more “efficient” or “cost effective”;
and (c) reviewing all academic programs in order to decide which underperforming
programs would be placed on “academic watch” or considered for discontinuation.
Through this process the Office of Instruction, in concert with the Academic Senate,
curtailed some course offerings and restructured the curriculum and certificates in the
programs.
Implementation Plan & Outcomes for Student Services- Student Services developed a
reorganization plan in conjunction with the 2010 Budget Act and the substantial loss of
funding for categorical programs, such as Matriculation, EOP&S and Disabled Students.
Part of the reorganization plan was to eliminate the dean of matriculation position. The
|Responses to Recommendations from the Most Recent Educational Quality and 104
Institutional Effectiveness Review
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
dean of matriculation’s function is now absorbed by the dean of student services position.
A reclassification of the admissions and records director was imperative to help validate
enrollment data in accordance with Title 5.
Implementation Plan & Outcomes for Administrative Services - There has been a
coordinated effort between the District and Colleges. First, when there was a retirement in
the Printing Services department, the position was eliminated to help with the 2010-11
reduction plan. Existing positions were reorganized and a confidential employee became a
supervisor to help manage administrative services (including printing). Second,
administrative processes have been refined within the district office to reduce
redundancies. Administrative functions that support student services and instructional
divisions are more successful and efficient.
In summary, responding to the recommendations from the California Collegiate Brain Trust
(CCBT) has served the college well as it assisted the college to address all ACCJC
recommendations from the last Accreditation cycle of 2007 and the midterm in 2011.
Since the midterm in 2011, the college continued to weather through state-wide fiscal
challenges via transparent participatory governance process throughout the college and
the district. The course offerings have been reviewed and shifted to support student
success by the work of Performance Goals Committee, Division and Department Chairs in
concert with the Student Success Act of 2012 and California Community College mission.
Curriculum has been aligned with the state inventory, course outline of records, and the
catalog revisions have been regularly made particularly to remove the HBA portion of the
instruction. All components inform the college’s budget planning process and allow the
institution to carry out its mission.
Evidence
R4.1
State Audit of HbA
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/
2013/evidence/recommendations/State_Audit_of_HbA.
pdf
R4.2
CCBT Report
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/
2013/evidence/recommendations/ccbt_report.pdf
Recommendation 5
The college constituencies work with the District administration and the Board of
Trustees to establish district wide goals that address the quality, integrity, and
effectiveness of the educational programs. These district wide goals need to be
incorporated into the strategic planning process of the College as recommended by the
previous visiting team. (IV.B.1, IV.B.1.c. 1. B.2., I.B.4)
|Responses to Recommendations from the Most Recent Educational Quality and 105
Institutional Effectiveness Review
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Progress Made Since March 2011
As thoroughly described and detailed in the responses to Recommendation 1, the Board of
Trustees revised the district’s goal development process in August 2010 to allow for college
planning informing district-level planning through this annual process. The connection
between the two processes has been strengthened principally through an adjustment of
timelines and coordination of college’s annual goals and objective setting with those of the
district. (R5.1) That is, through the college’s participatory governance process, annual goals
and objectives for the subsequent year is now established each fall. In January of each
year, the district’s participatory governance process will then utilize the outcome of the
college’s fall planning efforts to establish district goals for the upcoming year. This process
allows for a clear linking of college goals to district goals and connects planning in a more
systematic and timely way to resource allocation through the annual budget development
process.
The District Goals (R5.2), which were approved by District Council in May of 2013, were
informed by the college's goals and objective development and planning discussion which
took place on November 30, 2012 at the college's annual College Council Retreat. (R5.3)
The 2013-14 District Goals consist of the following:
"Support college initiatives to improve educational goal attainment across groups; Comply
with ACCJC standards; Increase professional development; Expand external partnerships;
Improve District-wide technology use; Establish a process for creating District goals with
appropriate
metrics;
and
Maintain
financial
stability.
With a streamlined and well-coordinated District Goal development process that is
informed by the goals from the colleges, the District's goals stem from the college's
Integrated Planning and Resource Allocation process (R5.4) which encompasses critical
analysis of the results from program reviews, student learning outcome assessments, and
budget and resource allocation process. (R5.5)
The colleges and the district successfully developed a comprehensive process for the
District-wide goal and its development process. It has been vetted through the college and
the district’s participatory governance process supported by the Board of Trustees. The
college’s goals are to be coordinated with the District-wide goal setting timeline and
framework described in the responses to recommendation 1. The district successfully
established an ongoing, continuous, and sustainable district-wide goal development and
evaluation process.
|Responses to Recommendations from the Most Recent Educational Quality and 106
Institutional Effectiveness Review
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
What remains a stable presence throughout this district goal planning process is West
Valley College’s alignment of its annual goals with its strategic plan. Updated in June 2009,
the college’s Educational and Facilities Master Plan (E&FMP) articulates five specific
strategic goals which mirror its values and support its mission: learning community,
diversity and inclusion, collaborative leadership, physical resources, and fiscal innovation.
These strategic goals are supported by a set of 39 educational initiatives embodied within
the E&FMP focused in four specific areas: educational programs and services, technology,
staffing, and facilities. West Valley College’s annual goal development uses this strategic
roadmap to align its focus with this broader-based planning agenda.
Evidence
R5.1
District Goal Development Process
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/
2013/evidence/recommendations/district_goal_process
_timeline.pdf
R5.2
District Goals 2013-14
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/
2013/evidence/recommendations/District_Goals_201314.pdf
R5.3
College Council Retreat Agenda –
November 2012
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/
2013/evidence/recommendations/College_Council_Retr
eat_Agenda_11-30-2012.pdf
R5.4
Integrated Planning and Resource
Allocation Framework
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/i
ntegrated_planning_diagram.html
R5.5
Budget and Resource Advisory
Council
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/
2013/evidence/recommendations/brac_12_17_13.pdf
|Responses to Recommendations from the Most Recent Educational Quality and 107
Institutional Effectiveness Review
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Standard I: Institutional Mission and Effectiveness
The institution demonstrates strong commitment to a mission that emphasizes
achievement of student learning and to communicating the mission internally and
externally. The institution uses analyses of quantitative and qualitative data and
analysis in an ongoing and systematic cycle of evaluation, integrated planning,
implementation, and re-evaluation to verify and improve the effectiveness by
which the mission is accomplished.
Standard IA: Mission
The institution has a statement of mission that defines the institution’s broad
educational purposes, its intended student population, and its commitment to
achieving student learning.
Descriptive Summary
College mission: The West Valley College community supports students along their
pathways to reach transfer and career goals in an environment of academic
excellence.
During the 2010-2011 academic year, the institution’s highest participatory
governance committee, College Council, following extensive research and utilization
of expert consultation, and with input from the entire campus community, rewrote
the college mission statement to clearly state its mission of promoting student
learning and students’ goals of transfer, basic skills, and career paths in alignment
with the CCCO stated areas of concentration. (1A.1) Consistent with its purpose,
character and its student population, the college's mission statement is
intentionally focused on pathways that lead to student success. The mission
statement is appropriate and meaningful because the college offers students
relevant degrees, certificates and programs that are supported by essential student
support services. The intended population of the college is determined by the
boundaries as outlined by the Los Gatos-Saratoga, Campbell, and Santa Clara high
school districts. (1A.2, 3) Since the college offers fifteen Associate Degrees for
Transfer (ADTs) and numerous specialized degree and certificate programs,
students from other parts of Santa Clara County also choose to attend classes at the
college. The identified population is appropriately matched with college resources
and the college has a major role in facilitating student pathways for transfer and
career success. The college conducts and utilizes research about its student
population, its service area, and the region to align intended goals with student
|Standard I: Institutional Mission and Effectiveness 108
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
needs. The college demonstrates its commitment to fostering successful student
learning outcomes by conducting ongoing assessments of learning that result in
sustained and documented improvements in student success and retention. (1A.4)
Student learning outcome results inform the writing of program review reports so
that both processes generate robust and relevant dialogue about student learning
and success strategies and opportunities for students. (1A.5) The college mission
statement's clear emphasis on fostering an environment of academic excellence is
felt in college classrooms, in student life and club activities, and in all aspects of the
college's positive campus community that focuses on student success.
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard.
Actionable Improvement Plans
None.
Evidence
1A.1
CCCO stated areas of Concentration
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/
2013/evidence/1a/sstf_final_report_01_17_12.pdf
1A. 2
Intended Service Population
http://wvm.edu/content.aspx?id=2192
1A. 3
WVC Fact Book 2013
http://westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/docu
ments/fact_book_12_03_2013.pdf
1A.4
Student Learning Outcomes
Webpage
http://westvalley.edu/committees/Student_Learning_O
utcomes/
1A.5
Program Review Website
http://westvalley.edu/committees/programreview/index.html
Standard IA.1
The institution establishes student learning programs and services aligned with its
purposes, its character, and its student population.
Descriptive Summary
In the process of developing the mission statement, listening sessions were
conducted with all participatory governance groups and with external constituents
to collect data about the college’s character and purpose. (1A.1.1) The mission
statement was reviewed by all key participatory governance groups to determine its
match with WVC goals for student learning. The mission directly expresses the
college's program goals of student learning. (1A.1.2) In the college mission
|Standard I: Institutional Mission and Effectiveness 109
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
statement student learning takes place along their pathway to fulfilling their
transfer and career goals. The college relies on Program Review, Student Learning
Outcome and Assessment processes, and the annual Scorecard Report to assess
institutional effectiveness and the ongoing relevance of the college mission
statement. (1A.1.3)
Data about current students (demographics, educational goals) is presented to the
College Council each year at its annual goals-development retreat. (1A.1.4) Labor
Market Reports are run for every Career and Technical Education (CTE) department
to assess the opportunities of graduates of the program. (1A.1.5) Regional labor
market data is presented to the community in the annual West Valley College Fact
Book, which includes a list of the fastest-growing jobs in the college's service area
that require an associate degree or certificate. (1A.1.6) All of these items ensure the
programs and services of the college are in alignment with the needs of its student
population.
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard.
Actionable Improvement Plans
None.
Evidence
1A.1.1
Our Vision, Our Mission, Our Future
http://www.westvalley.edu/research/Documents/
Our_Vision_Our_Mission_Our_Future_WhitePaper.pdf
1A.1.2
Mission statement
http://www.westvalley.edu/mission.html
1A.1.3
2013 Program Review Instructional
Instrument (institutional effectiveness:
Q5-6; Mission Statement Q3.4)
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/programreview/documents/Documents_And_Files/2013/fil
lable-pdf-document-instructional.pdf
1A.1.4
College Council Retreat Agenda and
handouts
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accredita
tion/2013/evidence/1a/College_Council_Integrate
d_Planning_Discussion_11.8.13.pdf
1A.1.5
2013 Fact Book
http://www.westvalley.edu/research/Documents/
Fact_Book/fact_book_2013_master.pdf
1A.1.6
CTE Labor Market Reports
http://westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/
documents/surveys/labor_market_report2013.pdf
|Standard I: Institutional Mission and Effectiveness 110
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Standard IA.2
The mission statement is approved by the governing board and published.
Descriptive Summary
The mission statement is published in the West Valley College Catalog, (1A.2.1) and
is posted in facilities throughout the campus, on most participatory governance
meeting agendas, and on the West Valley College website. (1A.2.2) The West Valley
College Mission Statement was approved by the board on January 17, 2012 as part
of the Board Policy revisions recommended by the Community College League of
California (CCLC). (1A.2.3)
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard.
Actionable Improvement Plans
None.
Evidence
1A.2.1
West Valley College Catalog
Pg. 3
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditatio
n/2013/evidence/1a/2014_Catalog_page3.pdf
1A.2.2
Mission statement on WVC Website
http://www.westvalley.edu/mission.html
1A.2.3
WVMCCD Board of Trustees
Approval – January 17, 2012
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditatio
n/2013/evidence/1a/bot_mission_approval.pdf
|Standard I: Institutional Mission and Effectiveness 111
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Standard IA.3
Using the institution's governance and decision-making processes, the institution
reviews its mission statement on a regular basis and revises it as necessary.
Descriptive Summary
The college undertook a process to develop a new mission statement in the 2010 –
2011 academic year. On April 28, 2011, the College Council adopted a White Paper
entitled Our Vision, Our Mission, Our Future. This paper defined the College
Council’s charge as follows:
(1) Define and prioritize the college focus into the future
(2) Re-craft the college mission statement to capture the essence of West
Valley College. (1A.3.1)
The White Paper describes a listening session process with stakeholders from
participatory governance groups in which facilitators asked guiding questions to
determine how a new college mission statement could best encapsulate the
college’s overarching vision and future initiatives. The listening sessions that took
place in 2011 included participants from the College Council, the Classified Senate,
the Marketing Committee, the Academic Senate, the Division Chair Council, the
Student Services Council, the Board of Trustees, Associated Students, Community
Leaders, and Associate Faculty. In total, ten listening sessions were conducted and
more than 115 participants participated in discussions. (1A.3.1)
At each listening session, multiple coordinators took notes to ensure that all
feedback was captured. Once all sessions were completed, the notes were coded
and analyzed to identify recurring themes. In addition, the study team conducted
an open-item student survey linked from the college website which elicited more
than 60 responses; these responses were included with the responses from the
listening sessions. Response frequencies were tabulated, and the results were
reviewed by the study team and the study consultants. The themes were refined
and prioritized, then presented for multiple readings at the College Council. The
college president, the consultants, the dean of technology, and the institutional
researcher collaborated on the presentation of the white paper, “Our Vision, Our
Mission, Our Future” which was then shared with all participatory governance
groups.
The listening session findings indicated that the college is a caring, welcoming
institution with a beautiful campus and excellent faculty, staff, and administrators.
The findings also stated that the college is focused on student success and an
|Standard I: Institutional Mission and Effectiveness 112
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
environment that fuels the mind. The college stakeholders also believe the college
can continue to grow as a regional leader in transfer, entrepreneurship resources,
global citizenship education, and STEM education. (1A.3.1)
The white paper became the foundation of the process for the development of the
new college mission statement. On August 18, 2011, the College Council convened
for a retreat with the purpose of developing the new mission statement. An
external facilitator guided college council members and stakeholders through the
process of creating a new mission statement that reflects the college vision for the
future. Two drafts were developed and presented to participatory governance
groups and external constituents for feedback. (1A.3.2, 1A.3.3) This feedback was
shared with College Council, which worked on a final revision of the statement
which was unanimously adopted on October 27, 2011.
The 2011 review of the college mission statement was prompted by the change in
the overall mission of the California Community College system. The college’s
process for periodic review of its mission statement is effective because it aligns
with the state’s priorities and student’s learning and success needs. The college
process firmly adheres to participatory governance principles and the resulting
statement was vetted and supported by a substantial population of college
stakeholders. (1A.3.4)
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard.
Actionable Improvement Plans
None.
Evidence
1A.3.1
Mission statement Development
Process-White Paper
http://www.westvalley.edu/research/Documents/Ou
r_Vision_Our_Mission_Our_Future_White-Paper.pdf
1A.3.2
College Council minutes – 1st reading
draft
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditatio
n/2013/evidence/1a/09-082011_Meeting_Summary_Approved.pdf
1A.3.3
College Council minutes – 2nd reading
draft
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditatio
n/2013/evidence/1a/10-132011_Meeting_Summary_Approved.pdf
1A.3.4
College Council Approval
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditatio
n/2013/evidence/1a
/college_council_mission_approval.pdf
|Standard I: Institutional Mission and Effectiveness 113
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Standard I.A.4
The institution's mission is central to institutional planning and decision making.
Descriptive summary
The college’s mission is central to all planning and decision making. The college’s
carefully crafted mission statement was developed via a deliberative vetting
process that took place over several months at College Council meetings and at an
extended College Council retreat. (1A.4.1) Representatives from the college’s
participatory governance bodies worked collaboratively to develop two possible
mission statements that were then submitted to the entire college community for
its feedback and approval. After the college community’s suggestions were
reviewed and incorporated, the College Council voted to approve and
institutionalize the following mission statement:
“The West Valley College community supports students along their pathways to
reach transfer and career goals in an environment of academic excellence.”
The college’s process for institutional planning and decision making is illustrated in
the college’s Integrated Planning and Resource Allocation map (1A.4.2). In this
process the college’s mission statement and Institutional Learning Outcomes inform
program review and SLO/A assessment. Assessment results then inform budget
planning and implementation. For example, in a recent program review, business
division faculty requested that business division classrooms be upgraded to smart
classrooms. This request was informed by SLO/A assessment results which
indicated that the lack of internet and multimedia capabilities in classrooms was
detrimental to student learning and not consistent with the college’s mission of
providing an environment of academic excellence. Therefore, in response to this
request, the college allocated funds for critical classroom upgrades. (1A.4.3)
The college’s mission statement is the central core of its Integrated Planning and
Resource Allocation process. It drives the formation of the college’s goals, informs
the program review process and influences resource allocation at the college.
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard.
Actionable Improvement Plans
None.
|Standard I: Institutional Mission and Effectiveness 114
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Evidence
1A.4.1
College Council Meeting Minutes;
College Council Retreat Minutes
http://westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2013/evi
dence/1a/College_Council_Mission_Development/
1A.4.2
Integrated Planning and Resource
Allocation concept map
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/inte
grated_planning_diagram.html
1.A.4.3
Budget Planning Memorandum
from VP Admin. Services
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/201
3/evidence/1a/fy13_14_budget_process.pdf
Standard IB: Improving Institutional Effectiveness
The institution demonstrates a conscious effort to produce and support student
learning, measures that learning, assesses how well learning is occurring, and
makes changes to improve student learning. The institution also organizes its key
processes and allocates it resources to effectively support student learning. The
institution demonstrates its effectiveness by providing 1) evidence of the
achievement of student learning outcomes and 2) evidence of institution and
program performance. The institution uses ongoing and systematic evaluation
and planning to refine its key processes and improve student learning.
Standard IB.1
The institution maintains an ongoing, collegial, self-reflective dialogue about the
continuous improvement of student learning and institutional processes.
Descriptive Summary
The college supports and assesses student learning through an ongoing and
reflective process. An SLO/A committee made up of faculty, student service, and
administrative service employees reviews and addresses ongoing student learning
and student service outcome assessments with a goal of working with the college
community to continuously improve services. Program leaders for academic,
student service, and administrative service programs have developed thoughtful
and relevant outcomes and assessments for their areas. (1B.1.1) An SLO/A task
force has developed and written Institutional Learning Outcomes (ILOs) that
indicate the overarching values of a West Valley College education. (1B.1.2) These
ILOs were developed via a collaborative process and were vetted through
participatory governance channels.
Student learning is measured on a cyclical basis and program leaders initiate course,
program, and service changes based on assessment results. In participatory
|Standard I: Institutional Mission and Effectiveness 115
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
governance meetings, college employees engage in an ongoing dialogue about
student learning, collaborative learning, and the potential for improving the cross
pollination of academic and student service areas in ways that benefit student
success. (1B.1.3, 1B.1.4) For example, in a recent partnering of student service and
academic areas, the Student Health Coordinator designed a “Wheel of Wellness
Program” for the college. For this event, college employees from student service
and faculty areas led a program for students in the campus center about the various
areas of “Wellness.” These areas included: Social, Spiritual, Physical, Intellectual,
and Occupational Wellness. This event was well attended, and it illustrated an
effective college-wide partnering that enhanced student learning. (1B.1.5)
In the spring of 2013, the SLO/A committee co-chairs visited six of the college’s
participatory governance bodies in order to engage in an important conversation
about student learning and its impact on improving institutional processes. (1B.1.6)
At College Council meetings, there is an ongoing discussion about improving
program review and budget allocation processes so the linkages are clearly defined
and transparent to the college community. In February of 2013, college council
members formed Focus Area Interdisciplinary Teams (FAIT) to assess the college in
order to improve and streamline its overall structure and operations. (1B.1.7)
Throughout spring and fall 2013 college council members and members of the
college community engaged in a robust dialogue about the recommendations and
potential improvements of institutional processes to be implemented in fall 2014.
(1B.1.8)
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard.
Actionable Improvement Plans
None.
Evidence
1B.1.1
March 15 SLO/A Report
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditatio
n/2013/evidence/1b/SLO_Report_03_15_13.pdf
1B.1.2
Institutional Learning Outcomes, College
Catalog link, page 3
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditatio
n/2013/evidence/1a/2014_Catalog_page3.pdf
1B.1.3
SLO/A Committee Meeting Minutes
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Student_Lea
rning_Outcomes/Documents/
|Standard I: Institutional Mission and Effectiveness 116
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
1B.1.4
Math Department Meeting minutes
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accredita
tion/2013/evidence/1b/math_department_slo_dis
cussions.pdf
1B.1.5
Wheel of Wellness Event
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accredita
tion/2013/evidence/1b/wheel_of_wellness.pdf
1B.1.6
SLO/A Participatory Governance Dialogs
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accredita
tion/2013/evidence/1b/slo_participatory_governa
nce_dialogs_sp13.pdf
1B.1.7
College Council Meeting Minutes re: FAIT
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accredita
tion/2013/evidence/1b/FAIT/College_Council_FAIT
_Meeting_Summaries_2013.pdf
1B.1.8
FAIT Summary
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accredita
tion/2013/evidence/1b/FAIT_Summary
|Standard I: Institutional Mission and Effectiveness 117
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Standard IB.2
The institution sets goals to improve its effectiveness consistent with its stated
purposes. The institution articulates its goals and states the objectives derived
from them in measurable terms so that the degree to which they are achieved can
be determined and widely discussed. The institutional members understand these
goals and work collaboratively toward their achievement.
Descriptive Summary
The college clearly articulates and communicates its institutional goals and
objectives so these stated purposes can serve as an overarching framework to guide
the college’s vision and day-to-day operational processes.
On September 18, 2009 the College Council convened a retreat to re-evaluate and
revise its annual goals. At the retreat, the College Council reduced the number of
college goals from fifteen or more to four succinct, high priority goals, after it was
determined that the sheer number of goals was diluting the effectiveness of the
process and the college’s ability to achieve the goals in a timely fashion. At the
annual planning retreat, the College Council membership was expanded for the day
to include additional members from each governance group in order to develop
goals that accurately represented the robust and diverse college views. (1B2.1)
On September 19, 2009, the following College Goals and Objectives were
established:
1. Facilitate interactive communication and ease of access to information.
a.) Redesign the college website, incorporating
recommendations. (IB2.2)
2. Optimize effectiveness of the college infrastructure.
the
Clarus
study
a) Establish accurate and reliable data and information systems.
b) Identify, prioritize, and obtain funding for facility improvements that ensure
suitable learning and working environments.
c) Reassess and align the organization to be responsive to fiscal imperatives
and change.
3. Optimize the effectiveness of Student Services to strengthen the pathways for
student success.
a) Reassess and align resources to meet the student services needs of current
and prospective students.
|Standard I: Institutional Mission and Effectiveness 118
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
b) Identify and utilize new and existing technology resources to improve
matriculation processes.
4. Establish new and improved linkages with the region’s educational institutions,
business and industry, and community-based organizations to respond more
effectively to emerging educational and workforce needs.
a) Develop strategic partnerships with select business/industry sectors to
strengthen programmatic offerings.
b) Raise WVC’s profile within the region’s high schools and four-year
institutions utilizing the Clarus study recommendations as a guide.
c) Proactively engage the neighboring communities with the goals and
programs of the college.
These statements precisely address the direction that the college needs to pursue
and to a large extent, these goals and objectives have been carried forward at each
annual Goal Setting Retreat, as the college makes significant strides towards
addressing these objectives.
The following summary addresses the progress the college has made on achieving
and measuring its goal attainment.
a) The college has revamped and streamlined its website. The college’s interim
webmaster has streamlined viewer navigation approaches, eliminated
screen redundancies, and improved Search Engine Optimization, so students
can more easily access information. Now that the college has adopted Omni
Update (OU) as its Content Management System, college staff members are
updating their content areas in a branded and consistent style, so the
website has a clear, crisp appeal and solid content. (1B.2.3)
b) The college has identified funding for facility improvements through Prop 30
and several private funding sources. Renovations in the Math/Science,
Language Arts/Social Sciences and Fox buildings reflect the student and
employee focused improvements in the college infrastructure. (1B.2.4)
c) Through the College Council’s leadership, the college has undergone two
rounds of budget reduction processes that meet fiscal imperatives and the
State Chancellor’s Office Mission in 2010-2011 (1B.2.5) and 2012-13 (1B.2.6)
d)
The Counseling Department has been very responsive to the Student
Success parameters and has established a clear and effective Orientation
and Educational Plan process for students, so they can be well informed and
|Standard I: Institutional Mission and Effectiveness 119
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
focused on their pathway to transfer, career or basic skills success. In fact,
the New Student Convocation where information is initially shared with
incoming students recently won the 2013 California State Chancellors Office
Student Success Award. (1B.2.7)
e)
Many of the college’s career programs have established strategic
partnerships with business sectors in order to promote workforce
development and internship opportunities. The Business Division features a
robust Entrepreneurship Program which affiliates with the Kauffman
Foundation, the Startup Cup, and the Extreme Entrepreneurship Tour. A
strong and active Entrepreneurship Advisory Board also helps to guide the
design of relevant program offerings. (1B.2.8)
Every year, the College Council meets and revises the college’s goals and objectives
to meet the changing needs of the student community and to comply with relevant
legislation. In the fall of 2012, the College Council held its annual retreat and
developed the following goals and objectives:
a) Focus institutional efforts on improving pathways of support to aid students’
identification and realization of their goals.
b) Reduce the disparity in student success across ethnic groups.
c) Organize and align resources to support and sustain an environment of
academic excellence.
d) Complete accreditation self-study preparation by December 2013.
(1B.2.9)
It is evident from the discussion that institutional members understand the goals
because they have contributed to the goal setting discussion, and they are actively
engaged in moving goal achievement forward. Additionally, the Director of
Institutional Research provides mid-year and end-of-year status updates to the
College Council and this information is then shared with constituent groups.
(1B.2.10)
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard.
Actionable Improvement Plans
None.
|Standard I: Institutional Mission and Effectiveness 120
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Evidence
1B.2.1
September 19, 2009 College Council
Retreat Agenda
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditatio
n/2013/evidence/1b/retreat_agenda
final_09_18_09.pdf
1B.2.2
Clarus Study
http://www.westvalley.edu/documents/faculty_reso
urces/Market_Research/WVMCCDExecutiveSummary.pdf
1B.2.3
WVC Website
http://westvalley.edu/
1B.2.4
WVC Construction Projects
http://westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/201
3/evidence/1b/WVC_Construction_Projects/
1B.2.5
Budget Reduction Process documents
(2011)
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/College_Cou
ncil/Documents/Committee_Documents/Survey_Res
ults_Budget_Reduction_2010-2011.pdf
1B.2.6
FAIT Restructuring; budget reduction
process (2013)
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditatio
n/2013/evidence/1b/FAIT/FAIT_Reductions_Revised_
10-24-13.pdf
1B.2.7
2013 Student Success Award
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditatio
n/2013/evidence/2b/convocation_award.pdf
1B.2.8
WVC ecenter website
http://wvc-ecenter.com/
1B.2.9
College Goals and Objectives
2012-13
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditatio
n/2013/evidence/1b/2012_13_goals_and_objectives.
pdf
1B.2.10
Status Reports on Goal Achievement
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditatio
n/2013/evidence/1b/2009_2012_goals_objectives_st
atus.pdf
|Standard I: Institutional Mission and Effectiveness 121
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Standard IB.3
The institution assesses progress toward achieving its stated goals and makes
decisions regarding the improvement of institutional effectiveness in an ongoing
and systematic evaluation, integrated planning, resource allocation,
implementation and re-evaluation. Evaluation is based on analyses of both
quantitative and qualitative data.
Descriptive Summary
In 2010, the College Council developed an Integrated Planning and Resource
Allocation process that clarified the college’s efforts toward the ongoing
maintenance of a high level of institutional effectiveness. The cyclical nature of the
Integrated Planning and Resource Allocation process is illustrated in the Integrated
Planning and Resource Allocation Process Concept Map—a diagram affectionately
known as the Solar System. (1B.3.1) These diagrams were used to introduce the
planning process to the West Valley College community on All College Day on
August 26, 2011. To highlight the importance of this process further, team
members wore t-shirts with the Concept Map printed on the back. The Integrated
Planning and Resource Allocation diagrams are also posted throughout the campus
in order to guide college constituent groups as they participate in this important
process. Every department participates in ongoing and Integrated Planning and
Resource Allocation through its departmental SLO/A assessment and dialogue,
program effectiveness surveys, and participation in program review. (1B.3.2)
Information and themes from the program reviews gathered in May of each
calendar year drive the development of college goals by the College Council during
its annual planning retreat in the fall semester. The college’s annual goals then
inform the resource allocation process. In the course of ensuing program reviews,
the effectiveness of the annual goals and allocations is measured. The process
repeats itself in a cyclical fashion.
At the College Council’s annual retreats, college council members review the
Educational and Facilities Master Plan to ensure that the overarching themes of this
plan are also incorporated in the college’s goals and objectives. The result of this
important review and discussion is that the college’s Integrated Planning and
Resource Allocation process is aligned with the Educational and Facilities Master
Plan (E&FMP). (1B.3.3)
Every department has access to institutional data through the college's Office of
Institutional Research and Planning (OIRP). In addition, programs are provided with
|Standard I: Institutional Mission and Effectiveness 122
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
their program specific data to inform their program self-evaluation. This data is
incorporated into each department's program review and goal setting. OIRP
educates and informs the college community on data analysis and interpretation by
periodic research briefs, Fast Facts about our students, Accountability Reporting for
Community Colleges (ARCC) presented to all participatory governance groups, and
individual consultation to programs and departments as necessary.
(1B.3.4)
The College Council reviews and assesses the status of goal implementation at the
end of each academic year. The responsible parties for each goal and objective
report to the College Council regarding the status and relative level of completion
of each goal. Goals and objectives that are not fully accomplished may be carried
forward to the next year’s annual goals, with revisions based on quantitative and
qualitative data. For example, for the last several years, one of the college’s annual
goals has been to address the student achievement gap. At the 2012 College
Council retreat, the College Council reviewed the most current student equity data,
and decided that the student achievement gap needed to be maintained as an
active and ongoing goal for the college. (1B.3.5, 6)
The college has established an Integrated Planning and Resource Allocation process
in which student learning outcome assessment results inform program review
requests which then inform resource planning and budget allocation. In this
iterative process, the college’s deliberate and integrated focus on student learning
and success facilitates the college’s overall attainment of institutional effectiveness.
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard.
Actionable Improvement Plans
None.
Evidence
1B.3.1
Integrated Planning and
Resource Allocation Process
Concept Map
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/integrat
ed_planning_diagram.html
1B.3.2
All College Day 2011, 2012 &
2013 Presentations
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2013/evi
dence/1b/All_College_Day_Agendas
1B.3.3
College Council Minutes –
February 9, 2012
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2013/evi
dence/1b/cc_minutes_02_09_12.pdf
|Standard I: Institutional Mission and Effectiveness 123
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
1.B.3.4
WVC Office of Institutional
Research and Planning
http://westvalley.edu/about/research.html
1B.3.5
Student Equity Data
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2013/evi
dence/1b/cc_minutes_02_09_12.pdf
1B.3.6
2009 – 2014 Goals and
Objectives
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2013/evi
dence/1b/2009_2014_goals_objectives_status.pdf
Standard IB.4
The institution provides evidence that the planning process is broad based, offers
opportunities for input by appropriate constituencies, allocates necessary
resources, and leads to improvement of institutional effectiveness.
Descriptive Summary
College planning is a collaborative process that involves the participation of all
departments and participatory governance groups. Broad based involvement is
guaranteed by the composition of the College Council. (1B.4.1) College Council is
comprised of members from every shared governance group on campus—as well as
key committees. The Council meetings are also always open to the entire college
community.
The function of the College Council is to involve the entire campus community in
planning. Each constituency group in the Council reports out to its respective
groups on Council activities and reports back to the College Council on the issues
and needs of its constituency. The primary means of participating in planning takes
place via participatory government representatives on College Council. For
example, the Focus Area Interdisciplinary Teams (FAIT) groups are led by College
Council members; however, the community was invited to join FAIT groups to
provide input into the restructuring dialogue. (1B.4.2) Beyond College Council,
members of campus constituent groups are encouraged to participate in their
representative participatory governance groups.
In spite of the difficult budget picture during the past several cycles, the college
committed to allocating resources in accordance with college goals and program
review needs. In 2010-11, the college used a zero-based budgeting process to
realign resources to goals and needs. The Integrated Planning and Resource
Allocation process ensures that resources are appropriately aligned with college
goals.
|Standard I: Institutional Mission and Effectiveness 124
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
When resources have been insufficient to implement plans, alternative resources
have been sought. Alternative resources have included funding support from the
District’s Land Corporation, as well as state and federal grants such as TRiO, energy
grants, and Santa Clara County Water District grants. (1B.4.3) In addition, the
college has partnered with the community to institute an annual gala event.
Moreover, the President has reached out to the surrounding community for
"naming" funds of facilities such as physical education and sport structures, the
planetarium, and a community garden. In 2012, the college received a $3.5 million
gift from a private donor to fund construction of a new planetarium.
The additional funds as noted above have created a TRiO program, the installation
of solar panels, and the beginning of the Vasona Creek restoration project.
Specifically, the annual College Council planning retreat includes council members,
and is expanded to include additional representatives from each of the
participatory governance groups. In addition, the chairs of the Program Review and
Student Learning Outcome committees as well as leadership from the bargaining
units attend and participate actively in the planning process. Throughout the year,
the planning retreat, as well as all regular participatory governance meetings, are
open to all members of the campus community.
The resource allocation process is driven by the college’s annual goals and program
review. (1B.4.4) Program owners evaluate their programs and then submit their
resource requests based on the needs identified in that evaluation. When College
Council reviews the resource requests, they do so through the eye of the annual
goals, with higher prioritization given to requests that support the achievement of
those goals.
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard.
Actionable Improvement Plans
None.
Evidence
1B.4.1
College Council Membership
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/College_Counc
il/members.html
1B.4.2
FAIT Town Hall Meetings
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/
2013/evidence/1b/FAIT/FAIT_Town_Hall_Meeting_Ann
ouncement_10-24-13.pdf
|Standard I: Institutional Mission and Effectiveness 125
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
1B.4.3
Land Corporation
http://landcorp.wvm.edu
1B.4.4
Budgeting and Resource Allocation
Documents
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/
2013/evidence/1a/fy13_14_budget_process.pdf
Standard IB.5
The institution uses documented assessment results to communicate matters of
quality assurance to appropriate constituencies.
Descriptive Summary
The college Office of Research, Planning and Institutional Effectiveness (OIRP)
assesses and analyzes data so that college decision makers are guided by firm and
sound evidence that supports effective and thoughtful planning for optimal student
success and institutional effectiveness.
The college communicates documented assessments results to constituent groups
and the public in order to ensure high quality programs and services.
The OIRP analyzes and summarizes data and information from the following
sources:










Self-Assessment of Participatory Governance Groups
Cognos Performance Data Reports
Clarus Report on Feeder High School Counselors And Students
Student Services Secret Shopper Report
Brain Trust Study
ARCC and Scorecard Data
Semi-Annual Research Briefs
Annual WVC Fact Book
District Data Dashboard
Student Learning Outcome Assessments
The OIRP collects data on the degree to which the college is accomplishing its
mission to "support students along their pathways to transfer and career goals in an
environment of academic excellence." This data includes: transfer velocity, transfer
counts, persistence, retention, success, equity, gainful employment data, student
satisfaction, degrees and certificates, Accountability Reporting for Community
Colleges (ARCC) Scorecard (1B.5.1), and Integrated Postsecondary Education Data
System (IPEDS). (1B.5.2)
|Standard I: Institutional Mission and Effectiveness 126
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
The OIRP disseminates data and analyses internally through research briefs, all user
emails, and research presentations at participatory governance groups and other
campus constituencies. The OIRP also publishes data and completed reports on the
college's research and planning website and through the College Fact Book that is
distributed both internally and as a public document on the college website.
(1B.5.3) After the OIRP summarizes the data, the college submits a written response
to the ARCC Report and Scorecard which is then posted on the State Chancellor
Office website and on the OIRP webpage. (1B.5.4)
The OIRP disaggregates data for college program managers so these areas can then
conduct effective and informed analyses of their individual programs. The OIRP
provides all programs with data that includes measures of enrollment, efficiency,
student success & retention, demographics, and equity. (1B.5.5) Completed
program reviews are published on the Program Review webpage; and the Program
Review Committee conducts a comprehensive analysis of all program reviews to
determine college-wide trends and correlations. These results are summarized for
college and public review and are used to inform college decision making. (1B.5.6)
The college has achieved the ACCJC’s standard for Continuous Quality Improvement
for Student Learning Outcomes by assessing all of its courses at the course,
program, and institution level and by assessing all of its student service programs at
the program and institution level. These assessment results are publicized via
participatory governance channels to college constituent groups. Constituent
groups and the public can also view these results on the Student Learning Outcome
and Assessment webpage. (1B.5.7)
The Brain Trust (1B.5.8) and Clarus Studies (1B.5.9) assessed how effectively the
college communicates its institutional quality to the public. The college has utilized
these studies to guide institutional decision making. For example, one of the Clarus
Study recommendations indicated that the college would benefit from a consistent
and branded image that is clear and accessible for the public. Specifically, the
Clarus Study recommended that the college should streamline its website and also
provide the public with clear and integrated marketing communications. The
college has provided effective responses to both recommendations in order to
increase its public presence and grow its overall institutional effectiveness.
The college is actively engaged in communicating documented assessment results
to the all constituent groups.
|Standard I: Institutional Mission and Effectiveness 127
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard.
Actionable Improvement Plans
None.
Evidence
1B.5.1
Accountability Reporting for
Community Colleges (ARCC)
Scorecard
http://scorecard.cccco.edu/scorecardrates.aspx?Col
legeID=493
1B.5.2
Integrated Postsecondary
Education Data System (IPEDS)
http://nces.ed.gov/ipeds/
1B.5.3
WVC Fact Book 2013
http://www.westvalley.edu/research/Documents/F
act_Book/fact_book_2013_master.pdf
1B.5.4
WVC Office of Institutional
Research and Planning
http://westvalley.edu/about/research.html
1B.5.5
WVC Office of Institutional
Research and Planning
http://westvalley.edu/about/research.html
1B.5.6
Program Review Webpage
http://westvalley.edu/committees/programreview/
1B.5.7
SLO & A webpage
http://westvalley.edu/committees/Student_Learnin
g_Outcomes/
1B.5.8
Brain Trust Report
http://www.westvalley.edu/commitees/Accreditati
on/2013/evidence/1b/ccbt_report.pdf
1B.5.9
Clarus report
http://www.westvalley.edu/documents/faculty_res
ources/Market_Research/WVMCCDExecutiveSummary.pdf
Standard IB.6
The institution assures the effectiveness of its ongoing planning and resource
allocation processes by systematically reviewing and modifying, as appropriate,
all parts of the cycle, including institutional and other research efforts.
Descriptive Summary
In 2011 the College Council developed an Integrated Planning and Resource
Allocation process that clarified the college’s efforts toward the improvement of
institutional effectiveness. The cyclical nature of the integrated process is illustrated
in the Integrated Planning and Resource Allocation Process Concept Map (1B.6.1).
|Standard I: Institutional Mission and Effectiveness 128
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
At the fall 2011 All College Day, the Integrated Planning and Resource Allocation
Team introduced a simple version of this planning process. (1B.6.2)
In 2013 the Integrated Planning and Resource Allocation Team refined the
presentation of the process. This refinement highlights the Implementation stage
of the process. Additionally, greater detail is provided to make the process more
user-friendly for the institution (1B.6.3).
After a review of the existing resource allocation processes, in the spring of 2013,
the VP of Administrative Services clarified the allocation process. (1B.6.4)
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard.
Actionable Improvement Plans
None.
Evidence
1B.6.1
Integrated Planning and Resource Allocation
Concept
http://www.westvalley.edu/research/Docume
nts/accreditation_and_integrated_planning_p
pt.pptx
1B.6.2
Conceptual overview of Integrated Planning
and Resource Allocation (slide #14)
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accre
ditation/2013/evidence/1b/1B63_accreditatio
n_and_integrated_planning_slide14.pdf
1B.6.3
Revised Integrated Planning and Resource
Allocation Concept Spring 2013
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accre
ditation/integrated_planning_diagram.html
1B.6.4
Budget Process 2013-14
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accre
ditation/documents/budgetplanning.pdf
Standard IB.7
The institution assesses its evaluation mechanisms through a systematic review of
their effectiveness in improving instructional programs, student support services,
and library and other learning support services.
Descriptive Summary
The Program Review process is one of the key mechanisms through which the
college evaluates its effectiveness toward improving instructional programs,
student support services, and library and other support services. In 2011 the
Academic Senate fundamentally changed the composition of the Program Review
Committee (PRC) committee by making the Chairmanship a faculty position.
|Standard I: Institutional Mission and Effectiveness 129
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Following the input from the PRC, the senate approved the mission statement,
goals, and a policy and procedures document setting the direction of the PRC.
(1B.7.1)
The PRC reviewed and revised the Program Review Self-Evaluation process to
ensure that questions aligned with that of the ACCJC Rubric for Program Review.
This change worked to elicit responses that focused respondents more on planned
improvements in program practices that lead to improvements in student learning
and student achievement. The PRC also created a Program Review Policy and
Procedures document. (1B.7.2) This document defines the Program Review policies
and illustrates procedures for the college. Prior to the beginning of each review
cycle, the PRC reviews the questions, the directions, and delivery method to help
make the process effective and efficient for the college. Any major changes must
be adopted first by the Academic Senate.
The PRC implemented several changes to the Program Review Questions as well as
the delivery system. Many of the questions within the program review were
modified to move programs away from simply summarizing activities and toward
conducting analysis, evaluation and identifying actions to improve practices.
(1B.7.3) One key example of this is Student Success and Retention. In the past, the
program would be asked to compare their program’s data to the college average.
This was changed to ask programs to compare their program’s data to peer
program success and retention data across the state and to explain differences. An
additional question was added to identify plans to improve the gap in success and
retention between program and peer programs. Additional SLO/A questions were
added to capture improvements in student learning, and finally, questions were
added to ensure that CTE programs met the state review requirement.
Another addition to the Program Review process was the establishment of
substantive feedback via a Program Review Rubric. (1B.7.4) The rubric allowed for
readers to focus the evaluation on specific elements that map with the ACCJC
Rubric for Program Review. This worked to significantly improve the quality of the
Program Reviews while providing feedback that helped the Program Leader to
begin believing that the program review process was not pro forma.
In 2012, the PRC implemented several changes that moved away from Microsoft
Word documents to a fully online system. Questions were made available online
with all necessary supporting data, research, and instructions available in one
location via hyperlinks. (1B.7.5) Through collaborative dialogue and critical
feedback from the institution, the PRC improved its online delivery system in 2013.
|Standard I: Institutional Mission and Effectiveness 130
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
(1B.7.6) The use of Survey Monkey allowed for a far more stable environment while
maintaining all the previous improvements. In addition, an improvement was added
to provide type and save pdf files that could be provided for collaboration.
Through the yearly Program Review process, which includes SLO/A assessment
questions, the college is regularly evaluating its effectiveness in improving programs
and services while assessing and improving the mechanisms for those evaluations.
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard.
Actionable Improvement Plans
None
Evidence
1B.7.1
Program Review webpage
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/programreview/index.html
1B.7.2
Program Review Policy &
Procedures
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/programreview/program-review-policy-and-procedure.pdf
1B.7.3
Program review questions
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/programreview/documents/Documents_And_Files/2013/fillable-pdfdocument-instructional.pdf
1B.7.4
Program Review Rubric
http://westvalley.edu/committees/programreview/documents/Documents_And_Files/2013/instructionalevaluation-rubric.pdf
1B.7.5
2012 Online Program
Review Form
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2013/
evidence/1b/2012-instructional-program-self-evaluations.pdf
1B.7.6
2013 Online Program
Review System
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/programreview/documents/pr-2013-documents.html
| 131
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Standard II: Student Learning Programs and
Services
Standard IIA: Instructional Programs
The institution offers high-quality instructional programs in recognized and
emerging fields of study that culminate in identified student outcomes leading to
degrees, certificates, employment, or transfer to other higher education
institutions or programs consistent with its mission. Instructional programs are
systematically assessed in order to assure currency, improve teaching and
learning strategies, and achieve stated student learning outcomes. The provisions
of this standard are broadly applicable to all institutional activities offered in the
name of the institution.
Standard IIA.1
The institution demonstrates that all instructional programs, regardless of
location or means of delivery, address and meet the mission of the institution and
uphold its integrity.
Descriptive Summary
In keeping with its mission “The West Valley College community supports students
along their pathways to reach transfer and career goals in an environment of
academic excellence,” West Valley College faculty and staff offer courses, programs,
and services which are reviewed and refined to reflect a curriculum that meets the
needs of its students and their future employers in the community. Whether they
are on campus, off campus or delivered through mediated learning, course content
review is overseen by the Curriculum Committee, faculty rights and responsibilities
that are articulated by the Academic Senate and the Faculty Association, and
evaluation tasks required of faculty and academic administrators are carried out for
courses and programs. The college utilizes multiple resources available from the
California Community College Chancellor’s Office including the Program and Course
Approval Handbook, 5th Edition, April 24, 2013. (2A.1.1) The college also uses the
Academic Senate for California Community Colleges (2A.1.2) and Accrediting
Commission for Community and Junior Colleges (ACCJC) (2A.1.3) as resources to
help the institution maintain high academic standards within constantly changing
delivery technology, such as podcasts, video streaming, and video captioning.
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 132
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
The Curriculum Committee reviews each new course, course revision, distanceeducation component, certificate, and degree (including Associate of Arts for
Transfer degree) on a five-year review cycle for non-Career Technical Education
(CTE) courses/programs and a two-year cycle for CTE courses/programs. (2A.1.4)
Courses and programs are reviewed not only for appropriate discipline content, but
also for college-level rigor and scope in terms of the mission and core competencies
for the college. In addition to the faculty representatives from each Division, the
Curriculum Committee members also include the Articulation Officer, Distance
Education Coordinator, and administrators from the Office of Instruction to ensure
all state and federal requirements are met. Additionally, alternate course delivery
methods—any other than face-to-face—are reviewed carefully by a Distance
Learning expert. The Curriculum Committee approves these methods of delivery as
part of the voting and approval process.
Instructional programs are assessed using the Program Review process, which was
developed by the Program Review Committee (PRC). (2A.1.5) The charge of the
Program Review Committee is to provide and refine procedures that enable the
systematic evaluation of programs to continuously improve student learning,
student achievement, and institutional planning and effectiveness with the goals of
providing an opportunity for programs to demonstrate their contribution to the
mission of West Valley College, improving linkages and accountability between
program review and resource allocation, and strengthening the quality of program
reviews leading to improved program practices. The PRC accomplishes these tasks
through the implementation of the Program Review Policy and Procedure. The
results of the Program Review process are posted online on the Program Review
webpage and summary results are presented to the Academic Senate and College
Council by publishing an annual Final Report for Integrated Planning and Resource
Allocation (2A.1.6). Typically, this report includes:



Themes in terms of Institutional Needs – overall and Student Learning
Outcome specific
Success and retention data trends
o Within the program
o As compared to peer instructional programs across the state
Data concerning completed Program Reviews
o Percentage or number of programs required to resubmit selfevaluation based on Program Review Rubric
o Number of programs failing to submit reviews
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 133
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014

Informs Budget and Resource Allocation stewards for Integrated Planning
and Resource Allocation
The college’s institutional researcher provides each program with a Program Review
dataset (2A.1.7). The data includes information and changes to enrollment, success,
persistence, completion rates and demographics over a three year period. Program
reviews and data sets are available on the PRC webpage allowing for multiple years
to be reviewed and used to support a comprehensive evaluation.
The 2011 Final Report showed a gap in the Program Review process and budgeting
and resource allocation. (2A.1.8) As a result of this report, the Program Review
process was reviewed and revised to clearly integrate into the College’s Integrated
Planning and Resource Allocation (2A.1.9) framework/process where Program
Review data informs the college of areas needing further analysis and help in
identifying college priorities. The Program Review cycle was also changed to a twoyear, two tier annual review process: WVC currently uses both a comprehensive
and regular review where all programs (including non-instructional programs and
services) annually evaluate its program in a cyclic fashion. (2A.1.10)
The Annual Program Review process integrates Student Learning Outcomes
(SLO/As) and assessment as part of the College’s Integrated Planning and Resource
Allocation process. (2A.1.11) The Program Review annual review results have the
ultimate goals of aligning Program Level Outcomes to the mission and strategic
initiatives, and linking program assessment to budget and resource allocation. The
Annual Program Review process is a critical part of the planning and assessment
cycle.
The CTE programs at the college have developed to prepare students to succeed in
their educational goals and also in the workplace, maintaining active and strong
relationships with each advisory committee. Any new courses, certificates or
degrees that are proposed are required to provide strong evidence of industry and
market data and are reviewed and approved by the Curriculum Committee.
Revisions to existing certificates and degree programs must also be reviewed and
approved through the Curriculum Committee.
Programs also identify how program outcomes relate to institutional outcomes,
thereby demonstrating how academic programs clearly support institutional
learning outcomes. All program outcomes are identified in the West Valley College
2013-14 Catalog. (2A.1.12)
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 134
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard. A rigorous five- year (for non-CTE) and two-year
(CTE) review process ensures that course content meets college standards and state
mandates, and links strongly to the stated program outcomes. In 2012-13 year, the
College’s Integrated Planning and Resource Allocation process pulled Program
Review, SLO/A and assessment, and resource allocation together creating a
systemic and integrated quality assurance and planning process.
Actionable Improvement Plans

Continue to address and complete the curriculum recency inventory.
Evidence
2A.1.1
CCCCO Program and Course Approval
Handbook
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accredi
tation/2013/evidence/2a/Handbook_5thEd_BOG
_Approved.pdf
2A.1.2
Academic Senate for California Community
Colleges
http://www.asccc.org/
2A.1.3
Accrediting Commission for Community and
Junior Colleges
http://www.accjc.org/
2A.1.4
Course Revision Schedule
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accredi
tation/2013/evidence/2a/1314_Course_Revision_Schedule_one.pdf
2A.1.5
Program Review Policy and Procedure
http://westvalley.edu/committees/programreview/program-review-policy-andprocedure.pdf
2A.1.6
PRC Final Report for Integrated Planning
http://westvalley.edu/committees/programreview/documents/2012-final-report-forintegrated-planning.pdf
2A.1.7
Program Review Dataset
http://westvalley.edu/committees/programreview/documents/program-review-datawvc.pdf
2A.1.8
Program Review Final Report 2011
2A.1.9
WVC Integrated Planning Concept Map
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/accredit
ation/2013/evidence/2a/programreview_2011.pdf
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accredi
tation/integrated_planning_diagram.html
2A.1.10
Master Program Review and SLO
Assessment Schedule
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accredi
tation/2013/evidence/recommendations/Master
_Program_Review_and_SLO_Assessment_Sched
ule_01-07-2014_External.pdf
2A.1.11
WVC Program Review Questions
http://westvalley.edu/committees/programreview/documents/2012-instructional-programself-evaluations.pdf
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 135
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
2A.1.12
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accredi
tation/2013/evidence/1a/2014_Catalog_page3.p
df
West Valley College 2013-14 Catalog
Standard IIA.1.a
The institution identifies and seeks to meet varied educational needs of its
students through programs consistent with their educational preparation and the
diversity, demographics, and economy of its communities. The institution relies
upon research and analysis to identify student learning needs and to assess
progress toward achieving stated learning outcomes.
Descriptive Summary
West Valley College has a broad representation of backgrounds, perspectives and
ideas inherent in its student population and offers a wide variety of courses and
programs to meet their needs. The college serves multiple purposes in the
community; transfer opportunities to baccalaureate granting institutions with or
without an associate degree; two year associate degree without transfer with or
without Transfer Model Curriculum (TMC); discovery of and preparation for
advancement of career interests or prospects; maintenance of certificate or license;
retaining of skills; and educational development. The implementation of the
Student Success Act of 2012 (SB 1456) will strengthen the matriculation process for
students who will have a clear educational plan developed with assessment results,
as well as appropriate orientation activities at entry to the college. Ethnically, the
college has a broadly diverse student body:
African-American
American
Indian/Alaskan
Native
Asian
Filipino
Hispanic
Pacific Islander
Two or More Races
Unknown/NonRespondent
White Non-Hispanic
Fall 2007
Fall 2008
Fall 2009
Fall 2010
Fall 2011
Fall 2012
2.7%
0.6%
2.9%
0.6%
2.7%
0.5%
3.1%
0.5%
3.2%
0.5%
2.9%
0.3%
13.2%
2.0%
14.8%
0.7%
0.0%
12.9%
12.8%
2.1%
14.1%
0.6%
0.0%
13.8%
13.0%
1.8%
14.8%
0.6%
1.0%
16.0%
13.1%
2.0%
16.7%
0.5%
2.2%
13.2%
13.3%
1.9%
18.2%
0.5%
2.2%
12.7%
12.7%
1.8%
19.3%
0.3%
3.7%
12.6%
53.1%
53.2%
49.6%
48.8%
47.5%
46.3%
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 136
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Women outnumber the men, accounting for 55% of the students. Forty-two
percent of the students qualify for the Board of Governors (BOG) Fee Waiver.
Thirty–one percent are full time and 47% are 24 years of age or younger. (2A.1.a.1)
The college offers a wide variety of course and program offerings to meet the
diverse needs of the students and the community. Effective fall 2013, the college
offers 25 AA degrees, 27 AS degrees, 15 ADTs, and 65 Certificates of Achievement
(12 or more units noted on transcripts). (2A.1.a.2) By fall 2014, the college will have
met the goal of 100% completion of ADT development in 20 disciplines. (2A.1.a.3)
To better serve the diverse needs of the student population, the college supports
student success through culturally-relevant special programs. The primary purpose
of these programs is to support students with their academic and educational
success through culturally-relevant pedagogy, instructional material, mentor faculty
and counselors, and a community-approach to supporting their success and growth.
Puente Project:
The Puente Project prepares students to compete academically in a
university environment. It emphasizes the Mexican-American/Latino
experience through English writing, counseling, and mentoring components.
The Puente Program integrates:





Two-semester English 905 & 1A linked classes.
Two semester Counseling classes.
Individual academic, personal, and career counseling.
Transfer information, university tours, student motivational and
transfer conferences, and assistance with the transfer process.
Personal mentor relationships with professionals from the MexicanAmerican/Latino community. (2A.1.a.4)
SUCCESS:
SUCCESS is counseling, instruction, and mentoring program that emphasizes
the African American experience and builds community among students.
The program focuses on implementing West Valley Colleges’ Strategic Goals.
The SUCCESS program:



Offers linked English 905 and 1A courses, Counseling 1, 5, and 12B.
Encourages enrollment in History 12, English 12, and Counseling 50.
Provides students with college, peer, and community mentors.
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 137
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014


Connects students with support services on campus and with
transfer institutions.
Provides cultural events, social outings, and visits to transfer
institutions. (2A.1.a.5)
CalWORKs Program:
The California Work Opportunity & Responsibility to Kids (CalWORKS)
Program, with the assistance of the state of California, provides students
who receive public assistance (TANF) support in obtaining a vocational
certificate or degree in a high demand field of employment. Support and
training are provided including:
Counseling















Academic and career counseling
Support groups and workshops
Assistance with financial aid applications and priority registration
Basic skills assessment
Tutoring assistance and peer advising
Support Services
Free, convenient child care on campus or near your home
Funds for books and supplies
Bus passes or gas money
Referrals to community resources
Career and Employment Services
Career coaching
Resumés
Interview and job search strategies
Work Study Opportunities (2A.1.a.6)
TRiO Student Support Services:
The West Valley TRiO program is a federally funded program, focused on
increasing the graduation and transfer rates for low-income, first generation
and/ or disabled students by providing support and resources to assist
students in attaining their academic and career goals.
Services provided include:

Personal, career and academic counseling
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 138
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014





Priority registration
Additional tutoring services
Financial aid and Scholarship assistance
College visits
Workshops on transfer, career, and financial literacy (2A.1.a.7)
Honors Program:
The Honors University Transfer Program is one of the institution’s primary
instruments for advanced academic excellence and scholastic training within
a critical-thinking mode. The program’s primary mission is to create and
maintain course enrichment and accelerates the intellectual and creative
development of high-ability students. This is accomplished by using an
innovative curriculum model called a trans-disciplinary unit, which expands
the concept of team-teaching and interdisciplinary instruction. Through an
interdisciplinary approach, the Honors Program concentrates on three
themes (two per semester): Civilizations of the World, Science: Inquiry and
Applications, and Thought and Politics.
Students have the option of enrolling in one, two, or three courses
depending on pre- and co-requisites, the number and type of general
education courses already completed, and the requirements of their majors.
Honors Program students who wish to transfer under the terms of the
transfer alliances with selected universities receive priority consideration. To
qualify, students must complete six or more Honors courses (18 units) with a
GPA of 3.3 or higher by the time they complete 60 or more transferable
units. High school students can apply to the program with a 3.5 HS GPA.
WVC students are eligible if they have a GPA of 3.3 or higher in a minimum
of 9 University-transferable units. (2A.1.a.8)
The college uses a variety of data and research to determine the educational needs
of the community it serves. Program development and growth is tied to community
and industry needs as identified by labor market information and employment
projections by industry and occupation. (2A.1.a.9) In addition the college’s Career
Technical Education programs regularly meet with their advisory committee to
better align the program content and sequence with industry needs and job
readiness. (2A.1.a.10) For existing programs, the college utilizes program review
and student success data (persistence, completion, success) to evaluate
effectiveness in meeting the students’ educational needs. (2A.1.a.11)
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 139
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
In fall 2012, the college embraced an Institutional Effectiveness framework that
encompasses three major areas: Integrated Planning and Resource Allocation,
Student Success, and Accreditation. (2A.1.a.12) In response to the Student Success
Act of 2012, the college committed to developing an institutional framework to
ensure that the Student Success Act implementation takes priority, as well as to
ensure that the Student Success Act of 2012 mandates are aligned with existing
institutional priorities, goals, and objectives moving forward. In spring 2012, faculty
leaders from the Basic Skills Advisory Committee (BSAC), Matriculation Committee,
and Student Equity, Access, and Success Committee (SEAS) led a process that would
result in integrating the three committees’ work in ensuring student success under
the framework of the Student Success Team. The finalization of the operational
aspect of the Student Success Team is scheduled for fall 2013 with the goal of
implementing in spring 2014. (2A.1.a.13) Each committee’s work to ensure that the
college supports students to successfully fulfill their educational goals will be
continued in an integrated framework for the institution utilizing the recent release
of the Scorecard and other research data that is provided by the Office of Research
and Institutional Planning. This process is in concert with the implementation of
mandatory student assessment, orientation, and educational plan; the college is
reviewing current institutional datasets to be not only in alignment with the
Scorecard but also with the elements of the Student Success Act of 2012.
The Integrated Planning and Resource Allocation Team under the Institutional
Effectiveness framework meets regularly to discuss effective institutional planning
processes. Program Review, Student Learning Outcome and Assessment (SLO/A),
and institutional budget planning and development processes were intentionally
integrated in fall 2012. The group reviews data sets, review questions used in each
area, and ensures that they are integrated on the level where results and outcomes
of Program Review and SLO/A are informing the decision making process for
resource allocation. (2A.1.a.14)
The Educational and Facilities Master Plan 2009 includes an environmental scan for
the college service area. (2A.1.a.15) However, four years later, the college realized
that an augmentation to the 2009 plan is necessary due to multiple factors that
changed the priorities of the college. The state fiscal crisis of 2010, Proposition 30
decision in fall 2012, Transfer Model Curriculum implementation mandate, and
Student Success Act of 2012, to name a few, are changing the face of West Valley
College. The college is currently planning to revise the existing Educational and
Facility Master Plan in 2014.
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 140
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard. The college’s Office of Research and Institutional
Planning, in collaboration with the District’s Information Systems Office, routinely
monitors the demographics of West Valley College. Year-to-year enrollment
reports are run each semester to track students by enrollment status (new,
continuing, returning, ethnicity, and zip codes). The annual West Valley College Fact
Book also includes a detailed snapshot of students and their progress. Content
includes general information about the college along with summary and trend data
comprised of enrollment, demographics, institutional effectiveness, co-curricular
activities, finance, employee, and regional data. (2A.1.a.16)
The college has a strong Institutional Effectiveness framework where college
priorities are clearly delineated as Integrated Planning and Resource Allocation,
Student Success, and Accreditation. In this framework, institutional research
priorities are identified. In spring 2012, the college conducted an Employee and
Student Survey in preparation for the Accreditation Self-Study. (2A.1.a.17)
Actionable Improvement Plans
None.
Evidence
2A.1.a.1
Student Demographic information
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accredita
tion/2013/evidence/2a/fact_book_2013_page16.p
df
2A.1.a.2
WVC Certificate and Degree list
2A.1.a.3
TMC Certification Goals
http://www.westvalley.edu/classes/programs/inde
x.html
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/accreditat
ion/2013/evidence/2a/tmc_certification.pdf
2A.1.a.4
Puente Project
http://westvalley.edu/services/academicsuccess/puente/index.html
2A.1.a.5
SUCCESS Program
http://westvalley.edu/services/academicsuccess/puente/index.html
2A.1.a.6
CalWORKs
http://westvalley.edu/services/academicsuccess/calworks/index.html
2A.1.a.7
TRiO Program
http://westvalley.edu/services/academicsuccess/trio/index.html
2A.1.a.8
Honors Transfer Program
http://westvalley.edu/services/academicsuccess/trio/index.html
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 141
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
2A.1.a.9
Labor Market Report
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/accreditat
ion/2013/evidence/2a/labor_market_report__10_
15_13.pdf
2A.1.a.10
Advising Committee Meetings
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accredita
tion/2013/evidence/2a/Advisory_Committee_Mee
tings
2A.1.a.11
Program Review Data
http://westvalley.edu/committees/programreview/documents/program-review-data-wvc.pdf
2A.1.a.12
Institutional Effectiveness Framework
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accredita
tion/2013/evidence/recommendations/Institutiona
l_Effectivenss_SS_Team_11-6-12.pdf
2A.1.a.13
Student Success Team
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accredita
tion/2013/evidence/2b/Student_Success_Act_Impl
ementation_Update_10-17-13.docx
2A.1.a.14
Integrated Planning Team meeting
notes
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accredita
tion/2013/evidence/2a/Integrated_Planning_Team
_Meeting_Notes.pdf
2A.1.a.15
Educational And Facilities Master Plan
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accredita
tion/2013/evidence/2a/Integrated_Planning_Team
_Meeting_Notes.pdf
2A.1.a.16
WVC Fact Book
http://www.westvalley.edu/faculty/_files/bondinge/fact_book_2013_master_doc_12032013.pdf
2A.1.a.17
Accreditation Employee and Student
Surveys
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accredita
tion/2013/evidence/3a/accreditation_survey_empl
oyee_final_7312.pdf
Standard IIA.1.b
The institution utilizes delivery systems and modes of instruction compatible with
the objectives of the curriculum and appropriate to the current and future needs
of its students.
Descriptive Summary
When developing instructional delivery modes, faculty and staff focus on the
quality, accessibility, and accountability of student programs and services as a
structural and practical means for successfully achieving curricular learning
outcomes.
Originating from the college's mission, college decisions regarding multiple delivery
systems and course offerings are consistent with the prescribed course and
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 142
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
program offering priorities of the California Community College system and the
Student Success Act of 2012.
West Valley College faculty and staff developed a vast range of instructional modes
of delivery with quality, accessibility and accountability for student programs and
services as a structural and practical means for successful learning outcomes of
course curriculum.
Starting from the college mission, West Valley College’s decision making on multiple
delivery systems and course offerings is based on the California Community College
course offering priorities and Student Success Act of 2012 prescribed course and
program offering priorities. The college’s Performance Goals Committee and
Division Chairs Council carefully analyze these priorities and identify courses and
their delivery methods per department and division when developing the schedule
of courses. (2A.1.b.1) The delivery system and methods of instruction offered are
influenced by multiple factors such as transfer institutions, student needs and
demands, employee and advisory committees, industry requirements, and survey
results from the program themselves.
The college’s Curriculum Committee (CC) ensures that the proposed course outline
requires the instructor to describe and explain all methods of instruction and how
the methods reflect an understanding of differing student learning styles. CC then
reviews the course content – including delivery methods – and provides feedback to
ensure the instruction is appropriate to the students’ learning objectives. A
Distance Learning Addendum approval is required for any new hybrid or Distance
Learning course as well as all five-year reviews. (2A.1.b.2) The process is initiated
by the faculty and department who wish to offer the course involving Distance
Learning; the faculty initiator consults with college’s Distance Learning Coordinator
(who is a member of the CC) and the division representative of the CC to prepare
the Distance Education Addendum form for the CC’s approval. In compliance with
the state and federal guidelines and requirements, the curriculum documents
(course outline and addendum form) clearly specify what delivery methods will be
used for the course and how the goals and objectives are met through technologymediated facilitation and other alternative delivery modes.
In the 2013-14 West Valley College Catalog, computer icons are placed next to
courses that are offered in a Distance Education modality indicating to the student
that the course can be offered in either face to face or Distance Learning format.
(2A.1.b.3)
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 143
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
The Curriculum Committee is composed of faculty representatives from each
academic division, the Articulation Officer, Curriculum Chair, Technical Reviewers (2
faculty), Distance Learning Coordinator, Vice President of Instruction, Dean of
Instruction and Student Success, and Administrative Analyst of Instruction for
technical and clerical support. (2A.1.b.4) The CC meets on a weekly basis
throughout the semester alternating between the technical review committee and
the CC to discuss and approve new course initiations and reviews. The Distance
Learning Coordinator provides consultations on the appropriate and effective use of
technology and instructional design, and offers student service and support.
In the spring of 2013, the distance education teaching modality was utilized in
12.3% (147 sections) of the total courses offered, with the majority of courses,
87.7% (1047 sections), being offered face-to-face. (2A.1.b.5) There has been a 6.3%
increase in the number of distance education course taught at the college since
2007. In 2007–2008, the number of Full-time Equivalent Students (FTES) enrolled in
distance education courses was 11.4% of the credit total. In 2012 – 2013, Distance
Learning FTES increased to 17.7%.
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard. The college has a strong Distance Education
Committee comprised of Instructional Technology staff, faculty members
experienced in using technology in teaching, administrators, and the Distance
Education Coordinator. (2A.1.b.6) The committee meets regularly to provide
guidance and feedback on policies and practices developed and implemented in the
services provided by the Instructional Technology department. The committee also
reviews regulation changes, compliance issues, and identification of necessary
guidelines for implementation. The college uses ANGEL as the course management
system which is used widely not only for instruction purposes but also for various
group work and projects within the participatory governance constituencies and
committees.
The Distance Education Coordinator offers regular training workshops on how to
develop and teach using the ANGEL system. (2A.1.b.7, 8) The Coordinator also
offers individual consultations on instructional design, the effective use of
technology, accessibility and other issues related to technology-mediated teaching
and learning. The Coordinator is a member of the Curriculum Committee and
provides direct guidance, quality assurance, and compliance matters regarding the
method of instruction for each course that is reviewed by the CC.
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 144
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Faculty use a variety of applications to supplement or conduct their courses,
including ANGEL, faculty websites, video streaming, and third-party resources such
as publishers’ websites. They can use any or a combination of resources to enhance
or teach online, hybrid, and face-to-face courses.
The Distance Learning Committee continues to work with faculty and student
services departments on campus to improve the quality of services and support for
students. During 2011-12, all telecourses were converted to a more interactive
online format. This format improves the regular, effective contact between faculty
and students in these courses.
As student and faculty demand for technology grows, the college continues to add,
refresh, and expand smart classrooms. With the passage of the 2012 Measure C
bond, the college will experience ongoing facility upgrades, modernization, and new
building in the areas of Applied Arts and Sciences, Student Services, Library,
Learning and Tutorial Center, and Fine and Performing Arts. As the college
continues to implement smart and technology-mediated classrooms in the
modernized and new buildings moving forward, the network capacity, wireless
services, and overall technology infrastructure must be regularly upgraded to
support such increased technology needs for the college.
Actionable Improvement Plans

Develop a technology infrastructure plan with the District’s Information
Technology department to ensure that the operational capacity supports a
steady increase of smart and technology-mediated classrooms and offices.
Evidence
2A.1.b.1
Performance Goals Committee
and Division Chairs Council
meetings re: curriculum and
modes of instruction
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/20
13/evidence/2a/PGC_Meeting_Discussions_on_Scheduling
_Priorites.pdf
2A.1.b.2
DE Addendum Form
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/20
13/evidence/2a/de_addendum_form.png
2A.1.b.3
Distance Learning
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/20
13/evidence/2a/2A1b3_201314_WVC_Catalog_distance_learning.pdf
2A.1.b.4
Curriculum Committee
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/20
13/evidence/2a/1314_Curriculum_Committee_Membership.pdf
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 145
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
2A.1.b.5
Spring 2013 Online Courses
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/accreditation/20
13/evidence/2a/2013_spring_online-tv_schedule.pdf
2A.1.b.6
Distance Education Committee
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Distance_Learnin
g_Committee/members.html
2A.1.b.7
Best Practices in using ANGEL
http://www.westvalley.edu/elearning/angel/practicesfaculty.html
2A.1.b.8
ANGEL and Distance Learning
Workshops
http://www.westvalley.edu/elearning/faculty/training.ht
ml
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 146
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Standard IIA.1.c
The institution identifies student learning outcomes for courses, programs,
certificates, and degrees; assesses student achievement of those outcomes; and
uses assessment results to make improvements.
Descriptive Summary
The identification, assessment and use of Student Learning Outcomes for
improvement of student learning and student success has been a key commitment
of the college in fulfilling both its Planning Agenda from 2011 Midterm Report and
the requirements mandated by the Accreditation Commission of Community and
Junior Colleges (ACCJC) to be at the Proficiency level by fall 2012. The college
successfully submitted the ACCJC Student Learning Outcome assessment report to
ACCJC on March 15, 2013 which includes all evidence for meeting the requirements
of the Proficiency level status. (2A.1.c.1) Since the midterm report, the college
focused on creating and strengthening an institutional framework and process
where the SLO/A and Assessment processes are integrated with the Program
Review and Budget development and allocation processes.
During 2010-11 year, the SLO/A and Assessment Committee and Program Review
Committee consisted of faculty, staff, and administrators focused on ensuring that
each entity developed a clear tool, process, and college-wide schedule (or
assessment cycle) that was derived from the college mission and in alignment with
the development and assessment of annual Goals and Objectives. (2A.1.c.2) In fall
2012, all active courses, programs, certificates, and degrees contained SLO/As and
assessment was conducted. By spring 2013, all instructional, student services, and
administrative programs conducted comprehensive and/or annual Program
Reviews.
With the support of the Academic Senate, the Curriculum Committee has been
requiring all course and program submissions to include clearly stated SLO/As and
assessment mechanisms in CurricuNet for the committee’s review and approval. In
the 2013-14 West Valley College Catalog, program level SLO/As are clearly
articulated so that students can easily understand and be aware of the goals and
purposes of the certificates or degrees. (2A.1.c.3)
A positive and productive dialogue about student learning outcomes is occurring on
campus throughout the implementation process. Using the results of SLO/A
assessment, the Student Learning Outcome Committee and programs across
campus are discussing ways to improve teaching and learning via collaborative
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 147
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
approaches and innovative pedagogy such as shared learning communities for
students. With the state’s implementation of the Student Success Scorecard in
spring 2013 (2A.1.c.4), campus-wide dialogue led by the Academic Senate,
SLO/Assessment Committee, Program Review Committee, and Student Success Act
Team expanded. Faculty and staff incorporated the Scorecard data with SLO/A
assessment results, as well as Program Review college-wide themes; this has
evolved into a professional development commitment to improve teaching and
learning that directly results in student success.
To ensure college-wide involvement and consistent understanding of the process
and participation in the SLO/Assessment process, the SLO/Assessment Committee
in conjunction with the Program Review Committee within the framework of
Integrated Planning and Resource Allocation conducted consistent workshops and
presentations at All College Day for the past two years. (2A.1.c.5) In addition,
SLO/Assessment and Program Review Committee Chairs frequently visited
participatory governance committees, constituency groups, and Division Chair
Council to provide updates and progress made, as well as encouraged open
dialogue about the results of assessment and identification of gaps. (2A.1.c.6)
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard. The college has responded to ACCJC, team
recommendations, and 2011 planning agenda recommendations for SLO/As and
Assessments. In 2012-2013 year, the college made a firm commitment to improve
its Integrated Planning and Resource Allocation process. In fall 2012, the college
created an Institutional Effectiveness organizational model in which the Integrated
Planning and Resource Allocation, Student Success Act activities, and Accreditation
were and continue to be the three main institutional priorities for ensuring
institutional effectiveness. In order to address the college's institutional
effectiveness framework, the SLO/Assessment Committee Chairs, Program Review
Chair, Director of Research and Institutional Effectiveness, Vice President of
Instruction, Vice President of Administrative Services, and Dean of Instruction and
Student Success met regularly during the 2013 spring and fall semesters, to
authentically integrate the planning process. (2A.1.c.7) At the Fall 2013 All College
Day, this team introduced the integrated SLO/Assessment, Program Review, and
Budget development and planning schedule along with a streamlined timeline that
ensures effective, logical and timely planning that is informed by college-wide
needs. (2A.1.c.8)
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 148
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
The Student Success Act Team (an integrated team of the Basics Skills Advisory,
Student Equity and Access, and Matriculation Committees) was formed in spring
2012 and continues to fine-tune its function, roles, and responsibilities for the
implementation of the Student Success Act of 2012 for a Student Success and
Support Program. This faculty led task force, supported by administration, has as
one of its focuses a conversation about effective pedagogy, teaching and learning,
and a culture of inquiry. The results of SLO/Assessment and Program Review will be
a major component in this conversation also.
Actionable Improvement Plans
None.
Evidence
2A.1.c.1
March 15, 2013 SLO/A Report to
ACCJC
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Student_Learni
ng_Outcomes/Documents/Committee_Documents/slore
portfinal.pdf
2A.1.c.2
Master Program Review & SLO
Assessment Schedule
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2
013/evidence/recommendations/Master_Program_Revie
w_and_SLO_Assessment_Schedule_01-072014_External.pdf
2A.1.c.3
WVC Catalog – Program Level
SLO/As
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2
013/evidence/2a/2A1c3_2014_catalog_page22.pdf
2A.1.c.4
Student Success Scorecard
http://scorecard.cccco.edu/scorecardrates.aspx?CollegeI
D=493
2A.1.c.5
All College Day SLO Presentations
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2
013/evidence/2a/All_College_SLO_Presentations/
2A.1.c.6
Participatory Governance
Dialogues re: Integrated Planning
and Resource Allocation Model
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2
013/evidence/2a/Participatory_Governance_Dialogues_o
n_Integrated_Planning_Model
2A.1.c.7
Integrated Planning and Resource
Allocation Map
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/in
tegrated_planning_diagram.html
2A.1.c.8
Master SLO/A Assessment and
Program Review Calendar
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2
013/evidence/recommendations/Master_Program_Revie
w_and_SLO_Assessment_Schedule_01-072014_External.pdf
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 149
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Standard IIA.2
The institution assures the quality and improvement of all instructional courses
and programs offered in the name of the institution, including collegiate,
developmental and pre-collegiate courses and programs, continuing and
community education, study abroad, short-term training courses and programs,
programs for international students, and contract or other special programs,
regardless of type of credited awarded, delivery mode or location.
Descriptive Summary
All courses offered by West Valley College, regardless of the type of credit awarded,
delivery mode, or location, maintain high quality and undergo periodic review that
assures continuous, sustainable, improvement to the standard and quality. The
college offers a wide variety of courses that enable two-year transfer and career
technical education leading to an Associate in Arts or Associate in Science degree,
as well as courses that lead to various Certificates of Achievement. As of fall 2013,
West Valley College also offers Associate Degrees in Transfer (ADT) in
Administration of Justice, Anthropology, Art History, Studio Arts, Psychology,
Sociology, Communications Studies, Early Childhood Education, Mathematics,
English, Political Science, Theater Arts, Business Administration, Music, and History.
(2A.2.1) West Valley College ADTs will enable students who are in these programs
to be guaranteed admission to certain California State Universities. The college has
met the State Chancellor’s Office requirement of 80% completion of the ADT
degrees for which the college currently has Associate of Arts or Science degrees by
fall 2013. (2A.2.2, 2a) The college also offers many outstanding services and
programs to community members of all ages and interests. The West Valley College
Community Education Program offers a wide-range of fee-based courses to meet
the needs of the community at large. (2A.2.3) West Valley College’s College for Kids
summer program marked its twenty-second year last year. The program serves
more than 350 6th to 9th graders with a broad range of enrichment courses that
challenge students in academic components, as well as providing creative and
interesting elective courses in areas such as art, business, drama, music, and sports.
(2A.2.4)
The West Valley College Campbell Center is the location of several West Valley
College contracts and programs. The Title IV-E Training and Education contract,
Foster Kinship Care and Education Program, Instructional Service Agreements,
Workplace Learning Resource Center Grant and Contract Education are all located
in the Campbell Center. The center has an office with four staff and three
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 150
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
classrooms. The three classrooms are utilized every weekday, evenings and
weekends. In addition to the training and education that take place in the three
classrooms, West Valley College credit based courses are provided onsite several
evenings per week. The facilities are well utilized by training and education;
approximately ten times per year additional rooms are rented in order to facilitate
all of training needs of the programs and contracts at the Center.
Title IVE Collaborative
Since 2005 West Valley College has provided training and education to those
who work directly with vulnerable children and families in Santa Clara County.
Participants include foster and adoptive parents, social workers, staff of
community based organizations, staff of residential treatment facilities,
children’s mental health workers and many other professionals and students in
pursuit of a social work certificate or degree are eligible for free training. In
2012/13 there were more than 3600 hours of Title IV-E funded training held at
the Center. (2A.2.5)
Foster Kinship Care and Education
The West Valley College Foster Kinship Care and Education (FKCE) Program
collaborates closely with Santa Clara County Social Services Agency and
providers of services for foster youth, foster families and adoptive families as
well as the statewide network of FKCE Programs. Santa Clara County pre and
post licensed Foster and adoptive parents and prospective parents are served
by this contract. In 2012/13 the West Valley College FKCE program trained 914.5
hours: 567 pre-service training hours and 347.5 in-service training hours.
Training is conducted in English, Spanish and Vietnamese in to meet the diverse
needs of Santa Clara County families and children.
Workplace Learning/Grants
The Workplace Learning Grant was competitively awarded to West Valley
College one year ago. The grant extension ends in September 2013. The West
Valley College Workplace Learning Resource Center is part of the West Valley
Mission Community College District that serves Silicon Valley, South San
Francisco and the surrounding communities. The Center collaborates with
clients, industry leaders and community college faculty to develop programs
that meet the current and future training needs of the region.
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 151
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
The center creates custom high-quality and affordable training programs that
meet the needs of their clients and often leverage resources from the
community college district and local businesses. The center is also an active
member of the Silicon Valley business community and is involved in several
initiatives and professional organizations and collaborations.
Training topics include:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
Workplace Basic Skills
Working in and Leading teams
Leadership and Management
Customer Service
Generational & Cultural Diversity
Creativity and Critical Thinking
English as a Second Language
Business Math
Business Communications
Instructional Services Partnerships
West Valley College has Instructional Services Agreements with local law
enforcement to provide relevant training to law enforcement officers.
Administration of Justice Courses 160 J, G, and K are credit based courses that
provide relevant education and training to officers. This program serves law
enforcement officers of Santa Clara Police Department, Santa Clara County
Office of the Sheriff, Santa Clara County Custody and Corrections and Santa
Clara County Probation Department.
West Valley College Credit Based Courses
West Valley College credit based courses have been offered at the Campbell
Center each semester, in fall and spring semester of the last year there have
been credit based courses four evenings per week. The academic departments
of Psychology, Speech, Child Studies, and Philosophy have held courses at
Campbell Center. These courses are often high in enrollment and students are
pleased to attend courses located at the Campbell Center.
The college engages in ongoing, purposeful assessment of programs in regards to
quality, effectiveness, relevance, and other outcome measures. In addition to the
systematic review of courses conducted by the Curriculum Committee, due to the
severe state-wide budget reductions occurring in the past three years, the college
faced a new challenge in rethinking its focus and priority for the instructional
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 152
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
courses and programs offered at the college while addressing the fiscal reduction
through workload reduction. The faculty-led Performance Goals Committee (PGC)
and Division Chair Council Committees (DCC) were tasked to lead this process on
behalf of the college. During 2012-2013 year, PGC and DCC set priorities for the
course and program offerings based on the California Community College’s mission
(GE/transfer, CTE, and Basic Skills) and the focus of the Student Success Act of 2012.
As a result, an extensive course analysis was conducted in each department
identifying “core”, “elective”, and “stand-alone” courses. (2A.2.6) Parallel yet in
conjunction with this process, the Office of Instruction conducted a comprehensive
catalog analysis using the same criteria. (2A.2.7) Faculty in PGC and DCC used such
information and focused first on offering “core” courses to a major, certificate, or
degree across the board. The “elective” courses were considered carefully with
implications and possible negative impact that may be caused if not offered. “Stand
alone” courses were discouraged from being offered. In spring 2013, PGC and DCC
added to these criteria for prioritization the courses that are part of the Associate
Degree for Transfer (ADT) so as to ensure course offerings that promote students to
a timely and successful completion of the degree for transfer. (2A.2.8)
The Curriculum Committee reengineered its approval process starting in 2011-12 by
adding a technical review committee review process prior to the Curriculum
Committee to ensure quality, improvement, and accuracy of all courses and
programs. The Distance Education Coordinator was added to the Curriculum
Committee membership to assure rigor, federal and state compliance, and quality
assurance in all distance learning courses. A comprehensive course recency analysis
began in fall 2012 that continues to review and assess quality and rigor of each
course.
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard. Course and program quality begins with the
creation of appropriate, high quality programs and courses. West Valley College is
responsive to student and community needs. For example, work to maintain
articulation with transfer institutions is continuous: advisory boards guide
certificate programs, labor market information assures program goals, industry
needs, and job attainment opportunity for students; and Community and Contract
Education respond to community needs.
Program Review is conducted college-wide as part of the Integrated Planning and
Resource Allocation framework, from individual programs through departments
and divisions. The Performance Goals Committee and Division Chairs Council use
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 153
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
assessment information from the Integrated Planning and Resource Allocation
process (Program Review and Student Learning Outcome Assessment) to evaluate
their effectiveness.
Actionable Improvement Plans

Expand enhanced non-credit courses (in progress)
Evidence
2A.2.1
WVC Degrees
http://westvalley.edu/classes/programs/index.h
tml
2A.2.2
ADT Certification
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/accredi
tation/2013/evidence/2a/tmc_certification.pdf
2A.2.2a
CCCCO ADT Status Report – September
24, 2013
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accredi
tation/2013/evidence/2a/ADT_Status_Report_9
_24_13.pdf
2A.2.3
Community Education Program
http://register.asapconnected.com/CoursesInde
x.aspx
2A.2.4
College For Kids
http://www.summercollege4kids.org/
2A.2.5
Campbell Center Annual Report 2012-13
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/accredi
tation/2013/evidence/2a/campbell_center_ann
ual_report_fy_1213.pdf
2A.2.6
Department Course Analysis form
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accredi
tation/2013/evidence/2a/Department_Course_A
nalysis_Form.pdf
2A.2.7
Catalog Analysis
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/accredi
tation/2013/evidence/2a/
core_elective_stand_alone_courses.xlsx
2A.2.8
PGC and DCC ADT criteria
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accredi
tation/2013/evidence/2a/PGC_discussions_on_p
rioritizing_ADT_courses.pdf
Standard IIA.2.a
The institution uses established procedures to design, identify learning outcomes
for, approve, administer, deliver, and evaluate courses and programs. The
institution recognizes the central role of its faculty for establishing quality and
improving instructional courses and programs.
Descriptive Summary
The college utilizes multiple established procedures to design and develop courses,
SLO/As and their assessments, as well as approval, administration, delivery, and
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 154
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
evaluation of courses and programs. The college maximizes the existing
participatory governance structure to promote collaboration and teamwork
between the faculty and the Curriculum Committee (CC), which consists of
representatives from every division, the college Articulation Officer, Distance
Learning Coordinator (faculty), Vice President of Instruction and Dean of Instruction
and Student Success. (2A.2.a.1)
The curriculum review and approval process occurs in identifiable stages and is
faculty driven. Faculty with subject matter expertise develop curriculum, and work
with CC division representatives and the Division Chair and/or Dean to prepare the
materials for initial review by the Curriculum Technical Committee—consisting of
the Curriculum Chair, Administrative Analyst for Instruction, two faculty members,
Dean of Instruction and Student Success. Faculty are cognizant of the overall
institutional mission, the focus of the annual goals and objectives, and course and
program offering priorities set by the Performance Goals Committee (PGC) and
Division Chairs Council (DCC) while developing and revising courses. The Division
Chairs, Division Deans, Administrative Analyst, and Curriculum Technical Committee
provide technical and other necessary resources for faculty during their process of
developing courses. The Curriculum Technical Committee meets weekly with
faculty who are proposing course revisions or new courses prior to the CC meeting.
On an as needed basis, the Articulation Officer and Distance Education Coordinator
join the Curriculum Technical Committee to support reviewing of the proposed
items. In addition, the Vice President of Instruction facilitates a weekly meeting
with the Curriculum Chair, Dean of Instruction and Student Success, and
Administrative Analyst for Instruction to review the agenda and any issues to be
discussed, resolved, and to problem solve course management related issues. State
regulations relative to curriculum and instruction, compliance issues, and new Title
5 regulation implementation are also discussed and planned in this meeting.
The initial review process primarily provides faculty with helpful technical and
administrative support, as well as a final review process that assists in preparing for
a smooth approval process at the Curriculum Committee. In the case of courses for
Career Technical Education (CTE), the Curriculum Technical Committee assists
faculty proposers with accurate and relevant labor market information data for
inclusion in the course outlines. Faculty developing the curriculum then present it
to the CC where questions are addressed, meaningful and student-centered
discussion occurs, and is followed by the approval of the curriculum by vote.
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 155
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
West Valley College utilizes CurricUNET as the main source of its course
management and approval process. While the college struggles with uncontrollable
technical glitches caused by the Governet software application, the Curriculum
Chair has developed a positive rapport with the staff at Governet to problem solve
issues as they arise. The college continues to customize CurricUNET to be in
alignment with quality assurance as prescribed by the Curriculum Committee—
including rapidly changing and newly added Title 5 regulation changes. Each fall
semester, the Curriculum Committee Chair and Vice President of Instruction
coordinate a mini-training for individuals (and their back-ups) who are a part of the
approval process. (2A.2.a.2) This training outlines in each step in the CurricUNET
system course approval process and clarifies each individual’s roles and
responsibilities, as well as accountability for timely review and approval (or
disapproval with comments) of the courses or programs at hand.
Course revision takes place on a regular cycle. In light of the Associate Degree for
Transfer (ADT) development process begun in 2011-12 and additional criteria
included in this process in 2012-13, the Curriculum Committee began the rigorous
process of course recency review and analysis. (2A.2.a.3) This process led to many
successful clearances for the Course Identification Descriptor (C-ID) that were
required for courses to be included in any ADT degrees. As a result, West Valley
College has 15 ADT degrees for 2013-14 academic year. (2A.2.a.4) The Curriculum
Committee will continue to work with department faculty to complete course
recency analysis in 2013-14. (2A.2.a.5)
A significant recent addition to the curriculum process is the mandatory
incorporation of Student Learning Outcomes (SLO/As) and Assessment. The West
Valley College Student Learning Outcome and Assessment (SLO/A) Committee,
working with faculty, leads the process of SLO/A development and assessment for
courses, certificates, and degrees. Faculty include SLO/As and assessments
methods in CurricUNET for their course outlines. In addition SLO/As are also
included in course syllabi for students. The Curriculum Committee only approves
courses that meet the high standards as described above in the Curriculum
Committee approval process which includes SLO/A and assessment methods.
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard. The Curriculum Committee, a subcommittee of the
Academic Senate, encourages faculty to create and revise their processes to ensure
that the matriculation needs of students are met. While faculty are solely
responsible for the content of their course outlines, the Curriculum Committee
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 156
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
provides essential checks and balances to ensure that they are written in
accordance with the mandates for Title 5 and has established clear guidelines for
developing outlines. The Curriculum Committee extensively reviews each new
course as well as existing courses submitted for revisions. Timeline for revisions of
existing courses are clearly indicated in the Curriculum Committee website and
CurricUNET front page, as well as Program Review website link. (2A.2.6) At All
College Day, the Curriculum Committee provides workshops to faculty on
CurricUNET, regulation changes, and newly updated resources that they can review
and utilize on the CurricUNET and Curriculum Committee website. (2A.2.7)
During the course outline review, the Curriculum Committee verifies that the
SLO/As for the courses are in line with the course objectives in the outline. The
committee also ensures that the SLO/As and course objectives are in alignment
with the assignments and methods of evaluation listed in the course outlines. This
review ensures a smooth progression from the SLO/As to the assessment cycle.
Significant progress has been made in establishing the Student Learning Outcomes
and Assessment Cycle process since West Valley College’s last Self Study. All
courses, certificates, and degrees have SLO/As and have been assessed at 100%
level, meeting the Accreditation Commission of Community and Junior Colleges
(ACCJC) requirement of being at the Proficiency level by fall 2012.
Beginning in spring 2013, the college’s Integrated Planning and Resource Allocation
Team—consisting of the SLO/Assessment Chairs (faculty and staff), Program Review
Chair (faculty), Director of Research and Institutional Effectiveness, Vice President
of Administrative Services, Dean of Instruction and Student Success, and Vice
President of Instruction—began intentional work to authentically integrate
schedules, tools, and college-wide dialogue on planning and resource allocation.
The preliminary plan was introduced to the college at the fall 2013 All College Day.
(2A.2.8)
Actionable Improvement Plans

As planned, ensure a successful and timely establishment of the Budget and
Resource Advisory Council (BRAC) as part of the college’s Integrated Planning
Process.
Evidence
2A.2.a.1
Curriculum Committee
Membership
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2
013/evidence/2a/1314_Curriculum_Committee_Membership.pdf
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 157
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
2A.2.a.2
Curriculum Approval Process
Training
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2
013/evidence/2a/CurricUNET_Approval_Process_Quick_
Sheet_for_Approvers.pdf
2A.2.a.3
Course Recency Review
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/accreditation/2
013/evidence/2a/2013_14_course_recency_list_09_09_1
3.pdf
2A.2.a.4
WVC Program List
http://westvalley.edu/classes/programs/index.html
2A.2.a.5
Course Recency Review
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/accreditation/2
013/evidence/2a/2013_14_course_recency_list_09_09_1
3.pdf
2A.2.a.6
Course Review Timeline
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2
013/evidence/2a/Curriculum_Review_Dates.pdf
2A.2.a.7
Curriculum Workshops
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2
013/evidence/2a/ACCJC_Status_Report_SLO_Implement
ation/14_All_College_Day_Schedules/acd2013_schedule.
docx
2A.2.a.8
Integrated Planning and Resource
Allocation Presentation – All
College Day Fall 2013
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2
013/evidence/2a/ACCJC_Status_Report_SLO_Implement
ation/13_All_College_Day_Presentation_on_Integrated_
Planning_Spring_2013/
Standard II.A.2.b
The institution relies on faculty expertise and the assistance of advisory
committees when appropriate to identify competency levels and measurable
student learning outcomes for courses, certificates, programs including general
and vocational education, and degrees. The institution regularly assesses student
progress towards achieving those outcomes.
Descriptive Summary
Competency levels and measurable student learning outcomes (SLO/As) are created
by faculty who teach the courses with the assistance of the Department Chairs and
the Curriculum Committee Division liaison. In addition, the Student Learning
Outcomes Committee was created by the Academic Senate to provide oversight
and guidance in the areas of



Improving creation of, and revisions to, Student Learning Outcomes
Facilitating the assessment of these outcomes by faculty members
Integrating assessment into Program Review
The committee members include one faculty member from each division and
representatives from students, Student Services, Administrative Services, and the
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 158
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Academic Senate. They work in coordination with the Dean of Instruction and
Student Success, and the Director of Research and Institutional Effectiveness.
Faculty representatives have attended workshops to help them develop or improve
assessment strategies for evaluating student achievement. (2A.2.b.1) The
Curriculum Committee assists all faculty members who wish to create new courses
or update existing courses with the development or improvement of course and
program SLO/As.
The Curriculum Handbook provides the principal guidelines used by the college for
the development, approval, administration, and evaluation of curricula. (2A.2.b.2)
Nearly all of the college’s curricular changes are initiated and designed by individual
faculty members and their departments. All new and modified courses and
programs proceed through systematic processes for evaluation and approval. The
Curriculum Committee undertakes these responsibilities and plays the pivotal role
in the evaluation and approval of proposed curriculum. Non-credit courses for
apportionment must also meet approval standards set by the Curriculum
Committee.
Periodic evaluation of departmental course offerings is carried out through a
detailed and comprehensive program review process. A Program Review
Committee was created by the Academic Senate to oversee the process. All of the
college’s programs and services are reviewed annually. (2A.2.b.3)
For departments with advisory committees, the advice of advisory board members
is used to determine the vocational competencies that should be addressed by the
specific course.
All departments that award vocational certificates have advisory committees that
meet at least once a year. Committee members generally include employers,
employment recruiters, graduates, current students, program instructors, college
administrators, and other members of the community. Advisory committees have a
variety of responsibilities that include:



Assessing the effectiveness of the program in terms of curriculum,
objectives, and achievement of student learning outcomes; the needs of the
community; and graduate performance
Assisting the program in securing competent instructors
Informing the program about changes and trends in the field
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 159
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014



Assisting the program in assessing the job market and in exploring and
developing career opportunities for graduates
Publicizing the program and securing community cooperation and interest
Evaluating the adequacy of library and technology resources
Changes recommended by advisory boards are documented in the meeting minutes
of the various departments. (2A.2.b.4) A list of the members of each program's
advisory board is published in the annual WVC college catalog. (2A.2.b.5)
The following are examples of advisory board recommendations and resultant
changes:
Health Care Technologies was advised by its board to provide training in
electronic medical records (EMR), as the federal government has now
mandated the use of this technology by any health care provider that
accepts Medicare under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of
2009. Based on this directive, a new course was created and put through
the Curriculum approval process. The course, HTECH 44, provides students
with instruction on eClinicalWorks (one of the leading EMR software
programs in health care). This is now part of the certificate requirement for
Medical Assisting and Clinical Assisting programs.
Fashion Design was advised by the employers on its board that they were
unable to find certain technological skills in their job applicants. The
program developed a new Technical Design course focusing on these skills
thereby making its students more employable.
Business was advised by its Board to develop a Project Management
certificate, so students will be equipped with the necessary skills for
effectively managing a project from start to finish. This State Approved
Certificate is now in place. (2A.2.b.6)
Faculty expertise is maintained and assured in a variety of ways. Most programs
and departments meet regularly throughout the semester. The purpose of these
meetings is to discuss program goals, course content, overall curriculum planning,
instructional methodology, and assessment.
West Valley's faculty must meet the minimum qualifications set by the state of
California and the West Valley Community College District. Most faculty members
who teach in vocational areas exceed the minimum qualifications by holding a
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 160
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Master's degree, PhD, or JD. Several faculty members have professional
certification in their areas of instruction and several years of experience working in
their areas of expertise.
Instructors are committed to maintaining currency in their respective industries.
Several maintain personal and institutional memberships in professional
organizations. Faculty stay current in their fields by reading professional and
government publications and by attending workshops and regional and national
conferences. Many associate faculty members are working professionals. Their
expertise in the classroom and input during faculty meetings help to keep their
programs current. The college routinely provides a variety of professional
development workshops to faculty members. These include specific activities on
professional development days, scheduled workshops, and the ongoing new faculty
orientation program that is provided to all first-year contract faculty members.
(2A.2.b.7)
The college evaluates the effectiveness of learning at each level by tracking
successful course completion, retention, and certificate and degree completion.
(2A.2.b.8) In addition, the Early Progress Alert system informs students about their
mid-semester academic progress and assists them in accessing support to improve
their possibilities for success. (2A.2.b.9) Support services include counseling,
tutoring, special accommodations, assessment, and financial aid. In addition,
students on probation or dismissal are invited to attend Back to Success workshops.
Several departments also have course sequences with prerequisites to assure that
students have the skills necessary to progress in the program and succeed in
obtaining a degree or certificate.
The college reviews the data from the Accountability Reporting for the California
Community Colleges (ARCC) and Student Success Scorecard to evaluate its
performance against state-wide educational outcomes. (2A.2.b.10) The college
reviews this data to identify areas of strength and areas for improvement
particularly in the areas of student progress and achievement.
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard.
All departments are committed to keeping their programs up-to-date to assure that
students are well-prepared to meet the needs of the business community.
Programs take steps to implement the recommended changes and improvements
suggested by their advisory committees and other faculty members.
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 161
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Actionable Improvement Plans
None.
Evidence
2A.2.b.1
Assessment Workshops
http://westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2013/e
vidence/2a/All_College_SLO_Presentations
2A.2.b.2
WVC Curriculum Handbook
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2
013/evidence/2a/Curriculum_Handbook_2002.pdf
2A.2.b.3
Department Program Reviews
http://westvalley.edu/committees/programreview/index.html
2A.2.b.4
Advisory Board Minutes
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2
013/evidence/2a/BUS_Advisory_Board/
2A.2.b.5
Advisory Board Members from
2013-14 WVC Catalog p. 19
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2
013/evidence/2a/2A2b5_2014_catalog_page19.pdf
2A.2.b.6
Project Management Certificate
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2
013/evidence/2a/2A2b6_2014_catalog_page45.pdf
2A.2.b.7
Professional Development
Workshops
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2
013/evidence/2a/PDC_Workshops/
2A.2.b.8
Course, Certificate and Degree
Completion Data
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2
013/evidence/2a/instructional_data_set_page3.pdf
2A.2.b.9
Early Alert Letter
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2
013/evidence/2a/2A2b9_Early_Alert_letter_F13_sk1.pdf
2A.2.b.10
Student Success Scorecard
http://scorecard.cccco.edu/scorecardrates.aspx?CollegeI
D=493 - home
Standard IIA.2.c
High-quality instruction and appropriate breadth, depth, rigor, sequencing, time
to completion, and synthesis of learning characterize all programs.
Descriptive Summary
An extensive hiring process, a thorough four-year Tenure Review process, and
subsequent periodic evaluations by students, peers, and administrators ensure high
quality instruction. All tenured faculty and contract faculty are evaluated every
three academic years. Temporary faculty and part-time faculty are evaluated once
every six semesters once Re-Employment Preference (REP) is granted. REP is
granted to associate faculty upon successful evaluation results during his/her first
(or second), third (or fourth), and fifth (or sixth) semesters. Details of the
procedures for evaluations and the guidelines and criteria used for evaluation are
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 162
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
available in the Collective Bargaining Agreement (Association of College Educators:
ACE). Policies and procedures for associate faculty hiring have been designed to
extend these standards to the associate faculty. (2A.2.c.1) Classified professionals
contribute to effective pedagogy as instructional assistants and lab
assistants.(2A.2.c.2)
Evaluation of probationary faculty employees for tenure follow guidelines that are
separate from those discussed above. Tenure-track faculty are evaluated during
the four-year tenure-review process, at three distinct intervals. Each tenure-track
faculty member is evaluated by her/his respective tenure review committee
through a rigorous process and schedule outlined in the Collective Bargaining
Agreement.
The appraisal of instruction in online courses, including student surveys, has been
developed in response to the 2011 midterm recommendation led by the West
Valley College Distance Learning (DE) Committee in conjunction with the Academic
Senate. The online evaluation methodology used is consistent with the way faceto-face courses are evaluated. (2A.2.c.3) In addition, the online evaluation tool
includes mechanisms that ensure quality assurance of online courses such as
regular and effective contact. The DE committee committed to support faculty by
providing various resources regarding effective and successful teaching and learning
through online courses. The DE committee produced an easy to understand and
use “Check List for Effective Online Course Instruction” in fall 2013, as well as a fiveminute training video to ensure high standard of online instruction is practiced
across campus. (2A.2.c.4, 5) In the meantime, the online evaluation tool is
encouraged for faculty to utilize as resources and guidelines when conducting
evaluation.
The college has excellent resources to support a faculty member’s efforts at
designing and teaching effective and interactive online courses. The distance
education department offers ongoing training and one-to-one assistance with the
college’s course management system, ANGEL Learning, as well as other aspects of
distance education. (2A.2.c.6) The Distance Learning Coordinator also offers faculty
training in Distance Learning Course Design. The college’s Fox Center is equipped
with video and audio editing technology so that instructors can film themselves or
their classes and this content can be uploaded in online courses. There are many
opportunities for enriching online courses so that courses can be robust and rich
with varied and interactive content.
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 163
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Degree and certificate programs at West Valley College conform to California
Education Code requirements and support the mission of the college. Degree
programs in transfer and career technical programs are designed by departmental
faculty who, in many cases, receive input from community industry advisers
appropriate to each field of study. The breadth and depth of college programs are
demonstrated by offering 54 associate degrees, 15 associate degrees for transfer
(as of fall 2013), 65 transcriptable certificates (2A.2.c.7) and 1,140 active courses as
well as through a comprehensive articulation process. The college has extensive
articulation agreements including majors and lower division courses, general
education patterns and course-to-course agreement with all CSU and UC campuses,
and 58 private and/or out-of-state four-year institutions. (2A.2.c.8) The curriculum
development process ensures rigor and sequencing of courses. The procedure for
initiating new or revised course outlines of record is structured and outlined on the
CurricuNet site developed in accordance with the criteria in the Program and
Course Approval Handbook (April 10, 2013 edition with revisions) (2A.2.c.9)
published by the State Chancellor’s Office and the spring 2008 publication by the
Academic Senate for California Community Colleges The Course Outline of Record
Curriculum Reference Guide. (2A.2.c.10)
The courses require consultation with and approval by the appropriate department
faculty members, chair(s), and division chair(s) in consultation with the division
Curriculum Committee representatives. The division Curriculum Committee
representatives, as well as division chair(s) ensure that proposed new courses and
revisions are in alignment with the institutional mission and priorities: offering
courses based on the California Community College priorities (General
Education/Transfer, Associate Degree for Transfer, Career Technical Education, and
Basic Skills) and Student Success and Support Programs (offering courses that
students need to complete their educational plans). The curriculum, Committee at
large ensures appropriate breadth, depth, rigor and adherence to college and state
guidelines in course outlines in its review and approval process.
In several disciplines, faculty develop courses taught in sequence with each
succeeding course progressing and building on content and rigor from the previous
course. Such courses generally require a minimum performance standard of grade
C or higher for a student to enroll in the next course in the sequence. As a result,
course outlines for such courses are developed with pre-requisites and/or corequisites that are also evaluated by the Curriculum Committee. In such cases,
faculty initiators are required to submit content review criteria adhering to one of
two levels of scrutiny. (2A.2.c.11) Level 1 scrutiny is for pre-requisite outside the
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 164
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
discipline for the target course, and Level 2 scrutiny is for pre-requisite outside the
discipline for a transferable course. The content review criteria examine the
appropriateness of the pre-requisites, and comparisons are drawn to equivalent
courses at CSUs and UCs for their pre-requisite requirements.
High-quality instruction in Career Technical Education (CTE) programs is ensured by
the oversight of advisory committees comprised of business and industry leaders,
as well as college faculty and administrators. (2A.2.c.12) These committees, during
their annual meetings, make certain that course offerings in their programs are
aligned with the current trends in regional and global industry and economics.
The evaluation of online courses has become a systematic institutional process that
enables the college to provide faculty with valuable feedback. In so doing, it fosters
the college’s ability to refine its distance education program by embracing the most
appropriate pedagogical and technological approaches for engaging our students.
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard. High-quality instruction begins with high-quality
instructors. All instructors are encouraged to advance themselves professionally by
enrolling in credit coursework at an accredited colleges or university, participation
in conferences or workshops, and engaging in appropriate professional activities or
projects. Faculty are provided support for professional growth activities by the
Professional Development Committee and college administration. (2A.2.c.13) The
college’s rigorous hiring and tenure review process have produced a qualified,
engaged and highly effective faculty, helping to ensure instructional quality,
breadth and depth, rigor, sequencing, progress to completion and synthesis for
students.
Breadth, depth and rigor in course content delivered by high-quality faculty are
guaranteed through a comprehensive course curriculum review process under the
purview of the Curriculum Committee. The review process focuses on course rigor
and sequencing, and the development of courses that meet appropriate standards
and reflect advice from community advisors.
Successful development of the 15 new Associate Degrees during for Transfer (ADT)
in the 2011-2012 and 2012-2013 academic years is a result of West Valley College’s
current high-quality curriculum, degrees, and sequencing of courses.
The issue of “time to completion” can be complex in community college. While
moving efficiently and expeditiously through the lower division program is a goal
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 165
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
for many of our students, the college also serves many students for whom such an
approach is not ideal or even possible. The college recognizes that appropriate
time to completion for such students may be significantly longer than two years.
Faculty are in the process of addressing such challenges through research and
discussion around innovative and effective teaching and learning, pedagogy and
instructional methodology (such as accelerated instruction) so as to assist students
to succeed in each course and lead them to reduced time to completion.
In addition, the college has developed an implementation plan for “Student Success
and Support Programs” to be an integrated mechanism to support student success
to reduce time to completion. (2A.2.c.14)
Actionable Improvement Plans
Complete the approval process with the Faculty Association (ACE) and the District
on online evaluation.
Evidence
2A.2.c.1
ACE Contract Article 112
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/accreditatio
n/2013/evidence/2a/ace_article_112.pdf
2A.2.c.2
Instructional and Lab Assistant Job
Descriptions
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/accreditatio
n/2013/evidence/2a/instructional_assistant.pdf
2A.2.c.3
Online Evaluation Methodology
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditatio
n/2013/evidence/2a/2A2c3_DL_faculty_eval_form
_rev_Nov-8-012.pdf
2A.2.c.4
Online Course Checklist
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditatio
n/2013/evidence/recommendations/Online_Learning
_Checklist_inal_Nov.6-2013.pdf
2A.2.c.5
Distance Education Training
Videos
http://westvalley.edu/elearning/index.html
2A.2.c.6
Distance Education Training
http://westvalley.edu/elearning/faculty/training.html
2A.2.c.7
2013-2014 Program List
http://westvalley.edu/classes/programs/index.html
2A.2.c.8
Articulation Agreements
http://westvalley.edu/services/academicsuccess/transfercenter/articulation/index.html
2A.2.c.9
Program and Course Approval
Handbook
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditatio
n/2013/evidence/2a/Handbook_5thEd_BOG_Approv
ed.pdf
2A.2.c.10
The Course Outline of Record
Curriculum Reference Guide
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/accreditatio
n/2013/evidence/2a/ace_cor_reference_guide.pdf
2A.2.c.11
Curriculum Course Content Review
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/accreditatio
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 166
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Criteria
n/2013/evidence/2a/curriculum_content_review_crit
eria.pdf
2A.2.c.12
CTE Advisory Meeting Minutes
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditatio
n/2013/evidence/2a/Advisory_Committee_Meetings
2A.2.c.13
Professional Development
Committee Workshops
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditatio
n/2013/evidence/2a/All_College_Day_Brochure_201
1.pdf
2A.2.c.14
Student Success and Support
Programs Implementation Plan
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditatio
n/2013/evidence/2b/Student_Success_Act_Impleme
ntation_Update_10-17-13.docx
Standard IIA.2.d
The institution uses delivery modes and teaching methodologies that reflect the
diverse needs and learning styles of its students.
Descriptive Summary
The college addresses the diverse needs and learning styles of its students by
providing a variety of delivery modes, teaching methodologies, and support services
that address the learning needs of its students. Instruction is offered in semesterlength lecture/lab courses, short courses, directed study courses, off-campus
courses, courses offered in a language other than English, online and hybrid courses
and technology-mediated course that supports students with disabilities.
The teaching methodologies are selected by faculty based on the appropriateness
of course content and the diversity of student learning styles (visual, aural, and
kinesthetic). Instruction is offered across the curriculum to address these three
basic modalities.
Face-to-face classes continue to be the most common mode of instruction at West
Valley College, and many faculty have developed pedagogical practices to increase
student learning and success.
Teaching methods employed by instructors at the college include demonstrations,
experiments, field trips, guest speakers, hands-on learning, internet enhancement,
captioning, streaming, lectures and group discussions, project-based learning,
thematic-approach learning, tutors, portfolios, practicum/internships, research,
student participation, student reports, projects, and presentations, web research,
collaborative learning, real-world experience, and problem-based leaning. The list
expands. The Curriculum Committee’s new course outline form requires faculty to
identify the teaching methodologies that will be used to review identified delivery
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 167
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
methods and provides feedback to ensure the instruction is appropriate to the
students’ learning objectives. (2A.2.d.1) Teaching effectiveness is evaluated in the
peer observation including appropriate methods of instruction and
recommendations for improvements are made.
Distance Learning courses offer students an alternative to traditional classroom
studies. Courses are designed to accommodate both students who prefer classes
that do not require on-campus contact with faculty and classmates. There are
numerous courses offered online or through hybrid delivery. (2A.2.d.2) To ensure
Distance Learning faculty have the necessary tools for course and student success,
WVC Distance Learning coordinator provides online course instruction for faculty
who prepare to teach Distance Learning courses. (2A.2.d.3)
Special programs such as the Puente and SUCCESS programs are designed to meet
the needs of culturally-specific students utilize instructional pedagogy that are
culturally-responsive, as well as culturally relevant models.
Puente Program
The Puente Program prepares students to compete academically in a university
environment. It emphasizes the Mexican- American/Latino experience through
English writing, counseling, and mentoring components.
The Puente Program integrates:





Two-semester English 905 & 1A linked classes.
Two semester Counseling classes.
Individual academic, personal, and career counseling.
Transfer information, university tours, student motivational and transfer
conferences, and assistance with the transfer process.
Personal mentor relationships with professionals from the MexicanAmerican/Latino community
SUCCESS Program
SUCCESS provides counseling, instruction and mentoring programs that emphasize
the African American experience and build community among students. The
program focuses on implementing West Valley Colleges’ Strategic Goals.
The SUCCESS program:

Offers linked English 905 and 1A courses, Counseling 5 and 12C.
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 168
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014




Encourages enrollment in History 12, English 12, and Counseling 50.
Provides students with college, peer and community mentors.
Connects students with support services on campus and with transfer
institutions.
Provides cultural events, social outings and visits to transfer institutions.
First Year Experience Program
The ‘First Year Experience’ (FYE) program at West Valley College is a learning
community designed for students who want to move forward with their college
goals and who welcome additional support and guidance. FYE consists of students
who, after taking the WVC Assessment, place into English 905, Read 961 and Math
103.
The fall schedule consists of these three classes as well as an English 990 lab and a
Counseling 2 class. Most of the students in the program are recent high school
graduates, but other interested students are welcomed. Classes are in a Monday –
Thursday daytime schedule. This block schedule approach provides an opportunity
to develop strong support and connections with other students, instructors and
support services.
FYE students receive the focused attention which contributes to college success.
These integrated classes are a great way to learn about college while developing
success oriented strategies leading to graduation and transfer.
TRiO Program
The West Valley TRiO program is a federally funded program, focused on increasing
the graduation and transfer rates for low-income, first generation and/ or disabled
students by providing support and resources to assist students in attaining their
academic and career goals.
Services provided include:






Personal, career and academic counseling
Priority registration
Additional tutoring services
Financial aid and Scholarship assistance
College visits
Workshops on transfer, career, and financial literacy
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 169
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Disability and Educational Services Program
The Disability and Educational Services Program (DESP) offers supported education
services to students with various disabilities. Students are provided with the
opportunity to experience a safe beginning or re-entry to college through
attendance in specially designed courses on college orientation. In accordance with
federal legislation (section 504 and 508 of the Federal Rehabilitation Act of 1973
and the American with Disabilities Act of 1990) and Title 5 of the State of California
Education Code, the college provides reasonable academic adjustments to students
with verified disabilities in order to create an educational environment where they
have equal access to instruction. A variety of services are available to ensure equal
access including academic and vocational counseling, interpreting or captioning
services, mobility assistance, provision of print materials in alternate formats,
tutorial assistance, and individual adaptive assistance as needed.
Specialized courses offered through DESP include classes for students with learning
disabilities, speech/language impairments, visual limitations, hearing impairments,
and mobility limitations. Specific courses in adaptive physical education, assistive
computer technology, and learning strategies are offered to accommodate students
with various needs.
Veterans Program
West Valley College provides comprehensive support for the men and women who
have served our country. Services provided to veteran students include:



Educational Benefits assistance through a specialized Financial Aid staff
Veteran Specific Orientation
Counseling and DESP Services through specialized counselors
Veteran’s Resource Center - The Veterans Resource Center (VRC) is located in the
Campus Center below the WVC Bookstore. The VRC at WVC provides a space for
veterans to gather, socialize and form relationships with other veterans. This space
is a hub for veterans programming efforts that can include connections with
veteran task force members and access to veteran’s resources provided by the
college. Resources for veterans include:




3 computers for veteran student use
Free Printing
Networking
Veterans Club
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 170
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014





Resources
Newsletters
Events
Bus Passes
Free Coffee
Middle College Program
The Middle College Program is a joint venture with the Campbell Union High School
District and the Los Gatos – Saratoga Joint Union High School District. The program
is a high school alternative for juniors and seniors from these two high school
districts. It offers students with college potential the opportunity to complete their
high school requirements on the West Valley campus.
Designed to provide a supportive yet challenging college setting, the program
enables students to take college level courses while completing high school
graduation requirements. This new academic environment provides students with
an opportunity to stimulate their academic development and spark their quest for
learning.
Tutorial Services in the Library and Learning Resource Center, Math Resource
Center, Trio Program, and CalWORKs serve to address the diverse needs and
learning styles of students.
Self-Evaluation
The College meets this standard. The many programs and services the college offers
attests to the commitment West Valley College has in meeting the diverse needs
and learning styles of its students, providing a variety of delivery modes, teaching
methodologies and pedagogies, as well as support services that address the
learning needs of all students. The Curriculum Committee monitors and evaluates
appropriateness of teaching methods employed in the classroom. Faculty and
students evaluations evaluate the effectiveness of these methods as well. The
integration of student learning outcomes assessment cycle will also enhance the
evaluation of teaching methodologies and delivery modes.
Actionable Improvement Plans
None.
Evidence
2A.2.d.1
Course Outline Form
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2013/eviden
ce/2a/Soc_001_COR.pdf
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 171
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
2A.2.d.2
Fall 2013 Online Classes
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/accreditation/2013/eviden
ce/2a/online_classes_fall_2013.pdf
2A.2.d.3
Distance Education
Training
http://westvalley.edu/elearning/faculty/training.html
Standard IIA.2.e
The institution evaluates all courses and programs through an on-going
systematic review of their relevance, appropriateness, achievement of learning
outcomes, currency, and future needs and plans.
Descriptive Summary
The major responsibility for evaluation of courses and programs rests with the
faculty; approving and evaluating the curricula are the responsibilities of the
Curriculum Committee, which is a subcommittee of the Academic Senate. The
college made major progress in 2012-13; the West Valley College Integrated
Planning and Resource Allocation process streamlined the course revision process
based on recency (5 years for non-CTE courses and 2 years for CTE courses) and was
fused with the SLO/A and Assessment process. (2A.2.e.1) With the recent successful
effort in developing a total of 15 Associate Degrees for Transfer (ADTs) as of fall
2013, faculty began engaging in further scrutinized evaluation of course outlines to
be in alignment with the Course Identification Descriptor (C-ID) under the
leadership of the Curriculum Committee. (2A.2.e.2) Based on the college-wide
course outline review calendar, the Curriculum Committee facilitates the review
process based on the priority.
In order to evaluate the achievement of the Student Learning Outcomes (SLO/As)
and assessment process, the college made significant improvements in the last few
years. SLO/As for all courses are now published in the course outlines through
CurricuNet. The Master Program Review and SLO/A Assessment schedule which is
an integrated calendar of Program Review and SLO/A Assessment cycle per course,
programs, non-instructional programs, and services ensure ongoing systemic review
occurs. (2A.2.e.3)
All programs are expected to conduct a comprehensive Program Review biannually,
followed by an update the next year, with the purpose of striving for continuous
improvement and planning for the future. The Master Program Review and SLO/A
Assessment schedule indicates which courses and programs are due for
comprehensive review and which are due for an update review. The reviews and
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 172
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
updates are submitted initially to the Program Review Committee for review and
feedback, once the review is finalized with feedback then it goes to the Academic
Senate and College Council for their approval. One criteria used to evaluate the
reviews and updates is examination of the Program Level Outcomes Assessment
Cycle in each program.
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard. All courses and programs offered at West Valley
College and all programs in the college are rigorously evaluated. The appropriate
administrators, faculty and staff review Career Technical Education (CTE) programs
annually as per California Code of Regulations, Title 5 (section 51022). Education
Code (Section 78016), and this Standard. The regular evaluations of CTE program is
also required by the Carl D. Perkins Career Technical Education Act of 2006, Title IC,
Section I35 (B) 6.
The college established a five-year cycle of evaluation for courses via course
outlines. The college is in the process of major course and program analysis under
the leadership of the Curriculum Committee. Faculty are engaged in deactivating
and revising courses according to this evaluation cycle. Programs are also reviewed
via a Program Review process annually either in a comprehensive or update format.
Both course and program review cycles are critically examined for SLO/A and the
assessment of SLO/As. All course outlines now incorporate SLO/As, and the
Curriculum Committee evaluates the course outlines for appropriate alignment of
the course objectives with the SLO/As.
Actionable Improvement Plans

The Academic Directions Committee was formed by the Academic Senate in
January 2013 to review struggling programs and help viable programs with
an action plan to improve their enrollment and completion rate. (2A.2.e.4)
Evidence
2A.2.e.1
Course Revision Schedule
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2013/evi
dence/2a/13-14_Course_Revision_Schedule_one.pdf
2A.2.e.2
Revised and Submitted C-ID
courses
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2013/evi
dence/2a/C-ID_list.docx
2A.2.e.3
Master Program review and
SLO/A Assessment Calendar
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2013/evi
dence/recommendations/Master_Program_Review_and_SLO_A
ssessment_Schedule_01-07-2014_External.pdf
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 173
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
2A.2.e.4
Academic Directions
Committee
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Academic_Directions/
Standard IIA.2.f
The institution engages in ongoing, systematic evaluation and integrated
planning to assure currency and measure achievement of its stated student
learning outcomes for courses, certificates, programs including general and
vocational education, and degrees. The institution systematically strives to
improve those outcomes and makes the results available to appropriate
constituencies.
Descriptive Summary
The college’s Integrated Planning and Resource Allocation process is cyclical, logical,
and methodical. The process is thoughtfully and carefully diagrammed so as to
inform the college community of the process. (2A.2.f.1) Participatory governance
groups actively contributed to conversations about the design and implementation
of the college’s Integrated Planning and Resource Allocation process, so it
effectively addresses student learning outcomes (SLO/As) for all programs, degrees,
and certificates. (2A.2.f.2)
SLO/A assessment results are integral to college-wide institutional planning and
resource allocation. The college cycle is as follows:
•
•
•
•
SLO/A assessment results at the course and program levels highlight
instructional needs and impediments for students success
The course and program level results are refined into targeted improvement
plans
The improvement plan recommendations are summarized in Program
Review reports that include funding requests
The college’s Vice President of Administrative Services facilitates budget and
allocation requests and leads a comprehensive college-wide budget plan.
The current Integrated Planning and Resource Allocation process responds to
student learning outcome requests by allocating funds and making improvements
as needed. For example, professional development funding has been allocated, so
ten faculty members will have the opportunity to participate in an OnCourse
National Conference in Irvine, California in late April, 2013. The conference will
focus on strategies for facilitating and enhancing student success outcomes. The
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 174
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
conference attendees plan to utilize the new strategies in their classes and to
conduct professional development training to disseminate their new knowledge to
other college faculty members. (2A.2.f.3)
The results of student learning outcome assessments for SLO/As, PLOs, and ILOs are
available locally in department chair SLO/A binders and globally on the institutional
research page of the WVC website. (2A.2.f.4)
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard.
Actionable Improvement Plans
None.
Evidence
2A.2.f.1
Memorandum: Budget
Planning, FY 2013-2014, RE:
Integrated Planning and
Resource Allocation Model for
Budget Allocation, March 2013
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2013
/evidence/3d/fy13-14_budget_process.pdf
2A.2.f.2
College Council Minutes
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2013
/evidence/1a/College_Council_Integrated_Planning_Discussi
on_11.8.13.pdf
2A.2.f.3
On Course Training conference
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2013
/evidence/2a/On_Course_Training_Conference.pdf
2A.2.f.4
Institutional Researcher’s page
on college website
http://www.westvalley.edu/about/research.html
Standard IIA.2.g
If an institution uses departmental course and/or program examinations, it
validates their effectiveness in measuring student learning and minimizes test
biases.
Descriptive Summary
Two programs at WVC use course examinations for assessing Student Learning
Outcomes. The Math Department uses departmental course examinations for
assessing student learning outcomes. When student learning outcomes need to be
assessed for a class:
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 175
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
The SLO/A assessment questions are determined and sent to all faculty in
the department for review. Questions are revised according to the feedback
received from the faculty.
• The agreed upon questions are placed on the final exam for every section of
the course. Instructors follow a set grading rubric for those questions.
(2A.2.g.1)
• The results are reported and aggregated. Comments received by faculty
from the SLO/A assessment forms are used to guide future department
meetings and curriculum changes.
Park Management uses three tests that are standardized material from outside
agencies. These include:
•
• Powersaws Class (National Wildland Fire Coordinating Group)
• Wildland Fire Class (National Wildland Fire Coordinating Group)
• Wilderness First Responder Class (US Department of Transportation)
The use of these exams from specialized agencies minimizes biases while measuring
the skills students are required to master upon course completion.
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard. Through the use of standardized questions and
exams, grade norming rubrics, and reported results, the college minimizes bias and
validates the effectiveness of departmental course exams.
Actionable Improvement Plans
None.
Evidence
2A.2.g.1
Math SLO/A Assessment Instructions
and form
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/accreditatio
n/2013/evidence/2a/math_slo_assessment_instructi
ons_form.pdf
Standard II.A.2.h
The institution awards credit based on student achievement of the course’s stated
learning outcomes. Units of credit awarded are consistent with institutional
policies that reflect generally accepted norms or equivalencies in higher
education.
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 176
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Descriptive Summary
The grading policies and the criteria for awarding credit for courses are stated
clearly in the college catalog. (2a.2.h.1) Course outlines of record, for new or
revised curricula submitted to the Curriculum Committee, must establish behavioral
objectives and a record of the methods of evaluating the objectives, including a
document establishing which pre-requisites and/or advisories and other conditions
of enrollment address the adequacy of preparation of students. The awarding
credit is based upon the student’s successful demonstration of achievement of the
course’s stated learning outcomes. West Valley College courses are required to
have a syllabus that outlines the course content and grading policy as they are
stated in the course outline of record. The Curriculum Committee review of courses
ensures that units of credit are awarded according to the Carnegie unit standard in
compliance with Title 5. At West Valley College, one unit of course work
corresponds to one hour of classroom work in lecture classes and one unit of course
work corresponds to three hours of classroom work for laboratory classes. (2A.h.2)
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard. Course outlines of record, which are developed by
the faculty and reviewed by the Curriculum Committee, provide detailed
information regarding number of hours of instruction for a particular course per
week and per semester. The Curriculum Committee evaluates this information for
consistency across courses, based on course objectives, content, methods of
evaluation and compliance with Title 5. Course outlines of record currently are
required to align course SLO/As with objectives, methods of evaluation and indicate
detailed criteria for evaluation of each course assignment. This information is
transferred to students through the course syllabi, which each instructor makes
available to the students. Syllabi are reviewed during faculty evaluations and
during the Tenure Review process to ensure that they are consistent with campus
policies, and that they accurately reflect the content, activities, and assessment
methods of the course.
Actionable Improvement Plans
None.
Evidence
2A.2.h.1
WVC College Catalog - Grading
Policies p. 186-7
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/
2013/evidence/2a/2A2h1_2014_catalog_page186.pdf
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 177
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
2A.2.h.2
Art 31 Course Outline of Record
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/
2013/evidence/2a/art_31a_cor.pdf
Standard IIA.2.i
The institution awards degrees and certificates based on student achievement of a
program's stated learning outcomes.
Descriptive Summary
Program Learning Outcomes (PLOs) are clearly identified for all students. PLOs are
easily visible in the college catalog in the pertinent section for each program.
(2A.2.i.1) Pursuant to the Student Success Act of 2012, counselors and student
service representatives meet with new students during an orientation in which
students are informed about the college’s program offerings and their outcomes.
After the orientation, new students meet with counselors to develop individual
educational plans that specify the programs’ intended learning outcomes. (2A.2.i.2)
Faculty and department chairs communicate with students about the outcomes
students will be able to accomplish upon successful program completion.
Each program sets benchmark success and completion standards that students
must fulfill in order to meet the program’s requirements for earning an approved
certificate or degree. (2A.2.i.3) The department chair for the program verifies
students’ success in relevant course work and then approves certificate and degree
paperwork. All degrees and certificates are then signed by the division chair and
college president. Based on a careful process of evaluation and scrutiny, degrees
and certificates are awarded based on students’ achievement of stated program
level learning outcomes.
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard.
Actionable Improvement Plans
None.
Evidence
2A.2.i.1
West Valley College Catalog
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation
/2013/evidence/2a/2014_Catalog_page22.pdf
2A.2.i.2
Student Education Plan
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation
/2013/evidence/2b/Blank_Ed_Plan.xlsx
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 178
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
2A.2.i.3
Program Level Outcome
Summaries
http://www.westvalley.edu/research/Documents/SLOPLO_Assessment_Results/
Standard IIA.3
The institution requires of all academic and vocational degree programs a
component of general education based on a carefully considered philosophy that
is clearly stated in its catalog. The institution, relying on the expertise of its
faculty, determines the appropriateness of each course for inclusion in the general
education curriculum by examining the stated learning outcomes for the course.
General education has comprehensive learning outcomes for the students who
complete it, including the following:
a. An understanding of the basic content and methodology of the major
areas of knowledge: areas include the humanities and fine arts, the natural
sciences, and the social sciences.
b. A capability to be a productive individual and lifelong learner: skills include
oral and written communication, information competency, computer
literacy, scientific and quantitative reasoning, critical analysis/logical
thinking, and the ability to acquire knowledge through a variety of means.
c. A recognition of what it means to be an ethical human being and effective
citizen; qualities include an appreciation of ethical principles;
interpersonal skills; respect for cultural diversity; historical and aesthetic
sensitivity; and the willingness to assume civic, political, and social
responsibilities locally, nationally, and globally.
Descriptive Summary
The college is committed to providing all students with foundational general
education courses that underpin its academic and Career Technical Education (CTE)
degree programs. The 2013-14 college catalog indicates that the college is
dedicated to student learning and success as stated in its mission statement and
further supported via the consistency of its values and the richness of its general
education curricular offerings. (2A.3.1)
The college mission statement is clearly visible to students on page 3 of the catalog:
“The West Valley College community supports students along their pathways to
reach transfer and career goals in an environment of academic excellence.” (2A.3.2)
The catalog further emphasizes the importance of general education as a
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 179
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
component of its degree programs by supporting students through the necessary
steps for completing a General Education Certification. Students are advised that
careful educational planning and counselor consultations will enable them to
complete their general education transfer requirements and their general
education requirements for an associate degree awarded by West Valley College.
(2A.3.3)
Stemming from thoughtful and strategic planning—and guided by faculty expertise
in pedagogy and academic discipline areas—faculty, counselors, the Office of
Instruction, the Curriculum Committee, and the Students Learning Outcomes
Committee review and revise stated learning outcomes in order to focus course and
program emphasis on the community college mission of transfer, career and
technical education, basic skills, and students success.
The college engages in a rigorous and regular curricular process that supports the
streamlined development of courses and programs that are pedagogically sound
and in accordance with California state laws, student needs, and labor market
demands. In conjunction with division, department chairs, and Curriculum
Committee representatives, faculty launch new courses and programs in their
disciplines by providing clearly stated student learning outcomes for all general
education courses. The Curriculum and Student Learning Outcome Committees
review the student learning outcomes and make recommendations for revisions, as
appropriate.
The college’s general education curriculum is founded on the college’s institutional
learning outcomes:
Institutional Learning Outcomes:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
Critical Thinking and Information Literacy
Quantitative and Qualitative Reasoning
Effective Communication
Technological Competency
Personal Responsibility
Social Responsibility
Global Awareness and Diversity
Creative Problem Solving
The Academic Senate approved the college’s institutional core competencies and
related SLO/As in March 2010. (2A.2.3.4) They were first published in the 2010-11
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 180
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
catalog. In order to maintain more consistency in the vernacular used by ACCJC, the
core competencies are now called Institutional Learning Outcomes.
The
institutional learning outcomes are displayed in the 2013-14 college catalog.
(2A.3.5)
Self- Evaluation
The college meets this standard. The college’s philosophy of general education
stems from the college’s mission statement that informs institutional, program, and
student learning outcomes. Faculty involvement in determining these outcomes has
been ongoing, consistent, and significant.
Actionable Improvement Plans
None.
Evidence
2A.3.1
West Valley College Catalog, page 3
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accredita
tion/2013/evidence/2a/2A31_201314_WVC_Catalog_page3.pdf
2A.3.2
West Valley College Catalog, page 3
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accredita
tion/2013/evidence/2a/2A31_201314_WVC_Catalog_page3.pdf
2A.3.3
West Valley College Catalog, page 5
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accredita
tion/2013/evidence/2a/2A33_201314_WVC_Catalog_page5.pdf
2A.3.4
Academic Senate Approval
http://www.westvalley.edu/wvcas/documents/Sen
ate_Minutes_And_Agendas/20092010_Academic_Year/2010_Spring/02-232010_WVCAS_Meeting_Summary_Approved.pdf
2A.3.5
West Valley College Catalog
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accredita
tion/2013/evidence/1a/2014_Catalog_page3.pdf
Standard IIA.4
All degree programs include focused study in at least one area of inquiry or in an
established interdisciplinary core.
Descriptive Summary
West Valley College offers both Associate of Art and Associate of Science degrees.
Each program leads to a degree and includes one area of focused study in an
established interdisciplinary core. Recipients of a degree from West Valley College
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 181
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
are required to complete all General Education (GE) requirements (25 semester
units) and complete all the requirements of the major with a grade of “C” or better;
in total a minimum of 60 degree-applicable semester units must be completed by
the students to obtain a degree. A complete list of the focused area of study is
available in the catalog (2A.4.1)
In an establishment of SB 1440, the Student Transfer Achievement Reform Act, and
SB 1415, the Common Course Number System Act (C-ID), the college has developed
a total of 15 Associate Degree for Transfer (ADT) as of fall 2013 (2A.4.2, 3), meeting
the state requirements of establishing 80% of an existing AA or AS degrees at the
college. (2A.4.4) West Valley College’s ADTs include: Administration of Justice,
Anthropology, Art History, Business Administration, Communications Studies,
English, Early Childhood Education, History, Mathematics, Music, Political Science,
Sociology, Studio Art, Psychology and Theater Arts. Each degree requires students
to obtain 60 total units of lower division courses in a given discipline with a “C” or
better grade in order for them to successfully transfer to California State
Universities with a guaranteed admission status.
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard. West Valley College offers 68 associate degrees
and prides itself on the rich array of option for students including 15 approved
ADTs. Transfer degree majors prepare students for upper division work in a
particular subject matter. Career degree majors prepare students for immediate
employment and/or upgrading of their employment skills and include specialized
occupational courses. Career degree majors may also prepare students for upper
division work in a particular subject matter (i.e. Business Administration).
Actionable Improvement Plans
None.
Evidence
2A.4 1
West Valley College Catalog
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2013/e
vidence/2a/2014_Catalog_page15.pdf
2A.4 2
ADT List
http://westvalley.edu/classes/programs/index.html
2A.4 3
ADTs in Catalog Addendum
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2013/e
vidence/2a/2014__addendum_page13-30.pdf
2A.4.4
CCCCO ADT Status Update
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2013/e
vidence/2a/ADT_Status_Report_9_24_13_page4.pdf
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 182
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Standard II.A.5
Students completing vocational and occupational certificates and degrees
demonstrate technical and professional competencies that meet employment and
other applicable standards and are prepared for external licensure and
certification.
Descriptive Summary
West Valley College offers career technical education (CTE), formally known as
vocational programs, in 65 fields. (2A.5.1) Programs are offered in a broad range of
disciplines and prepare students for the full spectrum of employment opportunities
in the greater Bay Area and throughout California. Program offerings can be
broadly divided into seven major areas:
•
Applied Arts and Sciences (Engineering, Architecture, Fashion Design,
Interior Design, Computer Animation, Digital Media, Photography)
•
Business and Accounting, Entrepreneurship
•
Child Development and Education
•
Computer Information Systems (Programming and Systems Administration)
•
Park Management
•
Health Careers (Health Technologies, Health Education, Medical Assistance)
•
Justice and Legal (Paralegal Studies, Administration of Justice, Court
Reporting)
West Valley College awards multiple levels of certificates and associate degrees in
arts and sciences. The certificate programs are divided into two categories;
Certificate of Specialization (fewer than 18 units – not noted on college transcripts)
and Certificate of Achievements (more than 18 units –noted on transcripts).
Associate in Arts and Sciences degrees require 18 or more units in specialization
plus GE for minimum of 60 units. All certificate and degree CTE programs have
been reviewed and approved by the Curriculum Committee, Academic Senate, and
the WVMCCD Board of Trustees, and the Bay Area Community College Consortium
who represent the California Community College Chancellor’s Office prior to the
submission to the State Chancellor’s office for approval. These approved programs
are inventoried with the California Community Colleges Curriculum Inventory.
When applicable, programs are required by private industry accreditation and the
Carl D. Perkins Career & Technical Education Act (Perkins IV) to track graduate
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 183
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
employment and to survey employers and graduates as to whether the program is
adequately preparing its students for employment. (2A.5.2) The process assures
that graduates meet employment or industry standards and requirements.
Programs are created and/or revised to ensure that graduates meet applicable
minimum standards required by law and industry standards. To assist in the
acquisition and demonstration of technical and professional competencies, most
programs require students to complete an internship. Internships are permitted
only after students have met a certain number of prerequisites, so they have
sufficient skills and knowledge to benefit from the experience. This also assures that
the student will provide a valuable service to the internship supervisor. In many
cases the student will be offered employment or a good reference from the
supervising employer.
Interior Design, Child Studies, Park Management, Engineering, and Architecture also
have programs designed for students who plan to transfer to four-year institutions
to complete their degrees. (2A.5.3) Currently, the Paralegal Program is working on
creating an articulation agreement with a four-year legal studies Bachelor’s degree
program. The program has for several years advised all incoming students who do
not already possess a four-year or higher degree to obtain a transferable degree (in
any area) while completing paralegal courses. This advice is based on industry
preferences; employers are looking for candidates with both a BA or BS degree and
a paralegal certificate.
Some programs such as Interior Design, Child Studies, Park Management, and
Architecture support both transfer and career tracks. Other programs such as Child
Development and Real Estate prepare students for external certification or
licensure. (2A.5.4)
The college’s career programs all have degree and certificate requirements stated in
the college catalog. Student competence in these programs is generally measured
and documented through conventional grading. Many of the programs also require
a student portfolio. The portfolio is designed to represent a student’s
accomplishments in his or her classes and also may be further used by the student
to demonstrate his or her abilities in pursuit of a career.
Self- Evaluation
The college meets this standard. In concert with the recently revised the Scorecard
data, the college’s CTE programs track student completion rates of each program.
(2A.5.5)
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 184
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Most career programs have a highly-developed system for evaluating whether their
programs are preparing students to meet technical and professional competencies.
At a minimum, each program conducts regular advisory committee and faculty
meetings, comparing student achievements with the SLO/A established for the
program. In addition, many programs conduct regular student, graduate, and
employer surveys as required by their external accreditation. Those programs which
prepare students for external certification or licensure have systems in place to
assure that the students are adequately prepared.
The college routinely documents the technical and professional competence of its
career program students and graduates through grade results, student portfolios,
and feedback from employers.
Action Plan
None.
Evidence
2A.5.1
West Valley College Catalog, pg. 10
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accre
ditation/2013/evidence/2a/2014_Catalog_page
10.pdf
2A.5.2
Program Graduate Employment Surveys
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accre
ditation/2013/evidence/2a/CTE_Program_Grad
uate_Employment_Surveys
2A.5.3
CTE Transfer Programs
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accre
ditation/2013/evidence/2a/CTE_Transfer_Progr
ams.pdf
2A.5.4
CTE Certification and Licensure
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accre
ditation/2013/evidence/2b/child_development
_licensure.pdf
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accre
ditation/2013/evidence/2a/2014_catalog_page
46.pdf
2A.5.5
CTE Completion Rates
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accre
ditation/2013/evidence/2a/CTE_Completion_R
ates.pdf
Standard II.A.6
The institution assures that students and prospective students receive clear and
accurate information about educational courses and programs, and transfer
policies. The institution describes its degrees and certificates in terms of their
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 185
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
purpose, content, course requirements, and expected student learning outcomes.
In every class section, students receive a course syllabus that specifies learning
objectives consistent with those in the institution’s officially approved course
outline.
Descriptive Summary
West Valley College recognizes the importance of providing students with accurate,
accessible and up-to-date information that will help them understand and meet
requirements for degrees, certificates and transfers. The college provides extensive
information through a variety of methods and media, including the catalog, printed
schedule, and the website. Course syllabi describe course methods and objectives
and provide a contract between students and their faculty. (2A.6.1)
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard. Students are most concerned with obtaining clear,
accurate, and understandable information about programs that will enable them to
plan and complete course sequences leading to degrees, certificates and transfer.
Starting in 2011-2012 academic year under the new Chief Instruction Officer, the
college began a comprehensive and thorough examination and analysis of active
courses, certificates, and degrees that are in the catalog and course outlines of
record. Curriculum Committee and department faculty, counseling department,
transfer center staff, and publication team worked diligently and collaboratively to
accomplish this important task. As a result, the West Valley College Catalog
includes clear and accurate information about educational courses and programs
including 15 newly developed Associate Degrees for Transfer as of fall 2013.
(2A.6.2) All certificate and degree programs that appear in the catalog include a
clear description and state expected student learning outcomes along with the
course requirements. There is an icon next to each course that designates that it
can be offered with a distance education modality. All distance education courses
have gone through a proper review and approval process by the Curriculum
Committee specifically developed for the distance learning instructional modality.
(2A.6.3)
When developing degree and certificate programs, West Valley College focuses on
compatibility with similar programs and on articulation with programs into which
students will transfer. Course sequences are designed to ensure that students
obtain not only the required courses, but also the knowledge and skills necessary
for success. Program and course descriptions are the core of this effort. During the
past few years the college drastically improved the process for approving new and
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 186
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
revised course outlines. The new model focuses on linking defined learning
outcomes with specific course content, knowledge and skills to appropriate and
measurable student outcomes.
Actionable Improvement Plans

Continue to review syllabi for consistency with appropriate standards as part
of SLO/A assessment scheduled activities.
Evidence
2A.6.1
Course Syllabus Example
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/201
3/evidence/2a/Course_Syllabus_Example.pdf
2A.6.2
Catalog Addendum with new
ADTs
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/201
3/evidence/2a/2014__addendum_page13-30.pdf
2A.6.3
Course Outline of Record DE
approval
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/201
3/evidence/2a/ACCC_DE_Approvals.pdf
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/201
3/evidence/2a/Distance_Learning_Coordinator_Review_an
_Approval_of_Curriculum.pdf
Standard II.A.6.a
The institution makes available to its students clearly stated transfer of credit
policies in order to facilitate the mobility of students without penalty. In accepting
transfer credits to fulfill degree requirements, the institution certifies that the
expected learning outcomes for transferred courses are comparable to the
learning outcomes of its own courses. Where patterns of student enrollment
between institutions are identified, the institution develops articulation
agreements as appropriate to its mission.
Descriptive Summary
The print and online versions of the West Valley College catalog describe the
required courses for its degree and certificate programs. Individual departments
and programs may also have their own flyers and brochures describing program
requirements.
The Transfer Center, Articulation Services, and Counseling Department at WVC
provide students with various services to assist them in the transfer-of-credit
process. These services include information about articulation agreements,
assortment of college catalogs from various academic institutions, workshops and
drop-in advising. The Transfer Center provides Information Sheets describing CSU
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 187
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
GE, IGETC, AA and AS-T degrees, AA and AS degrees and admission requirements
for various majors including pre-law, pre-dental, and pre-veterinary. (2A.6.a.1) The
same information is also available on the college website. Each division initiating
potential transfer curricula and the articulation officer at the college ensure that
course offerings correspond with coursework at other institutions.
As part of its transfer services mission, WVC has established formal articulation
agreement/transfer agreements with all CSU and UC campuses, and 58 private
and/or out-of-state four-year institutions. Students have access to the Assist.org
database to view specific articulation agreements between the three higher
education segments through the WVC Transfer Articulation webpage. (2A.6.a.2)
These agreements are coordinated through the Articulation Officer in the
counseling department. These agreements include course-to-course articulation,
major-to-major articulation and general education course and pattern articulation.
West Valley College currently holds general education reciprocity agreements with
9 other community colleges to accept the general education of these colleges “as
completed.” The process for obtaining a Certification of Completion WVC’s general
education is described in the college catalog. The participating institutions include:









Gavilan College
San Jose City College
Evergreen Valley College
DeAnza College
Foothill College
Chabot College
Las Positas College
Ohlone College
Mission College
West Valley College students who wish to transfer to a four-year college or
university can find detailed information regarding the transfer process, course
numbering system, and articulation agreements in the college catalog. (2A.6.a.3)
WVC participates in ASSIST (Articulation System Stimulating Inter-Institutional
Student Transfer. ASSIST is web-based and provides articulation and transfer
information between colleges. The WVC Articulation Officer submits courses to
ASSIST. In addition, with the recent requirement to develop Associate Degrees for
Transfer, the WVC Articulation Officer sends courses to Course Identification
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 188
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Descriptor (C-ID) approval to ensure equivalency of courses to CSU comparable
courses.
Students may earn credit by examination in accordance with the CA Code of
Regulations, title 5 Section 55753. Students must meet the criteria listed in the WVC
catalog to request credit by examination and the course for which the student is
requesting credit by examination must be designated as challengeable by exam by
the department chair. (2A.6.a.4) WVC also grants college credit toward at AA/AS
degree to students who earn scores of 3, 4, or 5 on advanced placement
examinations given by the College Entrance Examination Board. (2A.6.a.5) How
placement credit is awarded is clearly explained in the WVC catalog.
The WVC Transfer Center provides information regarding requirements for transfer,
including lower division transfer requirements, general education certification for
transfer students, transfer admission guarantee guaranteeing qualified students
admission to select UC and CSU, and the Transfer Alliance Program in person; such
information is readily available both in the printed catalog and online. (2A.6.a.6)
The Transfer Alliance Program is a collaborative program with University of
California, Los Angeles (UCLA) where qualified WVC students are given priority
consideration for admission to UCLA College of Letters and Science. Students are
encouraged to meet and work with a counselor regularly to obtain step-by-step and
updated transfer information and guidance.
In accordance with Title II of the Carl D. Perkins Career Technical Education Act of
2006, West Valley College develops articulation agreements with secondary CTE
programs at local high schools and occupational centers. Faculty from each
segment meet and jointly review course curriculum to determine if content and
program objectives align. Once this is established, a 2+2 Articulation Agreement is
developed.
To receive official transfer credit at West Valley College for foreign coursework, a
student must provide a foreign transcript evaluation report. (2A.6.a.7) Students
must order these from a third-party agency. The agency requires the student’s
official transcript from their home institution and for a fee the agency prepares a
transcript report that is evaluated by the college’s Admissions and Records Office.
The college will accept foreign transcript reports from any current member of the
National Association of Credential Evaluation Services. (2A.6.a.8)
Veterans who have a minimum of 90 days of active duty may receive credit for
military service by completing a Petition for Military Credit Form available from the
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 189
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Financial Aid Office. The amount of credit awarded is based on the Guide to
Evaluation of Education Experiences in the Armed Forces. (2A.6.a.9)
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard. It has effective procedures for establishing transfer
of credit from accredited institutions and communicating this to students. West
Valley College is committed to facilitate student transfer to CSU, UC, California
independent colleges and universities, and out-of-state institutions. By fall 2013,
the college established a total of 15 Associate Degrees for Transfer (ADT) where
students are offered more focused and timely transfer options and choices.
Students have multiple resources available to them that will aid in a smooth
transfer process and provide the most current information. These include:






The College Catalog and Addendum
The Counseling Department
The Transfer Center
TAA/TAG program with select colleges and universities
ASSIST - a statewide network of articulated courses of which WVC is a
member
C-ID website
The college relies on both the accreditation status and articulation agreements to
ensure comparability of learning outcomes between courses accepted in transfer
and those offered at West Valley College.
Actionable Improvement Plans
None.
Evidence
2A.6.a.1
Transfer Center
http://westvalley.edu/services/academicsuccess/transfercenter/
2A.6.a.2
WVC Transfer Articulation
webpage
http://westvalley.edu/services/academicsuccess/transfercenter/articulation/index.html
2A.6.a.3
College Catalog – Transfer
Information
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/201
3/evidence/2a/2A6a3_2014_catalog_page4.pdf
2A.6.a.4
Credit by Exam
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/201
3/evidence/2a/2A6a4_2014_catalog_page7.pdf
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 190
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
2A.6.a.5
Advance Placement Credit
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/201
3/evidence/2a/2A6a5_2014_catalog_page11.pdf
2A.6.a.6
Transfer Center
http://westvalley.edu/services/academicsuccess/transfercenter/index.html
2A.6.a.7
Foreign Transcript Credit
http://westvalley.edu/services/academicsuccess/international/intagencies.html
2A.6.a.8
National Association of
Credential Evaluation Services
http://www.naces.org/
2A.6.a.9
Guide to Evaluation of
Education Experiences in the
Armed Forces
http://www.acenet.edu/news-room/Pages/How-to-usethe-Military-Guide.aspx
Standard IIA.6.b
When programs are eliminated or program requirements are significantly
changed, the institution makes appropriate arrangements so that enrolled
students may complete their education in a timely manner with a minimum
disruption.
Descriptive Summary
West Valley College is committed to providing programs that address the needs of
students and that align with the college’s mission and Educational Master Plan. The
college is also committed to ensuring program quality irrespective of budget
reductions. In the event that a college program undergoes a change that would
affect students already in the program, students are notified of these changes or
closures in advance. The college offers required courses so that continuing
students will be allowed to finish the program according to the catalog description
existing at the time of their initial enrollment as long as they have been
continuously enrolled and working toward an objective of transfer, degree, or
certificate within the program. In some cases, students could be offered
alternatives such as course waivers and substitutions.
In light of the budget reductions experienced most recently since 2011-12 and
anticipated further reductions for 2014-15 academic year, the West Valley College
Academic Senate developed a Program Discontinuance Policy in April 2013.
(2A.6.b.1) In addition, the Academic Direction’s Committee (ADC) (2A.6.b.2) was
established under the auspice of the Academic Senate starting in spring 2013.
Programs that are struggling with enrollment, not currently supported by the
student demand, industry and market needs, or growth, and those not in alignment
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 191
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
with the current mission or priorities of the college are reviewed by this group. ADC
makes recommendations to the existing programs so the programs can be
revitalized and/or rejuvenated. There are currently five programs under review and
the final reports are to be submitted to the Academic Senate in March 2014.
(2A.6.b.3)
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard.
The college recognizes and adheres to the catalog rights students have in ongoing
programs. Catalog rights indicate that students are eligible to graduate under the
requirements in the catalog that was in effect at the time of their initial enrollment,
as long as he or she has maintained continuous enrollment and has been working
toward an objective of transfer degree, or certificate within the program. Students
also are eligible to use the requirements that are in effect at the time they
graduate, whether or not they maintain continuous enrollment. These rights are
published in the college catalog. (2A.6.b.4)
Actionable Improvement Plans
None.
Evidence
2A.6.b.1
Program Discontinuance
Policy
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/accreditation/2013/eviden
ce/2a/approved_program_discontinuance_policy_spring_2013.pdf
2A.6.b.2
Academic Directions
Committee
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Academic_Directions/
2A.6.b.3
ACD Presentation to the
Academic Senate
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/accreditation/2013/eviden
ce/2a/09.24.13_wvcas_meeting_minutes_approved.pdf
2A.6.b.4
Catalog Rights
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2013/eviden
ce/2a/2A6b4_2014_catalog_page4.pdf
Standard IIA.6.c
The institution represents itself clearly, accurately, and consistently to prospective
and current students, the public, and its personnel through its catalogs,
statements, and publications, including those presented in electronic formats. It
regularly reviews institutional policies, procedures, and publications to assure
integrity in all representations about its mission, programs, and services.
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 192
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Descriptive Summary
The college presents itself clearly, accurately, and consistently in all materials, both
in print and online. The college communicates with students about the college, its
mission, and the programs and services available to them through its catalog,
program-specific brochures, college website, social media, and public forums.
The college communicates with the campus community about news and issues of
interest to its employees through a variety of methods that include E-mail, division
or department meetings, committee meetings, and public forums.
The college communicates with the public about the college, its mission, and news
and issues of interest to the community served by the college. These methods of
communication include the college website, social media, press releases, and
public/community forums.
Each year the college updates its catalog in time for the new fiscal year (July) and
makes it available in print and electronic formats. The printed schedule of classes is
distributed each semester and covers every upcoming academic session. It is also
available on-line. The college continues to mail the printed schedule out to the
surrounding community with a strategic focus on areas and households who have
family members who may be interested in taking West Valley College courses. In
addition, the college focuses on mailing the printed schedule to students who are
part-time status with the college to promote their continued enrollment with the
college.
The catalog is reviewed and produced yearly and distributed to the entire college
community, feeder high schools, and, upon request, the community. The Vice
President of Instruction convenes a schedule and catalog development team each
semester. Schedule guidelines and timelines are published to the campus
community, and reviews are conducted by department and division chairs,
department Senior Office Coordinators, the Office of Instruction, and other
personnel with specific reviewing and editing assignments to ensure accuracy.
(2A.6.c.1) In light of recent increased legislative mandates, Title 5 changes, and
other regulatory changes in curriculum, course offerings, and student services, this
team accurately to captures all changes in the college catalog and schedule both in
printed and online formats.
The college publishes information on student achievement on its web site. The
Office of Institutional Research and Planning publicizes information about student
success
and
retention
compared
to
the
state
average
at
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 193
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
http://www.westvalley.edu/about/achievement.html. This information is updated
annually. The “Scorecard” information for West Valley College published by the
California Community College Chancellor’s office is also posted on the front page of
the website as required. (2A.6.c.2)
All board policy chapters were revised during fall 2011. A Policy Ad Hoc Committee
was formed to facilitate and coordinate the revision. The Committee worked with
the Chancellor, Special Assistant to the Chancellor, the Community College League
of California (CCLC) Special Consultant for the Policy and Procedure Service, legal
counsel, and key management staff to analyze the West Valley Mission Community
College District (WVMCCD) Policy Manual (2A.6.c.3) and the CCLC Model Service
Policy (2A.6.c.4). Input was sought from key district leaders, participatory governing
bodies, and the Board of Trustees. The revised board policy chapters were
approved by the WVMCCD Board of Trustees in January, 2012. Board policy was
revised to align with the Community College League of California Model Policy
Manual to ensure District compliance with federal, state, and local laws and
regulations and alignment with the policies of the majority of community college
districts within the state. The Board of Trustees is committed to utilizing the CCLC
schedule of updates for regular review and revision of District policies and
procedures. After receipt of the updates, appropriate District administrators,
faculty, and/or staff will review the CCLC recommended revisions or new policies
and procedures and consider revision of WVMCCD policy and procedure changes.
AP 2410 of the WVMCCD Board Policies and Administrative Procedures calls for
regular review, stating, “Administrators have an on-going obligation to review and
when appropriate, recommend the revision of policy and procedures in their areas
of responsibility.” During 2013-2014 year, the review is scheduled for October
2014.
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard. Through the catalog, website, and other materials,
the college represents itself clearly, accurately, and consistently to students and the
community. The catalog is reviewed annually for any needed revisions, as described
here and in Standard IIB.2, and the website and other materials are updated
regularly to ensure that the mission, programs, and services are described and
explained appropriately.
Actionable Improvement Plans
None.
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 194
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Evidence
2A.6.c.1
WVC Catalog and Schedule
Guides and Timelines
http://westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2013/evid
ence/2a/Catalog_Schedule_Guides_Timelines/
2A.6.c.2
Student Success Scorecard
http://scorecard.cccco.edu/scorecardrates.aspx?CollegeID=
493
2A.6.c.3
WVMCD Board Policies
http://wvm.edu/documents.aspx?fid=26324&doc=26745&y
ear=0&excludeyear=1
2A.6.c.4
CCLC Policy And Procedure
Service
http://www.ccleague.org/i4a/pages/index.cfm?pageid=331
2
Standard IIA.7
In order to assure the academic integrity of the teaching-learning process, the
institution uses and makes public governing board-adopted policies on academic
freedom and responsibility, student academic honesty, and specific institutional
beliefs or worldviews. These policies make clear the institution’s commitment to
the free pursuit and dissemination of knowledge.
Descriptive Summary
Governing board policies and administrative procedures addressing issues of
academic freedom and responsibility, including student academic honesty are
developed with participatory governance groups, most importantly by the
Academic Senate. Board Policies and related administrative procedures are
published on the WVMCCD website. (2A.7.1, 2) Examples include:






Academic Freedom (BP 4030) (2A.7.3)
Grading (BP AP 4230) (2A.7.4)
Academic Standards (BP AP 4220) (2A.7.5)
Student Code of Conduct (BP AP 5500) (2A.7.6)
Student Discipline Procedures (AP 5520) (2A.7.7)
Student Rights and Grievances (AP 5530) (2A.7.8)
Policies are provided to students in the College Catalog, WVC website, and Student
Portal.
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard. Policies regarding academic freedom and
responsibility and student academic honesty are established and thoroughly
reviewed. They are written and available in the West Valley College Class schedule,
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 195
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
catalog, and course syllabi. (2A.7.9) The policies are reflective of the college’s
Mission Statement also found in the publications listed and on the college website.
(2A.7.10) District board policies and the Faculty Association collective bargaining
agreement include academic freedom rights and responsibilities and are published
and available on the respective websites.
Actionable Improvements Plan
None.
Evidence
2A.7.1
Board Policies on WVMCD
website
http://wvm.edu/documents.aspx?fid=26324&doc=26745&y
ear=0&excludeyear=1
2A.7.2
Administrative Procedures on
WVMCCD website
http://wvm.edu/documents.aspx?fid=26324&doc=26746&y
ear=0&excludeyear=1
2A.7.3
Academic Freedom
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/accreditation/201
3/evidence/2a/bp_ap_4030.pdf
2A.7.4
Grading
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/accreditation/201
3/evidence/2a/bp_ap_4230.pdf
2A.7.5
Academic Standards
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/accreditation/201
3/evidence/2a/bp_ap_4220.pdf
2A.7.6
Student Code of Conduct
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/accreditation/201
3/evidence/2a/bp_ap_5500.pdf
2A.7.7
Student Discipline Procedures
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/accreditation/201
3/evidence/2a/ap_5520.pdf
2A.7.8
Student Rights and Grievances
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/accreditation/201
3/evidence/2a/ap_5530.pdf
2A.7.9
WVC Catalog – page 174-188
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/201
3/evidence/2a/2A79_2013-14_WVC_Catalog_page174188.pdf
2A.7.10
Mission Statement on web
http://www.westvalley.edu/mission.html
Standard IIA.7.a
Faculty distinguish between personal conviction and professionally accepted
views in a discipline. They present data and information fairly and objectively.
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 196
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Descriptive Summary
Faculty adhere to course content material that has been approved by the
Curriculum Committee. Each course is outlined in great detail and dictates the
content material and framework faculty is assigned to teach.
In return, as outlined in the College Catalog, faculty have academic freedom on
classroom material which is deemed appropriate under the framework of the
approved course curriculum. (2A.7.a.1)
The faculty Association Collective
Bargaining Agreement specifies the need for objectiveness in the instructor’s selfresponsibility and course material, in which the instructor must refrain from
demonstrating his/her individual interest.
Faculty are expected to distinguish between their personal convictions and
professionally accepted views in their discipline. This is a practice of professional
conduct as outlined in Board Policy 4030 (2A.7.a.2), and Academic Senate
Constitution, Article II (2A.7.a.3) where the language in each source is drawn from
statements of the American Association of University Professors concerning
academic freedom and professional ethics.
Academic responsibility is incorporated into performance evaluations as a criteria
for appraisal of faculty members in Association of College Educators articles
26A.4.2(b) and 112.4.2(B)– “Each member shall foster an environment that protects
academic freedom within the college community.” (2A.7.a.4, 5)
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard. Should a question arise pertaining to an
instructor’s individual conviction in regards to course material and instruction,
policy and procedures are outlined in the ACE contract under article 26A.7 – 13, and
112.8.
Actionable Improvement Plans
None.
Evidence
2A.7.a.1
WVC College Catalog – Academic
Freedom
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditatio
n/2013/evidence/2a/2A7a1_2014_catalog_page180.
pdf
2A.7.a.2
Board Policy, Administrative
Procedure 4030– Academic Freedom
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/accreditatio
n/2013/evidence/2a/bp_ap_4030.pdf
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 197
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
2A.7.a.3
Academic Senate Article II
http://westvalley.edu/wvcas/documents/freedom.ht
ml
2A.7.a.4
ACE Article 26A.4.2(b)
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/accreditatio
n/2013/evidence/2a/ace_article_26a.4.2.b.pdf
2A.7.a.5
ACE Article 112.4.2(B)
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/accreditatio
n/2013/evidence/2a/ace_article_112.4.2.b.pdf
Standard IIA.7.b
The institution establishes and publishes clear expectations concerning student
academic honesty and the consequences for dishonesty.
Descriptive Summary
The college has established expectations of student academic honesty. These
expectations and the consequences for dishonesty are clearly delineated and
available in the following:




Annual College Catalog under “Rights and Responsibilities” – hardcopy and
posted online (2A.7.b.1)
Faculty Handbook – Section 6: Faculty Rights & Responsibilities, Maintaining
Honest Academic Conduct – hardcopy and posted online. (2A.7.b.2)
Board Policy 5500 which establishes that academic dishonesty establishes
good cause for discipline. (2A.7.b.3)
Student Code of Conduct: 5520 Student Discipline Policy (Student Services
website under District Policies). (2A.7.b.4)
In addition, instructors include reference to the policies and consequences in their
course syllabi. (2A.7.b.5)
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard. Clear expectations regarding academic honesty are
established, reviewed, and published. Recent considerations of academic honesty
have focused on the use and misuse of online materials. As such, the college now
makes Turnitin plagiarism software available to instructors to assist in determining
plagiarism.
Actionable Improvement Plans
None.
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 198
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Evidence
2A.7.b.1
WVC College Catalog 2013-14
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation
/2013/evidence/2a/2014_catalog_page181.pdf
2A.7.b.2
WVC Faculty Handbook - Section 6
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation
/2013/evidence/2a/Faculty_Handbook_Complete_201
0-2011_section6.pdf
2A.7.b.3
WVMCCD Board Policy 5500
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/accreditation
/2013/evidence/2a/bp_ap_5500.pdf
2A.7.b.4
Student Code of Conduct
http://westvalley.edu/services/policy/conduct.html
2A.7.b.5
Course Syllabi
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation
/2013/evidence/2a/Course_Syllabus_Example.pdf
Standard IIA.7.c
Institutions that require conformity to specific codes of conduct of staff, faculty,
administrators, or students, or that seek to instill specific beliefs or worldviews,
give clear prior notice of such policies, including statements in the catalog and/or
appropriate faculty or student handbooks.
Descriptive Summary
West Valley College strives to instill an appreciation of all perspectives and points of
view. The Board of Trustees has established policies regarding key issues of
conduct in areas such as antidiscrimination, drugs and alcohols, sexual harassment,
and smoking on campus, published on the district website. (2A.8.1) The policies are
also represented on the college website (2A.8.2), WVC Faculty Handbook (2A.8.3),
and in the College Catalog: p. 174-188 (2A.8.4).
The district provides training sessions on compliance with State and Federal
Employment Laws, Education Code, and Board Policies. For more information see
Standard IIIA.5.
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard. West Valley College is a public non-sectarian
institution and therefore promotes the acceptance and exploration of a wide
variety of perspectives and points of view. In areas in which legal and other factors
are relevant, such as sexual harassment, numerous policies, procedures and
(training) programs have been made available to employees.
Policies are distributed widely, and new faculty and staff receive thorough
orientation to those policies and procedures.
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 199
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Actionable Improvement Plans
None.
Evidence
2A.8.1
WVMCCD Board Policies website
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditati
on/2013/evidence/2a/BP_chapter3.pdf
2A.8.2
WVC District Policies webpage
http://westvalley.edu/services/policy/index.html
2A.8.3
WVC Faculty Handbook
http://westvalley.edu/documents/faculty_resources
/Faculty_Handbook/Faculty_Handbook_Complete_2
010-2011.pdf
2A.8.4
WVC College Catalog 2013-14, pg.
174-188
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditati
on/2013/evidence/2a/2014_catalog_page174188.pdf
Standard IIA.8
Institutions offering curricula in foreign locations to students other than U.S.
nationals operate in conformity with standards and applicable Commission
policies.
West Valley College does not offer curricula in foreign locations.
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 200
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Standard IIB: Student Support Services
The institution recruits and admits diverse students who are able to benefit from
its programs, consistent with its mission. Student support services address the
identified needs of students and enhance a supportive learning environment. The
entire student pathway through the institutional experience is characterized by a
concern for student access, progress, learning and success. The institution
systematically assesses student support services using student learning outcomes,
faculty and staff input, and other appropriate measures in order to improve the
effectiveness of these services.
Descriptive Summary
West Valley College is an open access institution with students from over 25
countries. The college uses multiple measures to identify and address the needs of
its student body and the surrounding community. Student demographic, success,
completion, persistence, and retention data, community data projections from the
Educational and Facilities Master Plan 2009, along with data from Program Reviews
and SLO/A assessment results inform the annual Goals and Objective development
and assessment process.
In accordance with Title 5 California Code of Regulations and Board Policy, West
Valley College ensures student access to college through open access admission.
(2B.1) As indicated in the college catalog and on the college website, the college
admits any applicant (subject to residency requirements) who meets one of the
following requirements:




Has a high school diploma
Has a General Education Diploma
Has a proficiency certificate
It is at least 18 years old and shows evidence of being able to benefit from
the instruction offered by the college
A complete explanation of residency requirements is available on the Admissions
and Records webpage. (2B.2)
High school students who have completed their sophomore year and the
concurrent enrollment form may apply to register as special part-time students in a
maximum of 8 units per semester. (2B.3) High school students may enroll in classes
that are for enrichment, are Career Technical or are not offered at their high
schools. They may not enroll in ESL, Basic Skills, Guidance, Skills or other restricted
courses. Assessment tests are required for high school students who wish to enroll
in English, math, or science classes that have prerequisites. High school students
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 201
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
are exempt from the orientation and counseling components of the matriculation
process. These policies also apply to Middle College students. Middle College
allows high school students to enroll in 6-11 units of college level courses that count
toward high school graduation. (2B.4)
International students must provide proof that they have completed high school in
their home countries and proof of English language proficiency as minimum
requirements for admission to the college. (2B.5)
West Valley College has a demonstrated a commitment to student support services
that address students’ needs and enhance a supportive learning environment.
From application process through graduation and transfer, Student Services help
students to achieve their educational and career goals. (2B.6) Programs that serve
as entry points to and pathways through the college are indicated below and
described throughout this section.














Admissions and Records
Assessment Testing
Career Programs Center
Office of Student Development and Campus Center
Counseling and Advising
Extended Opportunity Programs and Services (EOPS)
Disability and Educational Support Program (DESP)
Financial Aid and Student Financial Assistance
Health Services
International Student Programs
Outreach
Transfer Center
Puente Program
SUCCESS program
The college is committed to provide Student Services programs that meet students’
needs and achieve academic success. For example the Puente Project, SUCCESS
Program, and First Year Experience are programs that promote access to college,
academic success, and support student retention.
In concert with the establishment of SB 1456, Student Success and Support
Programs in 2012, West Valley College institutionalized “Student Success” as one of
the three institutional priorities through participatory governance process. (2B.7) In
the 2011-2012 academic year consistent with the “Student Success
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 202
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Recommendations”, the college began integrating the following existing
committees: Basic Skills Advisory, Student Equity, Access, and Success, and
Matriculation. An external facilitator led a retreat for 50 committee members
where they developed a Strategic Vision Statement for the integrated “Student
Success” Team. (2B.8) As of fall 2013, the Student Success Team is led by a group of
“Core” Transitional Team members consisting of Instructional and Student Services
faculty and administrators. The team developed a recommended sustainable
organizational framework based on the Student Success Strategic Vision to ensure
that the Student Success and Support Program mandates are efficiently and
effectively institutionalized in time for and beyond the state-mandated fall 2014
implementation timeline. (2B.9) The Student Success Core Transitional Team’s
recommendations have been vetted through the participatory governance process
and a faculty coordinator and Student Success Work Group have been identified for
the spring 2014 semester. In addition to developing and institutionalizing the
organizational framework for Student Success and Support Program
implementation process, the Student Success Core Transitional Team is responsible
for overseeing the technical implementation of the Assessment/Orientation and
Educational Plan. Counseling faculty leaders in conjunction with the relevant
Student Services programs and personnel developed a comprehensive technical
implementation plan in time for fall 2014. (2B.10)
The college and Student Services are dedicated to continuous quality improvement
by actively engaging in the Student Learning Outcome and Assessment, and
Program Review processes as part of the college’s Integrated Planning and
Resource Allocation process. (2B.11) Student Services departments followed the
SLO/A and assessment cycle per the Program Review and SLO/A Assessment Master
Schedule calendar and 100% of the programs produced SLO/A by fall 2012.
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard.
West Valley College is well equipped and ready for a full and successful
implementation of the Student Success and Support Programs (SB 1456) with a
newly identified organizational structure. Both the sustainable organizational
structure and a comprehensive technical implementation plan of SB 1456 will
strengthen West Valley College’s commitment to ensuring student success.
Actionable Improvement Plan:
None.
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 203
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Evidence
2B.1
Open Admission
http://westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2013/ev
idence/2b/2B1_201314_WVC_Catalog_open_admission.pdf
2B.2
Admissions and Records Webpage
http://www.westvalley.edu/admissions/
2B.3
Concurrent Enrollment
Requirements
http://www.westvalley.edu/admissions/outreach/#tabs-2
2B.4
Middle College Requirements
http://www.westvalley.edu/admissions/outreach/#tabs-3
2B.5
International Student
Requirements
http://www.westvalley.edu/services/academicsuccess/international/
2B.6
Student Services Homepage
http://westvalley.edu/services/index.html
2B.7
Institutional Effectiveness
Framework
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/20
13/evidence/recommendations/Institutional_Effectivenss
_SS_Team_11-6-12.pdf
2B.8
Student Success Team Vision
Statement
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/20
13/evidence/2b/Student_Success_Strategic_Visioning_Re
treat_5-25-12.pdf
2B.9
State 2014 Student Success and
Support Program timeline
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/20
13/evidence/2b/SB1456_Implementation_Timeline_Stude
nt_Success_Support_Program.pdf
2B.10
Student Success Team Technical
Implementation Plan
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/20
13/evidence/2b/Student_Success_Act_Implementation_U
pdate_10-17-13.docx
2B.11
Master SLO/A and Program
Review Calendar
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/20
13/evidence/2b/Master_Program_Review_and_SLO_Asse
ssment_Schedule_01-07-2014_External.pdf
Standard IIB.1
The institution assures the quality of student support services and demonstrates
that these services, regardless of location or means of delivery, support student
learning and enhance achievement of the mission of the institution.
Descriptive Summary
West Valley College offers a wide array of high quality student support services that
enhance student learning and achievement. Students may obtain student support
services information both in person and on the college’s website. In collaboration
with the Vice President of Student Services, administrators of the respective
Student Survives areas are responsible for ensuring the quality of services and
connecting program goals to the college’s mission and annual Goals and Objectives.
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 204
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Coordination of services via discussions that occur in regularly scheduled Student
Services Council meetings and also via more informal contact among the college's
student services professionals.
West Valley College recognizes the important role student support services and
programs provide in assisting its communities with access and in supporting student
success. The college’s mission statement commits to supporting student learning
and establishes services and programs that align with its mission and serves the
needs of the diverse student population.
Admissions and Records
The Admissions & Records Office provides application assistance and information,
residency determination, processes official and unofficial transcript requests,
evaluates degree and certificate requests, creates student identification cards in
addition to many other services.
Assessment
The West Valley College Assessment Department uses standardized placement tests
combined with multiple measures to assess students’ skill levels in English, ESL,
reading, and mathematics. Assessment also supports counseling courses by
facilitating students’ access to and reports for the Strong Interest inventory and the
Myers Briggs Type Inventory (MBTI).
Career Programs Center
The Career Programs Center, located in the Applied Arts and Sciences Building,
Room 35, provides information on degree and certificate programs with career
emphasis. Brochures, major sheets, and information packets for career programs
are available.
Office of Student Development and Campus Center
The Campus Center is the heart and information hub of the campus community and
serves as the welcoming “living room” environment for students, faculty, and staff.
The Center houses a variety of student support services including, the Campus
Information Desk, Event Center, Coffee House, Student and Faculty Dining, Viking
Bookstore, Art Gallery, Global Citizenship Center, Associated Student Government,
Veterans Resource Center, TRIO, Center for Student Involvement, Leadership,
Volunteerism, Engagement & Resources (SILVER) as well as many indoor and
outdoor conference and meeting room venues.
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 205
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Center for Student Involvement, Leadership, Volunteerism, Engagement &
Resources (SILVER)
Focused on student support and retention, the SILVER Center promotes student
involvement and civic engagement through campus events and service learning
activities sponsored by the Event Program Board as well as leadership development
via student clubs and organizations. Opportunities for student involvement include
participation in student events, student employment on the Event Program Board,
student leadership in our campus Associated Student Government, Inter-Club
Council, or with over 35 student clubs on campus. Students are able to complete
“community service” hours as part of their required coursework with the SILVER
Center.
Counseling Center
WVC maintains a Counseling Center staffed by competent, highly-trained and
diversely experienced counselors, located behind Administration & Records.
Counselors are also located in the Disability and Educational Support Program
(DESP), Extended Opportunity Program and Services (EOPS), Educational Transition
Program (ET - Adult Reentry), Career Programs Center, and at the P.E. Department.
The primary goal of the College’s Counseling Department is to provide
opportunities for students to clarify their values and goals, to make decisions and
develop self-confidence, self-direction and self-esteem. Toward this goal, the
following programs and services are offered:
Academic Counseling
Academic counseling includes educational goal-setting, exploring
educational options and opportunities, evaluating educational potential, and
providing the student with clear, concise and up-to-date educational
information.
Career Counseling
Career counseling provides the student with an opportunity for clarification
and integration of career and educational goals, study of careers and lifestyles, vocational and career testing, and presentation of resource speakers,
special career counseling events and career decision making courses.
Personal Counseling
Personal counseling is provided on a limited basis to students who seek
assistance in resolving personal, relational, self-identity, or health-related
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 206
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
problems which are limiting or interfering with the student’s ability to
successfully pursue a college education.
Career Development and Counseling Courses
A variety of counseling courses covers such topics as College Survival Skills,
Careers and Lifestyles, Job Search Methods, Study Skills, Cross Cultural
Perspectives, and a wide range of personal growth subjects including
communication. The courses offer students an opportunity to explore
academic, career and personal development within a structured group
setting.
Online Counseling
West Valley College offers online counseling through its
[email protected] email account. Students (both distance education
and on-campus) have the option of conducting their advisement sessions via
email exchanges with our dedicated online counselor, Wanda Wong. Wanda
serviced 526 students in the 2012-13 academic year through this service and
conducted educational planning, personal counseling and success
counseling through this modality.
Extended Opportunity Programs and Services (EOPS)
EOP&S offers educational and financial support services to students who have
historically experienced language, social and economic barriers. Students must
meet the state mandated educational and financial disadvantage criteria to be
considered eligible. The intent, purpose, and resources of EOP&S are aimed at
assisting students to achieve their academic and career goals.
CARE is a program designed to help single parent students succeed in college. CARE
students must be at least 18 years of age and single heads of household. The
student or their child, who must be under 14 years of age, must be receiving
CalWORKS/TANF/AFDC. All CARE students are also EOPS eligible.
Services include:






Book vouchers and grants
Priority registration
Academic, career and personal counseling
Assistance with the transfer process
University application fee waivers
Additional tutoring hours
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 207
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014




Referrals to special programs and resources
Peer advising
Emergency loans
Multi-cultural awareness and social activities
Disability and Educational Support Program (DESP)
The primary purpose of DESP at West Valley College is to facilitate the success of
students with disabilities in classes and programs. A variety of services and special
classes are provided in an effort to equalize educational opportunities for students
as they move toward their educational or vocational goals. Course offerings are
listed under Disability and Educational Support Program and Physical Education in
this catalog.
Support Services
Support services are provided on an individual needs basis.










Interpreters / Real-Time Captioning
Counseling
Note takers
Alternate media / e-text
Specialized equipment
Readers
Registration priority
Mobility assistance
Braille transcription
Test-taking assistance
Specialized counseling is available to assist students with the college application
and registration process and to provide academic, career and personal counseling
to aid student success.
Learning Disability Services
Assessment of learning problems and courses for students with learning disabilities
are offered.
Adapted Physical Education
Physical education courses designed for students with disabilities are listed under
Physical Education in the catalog.
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 208
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
DSPS Computer Lab
Computer assisted instruction and evaluation and training in the use of computer
technology are available.
Mobility Services
An access tram is available on a limited basis to provide on-campus transportation.
Financial Aid and Student Financial Assistance
Student financial assistance opens the door to post-secondary education for many
whom could not otherwise afford its cost. The purpose of financial aid is to assist
eligible students in meeting education costs while attending school. Financial
“need” is the difference between the school’s Cost of Education and the resources
available to the student commonly termed EFC (Expected Family Contribution).
Financial aid assistance comes in the form of gift aid (grants and scholarships) and
self-help aid (jobs/loans).
Health Services
WVC Student Health Services is designated to facilitate the physical, emotional, and
social well-being of students to increase their potential for educational success.
Services include personal and crisis counseling, limited medical treatment,
contraceptive counseling, screenings for blood pressure, vision, hearing, pregnancy
and tuberculosis, health assessment, education and referrals to community
resources.
Services are provided by a team of health professionals including registered nurses,
mental health counselors, and consulting physicians. Special programs and activities
are conducted to address issues related to sexuality, substance abuse, HIV and
other high risk health concerns.
Telephone advice to off-campus students is available. In addition, students can get
information from the Health Services webpage.
International Student Program
The International Students Office facilitates the application process and the
transition to studying in the United States. To be admitted to the college a student
must achieve a minimum TOEFL score: 500 (paper based), 173 (computer based), or
61 (internet based). IELTS, ITEP and Step Eiken are also accepted in lieu of TOEFL.
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 209
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Please contact department for cut scores. The international student advisors hold
orientations at the start of the semester to acclimate the students to the American
Educational system and to review and assist students in registration. International
student advisors assist currently enrolled international students with such concerns
as academic matters, immigration regulations, and personal concerns.
Outreach
The Outreach Office at West Valley College serves prospective students and existing
students by introducing them to information and resources that will help improve
their college experience and help eliminate obstacles to educational opportunity.
The Outreach team shares information on college planning, admission
requirements, degree and certificate programs, guaranteed transfer programs,
financial aid, campus life, student services, and much more. Campus tours and high
school visits are arranged through the Outreach Office.
Transfer Center
The Transfer and Career Center is located in the Counseling building. The Center
provides resources for students who want to transfer to 4-year schools and tools to
assist with their major and career exploration.
Transfer Center Resources:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Free UC and CSU application workshops;
Access to online tools that outline the courses and requirements necessary
to transfer Information regarding TAGs (Transfer Admission Guarantees) to
UC, CSU, and Private Universities;
Handouts that outline the UC & CSU GE requirements.
An annual Transfer Day that hosts over 40 college and university
representatives (every fall semester)
Campus visits from four-year universities (including individual appointments
with university representatives)
Counseling appointments available
Puente Program
The Puente Program prepares students to compete academically in a university
environment. It emphasizes the Mexican-American/Latino experience through
English writing, counseling, and mentoring components. The Puente Program
integrates:
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 210
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014





Two-semester English 905 & 1A linked classes.
Two semester Counseling classes.
Individual academic, personal, and career counseling.
Transfer information, university tours, student motivational and
transfer conferences, and assistance with the transfer process.
Personal mentor relationships with professionals from the MexicanAmerican/Latino community.
SUCCESS Program
SUCCESS is a counseling, instruction, and mentoring program that emphasizes the
African American experience and builds community among students. The program
focuses on implementing West Valley Colleges’ Strategic Goals. The SUCCESS
program:




Offers linked English 905 and 1A courses, Counseling 1, 5, and 12B.
Encourages enrollment in History 12, English 12, and Counseling 50.
Provides students with college, peer, and community mentors.
Connects students with support services on campus and with
transfer institutions.
 Provides cultural events, social outings, and visits to transfer
institutions.
In addition to the regularly scheduled SLO/A and Program Review for each of the
Student Services program and services, West Valley College has conducted various
student surveys both formal and informal to determine the needs of on-campus,
off-campus, and distance-learning students. The most notable and recent surveys
include 2012 Student Survey Report (2B.1.1) and Point of Service Survey Summary
(2B.1.2) that informed the college relative to students’ perspectives and
experiences of the services we provide. Student Services programs developed
Student Learning Outcomes (SLO/As) and assessment related to their unique
service and student population needs. Student Services programs also submit an
annual program review with SLO/As as part of the college’s Integrated Planning and
Resource Allocation process. (2B.1.3)
Student Services is committed to utilizing multiple technology-oriented
communication tools in order to increase communication with students, faculty,
and community at large: website, WVC portal, online counseling, online orientation,
Distance Learning Committee, Saturday orientations, evening hours, assessments at
various high schools, AskWVC, Student Services Day, Online Course Module/Angel
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 211
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
in order to maximize student learning and offer student access or accommodation
in both face-to-face and online environments.
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard. The college created a Student Services Day that
takes place early in each fall semester as a means to showcase all student service
departments and services that students can access. The West Valley College
Distance Learning Committee meets regularly to discuss critically important topics
not only applicable to instructional but also to online student services.
AskWVC email gives West Valley College students the convenience of asking any
questions at any time and from any location; hyperlinks are provided on the bottom
of the left navigation panel on most webpages. Students are responded to with
necessary information, direction, and/or assistance in a timely fashion.
Students Services has enhanced and further utilized the available functions of the
Portal system on the college’s website so as to provide critical information, access
to services, and support student learning and achievement. The Portal allows
Student Services department, such as the ones described in the “Descriptive
Summary” section, to increase the efficiency of operations, integrate “anytimeanywhere access” platforms for information delivery, communicate with specific
student populations, and provide assistance to complete the student’s educational
goals. The Portal also accommodates the student’s registration, student account
balance management, contact information, academic standing, financial aid status
and award notification, announcement message board and calendar of events.
Financial Aid enhanced the Academic Appeals process by offering online services
with an online counseling module.
Actionable Improvement Plans

Continue to execute an implementation of online CCC apply application in
collaboration with the District’s Information Technology department.
Evidence
2B.1.1
2012 Student Survey
http://westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/documents/sur
veys/accreditation_student_survey_report__07_12.pdf
2B.1.2
Point of Service Survey
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2013/evi
dence/2b/ss_pos_survey_report_2012.pdf
2B.1.3
Master Program Review and
SLO/A Schedule
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2013/evi
dence/2b/SS_SLO_WV_Fall_2012_Final_Report.pdf
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 212
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Standard IIB.2
The institution provides a catalog for its constituencies with precise, accurate, and
current information concerning the following:
a. General Information
•
Official name, address (es), telephone number(s), and web site address of
the institution
• Educational mission
• Course, program, and degree offerings
• Academic calendar and program length
• Academic Freedom statement
• Available student financial aid
• Available learning resources
• Names and degrees of administrators and faculty
• Names of Governing Board members
b. Requirements
• Admissions
• Student fees and other financial obligations
• Degree, certificates, graduation and transfer
c. Major policies affecting students
• Academic regulations, including academic honesty
• Nondiscrimination
• Acceptance of transfer credits
• Grievance and complaint procedures
• Sexual harassment
• Refund of fees
d. Location or publications where other policies may be found
Descriptive Summary
The college ensures that clear, comprehensive and accurate information is
published in its annual catalog, including general material, requirements, policies
and website links for extensive additional information. The catalog is published
annually in time for the new fiscal year starting July for the upcoming academic
year.
With the leadership of Curriculum Committee members, Student Services
departments, and the Office of Instruction, subject area experts carefully review
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 213
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
and update all catalog information prior to production. Division and Department
Chairs are included in the review process. The printed catalogs are distributed
campus-wide according to programs, offices, divisions, and departments. The
completed catalog is available in print from the Bookstore and online in both
searchable pdf and flipbook (with a variety of features including hyperlinks as well
as search, full screen and zoom features, a linked table of contents, and print
options) versions—allowing for complete or selective printing. Archived copies are
available in the library and online. (2B.2.1)
The WVC Catalog provides important information to students on college programs
and services, requirements for degrees, certificates, and transfers, course
descriptions, policies and procedures, and all additional items required under this
standard. Information in the college catalog is thorough, accurate, and current.
The website has become a much more important source of information for students
in recent years, and a great deal of additional information including timely updates
on college news and events, as well as regulatory changes are regularly shared with
students through this medium.
In addition to publishing the major policies affecting students in the catalog, West
Valley College also maintains webpages containing these policies and to meet other
regulations, e.g. the Student’s Right to Know and Jeanne Clery Act statistics. These
may be found on the Student Services: Student Right to Know and Student Services:
District Policies webpages.
Location or publications where other policies may be found
Other district polices may be found on the district website. (2B.2.2) District policies
are divided into 7 chapters as follows:
Chapter 1 – The District
Chapter 2 – Board of Trustees
Chapter 3 – General Institution
Chapter 4 – Academic Affairs
Chapter 5 – Student Services
Chapter 6 – Business and Fiscal Affairs
Chapter 7 – Human Resources
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard. The college has developed a successful quality
control process to regularly review and update the catalog content. Each year prior
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 214
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
to the printing of the new college catalog, the current year’s information listed
above is sent to each relevant program, or department for review and update. Each
area is responsible for changes (additions or deletions) to the narrative text that is
to be included in the next version of the college catalog. All content is then edited
and checked for accuracy prior to publication.
Based on the 2012 Student Survey, a majority of student respondents (74%)
strongly agreed or agreed the college provides students with clear and accurate
information about courses, programs, requirements, student policies, and transfer
policies. A lesser majority of 67% strongly agreed or agreed that degree and
certificate requirements are clearly described in the college catalog. (2B.2.3)
Actionable Improvement Plans
None.
Evidence
2B.2.1
2013-2014 College Catalog and
Catalog Archive
http://www.westvalley.edu/catalog
2B.2.2
District Policy
http://wvm.edu/documents.aspx?fid=26324&doc=26745&year=0
&excludeyear=1
2B.2.3
2012 Student Survey
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2013/evid
ence/2b/2B23_accreditation_student_survey_report__07_12_pag
e9.pdf
Standard IIB.3
The institution researches and identifies the learning support needs of its student
population and provides appropriate services and programs to address these
needs.
Descriptive Summary
West Valley College is committed to the learning support needs of students as they
matriculate from application, assessment, educational planning, registration, and
orientation through graduation or the earning of a degree or certificate. Student
needs are analyzed through comprehensive Program Reviews, and Annual Program
Review updates, research, division and departmental meetings, and Student
Services Council meetings, all of which provide insight into what is needed to
promote and continue support to students.
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 215
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
The college-wide Program Review process provides and continuously refines
procedures that enable the systematic evaluation of programs to continuously
improve student learning. Each Program Review includes student success data
provided by the Office of Institutional Research. (2B.3.1) Program Review assures
that student learning is linked to and is at the forefront of campus resource
allocation as part of the Integrated Planning and Resource Allocation.
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard. Through Program Review data, research and
ongoing informal meetings and discussions, the college identifies and provides
services to support students as they matriculate. Coordination of outreach,
application, registration, assessment testing, educational planning/counseling and
orientation exemplify ways in which the college purposefully works to ensure
student success.
In the recent series of unprecedented severe state budget reductions resulting in
workload reduction, as well as regulatory changes in title 5 in repeatability, familycourse designation, and a heavy priority placed on the Associate Degree for
Transfer (ADT), the student population we serve has changed. As the California
Community College’s priority changes in this manner and as described in the
Student Success and Support Programs (SB 1456) (2B.3.2), the college is constantly
reviewing data in regards to student profile, achievement data (success,
persistence, and retention rates), career technical skills that lead to jobs available in
the market through Program Review, Assessment of Student Learning Outcome,
and the Student Success Team in terms of opening extensive discussion on
innovative teaching and learning that support and lead students to succeed.
West Valley College’s early alert system informs the college about students need for
academic and educational support at the beginning of each semester (5 th week).
As a result, students are informed of multiple forms of assistance and support they
could obtain in the early part of the semester to avoid an unsuccessful outcome.
(2B.3.3)
Disabled Educational Student Programs (DESP), EOPS, International Student
Programs, Math Resource Center, English Writing Center, Tutoring Center, the
Puente Project, SUCCESS program, TRiO program, and Veteran’s program are
examples of programs that have identified and met the needs of students in specific
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 216
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
population groups. These programs constantly assess their service to students and
make improvements and adjustments as needed.
Actionable Improvement Plans
None.
Evidence
2B.3.1
Program Review Data Sets
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accredi
tation/2013/evidence/2b/Program_Review_Data
_2013_Communication_Studies.pdf
2B.3.2
Student Success and Support Programs
(SB1456)
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accredi
tation/2013/evidence/2b/SB1456_Implementati
on_Timeline_Student_Success_Support_Program
.pdf
2B.3.3
Early Alert
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accredi
tation/2013/evidence/2b/Early_Alert
Standard IIB.3.a
The institution assures equitable access to all of its students by providing
appropriate, comprehensive, and reliable services to students regardless of service
location or delivery model.
Descriptive Summary
The core mission of the Outreach Office is to recruit and attract students from
diverse backgrounds to West Valley College, support prospective students in their
transition from high school to college, and work in collaboration with college
programs and services, local high schools and communities to promote college
access and success. In addition, advisory board members for Career and Technical
Education (CTE) programs provide valuable industry and career trend information,
as well as future industry needs to program faculty on a regular basis. CTE programs
use such feedback and conduct a “Career Night” each semester as a mechanism to
recruit diverse students to their programs in demand. (2B.3.a.1)
In 2010, the college began offering a New Student Convocation for nearly 425
incoming freshmen. Students are actively recruited to attend this important event
that establishes students' first impression of their college experience. At the
Convocation, students learn about the college's academic expectations and the
numerous opportunities available for student involvement. Student Services
programs such as Admissions and Records, Financial Aid, Health Services, the
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 217
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Transfer Center, and Student Government present information about their
programs to incoming students. (2B.3.a.2)
Printed materials, including booklets, brochures, and flyers are used to inform and
educate prospective students and parents. In addition, students have access to the
college’s portal, website, email, phone, and in-person to obtain information and
learn about the enrollment and matriculation process, academic programs, transfer
process, support services, financial aid, and a wide range of options and
opportunities available to them at West Valley College.
The college website enables students to find comprehensive information explaining
the various services and resources available to them. The college recently switched
its web platform to OU Campus, a content management system, which allows
department chairs, faculty, and Student Services programs to make necessary
changes to the area web pages in order to increase accuracy and available
information on academic programs and student services. In this process,
information is evaluated and updated regularly by the appropriate individuals based
on student feedback. (2B.3.a.3, 4, 5) After evaluation of web services, changes are
made to support students’ needs. For example, the counseling department has
revised the website to provide information regarding academic advising, career
counseling, personal counseling, and frequently asked questions. (2B.3.a.6) The
counseling department also offers Saturday orientations to new students and
athletes in addition to online counseling.
The WVC Portal allows the various Student Services departments to provide
“anytime-anywhere access” platforms for information delivery, communication
with their specific student population, and provide assistance to complete the
student’s educational goals. (2B.3.a.7)
[email protected] email gives West Valley College students the convenience
of asking questions at any time and from any location with a 24 hour response time.
The college utilized this system to ensure that all questions are answered for
students regardless of time or location of the questions.
The Financial Aid Office provides presentations and workshops on and off-campus
at various times to provide equitable access to all students regardless of their
economic backgrounds. The Financial Aid Office commits to utilizing a variety of
communication methods to make comprehensive information available to all
students via a telephone tree, the college website, and the WVC Portal. (2B.3.a.8)
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 218
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard. The Outreach Office collaborates with
departments throughout the college help ensure access to all students, particularly
those from historically underrepresented populations. The college mission, which
was revised in the fall of 2011, clearly established that the college will continuously
reflect on and assess the college’s annual goals and objectives.
Based on the
mission, the college worked steadily to provide access to all members of the
community and in turn offer programs and services to meet the needs of a diverse
student population. This work is an unending process and will continue with the
revised 2009 Educational and Facilities Master plan.
Actionable Improvement Plans


Consistent with the college’s Student Success and Support Program
implementation plan, expand online course support/workshops
Develop a plan for Adult Education Consortium Program (SB 86) offerings.
Evidence
2B.3.a.1
Career Night Program
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2013
/evidence/2b/career_day_night.pdf
2B.3.a.2
New Student Convocation
http://westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2013/evide
nce/2b/New_Student_Convocation
2B.3.a.3
Accreditation Student Survey
http://westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/documents
/surveys/accreditation_student_survey_report__07_12.pdf
2B.3.a.4
Student Services Point of
Service Survey
http://westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/documents
/surveys/ss_pos_survey_report_2012.pdf
2B.3.a.5
Facebook Quick Survey
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2013
/evidence/2b/aftrn_classes_srvy_031313.png
2B.3.a.6
Counseling Webpage
http://westvalley.edu/services/academicsuccess/counseling/index.html
2B.3.a.7
My West Valley-Mission
Portal
https://mywvm.wvm.edu/CookieAuth.dll?GetLogon?curl=Z2
F&reason=0&formdir=6
2B.3.a.8
Financial Aid Webpage
http://westvalley.edu/services/financialaid/index.html
Standard IIB.3.b
The institution provides an environment that encourages personal and civic
responsibility, as well as intellectual, aesthetic, and personal development for all
of its students.
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 219
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Descriptive Summary
West Valley College provides a tolerant and supportive environment that
encourages personal and civic responsibility, as well as intellectual, aesthetic, and
personal development for all of its students. Students are provided with a wealth
of opportunities to learn about current issues and participate in the WVC
community through educational programs, student services, participatory
governance, and college events and activities.
The college’s institutional learning outcomes focus on personal responsibility.
(2B.3.b.1) Institutional Learning Outcome V. Personal Responsibility, states “The
student will be able to: A. assess his or her knowledge, skills, and abilities to set
achievable goals; B. Manage personal health and/or well-being; c. Demonstrate
dependability, reliability and accountability.” Each institutional learning outcome is
mapped to individual course outcomes which are assessed and the results of which
are reviewed and discussed by campus faculty as part of the college’s Integrated
Planning and Resource Allocation process ensuring sustainable continuous quality
improvement.
West Valley College (WVC) provides comprehensive student support services
focused on student growth, development, and success. Our institutional mission
statement succinctly underscores this core value and intentionally emphasizes the
support provided to students who are journeying towards transfer and career goals.
Student Development oversees the Student Life Program Board, Veterans Resource
Center, Global Citizenship Center, Associated Student Organization, Inter-Club
Council and student clubs. Over 40 events and programs are offered through
Student Development that promote personal and civic responsibility, intellectual,
aesthetic, and personal development. The Student Program Board plans and
implements six events a month to benefit the WVC student population. Each event
supports a theme to benefit the overall growth and development of the student
community. The Program Board delivered 38 events and was also responsible for
running the Campus Center Concierge Desk. A brief description of the program
themes and a listing of their programs follows. Over 4,000 students attended
Student Life events.
Six Student Learning & Development Program Themes
Veteran Support
This Program Board Member is a veteran and advocates for
the other student veterans on campus, helps students in the
Veterans Resource Center, and connects students with
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 220
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
resources both on and off campus to allow the veteran
students to succeed and puts on events that connect
veterans.
Global Citizenship & Cultural
Diversity
This Program Board Member worked with the Global
Citizenship Center to deliver events that support students
becoming global citizens and recognizing cultural diversity.
Leadership
This Program Board Member created events to encourage
students to become student leaders on campus and develop
their skills.
Service Learning & Volunteerism
This Program Board Member connected students with
opportunities to volunteer within the community, and
promoted opportunities to learn while serving the
community.
New Student College Integration
This Program Board Member planned events that welcomed
new students into the campus and allowed them to connect
with other students.
Involvement & Engagement
This Program Board Member was responsible for getting
students involved and engaged with large-scale events
happening on campus.
Student Development & Success
This Program Board Member focused on providing students
with opportunities to learn ways to develop their life and
study skills to support continued student success.
Veteran Support Programs-Total students reached: 582






Veterans Mixer/25 people
Veteran’s Day Celebration/200 people
Veteran’s Panel Discussion/130 people
Toys for Tots/200 people
Game Console Day/12 people
Paintball/15 people
Global Citizenship & Cultural Diversity Programs-Total students reached: 452






Day of the Dead/150 people
World Aids Day/150 people
Vietnam Movie - The Vertical Ray of the Sun/35 people
Black History/32 people
Woman’s History Month Tea Party/60 people
Take Back The Night/25 people
Global Entrepreneurship Week -Total students reached - 445
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 221
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014



Extreme Entrepreneurship Tour/270 people
Global Trade Presentation/ 50 people
Startup Cup Awards Celebration/125 people
Leadership Programs-Total students reached: 104



Advocacy/15 people
ASO & ICC mixer/30 people
National African American Read-In/59 people
Service Learning & Volunteerism Programs-Total students reached: 308





Service Learning Resource Fair/150 people
Stanford Blood Drive/80 people
Campus Clean-up/40 people
Cancer Awareness/23 people
Composting Workshop/15 people
New Student College Integration Programs-Total students reached: 925






Welcome Week-Xbox Kinect Dance Central & Otter Pops/100 people
Karaoke & choir/300 people
Holiday Bash/150 people
Board Game Day/15 people
Open Mic/60 people
Nowruz Iranian New Year/300 people
Involvement & Engagement Programs-Total students reached: 1255
 Welcome Week-Get Connected Rock Wall & Jousting/550 people
 Welcome Week-Live Bands/80 people
 Movie Showing Food Inc. & Trail Mix Buffet/150 people
 Welcome Week-Watermelon Eating Contest/50 people
 Halloween/125 people
 West Valley Trivia/50 people
 Skate Show/250 people
Student Development & Success-Total students reached: 375

Student Support Programs Introduction/5 people
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 222
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014




Student Services Day/350 people
Planning and Budgeting Workshop/5 people
Time Management Workshop/10 people
Test Taking 101/5 people
The Global Citizenship Center (GCC) is housed in the WVC Campus Center.
(2B.3.b.2) Not only does it serve as a meeting venue for internal and external
campus groups, it serves as the “home base” for the Global Citizenship Committee
and the Global Citizenship student club. The mission of the Global Citizenship
Committee is to facilitate a campus-wide commitment through curriculum,
activities, and professional development. (2B.3.b.3) It was a banner year for Global
Citizenship which sponsored and co-sponsored events and activities that foster
personal and civic responsibility intellectual, aesthetic, and personal
development. (2B.3.b.4)
Event Name
Attendance
Host Cristina Garcia
150
Jennifer Siebel Newsome’s Miss Representation
90
Persian New Year
180
Connected: An Autobiography about Love, Death &
Technology
145
Women’s History Month Tea
48
Mini-Salzburg Leadership Conference
25
Climate Change Symposium
198
The 21st Century Educational Institution: Global
Citizenship, Civic Engagement, and Student Success
70
The “F-Word”: Feminisms Around the World
160
Jiro Dream of Sushi Movie (Global Citizenship
Student Club)
32
Graduation Stoles for GCC Student Club
12
GC Pipeline Project
30
12 Events
1,140 participants attended
The focus for the committee in the 2013-14 academic year includes the
implementation of a campus community read program, both fall and spring
semester books and inviting the authors to campus to further discuss the two
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 223
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
books. This past spring semester, passive programming and education was also a
part of the Global Citizenship Center offerings. The display boards were utilized to
highlight and increase awareness regarding the impact of AIDS globally, understand
African-American cultures throughout the world, Earth Day and the issue of Human
Trafficking for Women’s History Month. These education displays were researched,
designed and completed by Student Development staff members. This year, Global
Citizenship tackled the challenging topics of current events in Cuba, how women
are portrayed in the media and, relational connections, climate change,
homelessness, civic engagement, feminism around the world, and African-American
and Asian cultures.
The ASO has provided opportunities for thoughtful and engaging discussion
regarding the qualities of their learning environment and how student learning
outcomes have influenced the teaching-learning environment and West Valley
College. The Co-Chairs of the Student Learning Outcomes committee visited with
ASO and solicited their opinions regarding the strengths and weaknesses of the
college-wide SLO/A process. The majority of students appreciated that SLO/A’s
were at the top of their course syllabus, instructors gave them a week-by-week
schedule in which they could follow relative to lesson plans, and that a well thought
out syllabus helped students be accountable for their own learning, completing
assignments, and readying to projects and exams. A good learning environment to
them, was structured, and provided the opportunity for faculty to give students
feedback. They believed that this kind of structured and facilitated learning
environment could be achieved in on-line formats too. They stated that lab classes
tended to be less structured with syllabus and faculty feedback. Students stated
they appreciated Angel as a communication medium in which students and faculty
could discuss classroom content, assignments, and get questions answered. A good
learning environment was one in which all faculty used Angel to
communicate. Students indicated that there is inconsistency in the faculty use of
Angel. Additionally, students wanted to learn how to use Angel via their
faculty. The student group did indicate that there was inconsistency in faculty
explaining the determined SLO/A’s for each of their courses. Some included in the
syllabus and discussed them at the beginning of the class and others just listed
them in the syllabus. They preferred for the faculty to consistently approach this
with a more formal presentation of the SLO/A’s at the first class session. They
desired their faculty to be “transparent” and “expose” students to
SLO/A’s. Students wanted to know the implications for faculty in the event that
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 224
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
there were “No SLO/A’s” on the syllabus and no formal presentation of them within
the first two class sessions. (2B.3.b.5)
All West Valley College students are members of the Associated Student
Organization. ASO is the student governing body with responsibilities for
representing students (civic responsibility) of the college. (2B.3.b.6) Its members,
both elected and appointed, have many opportunities as student leaders to actively
shape the college community and develop leadership and life-skills through
purposeful training and workshops. To that end, ASO has accomplished much in the
past two years including:
1. Continued to finance and operationally support inexpensive access to
textbooks through the expansion of the Books for Food program.
2. Spearheaded the creation of a newspaper club and provided funding to pay
for the release of the first WVC newspaper in 4 years.
3. Sent 10 West Valley students to participate in an annual march in
Sacramento to raise awareness of the need for state legislators to support
higher education funding.
4. Increased collaboration between the Associated Student Organization
officers and all of the student clubs which resulted in expanded participation
at student life activities and events.
5. ASO implemented a ridesharing program set to go into effect in fall ’13 to
address traffic and parking issues that have been raised by many members
of the student body.
Inter-Club Council (ICC) is the governing body that oversees roughly 30 student
clubs and organizations that are chartered at West Valley College. (2B.3.b.7)
Students involved in West Valley College ICC and club system demonstrate a
personal commitment to the mission and purpose of their respective club and see
club membership as a way to be actively involved in their campus community
through co-curricular initiatives within Student Development and the Campus
Center. Over 300 student leaders are learning crucial personal skills as well as have
the chance to meet and work with different people. There was an increase in the
number of chartered student clubs from 26 to 30 over the past few years with a
number of student groups that are religious, international and/or culturallyfocused. What follows is a listing of the clubs chartered in 2012-13 and a list of
highlighted activities sponsored by the ASO, ICC, and respective clubs.
30 Student Clubs:
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 225
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
African American
Student Union
Environmentally
Sustainable Campus
Club
Alpha Gama Sigma
American Institute of
Architecture Students
Asian Pacific American
Students
Finance and Investing
Club
Puente Club
Political Action Club
Spirit Team
Tennis Club
USGBC Student Group
Global Student Club
Bio-Medical Club
Veterans Club
Hillel
Blade Runners
Voices Literary Club
Human Rights
Business Club
WVC Improv
Interior Design
Ceramic Art Guild
WV Viking Helm
Christians on Campus
Computer Science
Fashion Design and
Apparel Club
Philosophy Club
Middle College Club
NAMI on Campus
Oasis
Major ASO/ICC Events:
Event Name
Student Services/Club Showcase
Welcome Week Watermelon Contest
AIAS Pinkberry Fundraiser
AGS Blood Drive
Global Citizenship Club Movie
Prop 30 Open Mic
Halloween Bash
Thanksgiving Feast
Finals Survival kit
Ceramic Art Guild Fundraiser(F)
Ceramic Art Guild Fundraiser(Spr)
Spring Fling
Battle of the Bands
Dodge ball Tournament
AGS Blood Drive
Rock the Valley
16 Events
Attendance
350
60
22
100
25
75
200
160
500
60
60
225
70
30
80
100
2,117 students attended
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 226
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Some concrete examples of (but not limited to) activities, programs, and services
WVC provide that foster and enhance a learning environment that promotes such
personal attributes are described below:
Personal Responsibility:
WVC provides an intentional and concrete opportunity for students to understand
the meaning of Personal Responsibility. At the beginning of every fall semester,
incoming freshman students attend the WVC New Student Convocation. A keynote
speaker opens the event with a motivational message revealing the “Five Secrets to
College Success”—all elements focused on personal responsibility—based on the
book The 4 Secrets to College Life Success. How to thrive in your life during and after
college by Clint Pardoe. This unique approach to the typical orientation model
expands upon the Convocation models at primarily four-year institutions. It calls into
focus five success-oriented themes: (1) self –responsibility =being college ready; (2)
student success is holistic =being healthy and well in body and mind; (3)
collaboration=It takes a Village; equity and diversity is embraced=you are not alone;
and (5) as a forward thinking college we plan for your success=your destination is your
goal and our goal is to help you get there. At the closing of the Convocation,
participants receive a “Convocation Passport” (2B.3.b.8) which outlines key student
support services events for them to attend within the first few months of the fall
semester where they continue to engage in events and activities that foster their
learning environment and sense of personal responsibility as college students and
as a citizen of the community.
The key activities and events included are:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
Acquire Student ID Card
Meet with a Counselor/Get your Educational Plan
Attend the campus-wide Student Support Services Showcase
Attend Career Day
Attend Transfer Day
Visit Tutoring Services
Visit the Library
Attend a campus “Student Success” workshop offered through Student Life,
Health Services, Transfer Center, or Global Education
Annual Student Support Services Showcase Day in each semester continues to be a
priority event for supporting student development and growth both in the
classroom and outside of the classroom. (2B.3.b.9)
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 227
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
More than 30 Student and learning support service programs showcase their
services, events, and programs by providing information tables in the Campus
Center building which has been modernized in 2011. The Campus Center’s open
environment entices students to gather there naturally where they interact with
their peers, faculty, and staff.
Health Services has not only long provided an array of clinical services for students
but was also recently awarded grant funding to enhance awareness activities and
training to highlight mental health support offerings for students. Throughout the
academic year, Health Services promote student health and wellness through a
variety of “Awareness Week” marketing and workshop activities that pertain to
stress management, sleep deprivation, eating healthy, anxiety and depression, the
impact of drug and alcohol use, and domestic violence among others. Information
is distributed to students in on-line formats, with informal and passive tabling
efforts, and with active presentations and training that students can elect to attend.
Additionally, Health Services works with the Associated Student Organization
Health and Wellness Committee utilizing a peer education approach for outreach to
the student population promoting the importance of learning how to take personal
responsibilities around overall health. (2B.3.b.10) Most recently the Health Services
department provides the Student Health 101 webzine featuring articles to help
students with stress, sleep habits, nutrition, studying tips, and more. (2B.3.b.11)
In 2012-13, the TRiO program initiated two student success cohort groups within
their program focused on men and women attending WVC on focused topics. All
men are welcome to participate in “Men Valuing Progress” or “Women Valuing
Progress” support groups whereby students can share their academic, social, and
personal challenges and barriers they face, as they pursue their educational
dreams. Weekly meetings attract anywhere from 20-25 participants who often
disclose personal challenges and triumphs with their peers. (2B.3.b.12)
As part of the college’s priority to focus on professional development for student
learning and student success, the college funded the training of faculty in the On
Course method of student empowerment. This nationwide holistic pedagogical
movement trains educators on how to empower students to take responsibility for
their own success in their learning process. Faculty learn how to design learnercentered educational experiences and how to design classroom experiences such
that students feel they are in full control of their learning and hold full responsibility
for their learning success. Staff and administrators are taught how to provide
services and support in a way that doesn’t enable passive behavior, but rather puts
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 228
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
the responsibility for success in the students’ hands. During spring 2013, the college
successfully supported 18 faculty across campus to participate and be trained in this
pedagogy. (2B.3.b.13)
Civic Responsibility
Campus student engagement and civic responsibility are cornerstones in the
student experience at WVC. Students are presented with a plethora of options for
involvement including student government, student clubs and organizations,
service learning activities, student life events, participatory governance groups, the
sustainability committee, and through a variety of special program leadershiporiented field-trips. Student participation in all of these endeavors has shown an
increase, and all facets of the campus community support, encourage, and
appreciate student involvement. The Associated Student Organization is active in
campus operations where student leaders hold positions in all of our college and
district participatory governance groups including the Board of Trustees,
District/College Councils, Academic Senate, Curriculum Committee, Facilities and
Safety Advisory Council, as well as hiring committees. Here, students learn skills in
communication and public speaking, time management, cooperation and
collaboration, conflict resolution, and more importantly responsibility for others as
they make critical decisions on behalf of the student population. Through our 33
chartered student clubs and organizations, students can join and be involved in
clubs that match their own personal interests.
After completing the “Broadening Student Life” survey effort, in 2010, the Office of
Student Life assumed the responsibility of providing oversight for the service
learning component that would achieve a number of student outcomes: (1) to
provide activities for students who were required to fulfill 20 to 30 hours of service
as part of faculty requirements in their parent courses, and (2) to offer activities for
those students who valued community service and desired activities supplied both
on and off campus with surrounding agencies. (2B.3.b.14)
The WVC Sustainability Committee provides an overall environmental awareness
and consciousness of our college environment and beyond. This newly established
committee continues to integrate their affiliations across campus to promote
sustainability-conscious actions. (2B.3.b.15)
Student cohorts from Puente, EOP&S, Care, CAL Works and ASO participate in
student leadership conferences held regionally and state-wide during the academic
year. Students learn by participation and experience from these leadership
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 229
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
opportunities how to be a civic leader not only for their constituencies but for the
global community. Students also learn about how to become a social change agent
as a leader to promote student equity and success.
West Valley College’s Global Citizenship Committee, incepted in February 2007,
confirms the college’s commitment to providing an environment that encourages
personal and civic responsibility, as well as intellectual, aesthetic, and personal
development for students, faculty, staff, and administrators. Led by its mission
statement, “The WVC Global Citizenship Committee facilitates campus-wide
commitment to global citizenship through curriculum, activities and professional
development,” the committee promotes awareness by functioning as a resource
where students, faculty, staff, administrators and the surrounding community find
information and participate in diverse multicultural activities. In addition, the
committee further supports the processes by which students learn about
interdependence in the world and prepare for successful integration into varied
societies. The committee’s series of lectures, speakers, panel discussions, film, and
dialogues around diverse, international, and multicultural topics thus far elicit
valuable opportunities provided for the college community and beyond to develop
awareness, as well as personal and civic responsibilities within our community and
in the larger community. Global Citizenship Committee’s past and current activities
and events are accessible on the WVC website. (2B.3.b.16)
The West Valley College institutional learning outcomes under “VI. Social
Responsibility: The student will be able to: A. Demonstrate an awareness of civic,
political, and/or social issues and explain the role of the individual in addressing
these issues; B. Apply ethical principles to personal, academic, professional and/or
community issues.” (2B.3.b.17) West Valley College places a premium on civic
engagement and responsibility as demonstrated through the Global Citizenship
Committee activities, Sustainability Committee activities and the institutional
learning outcomes.
Intellectual Development
All courses offered at WVC promote intellectual development of students through
rigorous review by the Curriculum Committee. The college’s instructional and
student services programs support the development of intellectual competencies
through a variety of learning environments. There are courses that specifically
address this core: the Counseling 005 course, College Success, Counseling 012,
Careers and Lifestyles, and Counseling 050: Cross Cultural Perspectives all support
the mission of the college and aid new students in developing key academic and
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 230
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
study skills to be successful in an academic and learning institution. These courses
also raise awareness of equity, social justice, and the broad implications of culture
and our society.
Extended Opportunity Programs and Services (EOP&S) and Peer Assisted Learning
(PAL) Academy promote intellectual development through student participation at
seasonal leadership conferences as well as a variety of workshops with speakers.
(2B.b.18) Students can build intellectual competency through our Math Resource
Center, Library, and Tutoring Centers, which are designed to aid students in
mastering research and inquiry skills, improving literacy levels, and providing added
support to bolster classroom success.
The Global Citizenship Center, housed in the Campus Center, promotes
understanding and awareness of the role of citizens in the global community.
Through co-curricular workshops, movies, symposiums, panels, and featured
keynote speakers, students have increased their knowledge in the areas of global
concerns including energy and climate change, global feminism, and homelessness
and displacement.
Aesthetic Development
In concert with the beautiful landscape, nature and outdoor environment that WVC
enjoys, the college offers variety of teaching and learning related activities and
events that support one’s aesthetic development.
The West Valley College Art Gallery, also housed in the Campus Center, offers
seasonal gallery receptions that showcase the coursework of students, artwork by
staff and faculty. Art department faculty collaborate with Campus Center staff and
WVC community to promote aesthetic development through this venue. Special
holiday projects are completed through Student Services and Instructional faculty
and highlights art that depicts the importance of societal issues such as Dia de los
Muertos, Dr. Seuss’ Birthday, and World AIDS Day. (2B.3.b.19) Beyond the new Art
Gallery, art is displayed throughout many facilities on campus as a way to celebrate
aesthetic appreciation and make our college community environment even more
conducive to effective teaching and learning. The Music department performs
concerts to support music appreciation by the college and surrounding community.
(2B.3.b.20) Every spring the West Valley College Musical Theater department
presents a musical production in collaboration with the West Valley College
Foundation to raise awareness of the music dance and theater programs along with
funds to support them. (2B.3.b.21)
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 231
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Personal Development
West Valley College Professional Development Committee and participatory
governance constituencies support personal and professional development of all
employees and students. Where available and possible, each group select
conferences and/or leadership training that are in alignment with the college’s
mission and priority and send members to participate.
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard. The Office of Student Life systematically assesses
student support services to improve its effectiveness. All Student Services
programs and services have an established SLO/A and Assessment cycle to allow
them to evaluate their outcomes in a systemic manner.
The Global Citizens Committee continues to provide wide-range of social, cultural,
gender, equity, and multicultural issues for the college in a variety of formats where
personal and civic responsibilities are challenged and promoted.
The New Student Convocation received one of two Student Success Awards from
the California Community College Chancellor’s Office. The Convocation is seen as a
way to maximize resources while providing student with a year-long experience
promoting student involvement in their educational success. (2B.3.b.22)
Actionable Improvement Plans
None.
Evidence
2B.3.b.1
ILO Master List
http://westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/ilos.ht
ml
2B.3.b.2
Global Citizenship Center
Webpage
http://westvalley.edu/committees/Global_Citizenship/
members.html
2B.3.b.3
Global Citizenship Committee
Webpage
http://westvalley.edu/committees/Global_Citizenship/a
ctivities.html
2B.3.b.4
Global Citizenship Events
Webpage
http://westvalley.edu/committees/Global_Citizenship/g
lobal_events.html
2B.3.b.5
ASO and SLO/A committee
discussions re:SLO/As and
students
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/
2013/evidence/2b/aso_first_quarter_SLO/A_guiding_di
scussion_questions-comments.pdf
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 232
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
2B.3.b.6
Associated Student Organization
webpage
http://westvalley.edu/studentactivities/aso.html
2B.3.b.7
Inter-Club Council webpage
http://westvalley.edu/studentactivities/icc.htm
2B.3.b.8
Convocation Passport
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/
2013/evidence/2b/invite_card_convocation_2012.pdf
2B.3.b.9
Student Services Showcase memo
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/
2013/evidence/2b/student_services_showcase.pdf
2B.3.b.10
Wheel of Wellness Memo
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/
2013/evidence/2b/wheel_of_wellness.pdf
2B.3.b.11
WVC Student Health 101
http://readsh101.com/westvalley.html
2B.3.b.12
Men Valuing Progress and
Women Valuing Progress
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/
2013/evidence/2b/Womens_Mens_Group_Annoucnce
ment.pdf
2B.3.b.13
On Course Conference Agenda
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/
2013/evidence/2b/on_course_training_2013.pdf
2B.3.b.14
Broadening Student Life Survey
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/
2013/evidence/2b/broadening_student_life_survey_res
ults.pdf
2B.3.b.15
Sustainability Committee
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Sustainability/
2B.3.b.16
Global Citizenship Committee
http://westvalley.edu/committees/Global_Citizenship/a
ctivities.html
2B.3.b.17
ILOs
http://westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/ilos.ht
ml
2B.3.b.18
EOPS
http://westvalley.edu/services/academicsuccess/eops/index.html
2B.3.b.19
WVC Art Gallery
http://westvalley.edu/academics/fine_arts/art/art_galle
ry.html
2B.3.b.20
Music Department Performances
http://westvalley.edu/academics/fine_arts/music/
2B.3.b.21
2013 Musical Gala
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/
2013/evidence/2b/sweet_charity.pdf
2B.3.b.22
Student Convocation Award
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/
2013/evidence/2b/convocation_award.pdf
Standard IIB.3.c
The institution designs, maintains and evaluates counseling and/or academic
advising programs to support student development and success and prepares
faculty and other personnel responsible for the advising function.
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 233
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Descriptive Summary
West Valley College designs, maintains, and evaluates counseling and advising
programs. In order to better serve students through a variety of programs,
counseling and advising are offered not only in Counseling but throughout the
college: Athletics, CalWorks, DESP, EOPS, Freshman Year Experience (FYE),
International Student Program, Middle College, Puente, SUCCESS, and Trio
program. In collaboration with the Dean of Instruction and Student Success and
Vice President of Student Services, coordinators in their respective program areas
provide leadership for and coordination of counseling and advising services.
Through comprehensive Program Review and assessment of Program Learning
Outcomes (PLOs), counseling and advising services will continue to be regularly
evaluated and improved. (2B.3.c.1) Counseling and advising services contribute to
student development through academic, transfer, career, and personal counseling.
Counseling faculty and staff understand the important connection in delivering
counseling and advising services to traditional, nontraditional and special
populations of students. As the student population changes and its need for
services change, adjustments are made in counseling and advising services to
accommodate those needs both in person and online formats. For example,
counseling targeted by the College’s annual Goals and Objectives (Strategic
Planning) include the Puente Project and SUCCESS. Counseling services have also
expanded to address the needs of veterans and students who seek mental health
counseling through Health Services. In addition, the college continues to evolve in
its process of planning a successful implementation of educational plan
development through orientation, counseling, and advising per the Student Success
Act of 2012 or Student Success and Support Programs. (2B.3.c.2)
Counseling services supports the diverse population and needs of the student
population at West Valley College. (2B.3.c.3) The counseling and advising
component provides academic advice as well as academic and educational planning
opportunities for all students.
The counseling department has day and evening hours available throughout the
week and bilingual counselors are available as well. The department does not offer
any weekend counseling hours/appointments due to staff shortages. However, the
counseling and advising are offered in drop-in, half hour, and hour long
appointments. Students can make appointments over the phone and in person,
and reminder phone calls are made by an automated system to the student the day
before the appointment.
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 234
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Counselors have expertise in academic, career, transfer and personal counseling
with designated counselors specializing in specific areas such as Honors, Puente,
Success, First-Year Experience, EOPS, Veterans, TRiO, and the DESP program. Basic
Skills students are provided with specialized counseling through the following
programs:
First Year Experience includes a mandatory College Success Counseling course and a
counselor dedicated to working with First Year Experience students. All First Year
Experience students are basic skills students as they must assess into a basic skill
level Math and English class in order to qualify for the program. (2B.3.c.4)
The CalWORKs program has a counselor assigned to work only with CalWORKs
students. (2B.3.c.5) Basic Skills students in CalWORKs are identified following
assessment. Basic Skill students and all students in CalWORKs are monitored for
progress and completion and are seen three times over the semester.
Additional resources are recommended as needed, such as tutoring or interpreting
services if the student is a basic skills ESL level student. CalWORKs has a second
layer of intervention because the Santa Clara County caseworker can be called in to
provide additional resources if needed which can be extremely helpful for Basic
Skills students.
EOPS follows the model of “intrusive counseling” as they require students to see
their counselor three times per year so that interventions can be provided as soon
as students need help. (2B.3.c.6) This is particularly important with Basic Skills
students. EOPS offers the PAL Academy, a specialized tutoring program for basic
skill level math students conducted in the EOPS office. EOPS also offers support for
transportation and purchase of textbooks.
Evaluations for counseling services are conducted in a number of ways. Point of
Service surveys are given to determine student satisfaction with the services they
are receiving. (2B.3.c.7) Faculty evaluations of counselors are given twice a year for
the first two years of the tenure process and once a year during the last two years.
Evaluations and student surveys are conducted once every 3 years for counselors
who have achieved tenure. Student Learning Outcomes and assessment (SLO/A)
have been developed for all counseling services and classes to aim sustainable
continuous quality improvement of services and programs. The assessment of
SLO/As assists in the on-ongoing evaluation process of services and classes.
Counselors conduct student orientations that cover but are not limited to,
educational planning, transfer information, career programs and student support
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 235
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
services. Evaluations are conducted for sampled orientations. With the enactment
of the Student Success Act of 2012, West Valley College will provide mandatory
orientations for all nonexempt students starting fall 2014.
Counselors teach courses that include career exploration, study skills, college
success, personal development, and cultural diversity. Eight of the counseling
courses are transferrable to the CSU system and one is currently transferrable to
both the CSU and UC systems. Courses are evaluated by students when an
instructor is in the evaluation process and courses are also observed by faculty. All
counseling courses have developed SLO/As and assessments which serve as
ongoing evaluation and improvement process for the department.
Students in basic skills or who are undecided are encouraged to take Counseling
courses such as Counseling 002: Academic and Personal Planning, Counseling
012012C: Careers and Life Styles, Counseling 018: Job search methods or attend
workshops through our Transfer Center as well as Career Programs. These courses
provide a framework for students to explore their personal qualities and skills while
identifying possible career paths. Additionally they help assist students with
important skills required for college success such as study skills, stress
management, time management, and increasing self-confidence.
West Valley College provides campus wide events in which counselors participate,
such as Student Services Day, Transfer Day, an Early Admission Program for feeder
high schools which includes Orientation, Parent Boot Camp, and Convocation for
incoming students. These events support enhancement of student development
and success.
West Valley College believes quality research is an important component to
understanding and developing sound practices that serve our students while readily
illustrating the efficacy of these services. Through the analyzing and reporting of
data on student retention, persistence, course completions, educational goals,
transfers, etc., an informed plan may be created to address gaps in student
achievement. Balancing with the quantitative data, a focus group to poll students
on their perception of student services and counseling service delivery was formed
by our Associated Student Organization in 2011-12. (2B.3.c.8) Student Services
faculty met with the student officers of the ASO to discuss the results of this focus
group and to determine ways to ensure smooth delivery of services to the students
and to provide a welcoming environment for students when they enter the
counseling area.
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 236
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
The Early Alert program conducted each semester informs the college with valuable
information on students needing immediate counseling and advising on their
progress. (2B.3.c.9)
The integration of Mental Health with Health Services while maintaining
collaboration of referral services with all other student support programs has
provided a network of mental health support for graduate college students in need
of temporary crisis attention and brief therapy. Health Services maintains extensive
personal counseling support services on campus, using supervised student interns
to provide short term supportive and behavioral counseling to students
experiencing difficulties. This program has received statewide recognition as an
innovative model for delivering mental health services on a community college
campus. In addition, Health Services provides health advising and special events to
support student health and wellness such as smoking cessation workshops,
depression screening, domestic violence awareness, and suicide prevention. These
workshops are open to all college stakeholders and serve as a means of educating
our community on important health awareness issues.
Health Services received a grant through the California Community College Student
Mental Health Program to create the WVC Mental Health Initiative: introspection,
integration and innovation. (2B.3.c.10) The initiative is a three pronged approach to
addressing mental health issues on the WVC campus. WVC Health Services has
initiated many activities as part of this important initiative (2B.3.c.11):
1. Education, Training and Resource Development

August 2012 – launched Kognito Online Training - ongoing

August 2012 – All College Day Suicide Prevention Training

October 2012 – Depression Screening Day

October 2012 – “Wong Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” presentation

December 2012 – QPR Training at SJCC

January 2013 – All College Day Civility Workshop

February 2013 – NAMI “In Our Own Voice”

April 2013 – Wheel of Wellness Event

May 2013 – National College Health Assessment

August 2013 – All College Day Mental Health Showcase
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 237
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014

October 2013 – Send Silence Packing

Peer Resource Development
2. Assessment and Intervention

Mental Health Services Advisory Committee

Behavioral Assessment and Intervention Plan

Students of Concern Process Map

Monthly Tracker

Quarterly Summary Report

Incident Report Form
3. Integrated Clinical and Mental Health Care

Participated in National College Depression Partnership (NCDP)

All students screened for depression during initial visit

Mental Health referral initiated if indicated

Home of Mental Health Graduate Internship Program
West Valley College is committed to embracing student development and success
from a holistic view. The Mental Health Services Advisory Committee (MHASC) is
multidisciplinary and consists of interested faculty, Health Services staff, Student
Services staff, and campus police, who meet weekly to discuss and develop
intervention plans for issues related to the emotional well-being of our students.
Seamless collaboration between student services and instruction is one of the
critical success elements in supporting and enhancing student development and
success. The Counseling department holds a weekly meeting where the Student
Services Division Chair acts as a direct liaison bringing and disseminating critical
information to and from student services and instruction. In addition, the Student
Services Council consisted of coordinators, directors, and department chairs within
Student Services meet bi-monthly to discuss issues relative to counseling, advising,
matriculation, and other critically important topics for student development and
success.
The Matriculation Advisory Committee produced the Matriculation Plan for 2012-13
positioning the college to fully implement the Student Success Act of 2013
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 238
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
requirements. (2B.3.c.12) This committee is now the Matriculation task Force and
is part of the newly formed Student Success The Vice President of Student Services
attends pertinent trainings and regional matriculating meetings and disseminates
this information regularly back to the campus. Through the Matriculation Task
Force, on-going, campus-wide training sessions are conducted to provide
matriculation information to faculty, staff and administrators. Ongoing, campuswide training sessions to provide matriculation information to faculty, staff and
administrators:
 Flex day presentations to all campus on Student Success Act
 Flex day meetings with Student Services Division where matriculation
information is disseminated
 Flex day meetings with Division Chair Council where matriculation
information is disseminated
 Ongoing meetings with Student Services Division where matriculation
information is disseminated
 Ongoing meetings with Division Chair Council where matriculation
information is disseminated
Counseling staff are well trained and qualified professionals. Through the Student
Services bi-annual retreat, as well as counseling meetings, counselors are trained
with new initiatives, regulations, legislative mandates, and other student
development and success related interventions, methods of instruction, and
advising tips. New Counselor Training is provided when the counselors are hired.
Assigned mentors meet with them throughout their first year of employment to
help familiarize the new employee with information necessary to perform their job
duties and to understand the tenure process. In addition, new counselors will
shadow more experienced counselors and/or observe the classes of seasoned
counselor/instructors. Course syllabi are shared with newly hired counselors, as is
counseling information and protocols, during the mentor meetings and counseling
in-service meetings. Counselors attend CSU and UC transfer workshops twice a
year to receive updated information to facilitate the transfer counseling that
students need. All College Day, which takes place two times per year on the first
day of each semester, further serves to provide training for faculty through inservice presentations.
Self- Evaluation
The college meets this standard. The quality and design of counseling services are
assured through the mission of the college as well as WVC’s annual goals and
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 239
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
objectives (Strategic Plan) development process as well as regular and systematic
assessment. Many of the goals of counseling are informed by the Matriculation
Plan which was updated during 2012-13 academic year. Each of these reports
contained components to assess current services and implement changes where
necessary. Steady progress has been made with the planning agenda and goals laid
out in the reports. In addition, the counseling department executes SLO/A and
assessment as part of the Integrated Planning and Resource Allocation process to
aim for sustainable continuous improvement cycle of their operation.
Actionable Improvement Plans
None
Evidence
2B.3.c.1
Student Services Program Review
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accr
editation/2013/evidence/2b/SS_SLO_WV_Fall
_2012_Final_Report.pdf
2B.3.c.2
Student Success Implementation Plan
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accr
editation/2013/evidence/2b/Student_Success
_Act_Implementation_Update_10-17-13.docx
2B.3.c.3
Counseling webpage
http://westvalley.edu/counseling/
2B.3.c.4
First Year Experience Flyer
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accr
editation/2013/evidence/2b/First_Year_Experi
ence_Flyer_Fall_2013.pdf
2B.3.c.5
CalWORKs
http://westvalley.edu/services/academicsuccess/calworks/
2B.3.c.6
EOP&S
http://westvalley.edu/services/academicsuccess/eops/index.html
2B.3.c.7
Student Services Point of Service Survey
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accr
editation/2013/evidence/2b/ss_pos_survey_r
eport_2012.pdf
2B.3.c.8
Broadening Student Life Survey
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accr
editation/2013/evidence/2b/broadening_stud
ent_life_survey_results.pdf
2B.3.c.9
Early Alert Data
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accr
editation/2013/evidence/2b/Early_Alert
2B.3.c.10
Mental Health Initiative Presentation
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accr
editation/2013/evidence/2b/Mental_Health_I
nitiative_Presentation.pdf
2B.3.c.11
Health Services Activities
http://westvalley.edu/services/student-
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 240
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
development/health/index.html
2B.3.c.12
Matriculation Plan 2013-13
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accr
editation/2013/evidence/2b/Matriculation_Pl
an_rev_Spring_2013.pdf
Standard IIB.3.d
The institution designs and maintains appropriate programs, practices, and
services that support and enhance student understanding and appreciation of
diversity.
Descriptive Summary
West Valley College has a long-standing commitment to diversity, as evident in the
college’s strategic goals, and Institutional Learning Outcomes. As identified in the
WVC Institutional Learning Outcomes: VII. Global Awareness and Diversity, the
college strives to ensure that students will be able to:
a) Explain the sensitivity and skills needed to live and work in diverse local and
global communities and
b) Explain how one or more of the following affects life experiences and social
responsibilities: ability, race, ethnicity, class, gender, sexuality, and other
markers of social identify.
WVC’s academic framework and student services support stem from these
principles.
To earn an associate degree from West Valley College, students must complete a
three-unit Area F cultural diversity course. A wide range of courses in varied
disciplines across college contain instructional contents and educational activities
that raise awareness and appreciation of diversity, including gender, race, age,
ethnicity, disability, sexual orientation, language, religion, and socio-economic
status.
The West Valley College Global Citizenship Committee (a sub-committee of the
WVC Academic Senate) founded the WVC Citizenship Center in January 2007.
(2B.3.d.1) The center promotes global awareness by functioning as a resource
where students, faculty, staff, administrators, and the surrounding community find
information and participate in diverse multicultural activities. It further helps to
implement the Student Equity Plan, to address issues of recruitment, retention,
persistence and success, and facilitates needed conversations about diversity within
the United States. The center’s programs support the processes by which students
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 241
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
learn about interdependence in our world and prepare for successful integration
into varied societies. The Global Citizenship Committee constantly enriches the
campus through a variety of activities, some of which include a panel of Egyptian
scholars who spoke of the recent events in Egypt, a screening of Miss
Representation with a conversation with director Jennifer Siebel Newsom, a
conversation with Cuban author Christina Garcia, and a faculty presentation of
volunteer efforts through Habitat for Humanity. (2B.3.d.2)The Global Student Club
also holds events on campus that embrace the diverse nature of our students. Such
events include a presentation titled “Global Visions of Beauty” and an open
microphone evening of legends from around the world. Faculty ensure that
students are the center at these multicultural, international, and diverse events and
activities. Participation in such events and activities is often tied to their
coursework. Thoughtful and reflective discussion led by faculty or peers occurs in
respective classrooms relative these topics to enhance awareness and appreciation
of diversity.
The college designed an institutional approach to creating educational experiences
for students that are critical to their understanding and appreciation of diversity
and multicultural issues.
In 2007-2010, West Valley College and San José State University students had the
unique opportunity to spend one semester at Brazilian universities located in the
States of Minas Gerais and Amazonas. (2B.3.d.3) The California-Brazil Business &
Education Consortium fosters the advancement of technical expertise and cultural
understanding to help prepare students to work in an international context and
contribute to their long-term involvement in trade between the U.S. and Brazil. The
program is funded by FIPSE, Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education,
in the U.S. Department of Education, and CAPES, in Brazil's Ministry of Education.
In 2010, The WVMCCD Board of Trustees designated funding for WVC to recruit and
increase number of international students. A counselor who serves the
international student population travelled extensively to Asia and successfully
recruited students, an effort that raised West Valley College’s international student
population to 90; although in 2012 the number has dropped to 62. (2B.3.d.4)
Global Education is closely connected to the achievement of the underrepresented
population at West Valley College. In fall 2011, at All College Day, the WVC
president presented data showing the achievement gap between the Latino, African
American and American Indian student populations and the White and Asian
student populations both statewide and at WVC. (2B.3.d.5) It was clear that the
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 242
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
same achievement gap that exists in the state exists at WVC, and this achievement
gap occurs in all departments at WVC. This data prompted the creation of the
Student Equity, Access, and Success (SEAS) committee. WVC staff and faculty
volunteered to serve on this committee, and the membership represents different
ethnicities from all areas of campus. This committee is charged with keeping
student diversity and equity issues at the forefront of college practices.
At WVC, the Puente Program helps decrease this achievement gap for many Latino
students. Puente is a year-long learning community composed of counseling and
English courses. Although the program is open to all students, the counseling and
English courses are taught with a Latino emphasis, making the learning community
more attractive to Latino first-generation college students who may otherwise feel
displaced and marginalized on a college campus where they are an ethnic minority.
Puente is a bridge program designed to assist underrepresented college students in
developing college skills, personal empowerment, and career exploration, with the
end goal of having students transfer to a 4-year university and return to the
community as leaders and mentors. The Puente Program fosters an increasingly
diverse and inclusive learning community by communicating and building better
relationships with the communities it serves; decreasing systemic financial,
geographic, academic, physical, personal, and cultural barriers to make the campus
more accessible and inviting; and preparing and encouraging students to contribute
successfully to our contemporary, multi-cultural society.
The SUCCESS Program serves the purpose of recruiting and retaining African
American students and assisting in their efforts to succeed at the college. This helps
the college-wide goals related to maintaining diversity in the student population
and in the college’s curriculum. While the program is open to all students
at West Valley and indeed does serve others, it is especially committed to the
college’s students of African descent. The intention of the program is to meet some
of the specific needs of our African American student population in order to ensure
more successful outcomes in their academic careers. Many of the African American
students who enroll in the program are first-generation college students, and many
face other significant socio-economic limitations that would make a successful
journey through college extremely difficult. The SUCCESS Program offers special
support services to these African American students, and other underrepresented
students, and it fosters inclusion.
All student services programs at WVC provide access, retention, and support
services for students from multi-cultural and economically disadvantaged
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 243
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
backgrounds. WVC receives a TRiO grant from the U.S. Department of Education to
increase low income, first-generation college students’ chances of staying in
college, graduating, and going on to a four-year university. The WVC TRiO Program
sponsors MVP (Men Valuing Progress), a support group specifically for males, and a
similar Women’s Support Group. Through spring 2012, WVC supported the
Educational Transition for Women and Men (ET) adult re-entry program that
provided counseling for adult students, most of whom were over age 25 and had a
break in their formal education. Due to budget reductions, the ET program was
dissolved. Many ET students now receive support through the TRiO program. The
Extended Opportunity Programs and Services (EOP&S), Cooperative Agencies
Resources for Education (CARE) and CalWORKS programs serve many students from
multi-cultural backgrounds. Faculty and staff assist students in Spanish, Farsi, and
Vietnamese. West Valley College is committed to helping active duty members of
the military, veterans of military service and their spouse or dependents attain their
educational goals. The WVC Veteran's Task Force created a Veterans Resource
Center to provide support for its Veteran students. All support programs advocate
for participants and raise awareness for students and employees about the barriers,
academic needs, accomplishments, and contributions of diverse populations at
West Valley College.
The college’s student activities program provides rich opportunities for students to
plan, develop, and implement activities that advance understanding and
appreciation of diversity. Following is a sample of the activities: Veteran’s Open
House, Disability Awareness, Holocaust Remembrance Day, Women’s History Tea
Party, Health Awareness, Autism Awareness, Black History Month, Chinese Lantern
Festival, Global Student Club World Legends, Social Justice Event, and Dia de Los
Muertos. As an affiliate of the Student Senate, the Inter-Club Council (ICC) serves as
the representative governing group for all chartered clubs on campus. A variety of
chartered clubs gives students the opportunity to share cultural experiences and
values with other students. Club membership is inclusive, non-discriminatory, and
open to all students who desire to participate. Clubs having a central focus on
cultural appreciation include: Global Student Club, African American Student Union,
Gay-Straight Alliance, and Oasis Christian Fellowship. (2B.3.d.6)
West Valley College takes a team approach in its outreach endeavors. The
Outreach Department plays a central role in promoting a diverse, accessible, and
welcoming learning environment. The outreach staff specifically reach out to
underserved populations in East San Jose, a largely Latino area, and other targeted
high schools in Santa Clara County. The outreach office partners with the Disability
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 244
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
and Educational Support Program office in hosting an annual information night, “On
To College Night,” for students with disabilities and their parents to learn about the
support programs in place at the college. Outreach is very active in partnering with
California Student Opportunity and Access Program (Cal SOAP), an organization that
places college counselors in schools that traditionally have seen low numbers of
graduates enroll in college. Recruiters stress to potential students that a West
Valley College education will enrich their lives in a learning community that
embraces their unique experiences, knowledge, and accomplishments. High school
outreach activities include group presentations about admissions, registration, and
financial aid and an annual on-campus High School Day. These activities are
designed to address academic, cultural, geographical, financial, physical, and
personal barriers that may prevent students from accessing or even envisioning a
community college education. A bilingual EOP&S recruiter also visits East San Jose
high schools and assists students with college and EOP&S applications, registration,
financial aid processes, and referrals to student services programs. The WVC
Outreach Office, in partnership with Boynton High school, also provides a K -16
learning program to assist students with behavioral/discipline challenges to get
back on track to graduate and enroll in college.
West Valley College further serves a diverse demographic through its online course
offerings. The college steadily increased course offerings in online mode that
address issues of diversity for those students who are not able to physically be on
campus. WVC has had a 6.3% increase in distance education FTES as a percentage
of total FTES. In 2007-2008, our distance FTES was 11.4% of our credit total. In
2012-2013, it had increased to 17.7%.
Self-Evaluation
The college meets the standard. In fulfilling its Institutional Learning Outcomes and
Goals and Objectives of 2013-2014, WVC provides services, programs, and events
that help students to understand and appreciate the diversity of the world in which
they live. In addition the diversity of the staff, faculty, and administrators, along
with the student centered collaborative work in which they engage, provides a daily
example of the value of – and appreciation for – diversity which is a hallmark of
WVC.
Actionable Improvement Plans
None.
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 245
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Evidence
2B.3.d.1
Global Citizenship Committee
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Global_Ci
tizenship/activities.html
2B.3.d.2
WVC Global Citizenship Center Activities
http://westvalley.edu/committees/Global_Citizens
hip/global_events.html
2B.3.d.3
California-Brazil Business & Education
Consortium Program
2B.3.d.4
International Program Numbers –2013
Fact Book; page 18
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accredita
tion/2013/evidence/2b/2B3d4_fact_book_2013_p
age18.pdf
2B.3.d.5
Fall 2011 All College Day Presentation –
Achievement Gaps
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accredita
tion/2013/evidence/2b/SEAS_All_College_Day_Equ
ity_Breakouts_Data_August_2011.xlsx
2B.3.d.6
Inter-Club Council List of Clubs
http://westvalley.edu/studentactivities/docs/currn
ent_club_list11_7_13.pdf
http://ca-brazil.blogspot.com/
Standard IIB.3.e
The institution regularly evaluates admissions and placement instruments and
practices to validate their effectiveness while minimizing biases.
Descriptive Summary
The college recognizes the importance of evaluation and planning in the cycle of
improvement. WVC regularly evaluates its admission instruments and practices to
make certain they are effective and to minimize bias. Toward those goals, both
West Valley and Mission College implemented CCC Apply as the electronic
admission application platform for the district in 2001. (2B.3.e.1) Student Services
programs, including Admission and Records, conduct program reviews on an
established annual (comprehensive one year and update the other year) cycle,
providing an additional opportunity for evaluation and discussion of instruments
and practices needing improvement. In addition, Admissions and Records
developed Program Learning Outcomes and a meaningful plan to assess them.
(2B.3.e.2) Specific work in the Admissions, Assessment, Placement, and Evaluation
areas are noted below.
Admissions: The Admissions and Records Office (A&R) begins the matriculation
process, starting with information provided to students through our Outreach
Office.
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 246
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Individual staff members in the Admissions & Records Office speak Spanish,
Russian, Farsi, Vietnamese, and French. They are available to converse individually
with students in their language of choice and assist them with the application
process. In addition, the DESP Office has special software to assist visually impaired
students view the college application
Students have the option of completing a paper application (in person, mailed or
faxed) or an electronic application through the California Community College Apply
(CCCApply) system which is accessible from the WVC website. (2B.3.e.3 ) The paper
application is reviewed annually in order to verify that our application meets the
required state reporting standards. The Admissions and Records Office also reviews
and updates the CCC Apply module, so students receive the appropriate response
letters via email.
Electronic applications are processed using an interface created by the District’s
Information Systems (IS). New applicants receive an immediate confirmation email,
followed by a separate email that includes their identification number and steps for
registering within 24-48 hours. Students that choose to complete the paper
application can submit it in person, fax or mail. (2B.3.e.4) Paper applications are
also processed within 48 hours, and students who submit paper applications
receive their student identification number immediately Such timely responses to
students’ applications enables their matriculation process to work efficiently where
students proceed to the orientation process in a timely fashion. International (F-1)
students have additional admission documentation requirements.
These
requirements are reviewed annually and updated as necessary.
The Assessment Center regularly evaluates its placement instruments to ensure
they are in compliance with state requirements.
All non-exempt students
complete placement testing for Reading, English, Mathematics and English as a
Second Language (ESL). This is provided in large group sessions April through August
and November through January. Small group testing is also available in the
Assessment Center Monday-Thursday afternoons. Schedules are published on
www.westvalley.edu/assess and in the schedule of classes, and posted in the
Counseling Center. Assessment accommodations are provided for any student who
presents a special need that may invalidate assessment results if the assessment
were to be given in the standard manner. Accommodations are authorized by DESP
and may include modifications in timing, location, and/or manner of administration.
(2B.3.e.5)
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 247
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Scores of 3, 4, and 5 on Advance Placement Tests can be sent to the Admissions and
Records Office in order to grant the student credit and placement into particular
courses. Transcripts of previous coursework taken from an accredited institution
will also be accepted as a placement instrument into courses with prerequisite
requirements. Students having already earned an Associate Degree or higher are
also granted certain placement into courses based on their achievement.
Multiple measures are used in conjunction with raw test scores for placements in
English, ESL, Math, and Reading. The multiple measures may include high school
coursework, high school GPA, recency of previous classes, and/or grades in previous
coursework. Multiple measures also include other factors that may affect the
selection of courses that are appropriate for the student, such as study habits,
certainty of educational goals, specific skills, emotional well-being, employment,
family or other commitments, health, motivation, self-assessment, and education
history. The counseling staff uses multiple measures as outlined in the college
catalog. (2B.3.e.6) A challenge process provides students the opportunity to appeal
course placements and to provide additional supporting documentation to the
relevant academic department for a decision to approve or deny the challenge. The
Assessment Center and tools used for multiple measures are regularly evaluated
through Program Learning Outcome and assessment process to ensure that tools
are effectively and accurately evaluating student’s performance.
Assessment instruments are used only for the purposes for which they were
developed and validated. In conjunction with guidelines provided by the test
publishers and California Community College Chancellor’s Office (CCCCO) standards,
the college prepares locally developed documentation about cut scores, norming,
and bias predictions. (2B.3.e.7) The validated placement assessments serve to fulfill
prerequisites for English, Reading, Math and ESL courses.
The college uses the MDTP (math), CTEP (reading and writing), and CELSA (ESL)
placement tests that are on the CCCCO list of approved instruments. The locallydeveloped ESL Holistic Essay was submitted to the CCCCO in Spring 2012 for reapproval and received full approval effective until 2018. In light of the
implementation of Student Success Act of 2012, the college quickly moved to
change the instruments to electronic ACCUPLACER tests as valid instruments for
assessment effective spring 2014. (2B.3.e.8) During the fall 2014, Vice President of
Student Affairs and Assessment Coordinator led the process to make such a shift.
Annual placement data are reviewed to assist the college in enrollment
management planning. Data is also used to evaluate the placement process and to
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 248
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
make curricular decisions. Consequential validation research was completed for
Reading in fall 2012. Because of the small number of students, research will
continue in spring 2013. Validation research was conducted in spring 2013 for
English and Math. The consequential validation research will be used in conjunction
with the disproportionate impact research conducted in spring 2012 to determine
how placement into WVC courses is aligned with student success. Discussions about
the results will occur in spring 2013 with the English, Math, and Reading
departments and will provide the basis for recommendations for changes in
curricula, placement testing, or other interventions.
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard. Admission and placement instruments are
evaluated and validated regularly.
Actionable Improvement Plans
None.
Evidence
2B.3.e.1
CCC Apply
https://secure.cccapply.org/Applications/CCCApply/custom
_logons/logon.asp?nextpage=/Applications/CCCApply/CCCA
pply1.asp?application_id=1693
2B.3.e.2
Admission & Records SLO and
Assessment
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/201
3/evidence/2b/A&R_Program_Learning_Outcomes.pdf
2B.3.e.3
Assessment Webpage
http://www.westvalley.edu/assess
2B.3.e.4
WVC Paper Application
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/201
3/evidence/2b/paper_application.pdf
2B.3.e.5
DESP Assessment
Accommodation
http://westvalley.edu/services/academicsuccess/desp/workshop.html
2B.3.e.6
Multiple Measures
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/201
3/evidence/2b/multiple_measures.png
2B.3.e.7
Assessment Validation Research
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/201
3/evidence/2b/assessment_research_spring_2013.pdf
2B.3.e.8
ACCUPLACER Test
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/201
3/evidence/2b/Accuplacer_Implementation_Notes_Timelin
es.pdf
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 249
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Standard IIB.3.f
The institution maintains student records permanently, securely, and
confidentially, with provision for secure backup of all files, regardless of the form
in which those files are maintained. The institution publishes and follows
established policies for release of student records.
Descriptive Summary
West Valley College follows the state requirements regarding the treatment of
student records consistent with the California Education Code sections 76220 and
76232. In addition, district Board Policy 5040 requires the college to maintain
students’ educational records in accordance with the Family Educational Rights and
Privacy Act (FERPA) of 1974. (2B.3.f.1)
In compliance with these policies, a schedule for the retention, scanning in
electronic format, and destruction of student records is maintained by Admissions
and Records (A&R). (2B.3.f.2) Provisions are made for secure backup of all files
including network backups, electronic document imaging, and student data. All
student records files are backed up daily and backup procedures are documented
electronically and in hard copy. Admissions and Records personnel are trained to
ensure that administrative procedures are understood and practiced to maintain
student records securely and according to regulations. Standard practices are
followed for securing student files and limiting access to authorized staff. Varying
levels of access to student records are established based on the employees’ needto-know as a function of position, job duties, and responsibility. Within the
Colleague system, password access is tightly protected through strictly enforced
protocols. Additionally the ANGEL course management system keeps the student
e-mail addresses confidential.
To ensure security of the student records, the district’s IS has deployed a multilayered approach for network security and backup of college network-related data
and resources. The IS department is responsible for the Wide Area Network (WAN)
and Local Area Network (LAN). IS is also responsible for the Student Information
System used at WVC. In the event of a suspected security breach, IS follows a set of
detailed procedures to assess the situation, create an action plan, and perform a
post incident report. (2B.3.f.3) The district network has border routers and firewalls
performing security inspections.
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 250
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
State and federal programs such as Disability and Educational Support Program
(DESP), Extended Opportunity Programs and Services (EOP&S), CalWORKS, TRiOStudent Support Services and various Student Services departments such as Health
Services, Counseling, Financial Aid, and the Office of the Vice President each handle
student records based on mandated requirements that are pertinent to each
department and/or for the specific student cohort in addition to BP 5040.
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard. With clearly identified Board Policy (5040) relative
to secure maintenance of student records, the college practices accordingly to
maintain student records permanently, securely, and confidentially. The college
works in conjunction with the district’s IS department to ensure that the secure
backup of all files, regardless of the form is maintained. The process for
maintenance and/or release of student records is published in the catalog, website,
and communicated in person at the Admissions and Records office, as well as each
categorical program office.
Actionable Improvement Plans
None.
Evidence
2B.3.f.1
Family Educational Rights and Privacy
Act (FERPA) of 1974
http://www.westvalley.edu/services/policy/ferp
a.html
2B.3.f.2
Transcripts and Student Records
http://westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditatio
n/2013/evidence/2b/District_Information_Servi
ces_Data_Backup_Procedures.pdf
2B.3.f.3
IS Security Breach Procedures
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accred
itation/2013/evidence/2b/Security_Breach_Pro
cedures.pdf
Standard IIB.4
The institution evaluates student support services to assure their adequacy in
meeting identified student needs. Evaluation of these services provides evidence
that they contribute to the achievement of student learning outcomes. The
institution uses the results of these evaluations as the basis for improvement.
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 251
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Descriptive Summary
West Valley College Student Services has an established practice of completing
Program Reviews that inform planning and decision-making. As part of the
college’s Integrated Planning and Resource Allocation process and established cycle
of evaluation, Student Services ensures that Program Reviews are completed in a
timely fashion so that feedback and dialogue can occur within the Student Services
Council to make sustainable continuous improvements. (2B.4.1) In addition,
Student Services has conducted a number of evaluation and assessment activities
that are central to evaluating student needs for effective delivery of program and
services. Research has mainly been conducted via on-line or paper-pencil surveys,
and large and small focus groups. (2B.4.2)
Under the umbrella of the college’s Integrated Planning and Resource Allocation
process, the Program Review process is initiated and coordinated by the Program
Review Committee. Once Student Services Council discusses the Program Reviews,
the information goes back to Program Review Committee for feedback, then
become part of the annual report to the Academic Senate and then to the College
Council. As part of the non-instructional Program Review process, the Student
Services Council along with each Student Services department executes its Program
Review in the following areas:











Description and mission of the program
Program Effectiveness and Efficiency and research tools
External Influence to the program (Federal, State regulation, impact, for
example)
Student Success Act of 2012:
o Student readiness
o Support for entering students
o Incentivize successful student behaviors
o Improvement of the education of Basic Skills students
o Resource alignment with Student Success Act of 2012
Comparable programs and data at other institutions state-wide
Program Learning Outcomes
Institutional Learning Outcomes
Connection of program/services to the PLO and ILO
College Mission and Program mission
Outcome assessment of the program/services in the past 3 years
Identified improvements per discussion
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 252
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014


Established goals based on the identified discussion
Identification of institution-level needs
Quantitative measures are included to provide insight on how the program/services
are aligned with its mission and is meeting student needs. Program Reviews allow
Student Services to evaluate, discuss, plan, and allocate resources based on these
reviews. Program Review is well integrated with the Student Learning Outcome
and Assessment process which allows its evaluation process to be thorough,
systematic, and in consistent with the college’s Integrated Planning and Resource
Allocation process.
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard. Through the Program Review and SLO/A process,
Student Services Council, department and program meetings, and feedback from
students and other college constituencies, program improvements are made to
better serve students.
All Student Services and staff achieved 100% execution of both Program Review and
SLO/A and actively engaged in the ongoing Assessment cycle for continuous quality
improvements.
Actionable Improvement Plans
None.
Evidence
2B.4.1
Master Program Review and
SLO/A Assessment Calendar
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2013/
evidence/2b/Master_Program_Review_and_SLO_Assessment
_Schedule_01-07-2014_External.pdf
2B.4.2
Student Services Surveys
http://westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2013/eviden
ce/2b/Student_Services_Surveys
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 253
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Standard IIC: Library and Learning Support Services
Library and other learning support services for students are sufficient to support
the institution's instructional programs and intellectual, aesthetics, and cultural
activities in whatever format and wherever they are offered. Such services include
library services and collections, tutoring, learning centers, computer laboratories,
and learning technology development and training. The institution provides
access and training to students so that library and other learning support services
may be used effectively and efficiently. The institution systematically assesses
these services using student learning outcomes, faculty input, and other
appropriate measures in order to improve the effectiveness of the services.
Standard IIC.1
The institution supports the quality of its instructional programs by providing
library and other learning support services that are sufficient in quantity,
currency, depth, and variety to facilitate educational offerings, regardless of
location or means of delivery.
Relying on appropriate leadership, expertise of faculty and classified professionals,
the college Library and other learning support services provide an imperative part
of a student-centered approach by creating an effective learning environment that
supports students with academic excellence which is consistent with the West
Valley College’s mission.
In 2011-2012, the Library and Supervised Tutoring Program strategically
reorganized its structure to be more closely aligned with the Student Success Act.
The Dean of Instructional Technology assumed responsibility for overseeing the
Library and Tutorial Program in spring 2012. As of spring 2014, with the retirement
of this Dean, the college reorganized its administrative structure and the Library
and Tutorial Program began reporting to the Dean of Instruction. The Library and
Tutorial Program continues to function effectively in collaboration with campuswide department faculty and support services staff providing quality and variety of
educational offerings to the students.
Library
The West Valley College Library serves a fundamental role on campus in providing
student support for student learning and success. As many as 8,400 students visit
the library weekly (2C.1.1). In order to successfully achieve the Student Learning
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 254
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Outcomes of the program, the library provides a variety of learning spaces,
electronic equipment such as PCs, experienced library staff, and access to
information in a variety of mediums. With the passage of Measure C in 2012, the
Library and Learning Center building is slated for construction in 2018 where service
and pedagogical need driven planning and designing will take place during 20142015 academic year.
Facilities and Equipment
The library is located in the Library building in the north side of the college. This 41
year old 39,550 square-foot facility with a seating capacity of approximately 500
provides ample space for individual or group learning experiences including 8 study
rooms, 36 computers for student use, 6 TV/DVD/VCR player stations and other
audio equipment for student use, and one technology-enhanced classroom for
orientations with 29 laptop computers. The Library is equipped with a wireless
network available to all facility users. In 2010, the library purchased new furniture
and a display case for the front section of the library. With the addition of the DRIP
Coffee Café, also in 2010, the library has become a more inviting place for students
to study and collaborate
Services
Librarians are responsible for selecting materials and resources, maintaining the
collection, and supervising equipment use. The collection development librarian
has primary responsibility for the collection content with final approval from the
Dean of Instruction. Librarians receive information about student learning needs by
working closely with instructional faculty and accepting suggestions for purchases,
working closely with students with course assignments/research at the reference
desk, and serving on the curriculum committee providing library support.
Technical services include acquisitions, cataloging, processing and budget managing
for all library resources.
The Library Reserve Collection supports the curriculum and contributes to student
success by making course materials available (on a limited basis) to
students. Depending on the number of copies of textbooks (funded by the ASO)
we have for an individual course, students can borrow the book for up to two hours
at a time for use in the Library or borrow it overnight and return it the next
day. Instructors are encouraged to donate or loan course textbooks to augment the
limited selection purchased through the Reserve Book Program. The library keeps a
tally at the beginning of every semester of those textbooks requested that we don’t
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 255
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
have on reserve. We attempt to get a copy of the book from the instructor or if
that is unsuccessful, we have some limited funds to purchase some textbooks
(2C.1.2).
The library participates actively in the Books for Food Program sponsored by the
Associated Student Government. At the beginning of every semester, students can
trade in 10 -30 cans of food for the right to borrow a textbook for the entire
semester. Students are asked to donate their books to the program at the end of
the semester. These books in turn become part of the Books for Food Program and
are thus reused. All of the food is then donated to Second Harvest Food Bank of
Santa Clara County. The library is responsible for processing the books, collecting
the vouchers from the students after they bring the food to the ASO, and collecting
the books at the end of the semester. In fall 2013, there were a total of thirty-four
courses that participated in the Books for Food Program (2C.1.3).
Circulation Services involve the circulation of library materials, reserve, interlibrary
loans, instructional media, and DVDs. It also includes the allocation of group study
rooms to students, picking up materials used in the library, and shelving books and
other resources. The circulation staff consists of two library media technicians with
primary responsibility for its functions; two additional library media technicians
who provide backup and support; a few student workers; and one librarian who is
responsible for circulation functions as well as having other library responsibilities.
The circulation staff is often the first point of contact with the campus community.
Circulation staff typically handles circulation of materials, interlibrary loans,
overdue and billing notices, computer problems, printer/copier issues, and security
gate issues
Material and Resources
The library collection consists of over 100,000 volumes, 15,000 audio visual items,
and 81 current subscriptions. The library provides 24/7 access to more than 12 fulltext database/electronic resources including EBSCO Host, ABC -CLIO, Facts – onFile, and Grove Art online. These databases provide access to millions of articles
from journals, magazines, newspapers, and other reference works. The Library also
provides 24/7 access to over 13,000 electronic books (e-books) through ebrary, and
the EBSCO ebook Collection (accessible through the online catalog). Instructions for
accessing the library and extended catalogs are available on the library website.
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 256
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Learning Center
Tutoring Program and Services
The centralized Tutoring Program and Services is located adjacent to the Library and
is managed by the Tutorial Program Coordinator. The college’s supervised Tutoring
is coordinated by a faculty Tutorial Coordinator to ensure all regulatory mandates
for the Supervised Tutoring are met in conducting and providing Tutoring services
for the college. Tutoring Program and Services provides free tutoring services and
support, student workshops, and independent and group study in various subjects
for registered WVC students. The Tutoring program, also recruits and trains new
student tutors each semester, providing job opportunities for students during their
academic time at WVC.
Writing Center
The Writing Center provides free peer tutoring for any writing assignment in any
discipline at West Valley College. Peer Tutors are mentored and evaluated by
Faculty Supervisors who also provide short workshops and instruction, as needed,
to assist students and peer tutors alike in improving upon their writing skills. From
the time LS110E/apportionment funding was first granted to the Writing Center in
the fall 2011 until November of the Fall 2013 semester, enrollment has increased by
over 425% (from 74 students to over 400, and climbing). The Writing Center also
serves students in over 20 disciplines on campus, with roughly 70% of the students
served coming from Language Arts. As we continue offering this free service, we
hope to grow in the number of students, disciplines, and courses served in coming
semesters, and will keep recruiting, training, and supporting new peer tutors as well
in an effort to strengthen their teaching and communication skills and our service as
a whole. (2C.1.4)
Math Resource Center (MRC)
The MRC provides peer and instructor tutoring in all topics of math (with limited
help on some classes, such as Statistics). The Center has ten computers for students
to work on online math homework, with an additional two side rooms for group
study. Students are asked to log in when they enter the MRC in order to track their
time spent there: in the fall of 2012 student time totaled 2531 hours, and in the
Spring of 2013 students spent a total of 2979 hours. (2C.1.5)
ESL Lab and World Languages Lab
The ESL Skills Lab offers students in English as a Second Language classes a variety
of opportunities and materials to practice English. The ESL Skills Lab, located in the
WVC Library, is open to any student in any ESL class. Teachers may also bring entire
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 257
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
classes into the lab for practice. The ESL Skills Lab is coordinated by a certificated
ESL Instructor, (Instructional Lab Faculty), and is open for student use 18 hours per
week (Monday-Thursday). Students receive guidance and assistance from a
certificated ESL instructor as needed to facilitate student learning. However, the lab
is primarily an independent, individualized learning environment. With the
guidance of the lab coordinator, students may choose from a variety of materials to
enable them to practice grammar and writing such as 1) writing sentences
and/or paragraphs and/or 3-5 paragraph essays using the Focus of Grammar series,
a computer and writing-prompt program; and 2) practicing editing through books
such as The Article Book, Better Writing Through Editing, or Self-Correcting
Compositions; 3) reading comprehension; and 4) listening skills.
Unlike the World Language Center, which has 37-computers and no room for other
activities, the ESL Skills Lab has groups of tables, some computers, but mostly
comfortable areas where students can work on their own or join conversation
groups. Conversation groups are facilitated by an ESL faculty member or the lab
coordinator and are offered to ESL students 5 times a week for 30- to 45-minutes
each. Ten to 12 students are often divided in conversation groups to discuss current
events or other topics and learn the art of small talk with fellow WVC students of
different nationalities.
The statistics on student involvement at the ESL Skills Lab are tracked through SARS.
In Fall 2012, the ESL Skills Lab was used a total of 1,510 hours, a total of 1,281
individual visits and in Spring 2013, the ESL Skills Lab was used a total of 1,600
hours, a total of 1,326 individual visits (2C.1.6). Originally, this lab was designed for
students’ hours-by-arrangement requirements for specific classes in the ESL
curriculum, but as of Fall 2013, all attendance statistics are collected for ESL
students’ use enrolled in any ESL class.
The WVC World Languages Center is a technology-based learning lab in which
students of various languages (English as a Second Language, Spanish, French,
Russian, German, Chinese and Japanese.) Students can learn and practice a new
language at their own pace. The lab provides 37-work-stations with languagelearning software, online language programs, and access to all the audio material
for their textbooks. Moreover, the lab uses the unique Sanako language lab
software, which allows language teachers to design activities that increase
students’ listening comprehension and speaking practice. Some of the functions of
the system are as simple as being able to listen to individual students’ speech
(without walking around the room), make corrections or comments directly to
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 258
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
individual students quickly and easily, to more sophisticated functions such as
electronically linking pairs or groups of students, sending a model recording or
recording students' speaking (individually or in groups), and demonstrating the
target language in video and audio formats at all students’ stations. Students can
also work individually to digitally compare their speaking ability to that of a native
speaker.
The World Languages Center is staffed by an Instructional Lab Technician, (80% of
full-time, 30 hours per week), who works closely with the ESL and World Languages
department faculty. The lab is used as an open lab and a classroom lab throughout
the day, Monday-Friday. Teachers are able to bring their entire class into the lab for
intense practice or testing. In addition, the WLC has been used for various student
and faculty workshops on a variety of software programs.
In fall 2012, the WLC served 273 students who completed 7279 hours. Seventy-one
percent of these completed more than the required 27 hours (part of hours-byarrangement requirements for their classes.) In spring 2013, the hours-byarrangement requirement was replaced by web-based, publisher-created materials
for most of the foreign language students, except Russian and Japanese. The ESL
classes with hours-by-arrangement continued through spring 2013. In spring 2013,
the WLC served 229 students, for a total of 6528 hours. Currently, the World
Languages Center keeps track of whole-class and individual students’ attendance
with the SARS check-in system. (2C.1.7)
The Technology Center
With the removal of Hours by Arrangement (HBA) instruction from all Career
Technical Education courses in 2012, the Technology Center located in the Applied
Arts and Science building was converted into regular instructional classrooms. In
anticipation of the 2018 Library and Learning Center building construction, building
planning and design includes discussion among faculty of college-wide
supplemental instruction needs, accelerated and collaborative learning models, and
new pedagogy that will assure student success.
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard. The Library and Learning Resources Center (LRC)
supports the cultural, intellectual, and aesthetic qualities for the College and the
surrounding community. The Library and LRC attempt to meet the highest priorities
within the limitations of the budget. Despite recent serious budget cuts, library
staff succeeded in selecting and maintaining materials and electronic resources to
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 259
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
support student learning needs with input from faculty, students, surveys, and
statistics.
Actionable Improvements Plan

Plan for Library and LRC/Tutorial Programs and Services building design
based on the teaching and learning, support services, and pedagogical needs
based on student success.
Evidence
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accred
itation/2013/evidence/2c/20122013_Gate_Count_Library.pdf
2C.1.1
2012-2013 Gate Counts
2C.1.2
Library Course Reserves Form for
Faculty
2C.1.3
Books for Food Inventory List, Fall 2013
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accred
itation/2013/evidence/2c/Books_for_Food_Inve
ntory_List_Fall_2013.pdf
2C.1.4
Writing Center Statistics
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accred
itation/2013/evidence/2c/Writing_Center_Stats
_Fa13.pdf
2C.1.5
Math Resource Center Statistics
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accred
itation//2013/evidence/2c/Math_Resource_Usa
ge_2012-2013.pdf
2C.1.6
ESL Skills Lab Statistics
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accred
itation//2013/evidence/2c/ESL_Lab_Stats_2012
-2013.pdf
2C.1.7
World Languages Lab Statistics
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accred
itation/2013/evidence/2c/world_languages_lab
_statistics_2012-2013.pdf
http://westvalley.edu/library/reserves.html
Standard IIC.1.a
Relying on appropriate expertise of faculty, including librarians and other learning
support services professionals, the institution selects and maintains educational
equipment and materials to support student learning and enhance the
achievement of the mission of the institution.
Descriptive Summary
The Library provides resources and services relevant to general information needs;
intellectual, personal, and profession growth; cultural development and activities of
the college and community. The library Collection Development Policy guides the
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 260
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
librarians in the selection, evaluation, and deselection of materials (2C.1.a.1). The
librarians are largely responsible for selecting and purchasing library materials
based on need or recommendation. Faculty, staff, and students are encouraged to
suggest library materials for purchase. Librarians work closely with instructional
faculty regarding suggested collection purchases. The library works with learning
support labs and services to procure and circulate materials specific to the needs of
those programs, such as ESL and Basic Skills materials.
Working with students and serving on the Curriculum Committee, the Textbook
Access Project, and other campus-wide committees allows the library staff to stay
informed on the information needs of the campus. The purchase of LibGuides has
allowed the library to develop web-based research tools specifically tailored to
subject courses and our growing number of online courses. (2C.1.a.2) The Library
maintains a computer lab for conducting research, as well as audiovisual equipment
for listening and viewing learning materials. There is also a document print station
in the library.
The library collection consists of over 100,000 volumes, and added 2,184 books in
2011-2012. There are 15,000 audiovisual items, and 81 current subscriptions. The
library provides 24/7 access to more than 12 full-text databases/electronic
resources including EBSCO Host, ABC-CLIO, Facts on File, and Grove Art Online.
(2C.1.a.3). These databases provide access to millions of articles from journals,
magazines, newspapers, and other reference works. The Library also provides 24/7
access to over 10,000 electronic books (e-books) through ebrary and EBSCO ebook
Collection (accessible through the online catalog). (2C.1.a.4)
Beginning with the spring 2014 semester, the library will be offering the EBSCO
Discovery Service. This will allow our students and faculty to search a majority of
the library’s content with one search. The Discovery Service will simultaneously
search our book collection, all our EBSCOHost databases as well as some nonEBSCO content making it easier and faster for our students to meet their research
needs.
The depth and quality of the collection and services available on site to students,
faculty and staff are greatly enhanced by the library’s participation in the Link+
consortium. (2C.1.a.5) Materials from approximately 60 consortium member
libraries—18 million titles, 25 million items— may be requested and are delivered
within three days to the circulation desk for pickup by the requesting student, staff,
or faculty member. In 2012-2013, the library borrowed 3,038 books from other
Link+ libraries and filled 2,537 inter-library loan requests to other Link+ libraries.
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 261
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
The library collection’s strengths are also indicated by the corresponding number of
loans made to other libraries. (2C.1.a.6)
Each full-time librarian is assigned a section of the collection to evaluate for
currency and relevancy to the college’s current curriculum. Interaction with faculty
regarding research assignments provides the librarians with the essential
framework for acquiring resources relevant to their course and assignments. Any
faculty member proposing a new course or revising an existing one must identify
the current correction of the text books via Curriculum Committee. In addition, the
librarian who sits on the Curriculum Committee recommends additional materials
as necessary. This allows the library to be proactive in its support of new
curriculum.
Circulation staff notifies the librarians when materials have been long overdue,
damaged, lost or missing. This allows the librarian to decide whether a
replacement is necessary and/or to purchase additional titles related to the field. In
addition, librarians evaluate the circulation of their designated subject areas to
determine which areas have high or low circulation.
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard. The library continues to provide quality service
and resources despite the ongoing financial difficulties faced by the state and
college by selecting and maintaining material to support students’ learning needs.
By participating in Link+, the library is able to provide students with access to a
greatly expanded collection of books that could never be purchased locally.
The Supervised Tutorial Center maintains a strong presence on campus serving
diverse students learning needs. More than 150 sections of subject matters are
supported by the services that Center provides. Along with the Supervised Tutoring
Center, subject-focused Writing Center and Math Resource Centers are established
in the same manner that meets the Title 5 supervised tutoring requirements. The
Center collaborates with many categorical programs and other support programs
across campus. (2C.1.a.7)
The ESL and World Languages Labs serve a wide range of ESL students who come to
West Valley, from those who are just starting their college career to those who are
ready to transition to traditional college level classes. Lab coordinators and
instructors help students one-on-one at both labs. Some more advanced students
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 262
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
also take advantage of the Writing Center and register for LS110 to help them with
their more advance writing skills. (2C.1.a.8)
Actionable Improvement Plans
None.
Evidence
2C.1.a.1
Library Collection Development
Policy
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2
013/evidence/2c/3.1_policy_selecting_materials_for_libr
ary.pdf
2C.1.a.2
LibGuides Link
http://libguides.westvalley.edu/index.php
2C.1.a.3
WVC Library databases page
http://westvalley.edu/library/databases/index.html
2C.1.a.4
EBSCO Ebook Collection
http://0ehis.ebscohost.com.library.wvmccd.cc.ca.us/eds/search/
basic?sid=e9a23871-261f-471b-bfb172bf033cb486%40sessionmgr114&vid=1&hid=109
2C.1.a.5
Link+ Service
http://westvalley.edu/library/linkplus.html
2C.1.a.6
2012/2013 Library Collections
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2
013/evidence/2c/2008-13_Library_Statistics_Totals.pdf
2C.1.a.7
Tutorial Center Statistics
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation//
2013/evidence/2c/Tutorial_Usage_Mini_Report_20122013.pdf
2C.1.a.8
Writing Center Course
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2
013/evidence/2c/Writing_Center_Course.pdf
Standard II.C.1.b
The institution provides ongoing instruction for users of library and other learning
support services so that students are able to develop skills in information
competency.
Descriptive Summary
The primary goal of the library is to provide a learning environment that promotes
students’ acquisition of information competency skills. Library faculty members
teach information competency/literary skills, which include the ability to access,
retrieve, analyze, evaluate, and apply information and to document sources.
Information competency instruction is provided through the Library 004:
Information Competency courses.
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 263
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Beginning in 2002, the Information Competency Task Force, a shared governance
body created by the Academic Senate, began a program to build a incremental
development of information competency graduation requirement. The first stage
was the successful deployment in 2005 of Library 004 – Information Competency, a
one-unit course in which students learn how to find, evaluate, synthesize, and
communicate information. In addition, students learn about the ethical use of
information and also the use of citation styles (2C.1.b.1). As of fall 2013 the course
demand continues to be strong as ten sections are offered each semester, and four
to five intersession sections every year. The college continued to focus on Library
004 (information competency) course to be the main venue to ensure students
develop skills in information competency.
Reference Desk Service (Individualized Assistance):
Professional Librarians are assigned to the Reference Desk during all library
operating hours to provide instruction in using the catalog, the research databases,
and to assist students in accessing the print resources and services available to
them at the library.
The type of reference instruction offered varies according to the information need
of the student being served:
•
•
•
Students with little or no experience with libraries or students who require
instruction in basic library skills receive instruction in how to search the
online catalog and interpret the contents of a bibliographic record; learn
how the items in the library are arranged and learn how to use a call
number to locate library materials. Students also learn how to use the
most appropriate technology (email, printing, download, and photocopy)
for extracting the information they need.
Students who come to the library to engage in research learn how to
select a manageable research topic; refine their topics if and when
necessary, craft a research topic; and identify the concepts relevant to
their queries; they learn how to build search terms and construct queries
that are most appropriate for the information source being used.
Students who use library reference services are also able to develop their
critical thinking skills: students learn how to apply criteria to evaluate the
quality of information (credibility, reliability, relevance, and authorship)
which helps then identify the value and difference of potential information
resources.
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 264
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Library Orientation
The library also introduces information competency skills through library
orientations. These 1.5-hour workshops are scheduled for subject discipline classes
and focus on developing research skills based on the particular class’s research
project. A total of eighty-seven orientations to over 2,700 students (2C.1.b.2) were
taught in the 2011-2012 academic year, a record number for the library. Librarians
at the reference desk also teach students multiple aspects of the research process,
along with how to retrieve and critically evaluate information via the online catalog
and online databases.
Critical thinking and information literacy is an institutional learning outcome for the
college. The assessment of student learning outcomes in Library 004 and library
orientations is in place. The student learning outcome for Library 004 is for
students to produce and evaluative an annotated bibliography on a topic of their
choice. A comprehensive assessment report for Library 004 was last completed in
spring 2011 (2C.1.b.3). A rubric is used to grade the bibliographies and to measure
how well students accomplish the specific performance indicators.
The library also conducts post-orientation surveys on a periodic basis (2C.1.b.4).
Students are asked to self-assess their knowledge of specific learning objectives
before and after the orientation. In addition, librarians are regularly observed at
the reference desk as part of the faculty evaluation process. An observation and
feedback form is completed and reviewed with the observing faculty member.
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard.
The library has succeeded in extending its reference services to users beyond the
library’s physical space via electronic communication. The outreach librarian meets
with online instructors to demonstrate access to the college’s electronic resources.
At the request of individual instructors, a LibGuide is created for a specific course.
This acts as the “front door” to the library for our online students. Students can
request assistance by a librarian through our “Last Resort” contact form which is
checked throughout the day.
Course-related orientations have become more in demand in the last few years.
Offering tailored rather than general instructional session orientations requires
more intensive preparation time for the librarians but these sessions are more
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 265
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
effective. Students respond more positively and are more engaged when the
content of a session is relevant to their specific research assignments.
Actionable Improvement Plans
 The college plans to address how best to infuse information competency
into an overall teaching and learning context to ensure that students learn
such skills and knowledge.
Evidence
2C.1.b.1
Library 4 Course Outline
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2013/e
vidence/2c/Library_004_COR.pdf
2C.1.b.2
Library Orientation
http://westvalley.edu/library/orientations.html
2C.1.b.3
SLO/A Assessment for
Library 4
https://www.surveymonkey.com/sr.aspx?sm=k7j4naZ9_2fdR3
xOPF5RInvQR_2fgwoM_2fyyMf2W3rR7Ou3w_3d
2C.1.b.4
Post Orientation Survey
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2013/e
vidence/2c/slo_survey_for_orientation_2012.pdf
Standard II.C.1.c
The institution provides students and personnel responsible for student learning
programs and services adequate access to the library and other learning support
services, regardless of their location or means of delivery.
Descriptive Summary
The institution provides students and personnel responsible for student learning
programs and services adequate access to the libraries and other learning support
services. Library staffing consists of four full-time faculty librarians, four full-time
library technicians, several part-time faculty and student workers, depending on
budget availability. The Library and the Reference Desk are open during the fall and
spring semesters, Monday through Thursday, 8:00 a.m. to 7:30 p.m., Friday 8:00
a.m. to 12:00 p.m., and Saturday 12:00 to 4:00 p.m.
Library materials consist of non-circulating reference materials, the circulating
general collection (print and non-print), reserve materials based on our curriculum
and electronic databases. (2C.1.c.1) Electronic resources, such as e-books and
periodical databases, are accessible to off-campus students, faculty, and staff via
the library’s website. Students are able to access print books in the Mission College
collection by requesting delivery via our shared catalog system. Collections outside
the district are available through the Link+ Consortium, an inter-library loan
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 266
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
program consisting of academic and public libraries located in California and
Nevada. Access to these collections for distance learners is made easier through the
Link+ “visiting patron and pickup anywhere” option.
Despite statewide cuts to Instructional Equipment and Library Materials IELM and
Telecommunications and Technology Infrastructure Program (TTIP) funds for
community college libraries, WVC database offerings have grown since 2007 thanks
to the negotiating efforts of the Community College Library Consortium (CCLC). In
2011, the CCLC was able to secure a statewide subscription to Academic Search
Premier, a periodical database, allowing the remaining budget to be pinpointed for
the purchase of databases that would assist our curriculum in a number of different
subjects. These sources are available 24/7 for faculty, staff and student use via the
Web. Online databases are listed below and those that were acquired in the last six
years are marked with an asterisk:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Academic Search Premier (EbscoHost)*
Literary Reference Center
CQ Researcher
Facts on File
American Indian Experience*
Issues: Controversy and Society*
Ebrary (e-books)*
CollegeSource Online
Ferguson’s Career Guidance Center*
CountryWatch
Rand California
Oxford Art Online
AccessScience*
Auto Repair Reference Center*
The following databases will be added in spring 2014 with the new EBSCO Discovery
System:
• Academic Search Complete
• Biography Reference Center
• Business Source Complete
• Career Library
• Entrepreneurial Studies Source
• International Bibliography of Theatre & Dance with FT
• Points of View Reference Center
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 267
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
•
•
•
Science Reference Center
Vocational Studies Complete
Literary Reference Center Plus
Library services are posted online at http://www.westvalley.edu/library/. The
library has a prominent link on the college’s main webpage. Other remote access
points include:

A link to library resources from all ANGEL courses, the college’s distance
learning course management system. All faculty and students have access
to ANGEL whether their class is in person or online.
 West Valley College Portal (WVCPortal) under the “Support Services” area
 E-mail reference and telephone reference
 Library research guides (LibGuides) specifically tailored for certain classes
and subject areas
The library takes a proactive approach in developing tutorials for distance learning
students. Short video tutorials are available on how to search the online catalog
and more popular databases. These can be viewed at our YouTube channel:
http://www.youtube.com/user/wvclibrary/videos?view=0. These videos are being
incorporated into subject and class specific research guides for distance learning
students.
The Library is part of the campus-wide wireless network. This has allowed students
with mobile devices to easily connect to services and has extended our on-campus
reach. In addition, it has alleviated the lines to access our 29 public computers. In
addition, the Library also has a smart classroom, which is used primarily for the
library orientations. Currently, we have 29 Apple laptop computers available for
students enabling them to have hands-on practice with a librarian available to
demonstrate and answer individual questions.
Wireless printing is available for students from the public computers and their own
laptops. The library has one laser printer with a dedicated computer for requesting
the printouts. Two photocopy machines are also available for students to use. The
photocopy machines and printer are rented from Pinnacle. The company pays for
all of the supplies and maintenance of the machines.
Disabled student access is available via an adjustable computer table and two
disability-accessible computers, a scanner with special needs software, and closedcircuit television magnifier reader for print. The disability accessible computers are
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 268
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
equipped with Jaws, Kurzeil 3000 and Dragon Naturally Speaking. In addition all of
the library videos are captioned and created using Section 508 compliant software.
The library is comprised of three other learning resource areas: The Writing Center,
ESL Skills Lab, and Tutorial Services. The Writing Center is open to all students on
campus who need assistance with their writing, reading, studying, and keyboarding
skills. Students can register for a free half unit class called LS110: Supervised
Tutoring with an instructor’s referral. The ESL Skills Lab is open to English as a
Second Language student on campus who require assistance with grammar,
vocabulary, listening, reading, spelling, and writing. Students register for a half unit
ESL 975 class and come to the lab for two hours every week for the entire semester.
The Tutorial Center is open to all enrolled students on campus. Depending on the
subject to be tutored, the student can take advantage of drop-in tutoring for Math,
Chemistry, Physics or Economics. Students share the tutors who are on duty with
the other students in the drop-in area. Students can also schedule individual
tutoring or group tutoring in a number of other subjects. All of these areas are
accessible to students with disabilities.
Each of these learning services collects data on service usage and subsequently
adapts their schedules according to their findings. The Library uses usage data to
determine when to be open and what services to provide. (2C.1.c.2) Data collected
by Tutorial Services help in identifying where to market their offerings, what
services to offer, and when to schedule tutors for specific courses. (2C.1.c.3)
Services are publicized via websites, postings in the WVC Catalog, and fact sheets
distributed across services.
Self -Evaluation
The college meets this standard. At the time of the last self-study, the Library had
four service points: Circulation, Reference, Periodicals and Audio/Visual. The
Periodicals Desk was closed in 2010 and the photocopier machines and printers that
were next to the Periodicals Desk were moved to the Audio/Visual area, reducing
the number of staff needed, but maintaining as much convenience as possible for
the students. The library staff has leveraged social media, online services, and free
or inexpensive software to promote our services to students, faculty and staff,
regardless of their location or means of delivery.
While comments on the Student Accreditation Survey identified the need for more
open hours, 67% agreed or strongly agreed that library resources and services are
appropriate to support students’ educational goals. (2C.1.c.4)
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 269
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Actionable Improvement Plans
None.
Evidence
2C.1.c.1
Library Website
http://www.westvalley.edu/library/
2C.1.c.2
Library Services
http://westvalley.edu/library/index.html
2C.1.c.3
Tutorial Analysis
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation//2
013/evidence/2c/Tutorial_Usage_Mini_Report_20122013.pdf
2C.1.c.4
Student Accreditation Survey
pg11
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2
013/evidence/2c/Accreditation_Student_Survey_Report_
2012_page11.pdf
Standard II.C.1.d
The institution provides effective maintenance and security for its library and
other learning support services.
Descriptive Summary
The 41 year old library building is located in the north central part of the campus.
(2C.1.d.1) The Library building contains several departments/units: Digital Music
Classroom, ESL Skills Lab, Library, Printing Services, Tutorial Services, Writing
Center, and TV Office. (2C.1.d.2) Each department/unit maintains key access to its
own non-public areas. The sprawling building can be split into geographical areas:
east and west. On the east side of the building the following are located: Digital
Music Classroom, Printing Services, TV Studio, and the Writing Center computer
labs all have doors that are locked during non-business hours. On the west side of
the building are the ESL Lab, Library, and Tutorial Services. Tutorial Services has a
public entrance that is located on the outer part of the building, while an interior
door is used to enter the Library from within the Tutorial Services area. The ESL Lab
is entirely open to the building interior with entrances and exits leading to both the
Writing Center and the Library. The Library’s two entry points are the shared
entrance with the ESL Lab/Library Audio-Visual area and the main entrance. The
shared entrance has a 3M™Library Detection System (electromagnetic). Books and
items with the 3M™ tattle tape stripes, if not desensitized during checkout sound
an alert if the patron leaves through the gate with the items. During closed hours
this entrance is cordoned off by a one-foot high expandable wooden gate with a
hook latch.
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 270
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
The institution provides increased security for critical learning services areas on
campus which house expensive and/or critical equipment: specifically the systems
utilized are video recording and monitored security alarms. In the east side of the
Learning Resource Center a monitored security alarm system, as well as a video
recording system is utilized to protect the Digital Music Classroom, TV
Studio/Control Room, and AV support areas. These areas (east side of Library) not
only house expensive computers and video editing equipment, but also high-end TV
studio cameras and racks of AV/Video equipment/servers. The security alarm
systems are contracted primarily through Sonitrol, which not only triggers an alarm
when a door is opened without turning off the alarm, but also has microphones to
listen in on activity after an alarm has been triggered.
Public access computers located in rooms that cannot be locked are secured to
tables; laptops are locked within a Breford TL474LL/A 32 Laptop Mobility Cart and
behind the locked smart classroom door when not in use. Student computers are
maintained and updated by Instructional Technology Support Services (2C.1.d.3),
while staff computers are maintained by the district Information Systems Support
staff. (2C.1.d.4) Computers are obtained through campus technology upgrade
programs and also the WVC Integrated Planning and Resource Allocation process
which includes budget and resource allocation based on SLO/A Assessment and
Program Review. (2C.1.d.5) Library student, staff computers, and computer systems
are maintained by the systems librarian in conjunction with the district Information
Systems Support staff.
Access to library subscription services is restricted to authorized users through a
proxy service provided by Innovative Interfaces Inc. (III), an integrated library
system.
The Library and Writing Center utilizes Pinnacle Printing Services for student
printing and photocopying. Printers, copy machines, and the computer print
point/server are maintained by Pinnacle.
There is currently no dedicated safety phone in the library building. In spring 2012,
the Student Health Services Community Resource Coordinator presented “Assisting
Emotionally Distressed Students” for library staff. During fall 2012, library staff
participated in a “Shooter on Campus” training session presented by the District
Emergency Services Coordinator. The training session was held in the library
classroom and other library building units were invited to participate. In spring
2013, the library will participate in a Triage Workshop to be held in the library
classroom, other library building units will also be invited.
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 271
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
While the Library and Learning Resource Center are slated for construction in 2018,
most of the chairs are original to the 41-year old building and greatly in need of
replacement. In 2011, the Library received a Land Corporation grant to create a
modern space for group activity in the north entrance area. With the grant, the
furniture was replaced with updated and functional furniture for students. In
addition, a corner section of the north entrance flooring was replaced with linoleum
to creating a casual café area where students may congregate. The college plans to
ensure that sustainable and effective maintenance, as well as security for the new
Library and Learning Resource Center be the highest priority for the new building
construction plan.
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard. Library and Learning Resource Center staff has an
integral role in noticing any issues or problems with the library building. The staff
maintains open communication with Campus Police, Campus Maintenance
Department and Campus Custodians whenever issues or problems arise.
Security is maintained for the Library and Learning Resource Center, and its
collections, through staff oversight and a variety of electronic safeguards, including
locking systems, sensors and passwords.
Actionable Improvement Plans
None.
Evidence
2C.1.d.1
Campus Map
http://westvalley.edu/maps/kiosk/
2C.1.d.2
Library map
http://westvalley.edu/library/map.html
2C.1.d.3
Instructional Technology
Support Services
http://www.westvalley.edu/academics/instru_tech/
2C.1.d.4
District Information Systems
Department
http://wvm.edu/group.aspx?id=174
2C.1.d.5
Integrated Planning and
Resource Allocation Diagram
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/integr
ated_planning_diagram.html
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 272
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Standard II.C.1.e
When the institution relies on or collaborates with other institutions or other
sources for library and other learning support services for its instructional
programs, it documents that formal agreements exist and that such resources and
services are adequate for the institution's intended purposes, are easily accessible,
and utilized. The performance of these services is evaluated on a regular basis.
The institution takes responsibility for and assures the reliability of all services
provided either directly or through contractual arrangement.
Descriptive Summary
The Library relies on several library vendors to support library services. The Library
maintains and reviews written contractual agreements annually. Vendors are
evaluated at the time of renewals or if issues are raised (by staff or students) with
the service, this is done during departmental meetings. (2C.1.e.1)
Among the vendors are Innovative Interfaces Inc., Online Computer Library Center,
Link+, the Community College Library Consortium, Pinnacle, Califa Library Group,
the National Cooperative Purchasing Alliance, and Drip Coffee.




Innovative Interfaces Inc. (III): the vendor that supplies the electronic
circulation system for the Library, providing public access to the catalog and
databases from both on and off-campus. III also stores data and automated
system backup on their server. This technology allows the Systems Librarian
to do annual upgrades and to capture various usage statistics for analysis
and planning.
Online Computer Library Center (OCLC): the non-profit organization
provides cataloging records that make inter-library searches and requests
possible. OCLC is also a research organization providing useful statistics and
billing information on a monthly basis.
Link+: The WVC Library is a member of a consortium of 61 (currently)
participating libraries in California and Nevada. If an item is unavailable
locally, patrons may check the Link+ catalog and request the item from one
of the Link+ libraries, which is then received in 2 – 4 business days. The
library keeps statistics on materials borrowed and loaned to other Link+
libraries. Library faculty and staff participate in user group meetings.
The Community College Library Consortium (CCLC): the Library’s
resource for most of the electronic databases and periodicals. During the
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 273
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014




last year of state-wide budget cuts, CCLC was able to broker a contract with
EBSCO, an electronic database subscription service, for the community
colleges in the consortium at a discounted fee. The Acquisitions Librarian
monitors the subscriptions and licensing agreements with CCLC and collects
and reviews monthly usage statistics.
Pinnacle: the vendor provides two photocopiers (including toner and
paper), two networked and Wi-Fi printers, change machine, and copy-card
dispensers for students to use. The company owns and maintains the
equipment, collecting the revenues. Statistics kept by Pinnacle are faxed to
the Library monthly. If revenues exceed 130,000 copies, the excess is sent by
check to the WVC Library, which helps to defray other overhead costs.
Califa Library Group: Houses the WVC digitized archives. The library
received a start-up grant in 2010-11 to train our archives librarian, purchase
a scanner and supplies, and pay for the initial cost of uploading 200 images
onto the Califa website. Connect to our digitized archives via our Archives
page: http://westvalley.edu/library/archives/
The National Cooperative Purchasing Alliance (NCPA): is a national
government purchasing cooperative working to reduce the cost of goods
and services for public and educational agencies. One of our suppliers of
library materials is contracted with the NCPA, allowing us to make purchases
at a discounted price.
Drip Coffee: In September 2011, Drip Coffee café was set up in the library,
which has helped to attract students to the library and eliminated the need
for them to trek across campus for a beverage or snack. The library receives
a percentage of the Drip income.
Self -Evaluation
The college meets this standard. Vendors are evaluated at the time of renewals, or
if issues are raised (by staff or students) with the service evaluation is done during
departmental meetings. (2C.1.e.1) All contractual agreements are functioning well,
evaluated annually, and are adequate for the Library’s needs.
Actionable Improvement Plans
None.
Evidence
2C.1.e.1
Pinnacle Discussion
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2013/evidenc
e/2c/030311_Library_Staff_Meeting-Pinnacle_Example_Summary.pdf
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 274
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Standard II.C.2
The institution evaluates library and other learning support services to assure
their adequacy in meeting identified student needs. Evaluation of these services
provides evidence that they contribute to the achievement of student learning
outcomes. The institution uses the results of these evaluations as the basis for
improvement.
Descriptive Summary
Tutorial Services and the Library complete reviews through the formal West Valley
College program review process. The Library and Tutoring Services also develop
student learning outcomes and use institutional research data to assess their
services. The program review process specifically addresses access, use, and
relationship to intended student learning outcomes. Tutorial Services completed its
non-instructional program review in October 2010, (2C.2.1) and the Library also
completed both non-instructional and instructional program reviews in 2010 and
2013. (2C.2.2, 3)
With the closing of the Technology Center in May 2013, a hardware and software
migration was planned and executed. Computers with specialized software such as
AutoCad, AutoDesk, C++, Nutritionist Pro and others were moved to the Tutorial
Center. The library received twelve computers with Microsoft Office and internet
access to help alleviate lines for public computers. This sharing of the Technology
Center assets has helped to consolidate the areas on campus where students could
go to get assistance with class work. The old Technology Center was across campus
whereas now these services are under one roof—The Learning Resource Center.
The Library uses surveys, comment cards/e-mails, and other statistics to evaluate its
services. Tutorial Services conducts end-of-the-year surveys and gathers service
usage data. This data includes information on student success and retention and
assesses where the demand for Tutorial Services is greatest. (2C.2.4)
Surveys are the most comprehensive method of assessing use, access, satisfaction,
and student learning. The most recent library surveys were carried out during the
2012-13 academic year. The student survey was distributed to approximately 9,663
students who had provided the college with e-mail addresses; a total of 830 surveys
were returned for an eight percent return rate. Of the 830 responses, 551 (66%)
take in-person classes only, 224 (27%) take a combination of in-person and online
courses, and 55 (7%) take online classes only. Of the respondents who used and
rated library services on campus, 71 percent agreed or strongly agreed that the
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 275
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
levels of service at the circulation desk were satisfactory, and 64 percent agreed or
strongly agreed that the levels of service at the reference desk were satisfactory.
(2C.2.5)
At the same time, the faculty and staff library survey was administered. It was
distributed to all faculty and staff having a district e-mail address. The survey went
out to full-time and part-time faculty and staff; seventy-nine surveys were returned.
Overall, faculty and staff respondents were highly satisfied with various library
resources and services. In almost all cases, 50% to 60% indicated they either
“Strongly Agree” or “Agree” that they were satisfied and 40% to 50% indicated “No
opinion or not applicable.” Strongest levels of satisfaction were applied to services
provided by library media technicians (71%), services provided by faculty librarians
(71%), Book Checkout Desk Service (60%), handling of reserve materials (56%) and
online catalog (52%). In addition, many of the comments were in praise of library
staff and showed a high level of gratitude for the services that are provided by the
library. Comments also indicated a need for a newer, brighter space and better
training of associate librarians at the reference desk and for those associates that
give orientations. (2C.2.6)
During October-November, 2012, surveys evaluating student learning outcomes
from the library orientations were distributed to 174 students following their class
orientations. Responses were received from 151 of the 174 for an 86 percent return
rate. All students were “Very confident” or “Somewhat confident” that they could
locate books through the West Valley Library Catalog (100%) or Link+ (96%),
periodical articles using Academic Search Premier (95%) and web sites (98%).
Students appeared to be less confident about their ability to evaluate web pages
with 56 percent indicating “Very confident”; 34 percent indicating “Somewhat
confident”; and nine percent “Not very confident.” This confidence level is
attributable to the fact that very few students seem to have been introduced to the
ideas and methods for critically evaluating web pages. Students were also less
confident that they understood when and how to cite sources with 50 percent
stating they were “Very confident”; 34 percent “Somewhat confident”; 14 percent
“Not very confident”; and two percent stating they were “Not at all confident.”
Time for most orientations does not allow for a thorough teaching of citing sources,
which probably accounts for any indications of lagging confidence. Beginning in
spring 2013, the library orientation format changed. Laptops on loan from the Fox
Center were utilized to create a more interactive learning environment. The
orientations are now a mix of lecture and hands-on practice. Students have the
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 276
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
opportunity to start their research, and the librarian is available to answer students’
questions as they arise. (2C.2.7)
Student learning outcomes assessment for tutorial services yielded positive results.
The assessment indicated that tutors do not merely give answers to students.
Rather, they guide students in the learning process. Results indicated that students
excel at learning actively and learning independently. They become more efficient
learners as demonstrated through retention and success rates as well as improved
grades. (2C.2.8)
The combined analysis of program review information, usage data, and surveys
resulted in modifications in service, thus improving the connection between
learning services and intended student learning. Staff members regularly review
goals and objectives and establish new goals, as needed, based on these inputs and
others. Evaluations, whether by comment cards, e-mails, or surveys, are received
from faculty, staff, and students. Although comment cards and e-mails can be sent
by anyone, including the community in general, surveys provide the library and
other learning resources the opportunity to solicit information from specific groups
as needed. The faculty appraisal process that involves observations and student
evaluations also generates feedback and suggestions for improvement.
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard. The Library and Tutorial Center use the results of
the program review process, evaluations, usage data, and surveys as a basis for
improvement. Student Learning Outcomes (SLO/As) exist for library instruction and
orientations and for Tutorial Services. SLO/As have not been developed for other
library services.
Action Plan
None.
Evidence
2C.2.1
Tutorial Services Program
Review
http://www.westvalley.edu/documents/faculty_resources/Progr
am_Review/2010-2011_Academic_Year/NonInstructional_Programs/Tutorial_Services/Tutorial_Svcs_Prog_R
ev_10-11.pdf
2C.2.2
Library Non-instructional
Program Review
http://www.westvalley.edu/documents/faculty_resources/Progr
am_Review/2009-2010_Academic_Year/2009-2010_NonInstructional_Programs/Library/
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 277
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
2C.2.3
Library Instructional
Program Review (p. 176)
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation//2013/ev
idence/2c/instructional_program_review_submissions_page176.
pdf
2C.2.4
Tech Center Usage Data
2007-2012
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2013/evi
dence/2c/tech_ctr_usage_data-2007-2012.pdf
2C.2.5
2012 Library Survey Results
Full Report
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2013/evi
dence/2c/library_survey_2012_FINAL.pdf
2C.2.6
2012 Faculty/Staff Library
Survey results
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2013/evi
dence/2c/library_faculty_staff_survey_results_12-13.pdf
2C.2.7
2012 Library Orientation
Survey Results
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2013/evi
dence/2c/library_student_orientations_survey_results_1213.pdf
2C.2.8
Tutorial Services 1010-2011
Program Review and SLO/A
http://www.westvalley.edu/documents/faculty_resources/Progr
am_Review/2010-2011_Academic_Year/NonInstructional_Programs/Tutorial_Services/
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 278
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
This page intentionally left blank
|Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services 279
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Standard III: Resources
The institution effectively uses its human, physical, technology and financial
resources to achieve its broad educational purposes, including stated student
learning outcomes, and to improve institutional effectiveness. Accredited colleges
in multi-college systems may be organized such that responsibility for resources,
allocation for resources and planning rests with the system. In such cases, the
system is responsible for meeting standards on behalf of the accredited colleges.
Standard IIIA: Human Resources
The institution employs qualified personnel to support student learning programs
and services wherever offered and by whatever means, delivered, and to improve
institutional effectiveness. Personnel are treated equitably, are evaluated
regularly and systematically, and are provided opportunities for professional
development. Consistent with its mission, the institution demonstrates its
commitment to the significant educational role played by persons of diverse
backgrounds by making positive efforts to encourage such diversity. Human
resource planning is integrated with institutional planning.
West Valley College assures that as an institution it employs qualified personnel to
support student learning programs and services to facilitate and improve
institutional effectiveness. In partnership with the West Valley Mission Community
College District (WVMCCD), the college has procedures that assure employees to be
treated equitably regarding regular and systematic evaluation. There are also
systems in place to provide for opportunities for professional development. West
Valley College is committed to enhancing the significant role played by persons of
diverse background. West Valley College encourages diversity. This human
resource planning is integrated with institutional planning as developed through the
process of participatory governance.
|Standard III: Resources 280
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Standard IIIA.1
The institution assures the integrity and quality of its programs and services by
employing personnel who are qualified by appropriate education, training, and
experience to provide and support these programs and services. Criteria,
qualifications, and procedures for selection of personnel are clearly and publicly
stated. Job descriptions are directly related to institutional mission and goals and
accurately reflect position duties, responsibilities, and authority.
Descriptive Summary
West Valley College assures the integrity and quality of its programs and services by
employing personnel who are qualified by appropriate education, training, and
experience to provide support for the college’s programs and services. The college
adheres to the Faculty Minimum Qualifications as established by the Board of
Governors of California Community Colleges as well as minimum qualifications
established by the Academic Senate and WVMCCD Board of Trustees. (3A.1.1)
All applicants for academic, classified, and management positions are screened by
the Human Resources (HR) department to ensure all personnel are qualified for
their respective positions. HR supervises all phases of the recruitment process. All
hiring committees follow the procedures for selection and recruitment that have
been developed by the Academic Senate for faculty positions. (3A.1.2) Procedures
developed by Human Resources are followed for management and classified
positions. (3A.1.3) HR reviews applicants for minimum qualifications. If an
applicant does not meet minimum qualifications and requests equivalency, these
are forwarded to the faculty equivalency committee for evaluation.
Existing positions help the college operate effectively and smoothly in order to
assure the integrity and quality of its programs and services, which are derived from
the Institutional Mission as well as goals and objectives. The college develops new
positions or makes augmentations to existing positions when the institutional goals
and objectives require changes in organizational structure. Existing, new, and/or
revised position descriptions are directly related to institutional mission and goals
and accurately reflect position duties, responsibilities, and authority.
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard.
|Standard III: Resources 281
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Actionable Improvement Plans
None.
Evidence
3A.1.1
WVMCCD Minimum Faculty
Qualifications
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation
/2013/evidence/3a/bp_ap_7120_recruitment_hiring.p
df
3A.1.2
HR and Academic Senate Faculty
Selection and Hiring Procedures
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation
/2013/evidence/3a/Faculty_Hiring_Procedure.pdf
3A.1.3
Management and Classified
Selection and Hiring Procedures
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation
/2013/evidence/3a/manangement_classified_selection
_process.pdf
Standard IIIA.1.a
Criteria for selection of faculty include knowledge of the subject matter or service
to be performed (as determined by individuals with discipline expertise), effective
teaching, scholarly activities, and potential to contribute to the mission of the
institution. Institutional faculty play a significant role in selection of new faculty.
Degrees held by faculty and administrators are from institutions accredited by
recognized U.S. accrediting agencies. Degrees from non-U.S. institutions are
recognized only if equivalence has been established.
Descriptive Summary
West Valley-Mission Community College District has developed policies for ensuring
that all personnel are qualified by appropriate education, training and experience to
provide and support all programs and services. The policies are publicly available
and identify criteria, qualifications, and procedures for selection of all personnel.
The practices adhere to Education Code Section 70901.2, 70902(b)(7) & (d), and
87100 et seq.; and Title 5 Sections 53000 et seq., and 51023.5; as stated in
WVMCCD Board Policy 7120 (3A.1.a.1) and are outlined in the Faculty Recruitment
and Selection Procedures Manual (3A.1.a.2) and the Classified and Administrators
Recruitment and Selection Procedures Manual (3A.1.a.3); they are posted on the
Human Resources’ website. (3A.1.a.4)
These policies include, but are not limited to, providing full, objective and equal
access for all applicants; actively seeking applicants who demonstrate the required
technical expertise, competency, and sensitivity that will enable them to work
effectively in a multicultural educational environment; complying with all federal,
|Standard III: Resources 282
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
state, and local laws; ensuring participation by faculty, classified staff,
administration, and students in their respective roles throughout procedures so
that fair and equitable treatment of all individuals can be assured; ensuring
diversity on all screening committees; and maintaining confidentiality throughout
the process.
Participatory governance plays a pivotal role in the creation of hiring criteria,
policies, and procedures. Board Policy 7120 states the Academic Senate and
Classified Senate participate in the development, revision, and approval of these
policies and procedures jointly with administration. (3A.1.a.5)
All positions within the district have detailed job descriptions. In accordance with
the district’s recruitment and selection process, each hiring committee reviews the
job description and develops appropriate position announcements prior to posting
and conducting recruitment and hiring activities. This assures the relativity to the
institutional mission and goals, along with the accurate reflection of position duties,
responsibilities and authority. (3A.1.a.6) Job descriptions are available for viewing
on the Human Resources website. (3A.1.a.7)
The state of California establishes minimum qualifications for every faculty
discipline area. Applications must possess these minimum qualifications in order to
be considered for a position. Every faculty job description emphasizes the
importance of instructors being grounded in their subject, knowledgeable of the
best pedagogies in their field, committed to student learning and success, and
sensitive to the differences among students in a richly diverse campus environment.
Faculty must meet minimum qualifications, or the equivalent, as established by the
Statewide Academic Senate for California Community Colleges. These minimum
qualifications serve as a statewide benchmark for promoting professionalism and
rigor within the academic disciplines and as a guide to determine suitability for
employment.
The importance of effective teaching is clearly indicated in job announcements.
The candidates must demonstrate success in effective teaching by including a
special, separate statement in their cover letter or resume. In many cases, there
are additional supplemental questions that the candidates are required to answer
that demonstrate their ability to meet the needs of a diverse student population.
District procedures ensure that faculty play a significant role in the selection of new
faculty. Roles and responsibilities of faculty participating in the hiring committee
|Standard III: Resources 283
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
process are clearly stated in the Faculty Recruitment and Selection Procedures
Manual. (3A.1.a.8) Based on these procedures, faculty are involved in every step of
the hiring process: from the formation of the hiring committee with discipline
expertise, to the preparation of the job description, recruitment advertising,
development of paper screening criteria and rating form, equivalency review,
interviews, reference checks, and hiring recommendations. The faculty screening
committee includes five members, a majority of whom are subject matter faculty.
The screening committee may also include classified, management, and students.
The committee’s initial responsibility is to review the application. The screening
committee develops paper screening, interview and reference questions, which
address the knowledge, skills, and abilities of each applicant, as they pertain to the
duties and responsibilities of the position. Many faculty screening committees
include a teaching demonstration as part of the screening process. Many classified
positions include a skills demonstration as part of the screening process. All
screening committee questions are approved by the appropriate vice presidents for
content and HR for employment-related information. HR reviews all applications to
assure that they are complete, meet minimum qualifications and/or have requested
equivalency.
For faculty positions, an equivalency process has been established for applicants
who do not directly meet minimum qualifications in order to determine
equivalence, based on degree equivalence, academic background equivalence, or
professional equivalence. The same process is followed for applicants holding
degrees from non-U.S. institutions. This process includes a review of transcripts
and course descriptions.
Per Administrative Procedure 7211, “the Board of Trustees relies primarily upon the
advice and judgment of the Academic Senate to determine that each individual
employed under the authority granted by the regulations possesses qualifications
that are at least equivalent to the applicable minimum qualifications.” (3A.1.a.9)
The faculty equivalency process includes review by an Equivalency Committee
consisting of:
1. Vice President of Instruction, or designee, from each college
2. Four Academic Senate representatives, two from each college, each
serving a two-year term. Terms shall be staggered. A minimum of two
faculty members must be present to validate the committee’s decision
regarding equivalency
|Standard III: Resources 284
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
3. Up to two (2) ad-hoc full-time faculty members, one from each college in
the discipline from which the equivalency has been requested. A fulltime faculty member from a related discipline at the college requesting
the equivalency may be recommended as the faculty discipline
representative.
The job applicant is responsible for submitting the required forms and supporting
documents to assert and equivalency. (3A.1.a.10)
The process for hiring of associate faculty members is currently under review by
both colleges. This is an effort to streamline as well as install a more flexible and
efficient hiring process at the college; it is led by Division and Department Chairs
supported by appropriate Deans. (3A.1.a.11)
The hiring procedures of full-time employees are rigorous and thorough. All
positions follow the same process of initial screening of written applications,
interviews with the hiring committee, reference checking, final interview and
selection.
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard. The college’s hiring process for full-time
employees in all categories is thorough and consistent.
Actionable Improvement Plans

Continue to review associate faculty hiring process and implement new
process by fall 2014.
Evidence
3A.1.a.1
WVMCCD Board Policy 7120
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/20
13/evidence/3a/bp_7120.pdf
3A.1.a.2
Faculty Recruitment and
Selection Procedures Manual
http://westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2013/evi
dence/3a/faculty_hiring_procd.pdf
3A.1.a.3
Classified and Administrators
Recruitment and Selection
Procedures Manual
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/20
13/evidence/3a/Classified_Admin_Selection_Procedure.p
df
3A.1.a.4
Human Resources Forms
webpage
http://wvm.edu/documents.aspx?fid=26400&doc=26706&
year=0&category=1&excludeyear=1
3A.1.a.5
BP 7120 – Recruitment and
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/20
13/evidence/3a/ap_7120.pdf
|Standard III: Resources 285
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Hiring
3A.1.a.6
Faculty Job Announcement
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/20
13/evidence/3a/faculty.job.announcement.example.pdf
3A.1.a.7
Faculty Job Description
http://wvm.edu/documents.aspx?fid=26400&doc=26718&
year=0&category=39608&excludeyear=1
3A.1.a.8
WVMCCD Associate Faculty
Part-Time Pool Recruitment
Process Overview
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/20
13/evidence/3a/part_time_faculty_pool_recruitment_pro
cess_11_12_13.pdf
3A.1.a.9
AP 7211 – Minimum
Qualifications
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/20
13/evidence/3a/AP_7211.pdf
3A.1.a.10
Faculty Job Announcement
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/20
13/evidence/3a/Faculty Job Announcement with
Equivalency Requirement.pdf
3A.1.a.11
Associate Faculty Hiring Process
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/20
13/evidence/3a/Part Time Associate Faculty Pool
Recruitment Process_Rev 11.12.13.pdf
Standard IIIA.1.b
The institution assures the effectiveness of its human resources by evaluating all
personnel systematically and at stated intervals. The institution establishes
written criteria for evaluating all personnel, including performance of assigned
duties and participation in institutional responsibilities and other activities
appropriate to their expertise. Evaluation processes seek to assess effectiveness
of personnel and encourage improvement. Actions taken following evaluations
are formal, timely, and documented.
Descriptive Summary
All personnel are evaluated systematically and at stated intervals. Performance
evaluations are designed to encourage employee growth and development, and to
encourage open and productive communication among supervisors and employees.
General evaluation guidelines are laid out in Administrative Policy 7150 (3A.1.b.1)
and in contracts negotiated with the respective collective bargaining units:
Association of College Educators (ACE) for faculty, Classified Employees Association
(CEA) for classified personnel, Peace Officers Association for campus police
personnel, and Teamsters Local 856 for supervisory classified personnel. There are
written criteria established by the college and district for evaluating all personnel.
The criteria include assessing performance of assigned duties, participation in
institutional responsibilities, as well as other activities appropriate for the
|Standard III: Resources 286
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
individual’s position. Individuals are assessed to determine effectiveness of
personnel and to determine if improvement is needed.
The agreements with the employee collective bargaining units and unrepresented
employees require employee evaluations by the college. Human Resources
coordinates these evaluations in conjunction with college administrators, faculty,
and staff to assure that all administrators, faculty, and staff are evaluated in
accordance with district policies and collective bargaining agreements.
Full-Time Faculty
In accordance with the ACE contract, a four-year tenure review process is utilized
for tenure-track faculty as reflected in Board Policy 7210. (3A.1.b.2, 3) The purpose
of the tenure review period is to give faculty members an opportunity to
demonstrate that they meet the performance criteria established. During the fouryear tenure-review period, new full-time faculty is evaluated by a three member
Tenure Review Committee whose membership includes two tenured faculty
members and an administrative designee. Tenure-track faculty are also assigned to
a faculty mentor in the same discipline, if available. Student appraisal surveys are
completed for each of the faculty member’s course sections.
The
administrator/peer evaluation form and the student appraisal surveys contain a set
of criteria used to evaluate the faculty member’s performance, as well as a written
narrative to describe areas of performance and areas for improvement. Tenuretrack faculty undergo rigorous evaluation, which includes site observations,
appraisal surveys, and self-appraisal. A one year performance plan for tenure track
faculty is developed by the appraisal team, in consultation with the member, to
provide direction and set priorities during the tenure-track faculty’s first years of
service.
The plan focuses on enabling the tenure-track faculty to become oriented to the
college and District, ensuring successful completion of their primary services
assignment, and fulfillment of appraisal criteria. Part of this plan is based on
appraisal team’s recommendations of the previous appraisal period.
Recommendations signed by the faculty under review, are sent each year of tenurereview to the office of the appropriate Vice President and President. The President
or his designee reviews and comments on each document, signs, and forward them
to the district’s HR. The President shall notify the Vice Chancellor of HR when the
tenure-track faculty is placed on “Needs Improvement” or “Unsatisfactory”. During
the first year, if the appraisal recommends that the tenure-track faculty member’s
performance rates as “needs to improve,” he/she will be recommended for an
|Standard III: Resources 287
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
additional contract and a plan for corrective action will be provided by the team in
the Performance Plan. At the end of the 4th year, there must be a team
recommendation that the faculty member’s performance rates as “Satisfactory” or
tenure may be denied.
The ACE contract also explains in detail the procedures for evaluating regular and
contract faculty and stipulates that every regular faculty employee is to be
evaluated once every three academic years. The process is intended to be
proactive and to ensure that tenured faculty members are treated fairly and
objectively by established criteria. The goals of the evaluation process are to
communicate with tenured faculty, to document and measure performance, and to
set professional goals. The evaluation team is composed of two regular faculty in
satisfactory status, within the appraisee’s department, Division, or related
discipline. On alternate evaluation years, one of the faculty members is a regular
faculty from outside the appraisee’s department. Criteria for the evaluation
contain site observations, appraisal surveys, self-appraisal, reassigned time
evaluation (if reassigned time is 0.2 FTE or more), an administrative appraisal when
appropriate.
A faculty member and the evaluation team have opportunities to hold pre-appraisal
conference, progress review, and post-appraisal conference to discuss, review and
summarize the overall appraisal process. A summary evaluation report is produced
by the appraisal committee at the conclusion of the entire process. If the appraisal
committee concludes that the faculty needs improvement, the original appraisal
team, plus the appropriate administrator, will serve as the appraisal team.
The Division Chair, in consultation with the appropriate administrator or the
Department Chair, drafts a “Plan for Corrective Action” for those areas noted as
“Need-to-Improve”. A progress conference is conducted prior to the thirteen week
of the first semester in Needs-to-Improve status. The appraisal team reviews the
Plan for Corrective Action, the appraisal observations, and other relevant
information to ensure compliance with the plan. A progress conference is held with
the appraisal team and the appraisee prior to the final exam week of the first
semester in Needs-to Improve status. At the end of the progress conference, the
appropriate administrator prepares a written summary that specifies the progress
made to date by the appraisee. If the appraise returns to Satisfactory status in the
Professional Related and Collegial Related Criteria, the appraisal is complete. If the
appraisal team recommends that continued performance improvement is necessary
to correct noted deficiencies, the appraisee continues to be in Needs-to-Improve
|Standard III: Resources 288
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
status for the appropriate category for one more semester. At the conclusion of
the appraisal period of two semesters, if the appraisal team grants Unsatisfactory
Performance status to the appraisee due to insufficient progress made, a notice of
Unsatisfactory performance be issued by the appropriate administrator and
notification is reported to the college president and appropriate disciplinary action
will be taken.
Associate Faculty
Associate faculty are also evaluated on a regular basis: all new associate faculty in
their first semester and every six semesters once Re-Employment Preference (REP)
has been granted. Associate faculty are granted REP status if he/she successfully
served for six semesters within a period of five years during the academic
semesters, and he/she had three consecutive evaluations indicate satisfactory
performance and validated by the Vice President of Instruction. The goals of the
appraisal process are to communicate with the associate faculty member about
his/her performance, to document and measure performance, and to set
professional goals. The appraisal team consists of the Department Chair of
designee within the faculty member’s discipline or related discipline with an option
of adding one other faculty member on the team upon request by either the
Department Chair or the appraisee.
The college has in place necessary and appropriate employee performance
evaluation policies and process for management supervisor/teamsters, peace
officer and confidential staff. Employee performance evaluations support college
values and goals by building communication links between administrators,
supervisors, faculty, and staff; identifying education and training needs; aligning
work efforts with college goals and objectives; and, defining areas of strength and
needs. The performance appraisal process helps to inform employees and provides
employees opportunities to adjust and improve.
The college emphasizes its importance in conducting all evaluations in a timely
manner where the procedure, schedule, and timelines are reviewed and discussed
in the Cabinet meeting, as well as respective Division, Department, and program
meetings.
Classified Professionals
Board Policy 7230 defines the classified employee (3A.1.b.4); Article 13 of the
Collective Bargaining Agreement between West Valley-Mission Classified Employees
Association (WVMCEA) and West Valley – Mission Community College District
|Standard III: Resources 289
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
details the evaluation process for all WVMCEA classified employees. (3A.1.b.5) The
classified professional appraisals are monitored through the district Office of
Human Resources (HR). Vice Presidents receive classified professional appraisal
schedule from HR in a timely manner and disseminate information to relevant
Deans and managers, informing relevant Division and Department chairs, for a
timely completion.
A performance appraisal for probationary employees is given at five and ten
months, with an optional third evaluation at twelve months. If the employee is in
satisfactory status, he/she will become permanent at one year point. Permanent
employees are evaluated yearly until the worker reaches three years of
employment, and then every two years thereafter unless otherwise warranted.
The performance evaluation is based upon a mutual understanding of job
expectations, goals, and promotes professional and personal growth. This is
accomplished through review of the job description, knowledge of District
priorities, and review of the performance evaluation system and most importantly,
ongoing communication throughout the year.
The evaluation criteria include roles and responsibilities of the supervisor and the
employee in addition to rating performance factors and reviewing goals and
objectives. (3A.1.b.6)
Confidential Unit Professionals
Board Policy 7420 (3A.1.b.7) defines confidential professionals as those who are
required to develop or represent management positions with respect to collective
bargaining.
Confidential professionals follow a similar appraisal process as classified
professionals: A performance appraisal for probationary employees is given once by
the end of the fourth month and again by the end of the eighth month of
employment. A satisfactory evaluation is necessary to gain regular status with the
District. Should there be an unsatisfactory evaluation during the probationary
period, the immediate supervisor has the option to extend the probation, prior to
the end of the twelve-month probationary period, by no more than six months, at
which time a determination will be made on the employee’s employment status.
Once the confidential employee has gained regular status with the District, the
employee will be evaluated once per year for the first three years and then every
other year thereafter. (3A.1.b.8)
|Standard III: Resources 290
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
The performance evaluation is based upon a mutual understanding of job
expectations. This is accomplished through review of the job description,
knowledge of District priorities, review of the performance evaluation system and,
most importantly, ongoing communication throughout the year.
Supervisory Professionals
A Supervisory Professional’s appraisal is conducted in accordance with the
Supervisors Association, Teamsters Local 856 contract. A performance appraisal for
probationary employees is given twice during the probationary period. Once the
supervisory employee has earned permanent status with the District, the employee
will be evaluated at least once every two years. Supervisory employees with
unsatisfactory performance be placed on Improvement Program with a written plan
of specific activities to be undertaken to achieve improvement in specific areas of
work performance which are identified and indicated in the evaluation. The
administrator and/or Supervisor may decide to conduct an interim evaluation to
determine progress in achieving the objectives of the improvement program sooner
than the timeline identified in the improvement program. (3A.1.b.9)
Peace Officer Employees
In concert with the Peace Officers Association contract, newly hired officers must
complete a field training program prior to gaining probationary status. Once the
field training program has been completed, the member begins the one year
probationary period. The officer must gain two satisfactory written appraisals to
receive permanent status; one completed by the end of the sixth month and the
second by the end of the eleventh month. Once permanent status is gained,
officers are evaluated every other year. (3A.1.b.10) Performance criteria, process,
and improvement program are clearly delineated in the contract and the appraisal
forms are linked to the District’s HR website.
The evaluation form identifies specific rating performance factors. The college
realizes that institutional effectiveness and improvement depends on the
performance of all personnel. Performance factors are set forth within the
personnel evaluation process so that effectiveness of individual performance has a
standard by which to be evaluated. Actions taken following evaluations are formal,
timely, and documented. Employees not meeting the Satisfactory Standard Criteria
are given a chance to improve by completing an improvement plan with follow-up
evaluations to monitor progress.
|Standard III: Resources 291
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Administrators
Administrative Team Evaluations reflect a constructive attempt to assess strengths
and weaknesses, and to suggest ways in which administrative skills, human
relations, and professional knowledge can be enhanced. Per the WVMCCD
Administrative Handbook (3A.1.b.11), the administrator and his/her supervisor set
and agree upon mutually set objectives that relate to institutional goals and
objectives, program review findings, and pertinent accreditation recommendations
as well as objectives specific to responsibilities of the administrator’s job
description. (3A.1.b.12) The following timeline is used for evaluation purposes:






August 1 - Each administrator shall establish his or her annual objectives
on or before August 1 each year.
August 31 - The administrator's supervisor should review the objectives
and discuss any suggestions or necessary changes by August 31.
Otherwise, it is assumed that the objectives are approved as written.
December 1 - The administrator shall provide a progress report and
review of the annual objectives to his or her supervisor on or before
December 1.
December 31 - The supervisor shall review the progress report and
provide feedback to the administrator by December 31.
July 15 - The administrator shall complete a final report of the annual
objectives (Administrative Performance Review: Appendix B) and
provide a copy to his or her supervisor on or before July 15.
July 31 - The administrator's supervisor will review the final report of the
objectives and then complete a written final annual evaluation of the
administrator by July 31.
At the request of the supervisor or the administrator being evaluated, an
Administrative Performance Survey may be completed by colleagues and
constituents of the administrator to assess management style and effectiveness. In
order for administrative contracts to be renewed bi-annually, a current evaluation
must be on file in Human Resources.
President
The President is evaluated annually based on performance goals and objectives.
The evaluation process includes input from the: Academic, Classified, Student
Senates, reporting staff and administrators, and three to five members of the
community. (3A.1.b.13)
|Standard III: Resources 292
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard. The processes and procedures for evaluating
faculty, classified professionals, supervisory professionals, peace officers, and
administrators are clearly provided in each respective contract or in the
administrative handbook, supported by the district’s board policies.
Evaluation criteria for faculty who teach in an online modality are in the last stage
of negotiation. The Distance Education Committee along with Academic Senate
have established a check list for faculty that ensures effective student contact until
the criteria are finalized. Evaluations for faculty who teach in an online modality
are conducted in concert with the regular faculty evaluation per the ACE contract in
a timely fashion.
Actionable Improvement Plans
None
Evidence
3A.1.b.1
AP 7150 – Evaluations
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditati
on/2013/evidence/3a/ap_7150.pdf
3A.1.b.2
Board Policy 7210
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditati
on/2013/evidence/3a/bp_7210.pdf
3A.1.b.3
ACE Bargaining Agreement –
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditati
on/2013/evidence/3a/ace_contract_ext_2011_all_2
6B.pdf
Article 26B
3A.1.b.4
Board Policy 7230
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditati
on/2013/evidence/3a/bp_7230.pdf
3A.1.b.5
WVMCEA Contract Article 13
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditati
on/2013/evidence/3a/wvmcea_contract_2012_15_f
inal_web_article13.pdf
3A.1.b.6
Classified Employee Evaluation Form
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditati
on/2013/evidence/3a/Classified_Evaluation_Form.p
df
3A.1.b.7
Board Policy 7420
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditati
on/2013/evidence/3a/bp_7420.pdf
3A.1.b.8
Confidential Unit Handbook
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditati
on/2013/evidence/3a/Confidential_Unit_Regulation
s.pdf
3A.1.b.9
Teamsters Contract
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditati
on/2013/evidence/3a/Supervisors_Contract_All_0609_Ext_0612.pdf
|Standard III: Resources 293
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
3A.1.b.10
Peace Officer Association Contract
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditati
on/2013/evidence/3a/poa_contract_092611.pdf
3A.1.b.11
WVMCCD Administrative Handbook
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditati
on/2013/evidence/3a/admin_handbook.pdf
3A.1.b.12
Administrative Performance Review
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditati
on/2013/evidence/3a/New.Admin.Perform.Review.
0910.pdf
3A.1.b.13
Annual Evaluation of President
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditati
on/2013/evidence/3a/Admin.Perform.Survey.0710.
pdf
Standard IIIA.1.c
Faculty and others directly responsible for student progress toward achieving
stated student learning outcomes have, as a component of their evaluation,
effectiveness in producing those learning outcomes.
Descriptive Summary
West Valley College does not directly evaluate faculty on effectiveness of achieving
student learning outcomes. Teaching effectiveness is evaluated in peer observation
in the categories of student matter knowledge, appropriateness of methods of
instruction, organization of class, and appropriateness of assignment for the
objectives of the course, effective communication and promoting independent
thinking. Student appraisal surveys also address teaching effectiveness.
The Academic Senate holds the belief that the assessments associated with Student
Learning Outcomes are a part of the college’s commitment to a culture of inquiry.
The SLO/A process is dedicated to an ongoing exploration of how students learn. It
is dedicated to an introspective teaching process that is continually changing to
meet the needs of students.
The college successfully instituted a systemic and meaningful SLO/A process as part
of the Integrated Planning and Resource Allocation process with a clearly identified
master schedule. (3A.1.c.1) In addition, it is proven that the college’s progress and
status on SLO/A process is validated as 100% intact based on the feedback given by
ACCJC in response to our March 15, 2013 report. (3A.1.c.2) The Scorecard and
feedback indicated that West Valley College’s SLO/A process, quality,
meaningfulness, and connection to student success are exceedingly higher than
average scores and many areas rated the highest evaluation points.
|Standard III: Resources 294
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
The Academic Senate believes that the assessment of SLO/A is used in a culture of
inquiry to improve teaching and learning. It is a part of every faculty member’s
contribution to the college and aim to achieve student success.
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard. The college instituted a successful SLO/A process
as part of Integrated Planning and Resource Allocation where effectiveness at every
level of its organization is measured. Teaching effectiveness is evaluated through
an established peer evaluation process.
Actionable Improvement Plans
None.
Evidence
3A.1.c.1
Master Program Review and
SLO/A Assessment Schedule
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2013
/evidence/recommendations/Master_Program_Review_and
_SLO_Assessment_Schedule_01-07-2014_External.pdf
3A.1.c.2
ACCJC Report on WVC SLO/As
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2013
/evidence/2a/ACCJC_Status_Report_SLO_Implementation/0
1_March_15th_SLO_Assessment_Report/March_15_2013_S
LO_Report_Final_Final.pdf
Standard IIIA.1.d
The institution upholds a written code of ethics for all of its personnel.
Descriptive Summary
The college and district uphold a written code of professional ethics for all
personnel. WVMCCD Board Policy 3050 sets forth the tenets of the institutional
Code of Ethics. (3A.1.d.1, 2) The Code was approved by the Board of Trustees on
January 17, 2012. (3A.d.1.3) The district also has a Conflict of Interest Code that
mandates annual filings (by specified employees) with the State Fair Political
Practices Commission (FPPC). The Conflict of Interest Code is reviewed regularly by
the Board in cooperation with the FPPC.
The WVC catalog 2013-2014, the schedule of classes and the college website
include the following campus and district policies: (3A.d.1.4)
• Academic Freedom Policy
• Non-discrimination statement and policy
|Standard III: Resources 295
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
• Sexual Harassment and Sex discrimination Policy
• Standard of student conduct
• Drug free environment and Drug prevention program
Board policy and related district and college policies and procedures serve as
guidelines related to harassment, mutual respect, discrimination, and diversity.
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard. The codes of ethics exist for all employees.
Actionable Improvement Plans
None.
Evidence
3A.1.d.1
Board Policy 3050
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2013/evid
ence/3a/bp_3050.pdf
3A.1.d.2
AP 3050
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2013/evid
ence/3a/ap_3050.pdf
3A.1.d.3
Board Meeting Minutes January 17, 2012
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2013/evid
ence/3a/bot_approval_bp_3050.pdf
3A.1.d.4
WVC Catalog – page 172180
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2013/evid
ence/3a/3A1d4_2014_catalog_page172-180.pdf
Standard IIIA.2
The institution maintains a sufficient number of qualified faculty with full-time
responsibility to the institution. The institution has a sufficient number of staff
and administrators with appropriate preparation and experience to provide the
administrative services necessary to support the institution's mission and
purposes.
Descriptive Summary
All California community colleges are required to meet Full Time Faculty Obligation
(FON) under California Code of Regulations (CCR) Title 5 Section 51025 which
requires districts to increase the number of full-time faculty over the prior year in
proportion to the amount of growth in funded credit FTES. The district submits a
report annually to the State Chancellor’s Office demonstrating its compliance.
(3A.2.1) During the period since the last accreditation in 2007, West Valley College
has met its obligation each year. The college’s baseline budgetary funding includes
|Standard III: Resources 296
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
money each year to ensure compliance with this requirement. Prioritization of new
faculty hires is led jointly by the Division Chairs Council (DCC) and Academic Senate
each year using criteria and data necessary to identify faculty needs in disciplines or
programs whose goals are in alignment with the college’s mission and priorities.
The last several years of budget reductions have taken a toll on staffing levels. The
college is currently in the process of addressing the $1.5 million reduction required
by the district for the 2014-15 academic year to balance its budget. The President
charged the College Council to lead this challenging and difficult process across
campus, while maintaining the highest level of inclusion, participation, and
transparency. The College Council developed a process called Focus Area
Interdisciplinary Teams (FAIT) consisting of diverse and multidisciplinary members
of the campus community who collaboratively engaged in many difficult dialogues
across the campus. FAIT aimed at achieving the budgetary reduction while also
restructuring parts of the college so as to increase an overall institutional
effectiveness. (3A.2.2), As of the end of the Fall 2013 semester, the recommended
changes are identified to the college community by the President with the
exception of a reduction of contractual reassigned time for Division and
Department chairs and its organizational structure. (3A.2.3) As of this writing,
courageous and creative plans are discussed primarily by Division chairs,
Department chairs, and the Academic Senate with an anticipation of a
recommended plan to be submitted to the College Council and the President in
early spring 2014. The college also mitigated this budgetary challenge by not filling
vacated positions due to retirement or resignation causing challenging impacts on
reduced administrative positions.
For planning and budgeting, including staffing, the college has adopted an
Integrated Planning and Resource Allocation model where each academic, student
services, and administrative program completes a comprehensive review every
other year and an update-review when comprehensive review is not due. (3A.2.4)
Division and Department chairs produce reports which are submitted to the Budget
Resource Allocation Committee (BRAC). This is a newly instituted process effective
spring 2014 where the committee will continue to work on fine-tuning details
relating to the functionality of the committee. In conjunction with the district’s
budget development timeline, BRAC will conduct comprehensive review and
analysis of the reports based on established criteria and format and make
recommendations for overall resource allocation for departments and programs
including staffing needs. In addition to the BRAC’s recommendations for staffing
needs, departments, programs, and administrators that request vacant position to
|Standard III: Resources 297
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
be filled and/or new position to be created are required to bring requests to the
college council for review and approval with data and rationale. The College
Council makes decisions based on presented needs with college’s mission, annual
goals and objectives, Institutional Learning Outcome, and priorities.
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard. With the implementation of the Integrated
Planning and Resource Allocation process, which includes Program Review, Student
Learning Outcomes and Assessments, and Budget and Resource Allocation, the
college will have an increasingly better coordinated and more comprehensive
approach to educational master planning and resource allocation while meeting
stated institutional priorities. Program Review is an important component of this
comprehensive approach, and is enhanced with the incorporation of annual
Program Review and college-wide Student Learning Outcome assessments.
Effective staffing and resource allocation decision-making at the BRAC and College
Council levels can occur based on a timely and carefully structured program review
and student learning outcome information.
In a period of limited funding and an increased student demand for courses and
services, as well as rapidly increasing state, federal, and legislative mandates on the
implementation of new regulations and academic directions, the college responded
by instituting a system to evaluate and meet staffing needs. As this process is new,
the college will continue to carefully evaluate its process and make appropriate
improvements.
Staffing levels have been reduced due to state budget shortfalls in recent years.
Table 1 below indicates West Valley College’s full-time employees between Fall
2009 – Fall 2013.
Administrators
Full-time faculty
Classified
Total
2009-10
7
165
110
282
2010-11
7
167
111
285
2011-12
7
166
107
280
2012-13
7
166
100
263
Actionable Improvement Plans

Integrated Planning and Resource Allocation Team and College Council
ensure that the BRAC process as part of Integrated Planning and Resource
|Standard III: Resources 298
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014

Allocation works effectively in making resource allocation decisions in spring
2014.
Complete the FAIT 2014-15 budget reduction and organization restructuring
process by mid spring 2014 semester.
Evidence
3A.2.1
FON Report
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2013
/evidence/3a/fon_2013_14.xlsx
3A.2.2
FAIT Documents
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2013
/evidence/1b/FAIT/FAIT_Reductions_Revised_10-24-13.pdf
3A.2.3
President’s Email re: Budget
Reduction and
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2013
/evidence/3a/president_budget_reduction_restructuring_ou
tcomes.pdf
Restructuring Outcomes
3A.2.4
Master Program Review and
SLO/A Assessment Schedule
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2013
/evidence/recommendations/Master_Program_Review_and
_SLO_Assessment_Schedule_01-07-2014_External.pdf
Standard IIIA.3
The institution systematically develops personnel policies and procedures that are
available for information and review. Such policies and procedures are equitably
and consistently administered.
Standard IIIA.3.a
The institution establishes and adheres to written policies ensuring fairness in all
employment procedures.
Descriptive Summary
The district Human Resources (HR) Department is responsible for initiating and
recommending the development or revision of district personnel policies and
procedures. All policies, as well as rules and regulations, governing employment
procedures including the sexual harassment policy can be found on the district
website and employee portal. (3A.3.a.1) Each administrative office makes such
information readily available for reference and both district personnel and the
public has access to this information. Each administrator is responsible for
maintaining a current copy of the Rules and Regulations.
|Standard III: Resources 299
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
HR works in a participatory governance process with representatives, constituency
groups—including bargaining units and employee associations—of both colleges
and the district, to review policy language. Recommendations for revisions are
made to the Chancellor through the District Council which is the highest
participatory governance advisory group to the Chancellor. The Chancellor then
recommends action on the policy revisions to the Board.
On behalf of the Board, HR, the Chancellor and his staff regularly review board
policies and administrative procedures that provide guidance on implementing
board policy. They are updated as needed to ensure they are current, relevant, and
appropriate. District HR is responsible for the administration of personnel policies.
To ensure that personnel policies and procedures are equitable and consistently
applied, personnel policies and procedures are administered centrally by the district
Human Resources Department. A college-based Administrative Specialist-Personnel
has a dual reporting relationship to the college and to the district HR Department.
The college adheres to written personnel policies and procedures that have been
developed by the WVMCCD HR Department to ensure fairness in all employment
procedures. General principles include district compliance with federal, state, and
local laws, and the district commitment to equal opportunity, fairness, and
inclusion. Included are policies on unlawful discrimination, sexual harassment,
family medical leave, hiring, equivalency, and other policies governing hiring and
working conditions. (3A.3.a.2, 3) The district has established procedures for
handling and investigating any complaints of discrimination in the employment
process which can also be found on the WVMCCD website. (3A.3.a.4)
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard. The written policies and procedures have been
developed and refined adequately to ensure fairness in employment procedures.
Actionable Improvement Plans
None.
Evidence
3A.3a.1
Board Policies
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/20
13/evidence/3a/3A3a2_Board Policy_Chapter_3.pdf
3A.3.a.2
Board Policies Chapter 3
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/20
13/evidence/3a/3A3a2_Board Policy_Chapter_3.pdf
|Standard III: Resources 300
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
3A.3.a.3
Board Policies Chapter 7
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/20
13/evidence/3a/3A3a3_Board Policy_Chapter_7.pdf
3A.3.a.4
AP 3435 – Discrimination and
Harassment Investigations
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/20
13/evidence/3a/3A3a4_AP_3435.pdf
Standard IIIA.3.b
The institution makes provision for the security and confidentiality of personnel
records. Each employee has access to his/her personnel records in accordance
with law.
Descriptive Summary
In accordance with Education and Labor Codes, personnel records are private,
accurate, complete, and permanent. Individual collective bargaining agreements for
represented employees include additional detail regarding contents. (3A.3.b.1)
District Human Resources (HR) staff are trained to maintain personnel records and
the confidentiality of each employee’s information. Hard copies of required
personnel records regarding hiring, changes in employment, discipline, evaluations
and health/medical information are kept in individual employee files. All personnel
files are maintained in secure filing cabinets that are locked when not being
accessed at the district HR Department. Employees may request to review their
personnel file during regular business hours or by special arrangement. College
administrators oversee the security and confidentiality of all staff and faculty
records at the local level.
Every employee has the right to inspect personnel records pursuant to applicable
law and collective bargaining agreements. An employee may review his/her
personnel file by contacting the appropriate Human Resources Specialist and
making an appointment. To maintain security, the Specialist will remain with the
employee during the review process, and the employee will be required to sign a
log that he/she reviewed the file on a specific date.
The Human Resources Specialist will witness by signature that the employee
reviewed the file. The employee may request the Human Resources Specialist to
make copies of documents in his/her file.
The employee’s immediate supervisor and/or the supervisor’s supervisors (up to
the Chancellor) may review an employee’s personnel file by contacting the
appropriate Human Resources Specialist.
|Standard III: Resources 301
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
The employee may authorize a representative to review his/her personnel file. Such
authorization must be in writing to verify the signature of the employee. The
representative shall contact the Human Resources Specialist to make arrangements
for the review.
Furthermore, contents of personnel files may be subpoenaed. The Human
Resources Specialist will follow the terms and conditions of the subpoena.
Collective bargaining agreements listed below include language addressing
maintenance of personnel file contents and access to them. These files are
maintained in accordance with the provisions outline in specific articles:






ACE Bargaining Agreement – Article 11 (3A.3.b.2)
WVMCEA Bargaining Agreement – Article 12 (3A.3.b.3)
WVMCCD Administrative Handbook- Section 3 (3A.3.b.4)
WVMCCD Confidential Unit Handbook- Section 9 (3A.3.b.5)
Police Officers Association Contract - Article 11 (3A.3.b.6)
Teamsters Contract – Article 14 (3A.3.b.7)
Employees are informed via their agreement or handbook of their right to receive a
copy of all information to be placed into their hard copy personnel file. Employees
have a right to review and respond to any disputed evaluation or information prior
to the inclusion of any such material. Employees are informed of their right to
inspect and respond to any materials in their personnel file. Online personal
information under Portal is accessible by employees via self-services.
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard. District HR practices effectively secure and keep
confidential hard copy personnel records and database information. The provisions
of the bargaining agreements in relation to personnel records are strictly adhered
to.
Actionable Improvement Plans
None.
Evidence
3A.3.b.1
AP 7145
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/
2013/evidence/3a/3A3b1_AP_7145.pdf
3A.3.b.2
ACE Bargaining Agreement – Article
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/
2013/evidence/3a/ace_article_11.pdf
|Standard III: Resources 302
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
11
3A.3.b.3
WVMCEA Bargaining Agreement
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/
2013/evidence/3a/wvmcea_article 12.pdf
3A.3.b.4
WVMCCD Administrative Handbook
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/
2013/evidence/3a/admin_section_3.pdf
3A.3.b.5
WVMCCD Confidential Unit
Handbook
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/
2013/evidence/3a/conf_section_9.pdf
3A.3.b.6
Police Officers Association Contract
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/
2013/evidence/3a/poa_article_11.pdf
3A.3.b.7
Teamsters Contract
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/
2013/evidence/3a/teamsters_article_14.pdf
Standard IIIA.4
The institution demonstrates through policies and practices an appropriate
understanding of and concern for issues of equity and diversity.
Descriptive Summary
Issues of equity and diversity are part of the college’s core values and permeate
every aspect of college life. The district as a whole is committed to equity and
diversity as indicated by policies, procedures, and practices established and
regularly reviewed for relevance and improvement. The Equal Employment
Opportunity (EEO) Plan includes policy statements, provisions for an advisory
council, complaint mechanisms, training mandates, analysis methods, and steps to
improve underrepresentation. (3A.4.1) It is regularly reviewed and is, currently, in a
review cycle (2013-14).
The Board upholds policies and implements procedures in a number of areas of
specific relevance, including, but not limited to:








BP/AP 3410 – Non-discrimination (3A.4.2)
BP/AP 3420 – Equal Employment Opportunity (3A.4.3)
BP/AP 3430 – Prohibition of Harassment (3A.4.4)
AP 3435 – Discrimination and Harassment Investigations (3A.4.5)
BP/AP 7100 – Commitment to Diversity (3A.4.6)
BP/AP 7160 – Professional Development (3A.4.7)
BP/AP 7510 – Domestic Partners (3A.4.8)
BP/AP 7700 – Whistleblower Protection (3A.4.9)
|Standard III: Resources 303
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
The college prides itself with the richness of its diverse student population which
has increased drastically in the last several years. The college continuously assesses
ways to recruit, welcome, and help diverse students matriculate and succeed at
West Valley College and formulates innovative and effective ways to address equity
and diversity at the college. As part of the college’s budget reduction and
organizational restructure process for 2014-2015, the President restructured the
current administrative structure in the Student Services area, redeployed resources
and created a Director of Student Equity and Success position to oversee categorical
programs and culturally-focused educational programs including the SUCCESS
program for African-American students and PUENTE Project for Latino students. In
addition, West Valley College’s Student Equity Plan was revised in spring 2013 to
reflect upon college’s current priority and goals. (3A.4.10)
The college developed an Institutional Effectiveness organization structure in 20122013 where one of the three major focuses is the Student Success Team. In
addition to ensuring that the Student Success Act of 2012 implementation occurs
systemically and effectively, this team will be led by a faculty coordinator with a
working team consisting of faculty, classified staff, and administrators addressing
achievement gaps particularly among African American and Latino students,
bringing equity among our diverse student populations with their success.
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard. Understanding of and appreciation for diversity is
a core value at West Valley College. The college has an extensive collection of
practices, policies, and initiatives that afford understanding, appreciation, and
celebration of its diverse population. Student equity is also a central focus of the
experience at West Valley College.
Actionable Improvement Plans


Successfully operationalize the Student Success Team in spring 2014 with a
newly appointed faculty Coordinator and evaluate its work on equitable
student success among our diverse student population.
Continue to monitor the new implementation of the director of Student
Equity and Success starting in 2014-2015 and increasing the number of
diverse students who are successful.
Evidence
3A.4.1
WVMCCD EEO Plan
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2
013/evidence/3a/WVMCCD_EEO_Plan_Board_Approved_
|Standard III: Resources 304
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
2-19-09.pdf
3A.4.2
BP/AP 3410 – Nondiscrimination
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2
013/evidence/3a/3A42_AP_3410.pdf
3A.4.3
BP/AP 3420 – Equal
Employment Opportunity
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2
013/evidence/3a/3A43_AP_3420.pdf
3A.4.4
BP/AP 3430 – Prohibition of
Harassment
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2
013/evidence/3a/3A44_AP_3430.pdf
3A.4.5
AP 3435 – Discrimination and
Harassment Investigations
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2
013/evidence/3a/3A45_AP_3435.pdf
3A.4.6
BP/AP 7100 – Commitment to
Diversity
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2
013/evidence/3a/3A46_AP_7100.pdf
3A.4.7
BP/AP 7160 – Professional
Development
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2
013/evidence/3a/AP_7160.pdf
3A.4.8
BP/AP 7510 – Domestic Partners
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2
013/evidence/3a/3A48_AP_7510.pdf
3A.4.9
BP/AP 7700 – Whistleblower
Protection
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2
013/evidence/3a/3A49_AP_7700.pdf
3A.4.10
Student Equity Plan
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2
013/evidence/4a/2013_wvc_student_equity_plan.pdf
Standard IIIA.4.a
The institution creates and maintains appropriate programs, practices, and
services that support its diverse personnel.
Descriptive Summary
The college creates and maintains several appropriate programs, practices, and
services that support its diverse personnel.
West Valley College’s Educational Master Plan of 2009 clearly shows that diversity is
a core value of the institution and permeates every aspect of college life. The
college’s statement of philosophy is as follows:
West Valley College is a community of learners open to those seeking
advanced educational opportunities. Our faculty, staff, and students
have a passionate commitment to learning, fueled by the spirit of
inquiry. The college embraces innovation and change characterized by
trust, confidence, and accountability. Through communication and
|Standard III: Resources 305
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
teamwork, and a respect for diversity, West Valley College affirms its
commitment to people. (Adopted March 8, 2007)
The institutional mission, goals and objectives, and curriculum and pedagogy,
student services and the student life programs speak to the institution’s
commitment to the understanding of and concern for equity and diversity.
Through a comprehensive program of professional development opportunities, the
college and district serve the needs of diverse personnel. Since the last
accreditation cycle, the district completed a multi-module leadership development
academy that included participation of student services staff as well as
administrators and supervisors from across the district. (3A.4.a.1) An Employee
Assistance Program (EAP) implemented several years ago has provided valuable
support. (3A.4.a.2), A use-at-your-convenience training program called “People-OnThe-Go” has been well-received and, in the area of wellness, a new transportation
FSA has been established, which allows people who use public transportation to set
aside funds necessary “pre-tax.” (3A.4.a.3, 4)
The college’s Global Citizenship Committee serves as an institutional foundation to
promote, assure, and further explore wide-range of equity and diversity related
issues on campus on multiple levels. The committee coordinates programs, events,
and activities that address educational, academic, cultural, and social issues. They
are attended by all parts of the college community promoting critical discussion and
exchanges of opinions that lead to a planning of institutional priority relative to
equity and diversity.
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard. One of the hallmarks of West Valley College is its
commitment to providing appropriate programs, practices, and services that
support the diversity of its personnel.
Actionable Improvement Plans

Explore opportunities to increase funding for diversity programs on campus
Evidence
3A.4.a.1
People-OnTheGoDistrict Online
Courses for All Employees (Q4,
2013)
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation
/2013/evidence/3a/Lead_20A_Course_Outline.pdf
3A.4.a.2
Lead 20A Course Outline
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation
|Standard III: Resources 306
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
/2013/evidence/3a/EAP.Summary.Srvcs.1011.pdf
3A.4.a.3
EAP Summary of Services
http://www.people-onthego.com/westvalley-missiononline-q4
3A.4.a.4
CommuteEase Brochure
http://www.wvm.edu/WorkArea/DownloadAsset.aspx
?id=6793
Standard IIIA.4.b
The institution regularly assesses its record in employment equity and diversity
consistent with its mission.
Descriptive Summary
The district follows an established Equal Employment Opportunity policy in all its
hiring procedures, including a commitment that successful candidates demonstrate
sensitivity to and ability to work with the diverse academic, socioeconomic, cultural
and ethnic backgrounds of students, faculty, and staff, including ethnic group
identification, national origins, religion, age, gender, sexual orientation, race, color,
or physical or mental ability. (3A.4.b.1)
West Valley College is committed to hiring a diverse faculty and staff, an asset
which supports a dynamic environment for teaching, learning, and working. In order
to ensure a diverse pool of qualified applicants, Human Resources (HR) and the
hiring committee recommend particular websites and publications and journals
specific to the recruitment. For faculty positions, advertising is routinely placed in
the California Community College Registry, Chronicle of Higher Education,
Higheredjobs.com and various websites and publications targeting groups
underrepresented in higher education employment. In addition, hiring committees
are reviewed by HR to ensure that they are diverse in composition. Applicant data is
tracked for every recruitment period and a report is provided to the State
Chancellor’s office each year. Faculty and staff demographic data are also reported
annually. Finally, in all selection processes, each candidate is queried regarding
demonstrated ability to effectively interact with people of diverse socio-economic,
cultural, disability and ethnic backgrounds.
During the spring of 2008, members of the District Faculty and Staff Diversity
Advisory Council (FSDAC) attended a training session given by the law firm Liebert
Cassidy Whitmore entitled, “From Model Plan to Your Plan: Developing Compliant
EEO Plans That Work.” In addition, the FSDAC hosted a discussion forum relative to
Office Model Equal Employment Opportunity Plan with the EEO Model Plan Project
Director, from the California Community College Chancellor’s Office.
|Standard III: Resources 307
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
The FSDAC began data analysis related to student, faculty, and staff demographic
trends during this same time. The college’s Academic Senate held discussions
regarding the District’s EEO Plan on May 6, 2008, and May 13, 2008. At the
November 18, 2008, Academic Senate meeting, the District presented a draft of the
Equal Employment Opportunity Plan. Ultimately, the Board of Trustees approved
the District’s Equal Employment Opportunity Plan at its February 19, 2009, meeting.
(3A.4.b.2, 3)
In order to better incorporate the District Faculty and Staff Diversity Advisory
Council (FSCAC) into the district’s participatory governance structure and to
increase its stature, the current 2013-14 revision of the EEO Plan proposes that the
District’s highest participatory governance group, District Council, serve as the
FSDAC.
The responsibilities of the Council shall include but not be limited to the following:
1. Review and advise on aspects of the hiring, retention, and promotion
processes that impact the District’s ability to attract and retain a diverse
faculty and staff; advise on implementing the District’s obligation to hire
faculty and administrators with a demonstrated sensitivity to, and
understanding of, the diverse academic, socioeconomic, cultural,
disability and ethnic backgrounds of community college students;
2. Promote communication with community groups and organizations for
people with disabilities;
3. Promote hiring of faculty who have, themselves, graduated from a
community college;
4. Develop communications among departments to foster understandings
of the Plan;
5. To advise the Chancellor regarding special training or staff development
needs;
6. Review the Plan and monitor its progress; and
7. Recommend changes needed in the Plan.
In addition to advising the Associate Vice Chancellor of Human Resources (AVC), the
District Council (acting as FSDAC) has direct access to the Chancellor, the Vice
Chancellor of Administrative Services, and both college Presidents. The Council will
be positioned to better assure the institution’s support for appropriate programs,
practices, and services that support it diverse personnel and that the institution
regularly assesses its record in employment equity and diversity consistent with its
mission.
|Standard III: Resources 308
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
As the delegated EEO Officer, the AVC oversees the day-to-day implementation of
the EEO Plan and programs, and assures that reviews are conducted in a timely
manner and that any revisions to the Plan are communicated widely.
Table 2 and 3 below summarize information on ethnicity and gender of West Valley
college employees provided by HR and college’s research office.
Table 2: Number of Employees by gender
FT faculty
Classified
Administrators
Total
2009
M
F
74
108
32
85
3
5
109 198
2010
M
F
67
97
29
78
3
4
99
179
2011
M
F
67
98
28
84
2
5
97
187
2012
M
F
66
101
25
78
1
4
92
183
2013
M
F
59
105
23
72
4
8
86
80
Table 3: Employees by job category and ethnicity – fall 2013
FT faculty
Classified
Administrators
Native
American
0
0
0
Asian/Pacific
Islander
19
15
4
Black
Hispanic
6
2
1
1
1
1
White
Other
22
15
0
116
62
6
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard. The employee survey relative to this standard
included equity and diversity. All rated favorably (an average of 70%) on
understanding for issues of equity and diversity. Comments were made about the
inclusive atmosphere and high level of diversity at our college. (3A.4.b.4)
Actionable Improvement Plans
None.
Evidence
3A.4.b.1
AP 3420 Equal Opportunity
Employment
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/20
13/evidence/3a/3A43_AP_3420.pdf
3A.4.b.2
EEO Plan
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/20
13/evidence/3a/eeo_plan_wvmccd_board_approved_219-09.doc
|Standard III: Resources 309
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
3A.4.b.3
EEO Plan Board Approval February 19, 2009
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/20
13/evidence/3a/3A4b3_eeo_plan_wvmccd_board_approv
ed_2-19-09.pdf
3A.4.b.4
Accreditation Employee Survey
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/20
13/evidence/3a/accreditation_survey_employee_final_73
12.pdf
Standard IIIA.4.c
The institution subscribes to, advocates, and demonstrates integrity in the
treatment of its administration, faculty, staff and students.
Descriptive Summary
The college has avenues for advocacy for administration, faculty, staff and students
and Board Policies guide and support the actions of the college and the district.
The district maintains Commitment to:










Diversity BP 7100 (3A.4.c.1)
Equal Employment Opportunity BP 3420 (3A.4.c.2)
Non-Discrimination BP 3410 (3A.4.c.3)
Personnel Files (AP 7145) (3A.4.c.4)
Academic Freedom (BP 4030) (3A.4.c.5)
Workplace Violence Plan (BP 3510) (3A.4.c.6)
Sexual and Other Assault on Campus (BP 3540) (3A.4.c.7)
Prohibition of Harassment (BP 3430) (3A.4.c.8)
Whistleblower Protection (BP 7700) (3A.4.c.9)
Drug Free Environment and Drug Prevention Program (BP 3550) (3A.4.c.10)
These policies, along with appropriate procedures and processes, provide access to
service, classes and programs without regard to national origin, religion, age, sex or
gender, race, color, medical condition or sexual orientation. The district Human
Resources Department maintains the WVMCCD EEO Plan and provides training,
reporting and analysis to ensure compliance. (3A.4.c.11)
Students are also addressed in some of these policies in addition to the Student
Rights and Responsibility Policies, which are available on the WVC Website and also
published in the College Catalog including the Student Code of Conduct and
Complaint/Incident Report Form. (3A.4.c.12) Students are provided with a student
grievance policy that outlines the steps for filing a grievance in instances where
|Standard III: Resources 310
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
they feel that their rights have been violated. (3A.4.c.13) As appropriate, a hearing
process can be implemented led by the Vice President of Student Services. The
college implements policies and procedures against unlawful discrimination, sexual
harassment, and sexual discrimination as well as for injury/illness prevention, AIDS
education, workplace violence protection, nepotism, conflict of interest and
political activities.
Even though participatory governance is not unique to WVC, the roles and
perspective of all members of the college community are represented in the
operation of the college. With our participative, quadripartite mode of decision
making, there are numerous opportunities for constituency groups to advocate.
The councils, standing committees, task forces and ad hoc committees are
representatives of all four segments of the college community and their
deliberations are open.
Bargaining units provide advocacy opportunities: the Association of Educators (ACE)
for faculty, the Classified Employee Association (CEA) for classified professionals,
the Supervisors Association Teamsters Local 856 for classified supervisors, and the
Peace Officers Association for the District Police officers.
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard. The college’s treatment of its faculty, classified,
administration and students is guided by their constituency groups and their
respective bargaining contracts and district-wide policies and procedures.
Actionable Improvement Plans
None.
Evidence
3A.4.c.1
Commitment to Diversity BP 7100
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditatio
n/2013/evidence/3a/BP_7100.pdf
3A.4.c.2
Equal Employment Opportunity BP
3420
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditatio
n/2013/evidence/3a/3A43_AP_3420.pdf
3A.4.c.3
Non-Discrimination BP 3410
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditatio
n/2013/evidence/3a/3A42_AP_3410.pdf
3A.4.c.4
Personnel Files
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditatio
n/2013/evidence/3a/3A3b1_AP_7145.pdf
3A.4.c.5
Academic Freedom
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditatio
n/2013/evidence/3a/BP_4030_Academic_Freedom.p
df
|Standard III: Resources 311
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
3A.4.c.6
Workplace Violence Plan
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditatio
n/2013/evidence/3a/BP_3510_Workplace_Safety.pdf
3A.4.c.7
Sexual and Other Assault Policy
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditatio
n/2013/evidence/3a/BP_3540.pdf
3A.4.c.8
Harassment and Discrimination
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditatio
n/2013/evidence/3a/3A44_AP_3430.pdf
3A.4.c.9
Whistleblower Protection
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditatio
n/2013/evidence/3a/3A49_AP_7700.pdf
3A.4.c.10
Drug Free Environment and Drug
Prevention Program BP 3550
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditatio
n/2013/evidence/3a/BP_3550.pdf
3A.4.c.11
WVMCCD EEO Plan
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditatio
n/2013/evidence/3a/WVMCCD_EEO_Plan_Board_Ap
proved_2-19-09.pdf
3A.4.c.12
Complaint/Incident Report Form
http://westvalley.edu/services/policy/docs/generalcomplaint-form.pdf
Student Grievance Policy
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditatio
n/2013/evidence/3a/Student_Grievances_and_Appe
als_Policy.pdf
3A.4.c.13
Standard IIIA.5
The institution provides all personnel with appropriate opportunities for
continued professional development, consistent with the institution's mission and
based on identified teaching and learning needs.
Standard IIIA.5.a
The institution plans professional development activities to meet the needs of its
personnel.
Descriptive Summary
To meet its mission “to support students along their pathways to reach transfer and
career goals in an environment of academic excellence,” and in accordance with BP
7160, West Valley College and the District offer opportunities to all employees for
continued professional growth. (3A.5.1)
Contractual professional development leaves (sabbaticals, professional growth and
development (PG&D) award for faculty and the Classified Growth Incentive
Program provide opportunities for renewal and salary incentives. The district HR
Department provides various workshops and information sessions on multiple
topics relevant to the betterment of district employees’ well-being and professional
|Standard III: Resources 312
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
improvement. The district is committed to providing appropriate opportunities for
meaningful personal and professional development for all members of the district
community.
Co-sponsored by Human Resources and Information Systems and in partnership
with People-on-the-GO, beginning May 1, 2011, district employees are able to
access technology and efficiency training via webinar. This training is readily
available at no cost to them or their department right at their desktop. The program
provides staff with classes to learn and enhance skills with tools such as Excel,
Outlook and PowerPoint. In addition, classes are available on topics such as
Business Writing, Effective Meetings, and Accomplishing More with Less. Classes
range in length from 90 minutes to two hours, and staff may take as many as they
would like with approval of a supervisor. (3A.5.2)
Effective spring 2013, HR staff began presentations on topics of interest at quarterly
All Managers/Supervisors meetings. The purpose of such focused presentations is
to increase awareness of the work-relevant topics and resource information for the
managers so as to increase efficiencies, effectiveness, and support in their
respective positions. (3A.5.3)
Professional Growth and Development of faculty is addressed in ACE contract
article 47. (3A.5.4) The purpose of this article is to encourage the continued
professional growth of members through on-going updating of knowledge and
ability, development of new skills and continuous analysis and improvement of
professional expertise, by allowing for additional step advancement on the Salary
Schedule. Basic information and forms are available on the Professional Growth and
Development website. (3A.5.5)
The Classified Growth Incentive Program facilitates continued growth,
professionally and personally, of each individual worker and ultimately enhances
the District's institutional mission to effectively promote higher education.
The central feature of this program will be to provide work related opportunities to
upgrade individual worker skills through a variety of credit and non-credit
coursework, projects, workshops, or other related activities and/or complete
college level certificates or degrees. (3a.5.6)
District Human Resources encourages employees to attend training sessions complying
with state and federal employment laws, education code, and board policies. Training
schedules are announced periodically. These training sessions comply with the
applicable law or governing agency as listed.
|Standard III: Resources 313
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
District Staff Development
Training sessions complying with
State and Federal Employment Laws, Education Code, and Board Policies
Training Subject
Audience
Illness and Injury
Prevention Plan (IIPP)
All employees
Cultural
Competency/Diversity
All employees
Frequency Required
Yearly
Requiring Agency
Board Policy 3410
OSHA Requirement
(Federal: 66:59166135 State: T8 CCR
§3203)
All employees
during their first
year of
employment.
Board Policy 7100
CA Ed Code
1.1.1.201f
Updates when
policy changes are
made.
Supervisors - yearly
Violence in the
Workplace for
Supervisors
Violence in the
Workplace
Managers and
Supervisors
Employees (all faculty
and staff)
Once during
employment with
WVMCCD and upon
promotion to
supervisory position
Board Policy 3510
Once during
employment with
WVMCCD
Board Policy 3510
OSHA requirement
Federal §5 (a)(1)
CA Ed Code
1.1.1.233.a.3-7
OSHA requirement
Federal §5(a)(1)
CA Ed Code
1.1.1.233.a.3-7
Child Abuse Mandated
Reporter Training
All employees who have
contact with anyone
under the age of 18
during the course of
their work
Once during
employment with
WVMCCD
Board Policy 3518
Sexual Harassment
Prevention for
Supervisors
All employees with
supervisory duties
Within 6 months of
hire or promotion,
every 2 years
thereafter
Board Policy 3430
(Preventing
Discriminatory
Harassment for
Penal Code 11166
California Law
AB1825
Government Code
section 12950.1
|Standard III: Resources 314
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Supervisors)
Sexual Harassment
Prevention
Employees without
supervisory duties
Every two years
Board Policy 3430
Employees serving on
hiring committees
Before serving on a
committee
Administrative
Procedure 7100
(What Everyone Needs to
Know about
Discriminatory
Harassment – online
version)
Screening Committee
Training
Title 5, section
53003 (C)(4)
Academic Senate
screening
committee
procedures
FERPA (Student
Confidentiality)
Anyone in contact with
student records
Federal Education
Records Under the
Family Educational
Rights and Privacy Act
One time during
employment with
WVMCCD
Board Policy 5040
Applies to colleges
and universities
receiving federal
funds under any
program
administered by the
U.S. Dept. of
Education
34 C.F.R. 99.1(a),
99.3
Emergency
Management/HAZMAT
Training
Not coordinated by Staff
Development
Central Services has
this information
Board Policy 3505
Federal and State
Laws
In 2010, the District began offering an employee assistance program through
Claremont EAP, which provides training opportunities in addition to assistance and
programs for all employees. (3A.5.7)
The West Valley College Office of Instruction provides regularly scheduled retreats
each semester for Division Chairs. Each Division chair receives 50% of their
assignment to perform administrative duties per the ACE contract. (3A.5.8) For
this reason, it is critically important that each retreat serves as an orientation and
|Standard III: Resources 315
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
training ground for the Division Chairs. The Vice President of Instruction, in
consultation with the Division Chairs, conducts retreats with topics ranging from
Effective Enrollment Management, Budget planning, Student Success, Title 5
regulation changes, Curriculum, and Accreditation. (3A.5.9)
New faculty members participate in a new faculty orientation program provided
both by the district’s HR department and Office of Instruction at the college prior to
the beginning of their first semester. By participating in both sessions, new faculty
members acquire information about district-wide matters, as well as collegespecific matters. The college’s new faculty orientation usually takes place ongoing
throughout the faculty member's first academic year. The purpose of this
orientation program is to help facilitate a new faculty member's transition into fulltime teaching at the college, introducing them to the mission, core values, and
college priorities, and provide an array of support and resources to support their
first year at the college. Topics covered in this orientation include a general
overview of the college, participatory governance process of the college, role of the
faculty union, role of the Academic Senate, classroom management techniques, and
the use of technology in the classroom. (3A.5.10) With the recent budget
reductions and increased state and legislative mandates, the new faculty
orientation has not been as consistently ongoing as the college would have liked.
There is a plan to ensure that meaningful and innovative new faculty orientation to
be reinstated in spring 2014.
Beginning in June 2013, the Classified Senate provides online training to staff
through Lynda.com. (3A.5.11) Lynda offers more than 2000 courses including many
that are applicable to leadership skills. This service is paid for by the Senate using
fundraising monies. Since instituting the program, all seats have been filled each
time a new session begins demonstrating the need of classified employee training
that is flexible with work assignments.
Student and Administration Support Staff (SASS) is a peer-support training program
sponsored by the Classified Senate, with the support of President Davis. The goal is
to improve classified training, create an interactive forum for suggestions, changes,
and problem solving, and to develop more consistency in common processes
throughout the college. Many classified staff members have to learn new jobs or
take on more responsibility, and the college wants to support colleagues during this
difficult transition.
SASS is in its infancy. It met twice in spring 2013, and then began regular monthly
meetings in October 2013. A survey was conducted to determine the training needs
|Standard III: Resources 316
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
of staff. (3A.5.12) The first session offered was to introduce staff to Lynda.com after
the Classified Senate purchased five licenses for staff to use on a rotating basis.
(3A.5.13) Since then SASS presented trainings in the student and financial
applications of Cognos and Microsoft Outlook. The trainers are classified staff who
have expertise in a particular area and attendees are encouraged to share tips they
might have.
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard. The college and district offer a variety of
professional development opportunities for its faculty, staff, and administrators all
of which have at their core the goal of positively impacting student learning and
success.
Loss of funding due to budget reductions continues to impact the ability to offer
ongoing professional development activities. However, both the college and the
district managed to adapt its programming for alignment with institutional goals
and trends and needs of faculty and staff.
Actionable Improvement Plans



Explore opportunities to maximize staff development, utilizing data-driven
decision on focused-topics, during times of constrained budget.
Conduct streamlined and strategic leadership training for the Division chairs
and Department chairs.
Continue to offer an ongoing new faculty orientation in spring 2014.
Evidence
3A.5.1
Administrative Procedure 7160
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/201
3/evidence/3a/AP_7160.pdf
3A.5.2
WVMCCD Staff Training Webpage
http://wvm.edu/group.aspx?id=2473
3A.5.3
Supervisor/Manager Meeting
Agendas
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/201
3/evidence/3a/All_Managers_Team_Meetings/
3A.5.4
Association of College Educators
Article 47
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/201
3/evidence/3a/ace_article_47.pdf
3A.5.5
Faculty Professional
Development webpage
http://wvm.edu/content.aspx?id=2148
3A.5.6
Article 23 - Classified Professional
Growth Incentive Program
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/201
3/evidence/3a/wvmcea_contract_2012_15_final_web_arti
cle23.pdf
|Standard III: Resources 317
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
3A.5.7
Claremont Employee Assistance
Program
3A.5.8
ACE Contract Appendix D
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/201
3/evidence/3a/ace_contract_ext_2011_page189.pdf
3A.5.9
Division Chair Retreat
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/201
3/evidence/3a/Division_Chair_Retreats/
3A.5.10
Faculty Handbook
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/201
3/evidence/3a/faculty_handbook_complete_20102011.pdf
3A.5.11
Lynda Training
http://westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2013/evi
dence/3a/Lynda_Training/
3A.5.12
SASS Survey
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/201
3/evidence/3c/sass_training_survey_2013.xlsx
3A.5.13
SASS Training
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/201
3/evidence/3a/sass_agenda.pdf
http://www.claremonteap.com
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/201
3/evidence/3a/2013_Lynda.com_Licenses_Purchase.pdf
Standard IIIA.5.b
With the assistance of the participants, the institution systematically evaluates
professional development programs and uses the results of these evaluations as
the basis for improvement.
Descriptive Summary
District Human Resources Department includes a participant evaluation of
workshops and trainings each time they are offered. Feedback and comments are
reviewed and evaluated for relevance and effectiveness of training. Results are
utilized for future development of new training and professional development
opportunities. (3A.5.b.1)
The All College Day Committee is also responsible for planning and coordinating All
College Day (ACD) activities subject to the requirements of the Association of
College Educators Collective Bargaining Agreement and approved by the Academic
Senate.
The evaluation process for All College Day (Flex day) is completed through the
distribution of an assessment form during the initial welcoming events, workshops
and other events throughout the day. The assessment results are reviewed by the
All College Day Committee (ACD) (3A.5.b.2) and shared with the college President
and Cabinet. Recommendations are ascertained and implemented. The committee
|Standard III: Resources 318
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
develops and coordinates the All College Day activities from the input of faculty,
staff, administrators and the ACD Committee’s evaluation, survey, and e-mail.
The purpose of the WVC Professional Development Committee is to plan and
coordinate the professional development activities for faculty and staff. The
Professional Development Committee is responsible to assess the needs of the
college as they relate to professional development and improvement of teaching
and learning, and student service. They also develop programs and strategies to
meet these needs. The Professional Development Committee annually evaluates
the Professional Development Program and Funding Guidelines. (3A.5.b.3) The
Professional Development Committee members examine, approve or deny requests
for professional development funding using an established process.
The newly identified faculty coordinator for the WVC Student Success Team will
continue to lead the implementation process of the Student Success Act of 2012, or
the Student Success and Support Programs, and begin leading critical exploration of
teaching and learning needs that address student success. (3A.5.b.4) The college is
deeply committed to this newly and strategically focused work as part of the WVC’s
Institutional Effectiveness, supporting professional development opportunities for
faculty, staff, administrators, and students.
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard. The reduction of funding created a challenging
environment to continue supporting professional development activities. However,
the college made commitment to provide strong college-wide All College Day each
semester. With the Student Success Team led by the new coordinator starting in
spring 2014, the college will emphasize on new, innovative, and forward-thinking
teaching and learning, as well as student support opportunities to ensure student
success.
Actionable Improvement Plans

WVC Professional Development Committee and All College Day Committee
work to increase synergy between these committees to streamline efforts to
provide strong professional development activities for the campus
community.
Evidence
3A.5.b.1
Participant Evaluations –
EAP Orientation
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2013/e
vidence/3a/eap_mgt_orientation_eval_09-13-13.docx
|Standard III: Resources 319
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
3A.5.b.2
All College Day Committee
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/All_College_Day/inde
x.html
3A.5.b.3
Professional Development
Program and Funding
Guidelines
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Professional_Develop
ment/Documents/Forms_And_Instructions/Conference_And_G
rant_Forms/WVCMini-Grant_Guidelines_2011-12.doc
3A.5.b.4
Student Success team
Framework
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/student
_success_diagram.html
Standard IIIA.6
Human resource planning is integrated with institutional planning. The institution
systematically assesses the effective use of human resources and uses the results
of the evaluation as the basis for improvement.
Descriptive Summary
The college regularly assesses its human resources needs in a number of ways
which integrate human resources planning with institutional planning. The college
assesses the use of its human resources primarily through its planning and resource
allocation process as part of the college’s Integrated Planning and Resource
Allocation and resource allocation. (3A.6.1) Program Review, which is one of the
three main components of this ongoing planning and assessment cycle, includes
information for needs and rationale for human resources. Program Review allows
for departments to annually assess budgets and how goals are met through human
and other resource requirements. Subsequently, starting in spring 2014, the
Budget and Resource Advisory Council (BRAC) reviews the human resources needs
used established criteria and in alignment with the college’s mission. (3A.6.2)
Recommendations will be forwarded to College Council which advises the
president.
Faculty hiring at the college occurs through a clearly defined process that is
integrated in the participatory governance process. There is a clearly delineated
process chart and timeline produced each year by the Vice President of Instruction
in consultation with the Division Chairs Council and Academic Senate. (3A.6.3)
In recent years’ severe budget reduction, the college engaged in participatory
governance based assessment process in identifying areas of reductions in
conjunction with possible restructuring and consolidation of programs,
departments, and services. Beginning in spring 2013, subcommittee of the College
Council created four ”Focus Area Interdisciplinary Team (FAIT)”s across campus,
|Standard III: Resources 320
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
opening wide opportunity for the campus community members to participate in
this process, as well as ensuring transparency throughout the process. (3A.6.4) The
college came to some decisions in the late fall 2013 semester and some areas of
analysis will continue into the spring 2014 semester. (3A.6.5) While extremely
challenging, this process created ample opportunity for the college community to
thoughtfully review, analyze, and assess needs for human resources in various
sectors of the college.
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard. The decisions for prioritizing hiring requests are
firmly rooted in the participatory governance process, camps wide.
Actionable Improvement Plans
• Assess BRAC role and responsibilities in spring 2014.
Evidence
3A.6.1
Integrated Planning Diagram
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accredi
tation/integrated_planning_diagram.html
3A.6.2
Budget Resource Advisory Council
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accredi
tation/2013/evidence/3d/brac_12_17_13.pdf
3A.6.3
Faculty Hiring Process and Timeline
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accredi
tation/2013/evidence/3a/Faculty_Hiring_Proces
s_and_Timeline.pdf
3A.6.4
FAIT Documents
http://westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation
/2013/evidence/4b/FAIT_Process/
3A.6.5
President’s Letter re: Budget
Reduction/Restructuring Outcomes
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accredi
tation/2013/evidence/3a/president_budget_red
uction_restructuring_outcomes.pdf
|Standard III: Resources 321
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Standard IIIB: Physical Resources
Physical resources, which include facilities, equipment, land, and other assets,
support student learning programs and services and improve institutional
effectiveness. Physical resource planning is integrated with institutional planning.
Descriptive Summary
West Valley College provides safe and sufficient physical resources of its programs
and services.
West Valley College is set in a wooded area surrounded by natural beauty including
oak trees and a creek running through the campus. The physical facility consists of
29 buildings and 6 athletic fields sitting on 143 acres. (3B.1) There are 27 single
story buildings and two double story buildings. The college has seven parking areas
that will accommodate 3,130 vehicles for students and faculty. The majority of
parking is on the north-west corner of the campus at the intersection of Fruitvale
and Allendale Avenues. Most original structures are single story, but as the college
renovates and additions from approved Bond Measure H & C, more modern two
story buildings are becoming prevalent as with the Fox Center. The physical space
of the campus totals 538,242 gross square feet with 368,487 assignable square feet.
The campus consists of four informal zones distributed by academic disciplines and
use. The first zone on the north side of campus is the Sciences Zone. It includes the
Applied Arts and Science and the Science and Math Divisions. The second zone is
the Central Zone of campus includes the Business Division and multiple student
services including the bookstore, the Office of Admissions and Records, Counseling
and Administration Offices.
The third zone on the east side of campus is the
Liberal Arts Zone. It includes the Social Science, Fine Arts, and Language Arts
Divisions. It also includes the Tutorial Center and Library. The fourth zone on the
south side of campus is the Athletics Zone. It consists of the Physical Education
Division and Athletic fields. There are seven athletic fields for soccer, softball,
football, track, tennis, golf and baseball.
The West Valley Mission Community College District was approved by voters in
1963. The District’s first college, West Valley College, was established in 1964 and
became operational on a 12.5 acre site located in the city of Campbell. The first
year of operation, 1964-1965, the college had 3,203 students with 53 faculty and 10
administrators offering 100 courses.
Standard III: Resources 322
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
In 1964, the district purchased the current 143 acres of land bordered by Fruitvale
and Allendale avenues in Saratoga. Between the years of 1964 – 1974 the college
was created with the first buildings completed in 1968. Mission college was
established in 1979 and in 1985 the district added Mission College to form a twocollege district.
The college has existed in its present location for almost four decades and most of
its buildings were in need of updating and reconstruction. To meet this need, the
district successfully conducted a $235 million bond measure in November 2004. The
college was allocated $97 million from the Measure H Bond for new building and
reconstruction projects. (3B.2) The college has been successful in pursuing state
construction funds in excess of $60 million to help meet its facilities development
plans. The projects completed with Bond Measure H include the Math & Science
renovation and addition, the construction of a two-story Technology (Fox) Center, a
replacement pool for the Aquatic Center, and reconstruction of Applied Arts and
Science, Language Arts, Social Science, and the Learning Center. The measure also
renovated the Campus Center and modernized infrastructure. (3B.3)
In June of 2012, the electorate approved a $350 million local general obligation
bond (Measure C) for The West Valley Mission Community College District which
provides funding for $157 million in construction projects for West Valley College.
The bond (Measure C) will support the development of several construction
projects on the main campus. Construction project include new building
construction for Student Services, Fine and Performing Arts, and the Library and
Learning Resource Center. The projects also include renovation of Applies Arts and
Sciences, Business Division, Humanities and Fine Arts, Campus Center,
Administration of Justice, and Physical Education. Additional bond measure
projects include Technology Systems, Planetarium upgrades and parking lots and
walkway replacements. (3B.4)
Facilities planning, design, construction and maintenance are the primary
responsibilities of the West Valley Mission Facilities Department. (3B.5) However,
to ensure that physical resources support student learning programs and services
and improve institutional effectiveness, West Valley College employees play a
primary role in designing the functional elements of buildings and collaborate with
District staff on other aspects of new facilities. In addition, campus personnel play
an important part in coordinating the operations of facilities on campus.
Standard III: Resources 323
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard.
Actionable Improvement Plans
None.
Evidence
3B.1
Campus Map
http://westvalley.edu/maps/
3B.2
Measure H Bond Projects List
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2013/
evidence/3b/3b_7_bond_measure_h_priority_list.xls
3B.3
Measure H Completed Project
List
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2013/
evidence/3b/completed_measure_h_projects.pdf
3B.4
Measure C Bond Projects
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2013/
evidence/3b/3b_8_approved_measure_c_bond_project_.xls
3B.5
Function Map: Physical
Resources
Function Map: Physical Resources
Standard IIIB.1
The institution provides safe and sufficient physical resources that support and
assure the integrity and quality of its programs and services, regardless of
location or means of delivery.
Descriptive Summary
West Valley College and the West Valley Mission Community College District
(WVMCCD) Facilities Department have effective procedures to regularly evaluate
the safety of physical resources against multiple criteria. These criteria include
building codes, OSHA requirements, and common risk management best practices.
Stringent design standards are followed that meet or exceed current building codes
for school facilities. All building projects undergo multiple review procedures, both
in the design and construction phases to ensure that they meet all applicable
building codes and safety and accessibility requirements. In addition, the college
uses both internal and external safety and security evaluations of its facilities and
monitors employee and non-employee accident and injury reports to identify and
reduce or eliminate risk factors through maintenance and improvements of physical
resources and training of employees.
The college ensures the safety of its facilities by utilizing the annual report prepared
by the district’s insurance company, Keenan & Associates. Keenan & Associates
Standard III: Resources 324
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
complete an annual inspection of each facility and, in conjunction with the district
facilities manager. (3B.1.1) The report provides the college needed safety
adjustments and repairs. The college maintains standards in compliance with OSHA
(Occupational Safety Health Standards), ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act), and
local building codes requirements.
The Vice President of Administrative Services meets once a month with the
college’s Facilities and Safety Advisory Council to ensure that the campus meets
state regulations regarding health and safety. (3B.1.2) The committee is composed
of representatives from each building on campus plus representatives from Health
Services, Security, and Student Services. The committee receives annual revenues
to assign for facility repairs and improvements. Recommendations from this
committee are forwarded through the Vice President of Administrative Services to
the district facilities department.
The WVMCCD’s comprehensive planning process provides safe and sufficient
resources that assure the integrity and quality of its programs and services. The
college’s Educational and Facilities Master Plan 2009 (E&FMP) (3B.1.3) planning and
development process provided determination of sufficiency of classrooms, lecture
halls, laboratories, and other critical facilities for instruction and student services:
Beginning in 2001: The College developed its first E&FMP. It was a highly
participatory process involving many constituencies of the college.
August 2008: The WVMCCD Board of Trustees hired a planning team to assist West
Valley College in developing an Educational and Facilities Master Plan to the
previously developed 2001 plan. The planning process was a highly participatory
one involving many constituencies of the college. During the summer and early fall
of 2008, the College Council worked with the planning team to define the project
scope, develop processes and timelines, and develop the educational plan goals.
Educational planning information and data were collected, and Program Reviews
were analyzed to assure compatibility with the college’s strategic goals.
Fall 2008: Meetings were held with representatives from every work unit and
academic discipline. The meetings were designed to confirm findings from Program
Reviews and assess future plans and needs. The condition of existing facilities,
grounds, way finding, and pedestrian and vehicular access was also assessed.
Standard III: Resources 325
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
December through February 2009: Internal and external environmental scans were
completed. Concurrently, other studies were completed that provided information
for the E&FMP. These studies are described later in this section.
Using the Program Reviews, the environmental scan, the information from the
other studies, and a collection of other internal and external resource documents,
the College Council reviewed the list of potential college-wide educational
initiatives that were then disseminated via the participants to the entire campus
community. Then, in February, the College Council, working with the planning
consultants and using the educational initiatives as a guide, discussed several
options for possible new campus construction and facilities modifications.
Spring 2009: The College Council worked closely with the consultants reviewing a
series of planning options and developing recommendations for the Facilities Plan.
The discussion included the consideration of primary and secondary effects, project
linkages and priorities, strategies for maximizing state funding, preliminary project
budgets, and phasing plans.
The planning process included a series of College Council meetings as well as
presentations and discussions with the college to broaden the plan’s perspective
and to enhance the acceptance of proposed developments. The primary data used
to evaluate the sufficiency of classrooms, laboratories and other facilities are
capacity-to-load ratios and instructional space utilization reports.
The district facilities department annually updates the West Valley College Space
Inventory. (3B.1.4) The inventory details the type of usage for every space in every
building and becomes part of the justification for the Five-Year Construction Plan
(3B.1.5). The state uses these figures, along with projected enrollment growth, to
develop capacity/load ratios that are considered in the prioritization of projects.
In 2005, the district authorized Geier & Geier Consulting, Inc. to assess its current
facilities. This assessment found that over the three decades since the campus was
completed, changes in instructional methods have created the need to modify
existing space (classrooms, laboratories, and offices) and to develop additional
technology capacity and distance learning capabilities (3B.1.6). Findings from this
evaluation contributed to the formulation of direction for the Educational and
Facilities Master plan of 2009.
West Valley College plans, builds, maintains, and upgrades or replaces its physical
resources in a manner that assures effective utilization and the continuing quality
Standard III: Resources 326
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
necessary to support its programs and services. The college’s Educational and
Facilities Master Plan (E&FMP) assesses facilities needs in support of educational
programs. Working in collaboration with faculty, staff, and students, college
administrators are responsible for the implementation of the plan. Facilities,
maintenance, and custodial services are district functions with a district director of
facilities assigned to West Valley College. The E&FMP was last reviewed
comprehensively in 2009. (3B.1.7)
The district annually updates its Five-Year Construction Plan. This plan is developed
with the input from the President’s Cabinet and approved by the Board of Trustees.
The plan is reviewed and prioritized annually. State Chancellor Outlay Applications
are submitted to the state for renovation and new construction projects based on
the master plan. (3B.1.8)
The primary focus of all facilities planning is to ensure that facilities are constructed
and maintained to assure access, safety, security and a healthful learning and
working environment, while meeting instructional and institutional goals.
The Executive Director of Facilities, Construction, and Maintenance develops an
Annual Scheduled Maintenance Report for all district facilities maintenance needs.
(3B.1.9) The College’s Facilities and Safety Advisory Council, in conjunction with the
college’s facilities manager, meets and confers regarding maintenance and repair
needs. Roadways, pathways and signage are under continual scrutiny from campus
police, maintenance, and campus facility groups. (3B.1.10)
West Valley’s sixteen modular building are approved by the Department of State
Architects. Scheduled maintenance funds address the need for upkeep and
replacement of roofs, HVAC, windows and doors, and any other structural
improvements. (3B.1.11)
New building plans conform to state building code standards as determined by the
California Department of State Architects (DSA). Community Colleges currently
operate under the Field Act, a stringent building code for public schools. The college
hires a licensed architect to provide plans and specifications that are approved by
DSA. After DSA approval, the project is publicly bid and awarded to the lowest
responsible licensed contractor. A DSA state inspector is present during
construction to make sure that buildings are built to specifications. The West Valley
College Educational and Facilities Master Plan (E&FMP) called for an Environmental
Impact Report (EIR) to assess the effects of the actions proposed in the master plan.
(3B.1.12)
Standard III: Resources 327
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Prior to offering classes at any off-campus site, the location is inspected for safety
and sufficiency in meeting the needs of the programs and services. When courses
are offered off-campus, routine maintenance is performed regularly. These
facilities must comply with building regulations issued by the DSA and federally
mandated health and safety requirements, ensuring ADA access. To ensure off-site
facilities have the resources that aid in the delivery of West Valley College’s
educational programs, the coordinator of relevant academic area works with staff
at the off-site location to ensure that all instruction and service needs are met.
In March 2011, the college leased approximately 2,820 square feet at 1 West
Campbell Avenue from the City of Campbell. (3B.1.13) The Campbell Center
includes approximately 567 feet of office space and 2,253 feet of classroom space.
Three classrooms, each accommodating from 30 to 40 students, are now in
operation for day and evening classes. Off-campus facilities such as the
Campbell/San Jose Center are regularly inspected by West Valley College
employees and the same compliances described above apply.
The college maintains a safe, secure environment for its students and personnel
(3B.1.14). In the 2012 accreditation survey, 71% of the student respondents noted
positively that they feel safe on campus during the day. (3B.1.15) In addition, the
same survey indicated that 76% of students agree or strongly agree that the
condition of the campus facilities is conducive to student learning. The college does
not provide security at the Campbell/San Jose Center, as both have their own
security.
Funding requests for facilities are derived from the 2009 Educational and Facilities
Master Plan. Projects listed on the college’s annual, state-required Five-Year
Construction Plan are identified from the comprehensive plan. Projects eligible for
state funding remain on the Five-Year Construction Plan until they are funded or
rejected by the state, or until the priorities for facilities change because of other
factors.
Most funding sources for facilities maintenance and improvement, including the
Five-Year Construction Plan, have specific guidelines and/or restrictions. The college
regularly applies for state-scheduled maintenance funds earmarked for repairs. The
availability of funds varies from year-to-year with specific guidelines for the types of
projects that qualify. The state funds require matching funds. Each submitted
project is then rated against a state formula. Available funding determines the
number of funded projects. The college annually updates the list of projects to be
submitted to the state based on critical needs, periodic facilities maintenance
Standard III: Resources 328
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
assessment, the Facilities Condition Assessment Report and the availability of
matching funds (3B.1.16). Projects completed and in process since 1998 are listed in
the Facilities and Campus Development Project Listing.
The physical resource process is structured by two branches:
1) The Committee Structure:
The Facility and Safety Advisory Committee develops facility standards. The
standards include what type of seats or tables are standard for classrooms.
The committee develops policies and procedures. Small facilities projects
are determined by the VP of Financial Services and the cabinet if they are
less than $10,000 in scope. If the project cost is determined to be more
than $10,000 then it goes to the Facilities Advisory Committee for
prioritization in to Tier I, Tier II, or Tier III. The committee develops a project
cost and planning agenda. (3B.1.17)
2) The Administrative Structure:
A project determined to pass the “one-day” test is a project that will take
one day or less to complete. A one-day test project will be completed as a
work order. A project taking longer than one day will be a small facilities
improvement project (i.e. replacing office furniture mounted on a wall).
The Administrative Structure includes the following items:
•
•
•
•
E&FMP
Bond Measure Priority Project List
5-Year Project Plan
Small Facilities Project List
West Valley College uses its institutional planning process to identify equipment
needs. Departments identify and prioritize needs in their Program Reviews.
(3B.1.18) Starting in spring 2014, the Budget and Resource Advisory Council (BRAC),
as part of the Integrated Planning and Resource Allocation and resource allocation
processes, will review and analyze requests with established criteria in accordance
with the college mission statement and priorities to make subsequent
recommendations to the College Council. (3B.1.19) Once approved, distributed, and
installed, designated staff maintain campus-based equipment including
maintenance technicians, information technology staff, laboratory technicians,
athletic attendants, and instructional assistants. Funding for most facilities and
equipment is centralized in the college budget to meet the ongoing needs of the
college programs and services.
Standard III: Resources 329
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
The college’s Instructional Technology Division, which handles planning and upkeep
of the college’s technology equipment needs, was recently restructured due to the
retirement of the Dean of Instructional Technology and Services. Under the
leadership of the Vice President of Administrative Services, a streamlined
technology equipment inventory will be refreshed as well as cross-referenced with
facility equipment needs (i.e. HVAC computerized system, new alarm system). It is
reflected in the college’s Technology Strategic Plan. (3B.1.20)
Colleague, the college’s administrative management system, is used for class
scheduling and to assign classrooms and evaluate room utilization. West Valley
College and Mission College began exploring the Ad Astra system to specifically
address instructional facility space in 2010. (3B.1.21) Ad Astra is to be fully adopted
at West Valley College; however its implementation plan will be revisited to
incorporate the revisions occurring with facility and renovation priorities. As
buildings are renovated and room inventories change, Ad Astra's database will be
updated as well in order to align with the room assignments in Colleague's schedule
of classes. A review of the Ad Astra facilities inventory will be completed in spring
2014, followed by Ad Astra training for staff members using the system for more
complete implementation by fall 2104.
ANGEL Learning Management provides a cloud based distance learning
environment. (3B.1.22) District Information Systems (IS) manages campus network
and internet access which is currently at gigabit speed to provide enough
performance and capacity for the foreseeable future. ANGEL support is provided
through the college Instructional Technology Department. Computer and media
creation equipment is available for check out through Instructional Technology staff
on an as-needed basis.
The Annual Safety & Security Report For 2013 , completed in October of each year,
meets federal reporting guidelines. The report includes statistics on criminal
problems and police and security issues over a three year period. Overall reports
for assaults, burglary, sex crimes, stolen vehicles, theft, drug violations and traffic
collisions have declined during this period.
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard. The college has existed in its present location for
almost four decades, and most of its buildings are in need of updating and
reconstruction. To meet this need, the district successfully conducted a $235 million
bond measure in November 2004. The college was allocated $97 million from the
Standard III: Resources 330
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Measure H Bond for new building and reconstruction projects. (3B.1.23) The
college has been successful in pursuing state construction funds in excess of $60
million to help meet its facilities development plans. In June of 2012, the electorate
approved a $350 million local general obligation bond (Measure C) for The West
Valley Mission Community College District. The passing of bond Measure C in 2012
will provide $157 million in funding for new construction projects. (3B.1.24)
The college has always supported the learning outcomes of students with
disabilities. Disability Educational Student Program (DESP) maintains close
relationships with the Facilities department to ensure there are no physical barriers
that prevent students from achieving their educational goals. The college is in
compliance with state and federal mandated American with Disabilities Act (ADA)
standards and consistently makes improvements to the college’s physical plan to
ensure accessibility. (3B.1.25)
Actionable Improvement Plan


Under the leadership of the Vice President of Administrative Services in
conjunction with the district Information systems (IS) department, complete
installation of the Ad Astra software for instructional schedule planning for
room allocation.
Plan for revision of Educational and Facilities Master Plan district-wide
Evidence
3B.1.1
Keenan and Associates SWACC
Report
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2
013/evidence/3b/wvcmc_swacc_020113_condition.pdf
3B.1.2
Facilities and Safety Advisory Council
http://westvalley.edu/committees/Facilities_Safety_Advi
sory/
3B.1.3
Educational and Facilities Master
Plan 2009
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/d
ocuments/2009-wvc-educational-and-facilities-masterplan.pdf
3B.1.4
WVC Space Inventory
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2
013/evidence/3b/3b_5__space_inventory.pdf
3B.1.5
WVMCCD Five Year Construction
Plan
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2
013/evidence/3b/wvmccd_five_year_construction_plan_
2014_18.pdf
3B.1.6
Geier and Geier Report 2005
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2
013/evidence/3b/WVC _Geier&Geier
Consulting_Report_2005.pdf
3B.1.7
Educational and Facilities Master
Plan 2009
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/d
ocuments/2009-wvc-educational-and-facilities-masterplan.pdf
Standard III: Resources 331
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
3B.1.8
WVMCCD Five Year Construction
Plan
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2
013/evidence/3b/wvmccd_five_year_construction_plan_
2014_18.pdf
3B.1.9
WVMCCD Annual Scheduled
Maintenance Report
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2
013/evidence/3b/3b1b_15_201314_state_scheduled_ma
intenance_plan.pdf
3B.1.10
Facilities and Campus Development
Project Listing
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2
013/evidence/3b/3b_16__2011_12_smallfacilitiesproject.
pdf
3B.1.11
Scheduled Maintenance Funds
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2
013/evidence/3b/3b1b_1_maintenance_operating_budg
et.pd
3B.1.12
Environmental Impact Report
http://wvm.edu/content.aspx?id=4978
3B.1.13
Campbell Center
http://westvalley.edu/classes/campbell.html
3B.1.14
Annual Safety & Security Report For
2013
http://wvm.edu/WorkArea/linkit.aspx?LinkIdentifier=id&I
temID=7012
3B.1.15
Accreditation Student Survey
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/d
ocuments/surveys/accreditation_student_survey_report_
_07_12.pdf
3B.1.16
Facilities Condition Assessment
Report
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2
013/evidence/3b/Facilities_Condition_Assessment_Repor
t.pdf
3B.1.17
Small Facilities Project Flow Chart
and Form
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2
013/evidence/3b//small_facilities_project_flow_chartand
form.xls
3B.1.18
Program Review
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/programreview/index.html
3B.1.19
Budget and Resource Advisory
Council
http://westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2013/e
vidence/3b/brac_12_17_13.pdf
3B.1.20
WVC Tech Plan November 2013
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2
013/evidence/3c/technology_strategy_update_for_tac_1
1-12-13.pdf
3B.1.21
Ad Astra
http://www.aais.com/products
3B.1.22
Angel Course Management System
http://wvmccd.angellearning.com/default.asp
3B.1.23
Measure H Bond Projects List
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2
013/evidence/3b/3b_7_bond_measure_h_priority_list.xls
3B.1.24
Measure C Bond Projects List
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2
013/evidence/3b/3b_8_approved_measure_c_bond_proj
ect_.xls
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2
013/evidence/3b/ada_barrier_removal_project_2010.pdf
Standard III: Resources 332
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Standard IIIB.1.a
The institution plans, builds, maintains, and upgrades or replaces its physical
resources in a manner that assures effective utilization and the continuing quality
necessary to support its programs and services.
Descriptive Summary
The West Valley Mission Community College District (WVMCCD) Facilities
Department is led by the Executive Director of Facilities, Maintenance and
Construction. (3B.1.a.1, 2) Each college has a Manager of College Facilities housed
locally who manages the maintenance and operations of its physical resources.
Grounds Services and Custodial Services report to the campus-assigned Director.
All service and work orders are processed through an automated work order system
prioritized and attended to in order of precedence and urgency. The Vice President
of Administrative Services at the college is the direct contact with the WVMCCD
Facilities Department on all facilities maintenance and renovations. The Executive
Director of Facilities, Maintenance, and Construction supervises and manages all
bond-supported construction related projects for both colleges.
In addition to a comprehensive long-range planning process to ensure the adequacy
of resources will into the future, the WVMCCD Facilities Department and West
Valley College use an integrated process to design, construct, modify and maintain
buildings to ensure effective utilization and continuing quality of facilities to meet
the needs of its programs and services. The WVMCCD Facilities Department
evaluates and formulates plans for facilities using state prioritization criteria to
project eligibility for new or modernized space across campus. West Valley College
continuously evaluates facility needs based on college priorities through the
institutional planning process. West Valley Mission Community College District’s
(WVMCCD) comprehensive planning process aligns with the mission statements of
the district and colleges, encompassing resource allocation and curriculum
offerings. As a result, the WVC Educational and Facilities Master Plan 2009
(3B.1.a.3) clearly delineated recommendations for the college’s facility needs:
1. Maximize functional space
a. Renovate facilities
b. Address program needs
c. Continue technological advancements
2. Eliminate non-functional space
a. Remove temporary buildings
Standard III: Resources 333
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
b. Replace aging facilities
3. Improve efficiency/utilization of facilities
a. Consolidate related programs
b. Create flexible, interdisciplinary spaces
4. Enhance the campus environment
a. Create gathering spaces for learning
b. Improve landscape and way finding
With the successful passage of Measure H bond in the amount of $235 million for
the district in November 2004, construction projects were successfully completed
below based on the Educational and Facilities Master Plan. (3B.1.a.4)













Aquatic Center project
Campus Technology Center (Fox Center)
Science and Math addition
Science and Math Building renovation
ADA barrier removal (phase 1)
Utility infrastructure modernization
Surface improvements (I, II & III)
Interim housing/swing space/Wet labs
Campus Center building renovation
Campus Center Student Grove project
Applied Arts and Science renovation
Classroom and student services facility upgrades
Solar photo voltaic system projects
The college is completing one project remaining from Measure H—the Applied Arts
and Science (AAS) renovation which is slated for completion in the Spring 2014
semester.
With the recent successful passing of the bond measure C with $350 million. The
college delineated the following re-prioritized plan. The initial list of construction
projects was approved by the Board in January 2013. (3B.1.a.5)




Applied Arts and Science renovation
Student Services Building-New replacement
Library and Learning Resources Center reconstruction
Fine Arts Building – new replacement
Standard III: Resources 334
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014



Humanities and Fine Arts building renovation
Business Division renovation and Administration of Justice building
Planetarium upgrade
The Educational and Facilities Master Plan 2009 also discussed sustainable design
principles. The district committed to working with respective architects to comply
with LEED certified building if the project is larger than 10,000 square feet of new or
renovated projects. When the building project is LEED certified, the college’s
Sustainability Committee (3B.1.a.6), an advisory committee to the College Council,
works in collaboration with the architects often creating student internship
opportunities.
Once any individual project is launched, the design team is constructed. A team
consists of a Project Lead who is a college administrator who is the overseer of the
entire project, a core group that includes key personnel of the focused areas, the
architects, the project manager (Gilbane), and the Executive Director of Facilities,
Maintenance, and Construction. Initially the project architects/engineers/project
managers and facilities planners meet early and often with WVC end users to
identify the programmatic requirements of the project, develop schematic designs,
and ultimately progress to the construction documents phase that allows the
project to be put out to bid in order for a contract to be awarded. WVC end-user
participation scales back during the construction phase, when the designs are being
built, but then the college’s involvement ratchets up once again toward the end of
construction when furniture and equipment requirements are identified and
produced.
At key milestones in the project design, plans are submitted to the West Valley
College President’s Cabinet for review and input. Once the design is complete, the
project is submitted to the Division of the State Architect (DSA) for structural,
fire/life safety, and accessibility review and approval.
The WVMCCD Facilities Department staff also coordinates all significant alterations
and upgrades to ensure facilities meet changing needs and provide a safe and
accessible learning and working environment. Routine repairs and maintenance is
performed by a combination of WVMCCD Facilities Department and West Valley
College.
The WVMCCD Facilities Department and West Valley College use a coordinated
approach to address both urgent and non-urgent requests for ‘as-needed’
Standard III: Resources 335
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
maintenance services. Urgent requests are initiated by calling the WVMCCD
Facilities Department to dispatch maintenance personnel to provide services. Nonurgent requests for custodial, maintenance or other facilities services such as
alterations and upgrades are submitted via an online work order system. (3B.1.a.7)
An employee can initiate a work order to identify needed maintenance or
alterations to improve facilities. Priority is given to safety and health requests and
other critical needs.
West Valley College evaluates the effectiveness of its facilities and equipment using
input from the Program Review process, as part of the college’s Integrated Planning
and Resource Allocation process, as well as by monitoring work order requests and
other forms of input through the Facility and Safety Advisory Council or other
campus constituency groups. Some work orders are maintenance related such as
furniture replacement and repair, some are technology related use in classrooms
and faculty offices. West Valley College has three different entities for addressing
different technological maintenance needs:
1) The district Information System (IS) department is responsible for faculty
offices and classroom network connections as well as the campus-wide
wireless internet system consistently used by students and staff to utilize
laptops, tablets, or iPads. The district IS department is responsible for
providing necessary computer and printers for individual staff and
faculty.
2) Instructional Technology staff on campus are responsible for the
replacement of computer equipment in classrooms, computer labs, and
other instruction-related facilities. The staff is also responsible for
setting up such “smart” classrooms and labs to be ready for instructional
purposes prior to start date of each semester. Staff also provide
maintenance, troubleshooting, and faculty assistance for any classroom
instructional technology related needs during the semester.
3) Classroom Technology staff who update, replace, or troubleshoot audiovideo related works.
All forms of feedback are used to identify and prioritize needed improvements to
facilities and equipment. At a time of reduced resources, it is critically important
for the college and district IS to coordinate their planning efforts in providing
necessary support and services to the college. The college is in the process of
implementing Ad Astra software for effective utilization of facilities and classrooms.
(3B.1.a.8) Implementation of this tool will allow the college to receive reports on
Standard III: Resources 336
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
academic and non-academic use of classrooms in a timely manner to ensure rooms
are scheduled efficiently. In addition, currently separately managed room
reservations such as those in the Fox building, Campus Center, and the Library can
centralized through Ad Astra.
West Valley College’s Hazardous Material Management Plan (HMMP) was certified
by the FHDA. (3B.1.a.9) The HMMP outlines procedures for emergency response
and contingency in case of chemical spills, fumes, injury, and/or containment,
treatment, evacuation, and training.
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard. The above initiatives, activities, and processes
demonstrate how the institution plans, builds, maintains, and upgrades its physical
resources in a manner that assures effective utilization and the continuing quality
necessary to support its programs and services.
Actionable Improvement Plan
•
Coordinate planning processes of the District IS and college’s IT in regards to
needs of equipment and software.
Evidence
3B.1.a.1
WVMCCD Organizational Chart
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/
2013/evidence/4b/wvmccd_org_chart_2012_13.pdf
3B.1.a.2
WVMCCD Facilities Webpage
http://wvm.edu/group.aspx?id=176&linkidentifier=id&i
temid=176
3B.1.a.3
WVC Educational and Facilities
Master Plan 2009- page 73
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/
2013/evidence/3b/2009_wvc_educational_and_facilitie
s_master_plan_page73.pdf
3B.1.a.4
Measure H and Capital Outlay
Program report November 13, 2013
(p. 2-4)
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/
2013/evidence/3b/completed_measure_h_projects_pa
ge2-4.pdf
3B.1.a.5
Board Approval – Measure C
construction List, January 2013
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/
2013/evidence/3b/3b_8_approved_measure_c_bond_
project_.xls
3B.1.a.6
WVC Sustainability Committee
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Sustainability/
3B.1.a.7
Work Order System
http://secure-www.wvm.edu/
3B.1.a.8
Ad Astra
http://www.aais.com/products
3B.1.a.9
WVC Hazardous Material
Management Plan
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/
2013/evidence/3b/WVMCCD_Hazardous_Material_Pla
Standard III: Resources 337
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
n_2012.pdf
Standard IIIB.1.b
The institution assures that physical resources at all locations where it offers
courses, programs, and services are constructed and maintained to assure access,
safety, security, and a healthful learning and working environment.
Descriptive Summary
West Valley College assures that physical resources are accessible, safe, secure, and
provide a healthful environment by complying with federally mandated American
with Disabilities Act (ADA), seismic safety, and Division of the State Architect (DSA)
regulations. Access for the disabled community is a high priority of WVMCCD and
West Valley College. In May 2011, with the support of Measure H Bond, the college
removed the architectural barriers were out of compliance with current ADA
standards. (3B.1.b.1)
The college has always been a leader in recruiting and supporting the learning
outcomes of those students who possess a disability of some sort. The Disability
and Educational Support Program (DESP) maintains close relationships with the
WVMCCD Facilities Department to ensure there are no physical barriers that
prevent these students from achieving their educational goals. In alignment with its
mission, goals and objectives, the college strives to provide facilities that ensure a
successful learning environment for all students.
The college continues to upgrade the facilities as part of the Measure C Bond
construction project to maintain compliance with the Americans with Disabilities
Act (ADA) standards and related state codes. All renovations and new projects are
reviewed and approved by the Division of the State Architect. It is the position of
the college not to deny any student instructional access due to physical limitations
imposed by the campus. Toward that end, the college has over the years made
improvements to the college’s physical plan to ensure accessibility. On an ongoing
basis, ADA and other safety issues are addressed through the campus’s Facility and
Safety Advisory Council. (3B.1.b.2) The Facility and Safety Advisory Council reviews
and recommends policies governing the college’s physical plant and physical plan
improvements to the college’s highest governing committee, the College Council.
In addition, as part of the capital construction plan, newly constructed facilities and
existing facilities that are renovated are built to comply with ADA codes.
Standard III: Resources 338
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
The district and the college routinely assess accessibility and safety of the buildings.
The Division of State Architect (DSA) and Santa Clara County Fire Department
perform annual campus inspections with an Inspector of Record for ADA access,
structural, fire, and life safety compliance followed by the creation of an ADA
Compliance Plan. (3B.1.b.3)
The college also places a high level of attention on the safety of it facilities.
Activities that demonstrate this commitment to safety include regular meetings of
the WVC Facility and Safety Committee, annual safety inspections to comply with
the California Occupational Health and Safety Act (Cal OSHA), and the resolution
cycle with the college’s property and liability insurance provider. Keenan and
Associates conducts annual campus inspections and reports any findings to the
district Facilities Department. (3B.1.b.4)
The WVC Facilities and Safety Advisory Council meets monthly to facilitate overall
safety and facility related issues surrounding campus such as the review of recent
accident and injury incidents, safety inspections, and the promotion of safety on
campus. (3B.1.b.5) The Facility and Safety Advisory Council members represent all
constituency groups at the college, including administrators, faculty, staff, and
students. The district Executive Director of Facilities, Construction, and
Maintenance Department develops an annual scheduled maintenance report of all
district facility maintenance needs. (3B.1.b.6) The college’s Facilities and Safety
Advisory Council, in conjunction with the college’s facilities managers, meets
bimonthly and confer regarding maintenance and repairs needs. Roadways,
pathways, and signage are under continual scrutiny from district police,
maintenance personnel, and campus groups.
The security of its facilities is of paramount importance at West Valley College. The
college fire alarm system was upgraded in 2012 to include retrofitted fire alarm
systems in each classroom and building. The alarm system is automatically
dispatched with the local fire agency for immediate response. In addition, the
college upgraded all classrooms on campus, with the exception of the Physical
Education Division, with a new emergency telephone system. The emergency
telephone system enables anyone to connect with emergency services as well as
automatic dispatch to EMS. To ensure a timely emergency communication to the
college community, the emergency telephone system’s uniform audible (verbal)
message feature can be used to carry out messages to all user phones with collegewide emergency information. The college is equipped with a web and phone based
Standard III: Resources 339
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
emergency alert system—WVM Alert—which provides real time emergency
information to all registered users. (3B.1.b.7)
The safety of students on campus is a major priority, so that all students can focus
on their learning experience. The WVMCCD maintains a campus Police Department
staffed with highly trained officers to help protect the safety and ensure the
security of students, staff, their property, and property of the district. (3B.1.b.8)
District police officers, committed to standards of professional excellence, are
required to meet the selection and training requirements of the California Peace
Officer Standards and Training Commission. Officers receive the same training and
carry the same authority on or near the college campuses as city police officers and
county deputy sheriffs.
The District Police, under the direction of a Vice Chancellor of Administrative
Services, offers a wide range of services to the campus community. Services include
providing and presenting current crime prevention information, patrolling the
college campuses and parking lots, proactive crime suppression, investigating all
offenses that occur on the campus, and informing campus users of the occurrence
of crimes specified by federal statute. Officers are authorized to arrest or cite law
violations.
The District Police releases the WVMCCD Safety and Security Report. (3B.1.b.9) The
Jeanne Cleary Disclosure of Campus Safety Policy and Campus Crime Statistic Act
(commonly known as the Clery Act) is federal legislation designated to provide
students, prospective students, and the public with uniform information from
universities throughout the country on criminal problems and police and security
issues. Criminal statistics are updated by October 1 of each year and include data
from the three previous calendar years. The report can be found both at the WVC
website and District Police website. To accommodate easy access to the campus
police, the telephone extension to the campus police department is posted in all
classrooms and offices.
The college recognizes that smoking on campus is a public health issue. To address
the issue in hopes of decreasing the health risks to member of its community, the
Facility and Safety Committee recently identified smoking areas which are well
away from entrances to buildings and clear of main pathways throughout the
college. (3B.1.b.10) The decision was reached after vetted through the college’s
participatory governance process with discussion forums held to solicit feedback.
Standard III: Resources 340
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
The college maintains an off-site facility, The Campbell Educational Development
Center. (3B.1.b.11) The Campbell Center adheres to the same safety and security
standard and measures as the main campus site and reviews to assure access,
safety, security and a healthy learning and working environment for college
programs and services. The Campbell Center agreement is negotiated to ensure
that West Valley College maintains sufficient control to ensure the quality of off-site
facilities.
Self- Evaluation
The college meets this standard. The college has a number of processes and
protocols to measure and ensure West Valley College’s physical resources are
constructed and maintained to assure access, safety, security, and a healthful
learning and working environment. Effective decision making guides the planning,
design and construction of new and renovated facilities. The college is not yet
where it wants to be in regards to campus security and training programs.
Actionable Improvement Plan
•
District and the colleges commit to develop a comprehensive Emergency
Preparedness process.
Standard III: Resources 341
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Evidence
3B.1.b.1
ADA Barrier Removal
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditati
on/2013/evidence/3b/completed_measure_h_proje
cts_page3.pdf
3B.1.b.2
Facilities and Safety Advisory Council
http://westvalley.edu/committees/Facilities_Safety_
Advisory/
3B.1.b.3
ADA Compliance Plan – HMC
Architect
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditati
on/2013/evidence/3b/WV_AAS_13_0315_RASTUDY_2_Core_Revisions.pdf
3B.1.b.4
Keenan and Associates Inspection
Report
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditati
on/2013/evidence/3b/wvcmc_swacc_020113_condi
tion.pdf
3B.1.b.5
Facilities and Safety Advisory Council
http://westvalley.edu/committees/Facilities_Safety_
Advisory/
3B.1.b.6
Annual Scheduled Maintenance
Report
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditati
on/2013/evidence/3b/3b1b_15_201314_state_sche
duled_maintenance_plan.pdf
3B.1.b.7
WVM Alert
http://wvm.edu/emergency.aspx?id=3480
3B.1.b.8
Campus Police
http://wvm.edu/police/
3B.1.b.9
WVMCCD Safety and Security Report
http://wvm.edu/WorkArea/linkit.aspx?LinkIdentifier
=id&ItemID=7012
3B.1.b.10
Smoke Free Campus Policy
http://westvalley.edu/services/studentdevelopment/health/smoking.html
3B.1.b.11
Campbell Educational Development
Center
http://westvalley.edu/classes/campbell.html
Standard IIIB.2
To assure the feasibility and effectiveness of physical resources in supporting
institutional programs and services, the institution plans and evaluates its
facilities and equipment on a regular basis, taking utilization and other relevant
data into account.
Descriptive Summary
The Educational and Facilities Master Plan serves as the basis for all facilities and
equipment-related planning and evaluation. The Educational Master Plan identifies
the college’s educational mission and overall direction and the accompanying
Facilities Master Plan assesses data such as space utilization and capacity to use
ratios to ensure the physical facilities can support the educational mission and goals
of the college. The college’s current Educational and Facilities Master Plan was
Standard III: Resources 342
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
produced in 2009. (3B.2.1) Since that time, the college experienced workload
reductions due to the state budget crisis, and is currently engaged in a 2014-15
budget reduction strategy and college restructuring process. College priorities have
shifted due to the legislative mandates of both the Student Success Act of 2012 (SB
1456) and Associate Degree for Transfer (SB 1440) which changed the definition of
effective service offerings to ensure student success. Consequently, the college
facility projects supported by the recent passage of Bond Measure C will need
careful examination based on fast-changing college priorities. To that end, the
college and the district realize the need for revision of the Educational and Facilities
Master Plan 2009. The college and the district began discussing the best way to
make the revision so as to obtain accurate and current data of the college’s needs
for the college’s facility planning. This timing conveniently coincides with the
WVMCCD policy to review and update the Educational and Facilities Master Plan
every five years.
The district Facilities Department conducts annual space inventories. (3B.2.2) The
space inventories help to determine the capacity-load ratio of all space on campus.
This ratio assists the college in determining where more space is needed on campus
and suggests in which areas additional facilities may be needed. The District
Facilities Department submits a Five Year Construction Plan to the California
Community College Chancellor’s Office for funding consideration in the Capital
Outlay Program. (3B.2.3) This plan is developed by the District Facilities
Department, in consultation with WVC and district administration, and is approved
by the Board of Trustees. Initial project proposals for state funding, final project
proposals, and a comprehensive detailing of planned projects (locally or state
funded) are shown in priority and sequence of the construction projects. The plan
takes into account an important criterion for campus facilities planning; capacity to
load ratios. The capacity to load ratio is a comparison of the square footage a
college has in relation to the square footage the college’s enrollment indicates it
needs. Capacity to load ratios is measured for different categories of space,
including lecture, laboratory, office, library, and audio/visual support spaces.
As the capital construction program provides opportunities to construct facilities
that meet the needs of WVC, the cost of operating and maintaining those facilities –
the total cost of ownership (TCO) – is considered. The district and the college have
several mechanisms by which to ensure that TCO is taken into account. Facilities
design standards have been developed to ensure that new and renovated facilities
are designed and constructed in accordance with WVMCCD operational criteria that
include energy efficiency and LEED certification where appropriate.
Standard III: Resources 343
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Audio-visual equipment is evaluated by the Instructional Technology staff at the
college on a regular basis. The unit performs necessary repairs, upgrades, and
maintenance of the equipment in the classrooms and labs. The Instructional
Technology unit maintains repair and maintenance records for classroom
equipment and communicates the need for repair or replacement with Division
Chairs, the Vice President of Administrative Services, and Vice President of
Instruction.
Self- Evaluation
The college meets this standard. The Educational and Facilities Master Plan process,
which engages constituencies at both the college and district levels, successfully
ensures that physical resource planning is integrated with institutional planning.
Actionable Improvement Plan

Continue planning for the Educational and Facilities Master Plan 2009
revision with the district.
Evidence
3B.2.1
Educational and Facilities
Master Plan 2009
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/d
ocuments/2009-wvc-educational-and-facilities-masterplan.pdf
3B.2.2
Annual Space Inventory
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2
013/evidence/3b/3b_5__space_inventory.pdf
3B.2.3
Five Year Construction Plan
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2
013/evidence/3b/wvmccd_five_year_construction_plan_
2014_18.pdf
Standard IIIB.2.a
Long-range capital plans support institutional improvement goals and reflect
projections of the total cost of ownership of new facilities and equipment.
Descriptive Summary
The West Valley-Mission Community College District (WVMCCD) developed its
2014-2018 Five Year Construction Plan (3b.2.a.1) based on in-depth analysis of
cumulative capacities and load ratios appropriate to a community college
environment. Facilities project lists for the Measure “H” Bond (2004) (3B.2.a.2) and
Measure “C” Bond (2012) (3B.2.a.3) are directly tied to institutional planning
through the 2009 Educational and Facilities Master Plan (3B.2.a.4) which is in
alignment with the college’s annual goals and objectives approved by the WVC
Standard III: Resources 344
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
College Council. Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) is analyzed by the college and
district to assess long-term fiscal implications in the maintenance and support of
facilities development, as well as purchases of major technology and instructional
equipment, and durable goods such as vehicles.
Self -Evaluation
The college meets this standard. TCO was a factor in the district’s 2014-2018 FiveYear Construction Plan for both colleges and will be considered in the Educational
and Facilities Master Plan update currently being planned.
Action Plan

Continue planning of Educational and Facilities Master Plan revision.
Evidence
3B.2.a.1
2014-2018 Five Year
Construction Plan
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/20
13/evidence/3b/wvmccd_five_year_construction_plan_20
14_18.pdf
3B.2.a.2
Measure H Project List
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/20
13/evidence/3b/3b_7_bond_measure_h_priority_list.xls
3B.2.a.3
Measure C Project List
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/20
13/evidence/3b/3b_8_approved_measure_c_bond_projec
t_.xls
3B.2.a.4
2009 Educational and Facilities
Master Plan
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/do
cuments/2009-wvc-educational-and-facilities-masterplan.pdf
Standard IIIB.2.b
Physical resource planning is integrated with institutional planning. The
institution systematically assesses the effective use of physical resources and uses
the results of the evaluation as the basis for improvement.
Descriptive Summary
West Valley College works to ensure physical resource planning is integrated with
institutional planning through the development of and updating the Educational
and Facilities Master Plan (3B.2.b.1) and the Five-Year Construction Plan. (3B.2.b.2)
Both the Facility Plan and Five-Year Construction Plan are driven by the college’s
Educational Plan which outlines the college mission, goals and quality indicators
that guide planning and budgeting. The Facilities Master Plan is the enactment of
Standard III: Resources 345
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
the Educational Master Plan relative to physical resources and addresses the
educational, site, and facilities needs of the college.
The Five-Year Construction Plan is a document submitted to the state Chancellor’s
Office requesting funding for capital projects. It provides for long-range capital
planning and is updated annually by the district Executive Director of Facilities,
Maintenance, and Construction. The report identifies current data on capacity use
ratios, demographics, and student enrollment.
The process of physical resource planning in the Educational and Facilities Master
Plan is highly participatory and iterative. During the development of the plan, all
segments of the college community—faculty, classified professionals,
administrators, and students—worked together to clearly articulate the mission and
goals of the college. The Educational and Facilities Master Plan was completed in
February 2001 and updated in April 2005 and again in 2009. Consultants familiar
with state standards facilitated development of the Facilities Master Plan. The
consultants involved the college community through open forums, steering
committees, and participatory governance meetings. The college and district are in
the process of planning a revision to this report in 2014. The project priority list is
presented to the Board by the Director of Facilities, and rankings are based on
institutional needs as defined in the Educational and Facilities Master Plan, which is
based on feedback from the College Cabinet, College Council, and other bodies of
participatory governance.
WVMCCD and West Valley College’s capital construction program has resulted in
the addition of new buildings in the space inventory which must be maintained.
The newly developed Budget and Resource Advisory Council (BRAC), (3B.2.b.3) as
part of the college’s Integrated Planning and Resource Allocation, will address a
mechanism that adjusts annual maintenance budgets to reflect additions and
deletions from the space that needs to be maintained.
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard. The Educational and Facilities Master Plan process,
which engages constituencies at both the college and district levels, successfully
ensures that physical resource planning is integrated with institutional planning.
While institutional planning precedes and informs physical resource planning,
regular evaluations of physical resource needs are factored back into planning and
decision-making at each level. All college decisions regarding resource allocation
are made on the basis of evidence, through a participatory governance process,
Standard III: Resources 346
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
ensuring that assessment and evaluation will continue to serve as the basis for
college-wide improvement.
Actionable Improvement Plans
None.
Evidence
3B.2.b.1
Educational and Facilities
Master Plan
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/doc
uments/2009-wvc-educational-and-facilities-masterplan.pdf
3B.2b.2
WVMCCD Five-Year
Construction Plan
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/201
3/evidence/3b/wvmccd_five_year_construction_plan_2014
_18.pdf
3B.2b.3
Budget and Resource Advisory
Council
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/201
3/evidence/3b/brac_12_17_13.pdf
Standard III: Resources 347
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Standard IIIC: Technology Resources
Technology resources are used to support student learning programs and services
and to improve institutional effectiveness. Technology planning is integrated with
institutional planning.
Standard IIIC.1
The institution assures than any technology support it provides is designed to
meet the needs of learning, teaching, college-wide communications, research, and
operational systems.
Descriptive Summary
Technology resources are used throughout the college to support and increase the
effectiveness of student learning programs and services. College-wide technology
needs are identified by the following participatory governance groups: the
Technology Advisory committee (TAC) and the Distance Education Committee (DE).
TAC consists of one faculty representative from each division, and the Dean of
Instructional Technology and Services. TAC meets regularly to assess and support
the technology needs of faculty, staff, and classroom users. (3C.1.1) TAC is also the
participatory governance body responsible for maintaining the Instructional
Technology Strategic Plan, developed in 2011, and updated in 2013. (3C.1.2) TAC
identifies technology needs by examining the college’s Educational Master Plan,
through analysis of Instructional, Student Services, and Administrative Program
Reviews, and by soliciting input from the Division Chairs Council, Student Services
Council, and members of the Distance Learning Committee. Late in the Fall 2013
semester, the Dean of Instructional Technology, who led this committee, retired.
The college is currently in the process of reassessing the charge, role, and
functionality of this committee aiming to better align its efforts with the Budget and
Resource Advisory Council (BRAC) (3C.1.3) as part of the college’s Integrated
Planning and Resource Allocation process. (3C.1.4)
The Distance Education (DE) Committee serves as a resource for and advisors to the
Academic Senate, faculty, staff, and administrators in matters of policy, practice
and pedagogy regarding distance learning and technology-enhanced instruction
assisting faculty in learning about and integrating technology and distance learning
into the curriculum. The DE committee consists of the Distance Education
Coordinator (faculty), the ANGEL Coordinator (classified staff), one faculty
representative from each division, and the Dean of Instructional Technology. The
Standard III: Resources 348
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
DE committee informs the college of DE practices and technology needs as they
pertain to effective teaching and learning in an e-learning context. (3C.1.5)
Stemming from the college's mission statement and its deliberate efforts to support
institutional effectiveness, college technology planning decisions are informed by
the Integrated Planning and Resource Allocation process and technology resources
are allocated accordingly. In response to student learning outcome assessment
results and program review summaries, the college has completed numerous
projects that have provided instructional equipment in new and remodeled
classrooms. The standard instructional equipment installed in new and remodeled
classrooms includes: an instructor computer (dual boot iMac with Windows & OSX),
document camera, data projector and sound system. All of these technology
upgrades foster an enhanced learning environment in which faculty can incorporate
more dynamic and interactive teaching and learning approaches that lead to
greater levels of student engagement and higher levels of success in achieving
student level outcomes.
Assessment, planning, and implementation of college-wide technology support are
carefully coordinated with facility projects based on the Facility Master Plan.
Technology implementation and support are included in each renovation and/or
new building project planning process of the college. Recently completed building
projects with significant instructional technology funded by the Measure H Facilities
bond and state funds include:






Science Building Addition – three new science labs
Fox Technology Center
Science/Math Building Phase 1 – eight Math and three Chemistry labs
Temporary classrooms (the “Village”)
Science/Math building Phase 2 (fall 2011/spring 2012)
Language Arts/Social Science building (Fall 13)
The Fox Technology Center, which opened for instruction in February 2010, is a
state-of–the-art instructional technology building supporting an expansion of
Distance Learning and Distance Learning enhanced instruction. Each classroom of
the Center is equipped with advanced audio visual capabilities including full HD
Digital Video. The center also houses:

Four multi-media classrooms, fully outfitted with audio visual systems, as
well as cameras to capture lectures and student presentation
Standard III: Resources 349
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014








Three computer classrooms
Two distance learning classrooms, including lecture capture and live
streaming
One large lecture hall that includes cameras to capture lectures, Dolby 7.1
sound system, and special acoustics
Both distance learning classrooms and the lecture hall have dedicated
audio/visual control rooms, recording equipment, advanced software, and a
connection to the Comcast cable head-end for broadcast over cable from
Fox
Laptops on carts
Instructional software
Instructional servers
Software for effective management of the instructional network
The district and the college strategically allocate funds for technology support when
the bond measures are passed in order to support ongoing needs of maintenance
and sustainability of the technology implemented.
For example, the most recent voter approved Facilities Bond Measure C (2011)
includes $1,350,000 identified for Technology Refresh Funds. (3C.1.6) The specific
allocation of these funds, identified for support of campus technology
infrastructure, will be further determined by assessing specific needs of the college
based on the Educational and Facilities Master Plan, Instructional Technology
Strategic Plan, and BRAC recommendations based on Program Review data.
District Information Services (IS) has completed a number of technology projects in
support of the colleges, which have been funded primarily by the Measure H facility
bond and the West Valley College/Mission College Land Corporation. This work
includes a network refresh with new data network routers/switches as well as a
40GB fiber backbone that provides a redundant network “ring” around the large
West Valley College campus.
Other recent completed District IS projects included:




Microsoft E-Mail/Exchange implementation
WVM-ALERT, which provides emergency alerts to faculty, staff and students
Telephone system upgrades
Colleague (Datatel) Student Portal
Standard III: Resources 350
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
The following are instructional technology projects that were funded in fiscal 20102011 through the District’s auxiliary entity, the Land Corporation (3C.1.7):








Omni Update Web Content Management System to manage College
Website
Upgrade Computers in computer classrooms and labs (over $90,000)
New Digital Music Studio
Ten Additional Multi-Media classrooms
Adapted Software/Hardware for accessibility
Virtual Distance Learning Resource Center
Computer Upgrades in Architecture and Interior Design
AutoDesk Software Licenses
The college assures that technology support is designed to meet the range of
needs:
Teaching and Learning
Use of technology in teaching and learning is rapidly increasing as pedagogy and
teaching strategies change to meet the needs of student learning. The college has
invested significantly by installing smart/multimedia in classrooms throughout the
campus. This level of access provides students with a full multimedia experience,
and empowers instructors to utilize dynamic applications including internet
resources, streaming videos, and image displays. Students may utilize the
technology to enhance oral presentations or group projects. In addition there are
Instructional Labs equipped with modern computer equipment and software
available for students at various locations across campus.
The Angel Learning Management System provides a virtual classroom for both fully
on-line courses as well as web enhancement for face-to-face course offerings.
(3C.1.8) With an increased focus at colleges on plagiarism and academic honesty,
West Valley College provides faculty with a campus license for Turnitin antiplagiarism software so they can authenticate student work. (3C.1.9)
College-wide Communications
College communications have been greatly enhanced with the implementation of
Outlook/Exchange 2010 for email, calendaring, and group scheduling. The
EverBridge Emergency Mass Notification System is deployed throughout the
district. (3C.1.10) ARMS is a law enforcement system that allows the campus police
Standard III: Resources 351
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
to respond, capture, and report incidents quickly and accurately, whether in the
office or on a mobile device.
The implementation of a website content management system, OmniUpdate (OU),
has provided a strong technical foundation for the college website. (3C.1.11) It
allows users to manage their faculty/staff profile, department and program pages
with limited support needed from the Webmaster. A Colleague (Datatel) portal was
implemented which provides students and faculty/staff with easy access to
important operational processes such as: class registration, tuition/fee payment,
grades, budget, and personnel information. (3C.1.12)
Other communication systems utilized by the college include: digital signage, social
media such as Facebook, Twitter, Linked In, YouTube, Instagram, and iTunes U.
These technologies may be used for teaching and learning as well as a marketing
tool for the college and are accessible from the WVC Homepage. (3C.1.13)
Operational Systems and Research
WVMCCD uses the Colleague (Datatel) Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) system
to provide Student, Financial and Human Resources information for the district.
(3C.1.14) The Information Systems Applications group implements and maintains
the Colleague administrative software, including student admissions, registration,
accounts payable and receivable, financial aid, finance, purchasing, and human
resources. Cognos is a Business Intelligence Tool that is designed to support
reporting institutional data. It works together with Colleague and allows for
standardized and ad-hoc reports to be created. (3C.1.15)
The WVC Office of Institutional Research and Planning (OIRP) assesses and analyzes
data so that college decision makers are guided by firm and sound evidence that
supports effective and thoughtful planning for optimal student success and
institutional effectiveness. (3C.1.16) The college communicates documented
assessment results to constituent groups and the public in order to ensure high
quality programs and services.
The OIRP analyzes and summarizes data and information from the following
sources:
•
•
•
•
Self-Assessment of Participatory Governance Groups
Cognos Performance Data Reports
Clarus Report on Feeder High School Counselors And Students
Student Services Secret Shopper Report
Standard III: Resources 352
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Brain Trust Study
ARCC and Scorecard Data
Semi-Annual Research Briefs
Annual WVC Fact Book
District Data Dashboard
Student Learning Outcome Assessments
Labor Market Reports
The college evaluates the effectiveness of its technology in meeting its range of
needs by revisiting student learning outcome assessment results and program
review summary trends at the annual College Council retreat when annual goals are
planned. (3C.1.17)
As part of the quality improvement cycle of “reviewing, planning and doing,” the
College Council verifies the extent to which newly installed technology meets the
needs identified by faculty and staff at the college. For example, the Program
Review Annual Report submitted at the November 8, 2013 College Council Retreat
stated that:
Technology integration and upgrade Technology is understood
differently across programs. For some programs, this involves the
creation of online components, while for other programs it means
experimenting with technology to increase student to student
interactions. Still others require specialty software applications such as
Rivet Architecture and Aplia. In addition to the integration of new
technology into courses, a number of programs are struggling to
update and replace older instructional software like QuickBooks and
AutoCAD. (3C.1.18)
This informative response reflects the extent of the college's diverse technology
needs and how the college is very adept and creative in responding to the rapidly
changing needs of instructional technology in today's classrooms and e-learning
teaching modalities.
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard. West Valley College effectively uses technology to
meet the needs of students and employees, and the college continues to be
responsive to the rapidly advancing need for new technologies. Through the
development and innovative use of smart/multimedia classrooms, learning
Standard III: Resources 353
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
management systems, social media, office applications and operational systems,
the college supports the technological needs of its community.
With the recent implementation of the college’s Budget and Resources Advisory
Council (BRAC) reporting as a sub-committee of the College Council and as part of
the college’s Integrated Planning and Resource Allocation process, college-wide
technology planning will be addressed through re-focusing on the role and function
of the Technology Advisory Committee (TAC) and further alignment with the
college-wide planning process.
Actionable Improvement Plans

Continue re-focusing of the TAC and develop further alignment with the
Integrated Planning and Resource Allocation process, particularly with BRAC
Evidence
3C.1.1
Technology Advisory Committee
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Technology_A
dvisory/
3C.1.2
Instructional Technology Strategic
Plan
http://www.westvalley.edu/academics/instru_tech/inst
ru_documents/tac_stratgey_rev_spring_2011_addendu
m.pdf
3C.1.3
Budget and Resource Advisory
Council
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/
2013/evidence/3b/brac_12_17_13.pdf
3C.1.4
Distance Education Committee
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Distance_Lear
ning_Committee/index.html
3C.1.5
Integrated Planning and Resource
Allocation Process
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/i
ntegrated_planning_diagram.html
3C.1.6
Measure C Technology Refresh
Funds
http://westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2013/
evidence/3c/technology_refresh_funds.pdf
3C.1.7
Mission West Valley Land
Corporation
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/
2013/evidence/3c/Landcorp_Projects_WVC_20102011_pg12.pdf
3C.1.8
Angel Learning Management
System
3C.1.9
Turnitin
3C.1.10
EverBridge Emergency Mass
Notification System – WVM Alert
http://wvm.edu/emergency.aspx?id=3480
3C.1.11
OmniUpdate
http://omniupdate.com/
3C.1.12
My WVC Portal
http://westvalley.edu/wvcportal
http://wvmccd.angellearning.com/default.asp
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/
2013/evidence/3c/Turn_It_In_Instructions.pdf
Standard III: Resources 354
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
3C.1.13
Social Media on WVC Homepage
http://www.westvalley.edu/
3C.1.14
Colleague by Ellucian (Datatel)
http://www.ellucian.com/Solutions/Colleague-byEllucian/
3C.1.15
Cognos
http://www01.ibm.com/software/analytics/cognos/enterprise/
3C.1.16
Office of Institutional Research and
Planning
http://www.westvalley.edu/about/research.html
3C.1.17
College Council Retreat Agenda,
November 8, 2013
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/
2013/evidence/3c/11-08-2013_CC_Retreat_Agenda.pdf
3C.1.18
Program Review Report, November
8, 2013
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/
2013/evidence/3c/Program_Review_2013_Final_Report
_p5.pdf
Standard IIIC.1.a
Technology services, professional support, facilities, hardware and software are
designed to enhance the operation and effectiveness of the institution.
Descriptive Summary
All technology use throughout the college is designed to enhance the operation and
effectiveness of the college whether in the classroom (real or virtual), support
services, or administrative capacities. The responsibility of technology services,
professional support, facilities, hardware and software are shared between the
district and the college. Technology services and support for West Valley College is
currently managed in a two prong approach: the District Information Systems
department provides support for the district’s administrative system, Colleague and
related software services, and the overall infrastructure while the college manages
college-related classroom instructional computer technology and services, the
college’s web site through Omni Update, on-line learning management through
Angel, and other college-specific technical services. There are multiple districtcollege teams that exist to assess and address technology enhancement and
operation.
The VP-IS monthly meeting is coordinated by the district’s IS manager on a monthly
basis with the college’s three Vice Presidents (Instruction, Student Services, and
Administrative Services). (3C.1.a.1) The meeting focuses on the creation and
utilization of a priority list of technology projects and discussion on progress made
and changes needed based on college/district priorities. The Curriculum and
Student Team (CST) has also been coordinated by the district IS staff with college
Standard III: Resources 355
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
staff from the areas of Instruction, Admission and Records, Financial Aid,
Counseling, and Matriculation. (3C.1.a.2) The purpose of the group was to assess
and discuss technical functionality and effectiveness of the commonly used
Colleague fields, coordinate a district-wide calendar of instruction and student
services activities so as to streamline processes, avoid unnecessary conflicts and
errors, and make technical recommendations for changes for improvements. With
the district IS staff’s retirement and shift in assignment in spring 2013, the CST has
not met regularly; however, there is a plan to revisit its roles and responsibilities,
membership makeup, and effectiveness.
District Information Systems Department
The District Information Systems (IS) Department is responsible for core IT
operations and supports the Faculty/Staff computers for the colleges, including the
network (both wired and wireless), email (MS-Exchange/Outlook), and desktop
support. The mission of IS is
“to build a solid comprehensive technology infrastructure: maintain
an efficient, effective operations environment; deliver high quality,
timely district services which support the colleges' programs for
instruction, student services, and administration. IS (faculty/staff),
and enterprise servers.” (3C.1.a.3)
The department achieves its goals through three working groups:



Application and Support Development
Microcomputer Support
Systems and Networks Operations
West Valley College Instructional Technology and Services
The responsibility of Instructional Technology at West Valley College focuses on the
design, installation, setup, and maintenance of: computer classrooms/labs,
classroom technology, campus-wide audio visual systems, digital signage, lecture
capture, instructional servers, distance education/web enhanced instruction
(Angel), college website, laptop checkout, etc. (3C.1.a.4)
Some of the major initiatives undertaken since the last accreditation include:


Classroom technology upgrades in Applied Arts and Sciences, and Fine Arts
(Measure C)
Classroom technology upgrades funded by facilities bond projects in:
o Fox Center
Standard III: Resources 356
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014



o Science and Math
o Language Arts and Social Sciences (Opened Sept 2013)
o Village portable classrooms - construction swing space – 17 smart
classrooms, expanding to 26 in 2014
Campus Center Audio/Visual Systems
OmniUpdate Web Content Management System
New Server Cluster and Storage Area Network
Technology Enhanced Instructional Facilities
Significant upgrades to classroom technology have been funded by voter approved
state and local bond funds, Measure C and H, allowing the college to enhance its
capacity to support Distance Learning and other technology enhanced teaching and
learning. Specifically the Fox Technology Center, Science and Math building
renovation and addition, Language Arts/Social Sciences building along with the
design and planning of the next upgrade, the Applied Arts and Sciences have all
been successfully enhanced with instructional technology. As a result, since the last
accreditation visit, West Valley College increased the number of smart classrooms
from 30 to 120, installing computers, projectors, recording systems, and audiovisual control systems. (3C.1.a.5)
Instructional Applications and Systems
CurricUNET is state-recognized software program from Governet that provides
curriculum management tool that automates the approval process of curriculum
development from faculty initiating the course outline of records (COR), approvals
of Curriculum Committee, Academic Senate, Office of Instruction, and the board
prior to submission to the State Chancellor’s office. (3C.1.a.6) Once courses or
programs are approved by the State Chancellor’s office, they are then imported into
local Colleague. CurricUNET maintains the historical CORs while Colleague contains
the current .and accurate course and program information that serves as the
foundation for Degree Audit, Catalog information, and CCC apply. The college
arranged for the CurricUNET to include Student Learning Outcomes and Assessment
(SLO/A&A) filed for each COR and program which ensures that faculty mindfully
construct SLO/A&A whenever he/she develops a new course or revise them based
on the SLO/A&A results.
ANGEL Learning Management Systems
The college uses ANGEL as its official Distance Learning management system. It is
hosted on secure servers off-site; users are required to login with a username and
password to access the system. (3C.1.a.7) ANGEL allows users to create Virtual
Standard III: Resources 357
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Learning Environments for online, hybrid or blended (web-enhanced) classes. Initial
support for ANGEL is provided by the college’s Instructional Technology and
Services department with second tier support by the vendor.
Innovative Interfaces
This software provides both colleges with an integrated library system. The system
interfaces with the Colleague registration system allowing all current students at
both colleges to be automatically entered into the library system. Once the
interface is complete, students are able to access an extensive array of online
resources including electronic databases, reference guides, and additional services
on- and off- campus. (3C.1.a.8)
CCC Apply
The system allows prospective student to apply online; the software was developed
by XAP Corporation with the support of the State Chancellor’s Office and is used by
many California Community Colleges. (3C.1.a.9)
SARS Trak
This system has multiple functions. The college uses SARS Trak for collecting
students learning and services activities every time they check in and out of service
sites (counseling, labs, library, etc.). It records reasons for their visits, verify student
identification, courses that students are taking and its affiliation with the services
received. In addition, the system will register arrival and departure times allowing
the college to accurately and correctly manage the positive attendance contact
hours from these learning and services activities. SARS Grid assists counselors in
scheduling counseling appointments, and assessment appointments. (3C.1.a.10)
WVC Portal
The portal provides students and employees with secure access to critical
information. For students, information such as class registration system, current
class schedule, financial aid information, and unofficial transcript, grades, units and
GPA, class roster, and current class schedule. For employees, information relative to
personnel, budget, and purchasing information can be accessed as well as
processed. (3C.1.a.11)
Server Infrastructure
A new server infrastructure supports the production of the WVC website, calendar
system, instructor webpages, and streaming video. It utilizes VMWare (virtual
servers), which provides a scalable and flexible application system. This new
VMWare environment resides on a new cluster of servers and a storage area
Standard III: Resources 358
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
network (SAN) that has the capacity of 6 Terabytes of RAID (redundant array of
independent disks) storage. (3C.1.a.12)
Mass Notification System
Everbridge allows the district to send emergency notification messages to all
registered faculty, staff, and students during a crisis or emergency. The service is
available through WVM Alert. (3C.1.a.13)
Enterprise Anti-Virus System
WVMCCD uses Symantec Protection Suite as its primary virus protection solution
for all desktop and server systems district-wide.
Messaging Gateway System
WVMCCD uses Symantec Brightmail as its primary inbound and outbound
messaging security system: with real-time anti-spam and anti-malware protection,
content filtering, data loss prevention, and optional email encryption method.
Firewall System
WVMCCD uses Checkpoint Firewall. Checkpoint’s primary objective is to control the
incoming and outgoing network traffic by analyzing the data packets and
determining whether it should be allowed through or not, based on a
predetermined rule set.
Network Traffic Prioritization System
Blue Coat PacketShaper prevents the unauthorized distribution of copyrighted
material, and illegal applications being executed on the network. In addition, Blue
Coat's packet shaping software will help deter the usage of illegal Point-to-Point
software by controlling the bandwidth of both incoming and outbound services
such as BitTorrent, Limewire and Gnutella, and re-prioritize the network traffic,
giving higher priority to important content and restricting recreational downloads.
Network Access Control (NAC)
Bradford Network Sentry provides complete visibility and control of all users and
devices on WVMCCD’s network to prevent unauthorized access and keep the
network secure. Network Sentry registers and authenticates all users and their
associated devices, monitors their access and network usage, and dynamically
provisions role-based policies to ensure that users access only the resources they
need to access.
General Summary
Standard III: Resources 359
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Since the last accreditation visit in 2008, major improvements and upgrades have
been made:







Improvements to the functionality of the Colleague (Datatel)
administrative systems
Complete Upgrade of the Server Infrastructure (2008)
Complete Upgrade of the Network Infrastructure (2009)
Implementation of the new Microsoft Exchange mail system (2010)
Implementation of Project Tracking list (2010)
Complete upgrade of both PBX phone systems (2011)
Implementation of the Colleague Portal system (2011)
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard. Technology services, professional support,
facilities, hardware and software are designed to enhance the operation and
effectiveness of the institution. The college and district have successfully
implemented many critical technology systems in support of teaching, learning,
communications and operations. These systems include Microsoft Exchange email,
Student and Faculty/Staff Portal, Angel Learning Management System and OU
Campus to manage the college website.
A significant amount of new classroom technology equipment has been purchased
usually with vendor support contracts included. However, these vendor support
contracts are expiring, creating a need to identify funding to renew these service
contracts. With the classroom technology upgrades to over 120 classrooms across
the campus, there is a corresponding need to increase classroom technology
support staff to support this significant increase in college-based technology.
Significant budget constraints have limited the college’s response to this need.
Wireless access continues to be an issue. Although wireless access is provided
across the campus by the district IS department, during peak usage times (10am2pm), many students are not able to use the wireless system. One principal
underlying factor to difficulties with wireless network access is the rapidly
increasing numbers of device connections demanded by the ever-expanding
“BYOD” (Bring Your Own Device) trend. Rather than a single laptop connecting as
was prevalent a very few years ago, individuals now bring their tablet,
smartphones, and other IP-enabled devices, all needing a separate wireless address
to function. A new wireless authentication system from Bradford Networks was
implemented at the end of April 2013, necessitated by network provider rules
Standard III: Resources 360
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
mandating specific controls be placed on network use. The authentication does not
address the access issue and has made logging into the wireless network more
complex. Continuing adjustments are made to the system in an attempt to rectify
access limitations, including a study related to the number of access points and
density of coverage.
Technology in all aspects is an increasingly critical part of overall strategic planning,
not only for supporting college operations but also as a key component of
classroom instruction, whether in-person or on-line. Realizing that the past few
years of budget difficulties have pushed strategic planning for technology to the
background, the college realizes that there is a need to reinstate critical technology
planning and strategy discussions at all levels, from what is needed to support the
classroom, to support for college operations, to a discussion on how to improve
overall campus infrastructure in order to adapt to the rapid changes technology
imposes.
Actionable Improvement Plans
•
Based on the college’s Instructional Technology Strategy, develop a
comprehensive college Technology Plan, coordinate its effort with the
district’s Instructional Systems (IS) Department and develop a district-wide
comprehensive Technology Plan.
Evidence
3C.1.a.1
Vice Presidents and IS Meeting
Agendas
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2
013/evidence/3c/Vice_Presidents_IS_Meetings/
3C.1.a.2
IS, Curriculum and Student
Team Meeting Agendas
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2
013/evidence/3c/Curriculum_Student-Team_Meetings/
3C.1.a.3
District Information Systems
http://wvm.edu/is
3C.1.a.4
WVC Instructional Technology
and Services
http://westvalley.edu/academics/instru_tech/
3C.1.a.5
Technology Enhanced Facilities
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2
013/evidence/3c/Classroom_AV_Computer_Lab_Invento
ry_Spring_2014.pdf
3C.1.a.6
WVC CurricUNET
http://www.curricunet.com/westvalley/
3C.1.a.7
WVC ANGEL
http://wvmccd.angellearning.com/default.asp
3C.1.a.8
Innovative Interfaces
http://www.iii.com/
3C.1.a.9
CCC Apply
https://secure.cccapply.org/applications/CCCApply/apply
/West_Valley_College.html
Standard III: Resources 361
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
3C.1.a.10
SARS Trak
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2
013/evidence/3c/SARS_Grid.png
3C.1.a.11
WVC Portal
http://westvalley.edu/wvcportal
3C.1.a.12
VMWare server infrastructure
http://www.westvalley.edu/academics/instru_tech/instr
u_documents/west_valley_vmware_webedit_110813.pdf
3C.1.a.13
Everbridge – WVM Alert
http://wvm.edu/emergency.aspx?id=3480
Standard IIIC.1.b
The institution provides quality training in the effective application of its
information technology to students and personnel.
Descriptive Summary
The college provides relevant, current, hands-on technology training for faculty,
students and staff. Currently, the college does not rely on one centralized
department for technology training; however, appropriate training opportunities
are made available to the college community based on the type of technology they
use. The college assesses training needs by consulting with end users primarily
through the Technology Advisory Committee, Distance Learning Committee, and via
input from Program Reviews and SLO/A assessments. Feedback obtained from
these participatory governance groups confirmed there are needs for ongoing
technology specific training so as to better perform their respective job duties in
instructional and student service areas.
Faculty, Staff, and Student Training
The college offers a comprehensive "Introduction to Online Instruction Course
Design" program for faculty. (3C.1.b.1) Faculty who successfully complete this
program, become certified online learning instructors. In addition, the DE
Coordinator offers ongoing distance learning workshops in order for faculty to stay
current with rapid changes in technology, state and federal regulations, and
pedagogical best practices. (3C.1.b.2)
eLearning Web Site
The college's eLearning website, provides comprehensive information, resources,
and training regarding online courses both for faculty and students. The website
includes well designed and user friendly videos: Introduction to eLearning, Student
Success, Instructor Preparation, ADA and Accessibility, the F2F Classroom and Best
Practices.
Standard III: Resources 362
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
OmniUpdate Training
OmniUpdate training, developed by the college’s Instructional Technology staff, is
for faculty and staff who manage components of the college website such as
department, division, programs, and committees. The training is designed and
organized based on different knowledge level and end user's needs. For basic users,
training takes place in a 90-minute open workshop environment located in one of
our 35-station computer labs in the Fox Building. Basic users are defined as those
who will use the basic OU functions to edit their personal or department pages. The
lead trainer provides step-by-step guidance from the instructor's computer that's
displayed on dual projection screens. Roaming co-trainers provide support
throughout the classroom. Learning outcomes for the basic users understand how
to find their personal or department page, login, upload documents, add headers,
text, graphics, photos, provide links, and publish.
Second level training is delivered in a similar fashion as the Basic level targeting
users who edit program, department, or division level web pages that may involve
higher maintenance i.e. updating of calendars, blogs, and uploading of mandated
data and documents. Workshops for each level of training are offered 2-3 times a
semester. (3C.1.b.3)
A series of online training videos, also produced by the college’s Instructional
Technology staff, are easily available for the basic and second level users. (3C.1.b.4)
The recordings provide video screen shots and audio narration that guides users
through the step-by-step processes of certain tasks. The short 4-6 minute videos
feature a small list of topics organized in an easy to follow format. The video-player
window allows for pausing and repeating steps as needed.
Higher level or "super-users" are trained personally by the college’s webmaster or
other trained super-users. These users manage areas of the college website or
information that is institutional such as the Student Services Division pages
(3C.1.b.5), Office of Institutional Research and Planning pages (3C.1.b.6),
Accreditation pages (3C.1.b.7), instructional media file storage and streaming team,
and Academic and Career Programs (3C.1.b.8). To accommodate the college
community’s schedule, flexible "Walk-in" training and support are available daily
provided by the webmaster or trained super-users during work hours via face-toface, phone, or email.
The three-tiered training programs are evaluated and improved on a regular basis.
New and additional training programs are in the planning stage.
Standard III: Resources 363
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Student and Administration Support Staff (SASS)
Student and Administration Support Staff (SASS) Program is a peer-support and
peer-led technology training program sponsored by the Classified Senate of the
college. SASS Program newly instituted in spring 2013 and began its monthly
training in fall 2013 supporting many classified professionals. The primary goal of
the program is to provide job-relevant technology training for classified
professionals in the areas or tools that bring efficiency and effectiveness to their
day to day job. SASS Program uses a peer-let training model where classified
professionals who possess technological expertise in certain area conduct training
for their colleagues. Training topics are discussed and selected among classified
professionals who determine their training needs based on job requirements and
process and procedural changes, as well as changes in software and other technical
changes. (3C.1.b.9) Recently held training includes Microsoft Outlook and Cognos
data access system which were held in the training room of the district’s IS building.
One of the outcomes that SASS Program aims is to develop consistency in the use of
technology across campus and existing common processes to be better
streamlined. As the college faces fiscal challenges, some classified positions are
required to be more flexible, shifting job direction and/or adding new
responsibilities at times. To respond to such changes, SASS Program serves as a
proactive approach to professional development for the classified professionals for
technology. (3C.1.b.10)
Student Portal Training
The college offers a series of technology training to its students—whether
perspective, incoming, or continuing. During new student orientation and ongoing
orientation sessions, all students are introduced and trained on the use of the
MyWVC student portal; in addition there is a training video showing how to login to
the Portal on the Admission’s homepage. (3C.1.b.11) The portal includes critical
information and the access students need in order for them to successfully navigate
their educational experiences at West Valley College. In addition, the student
portal training is incorporated in the college’s award-winning New Student
Convocation at the beginning of each fall semester. Students are well equipped
with the navigation of the portal site that helps them be ready for their educational
career at the college.
In Counseling 012: Careers and Lifestyles (3C.1.b.12) and Counseling 018: Job
Search Methods (3C.1.b.13) classes, students are introduced to the EUREKA system
assisting them to become proficient in using the system for discovery and research.
Standard III: Resources 364
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
EUREKA particularly assists students in specific job search and research processes,
as well as guiding them in self-assessment of personality type and skill set to
discover potential career fields suited to their style. (3C.1.b.14)
During the high school recruitment process, the college introduces the K16 Bridge
Program to prospective students. The K16 Bridge Program combines online lessons
and support (via an active portal) with in-person standards-based instruction.
Prospective students learn how to use the K16 Bridge Program to access a variety of
information such as college and career options. Using the K16 Bridge Program as
part of the college’s outreach effort has resulted in focused connection between
prospective students and their selection of majors at the college. (3C.1.b.15)
District Administrative Systems Training
The WVMCCD IS Department provides training to district-wide community on new
hardware or software whenever it is implemented. The training is conducted to
ensure it is appropriate and effective for specific personnel assisting them to be upto-date on the operational systems.
District IS receives ad-hoc requests on specific training needs for personnel at the
colleges and district. IS then moves forward with identifying the resources to
provide the training. In some cases, an outside resource is brought in, if funding
permits, to provide the training. There are no dedicated personnel at the district IS
department to provide on-going training on existing technology. In moving
forward, the colleges recommend that coordination of technology-related training
based on users’ needs be coordinated through a District-Wide Technology
Committee.
District Staff Development also provides technology training to personnel for
various Microsoft applications. The list can be viewed at http://www.peopleonthego.com/westvalley-mission-online-q4/.
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard. The college provides training in the effective
application of its information technology to students and personnel. Technology
training at the college is offered in-depth in some areas (e.g. Distance Education
Certification and OmniUpdate website, student portal, K-16 Bridge Program) in
purpose-specific manner. Recent state budget reduction caused severe challenges
for the college to continue and sustain ongoing technology training. However, the
college’s most recently revised Instructional Technology Strategic Plan clearly
Standard III: Resources 365
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
indicates vast needs for a comprehensive technology training plan. (3C.1.b.15) The
college recognizes that investing in well-planned, well-organized, and efficiently
coordinated technology training for various areas of the college and different user
groups would increase overall institutional effectiveness. In addition to the
college’s Instructional Technology Strategic Plan, the college is in the process of
developing a Technology Plan through its Technology Advisory Committee (TAC).
The college seeks the district IS department’s leadership and support to reestablish
the District-wide Technology Committee so that the college’s technology training
and overall technology-related plans can be incorporated in its systemic planning
process.
Actionable Improvement Plans


District IS department reestablish the District-wide Technology Committee.
The college develops and completes the WVC Technology Plan to include a
comprehensive, systemic, and streamlined plan for technology training.
Evidence
3C.1.b.1
Introduction to Online Instruction
Course Design
http://www.westvalley.edu/elearning/faculty/trai
ning.html
3C.1.b.2
DE Workshops and Boot Camps
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accredit
ation/2013/evidence/3c/de_training_workshops_
2013.pdf
3C.1.b.3
Omni Update Training
Announcements
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accredit
ation/2013/evidence/3c/OU_training_emails.pdf
3C.1.b.4
Omni Update Training Videos
http://instruct.westvalley.edu/wvmedia/classes/
Omni_Update_Training/
3C.1.b.5
Student Services Division Webpages
http://www.westvalley.edu/services/index.html
3C.1.b.6
Office of Institutional Research and
Planning Webpages
http://westvalley.edu/research/
3C.1.b.7
Accreditation Webpages
3C.1.b.8
Academic and Career Programs
Webpages
3C.1.b.9
SASS Survey
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accredit
ation/2013/evidence/3c/sass_training_survey_20
13.xlsx
3C.1.b.10
SASS Training
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accredit
ation/2013/evidence/3c/SASS_Training_Fall_2013
_Microsoft_Outlook.pdf
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accredit
ation/index.html
http://westvalley.edu/academics/
Standard III: Resources 366
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
3C.1.b.11
My WVM Portal
http://www.westvalley.edu/admissions
3C.1.b.12
Counseling 012 Course Outline of
Record
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accredit
ation/2013/evidence/3c/couns_12_cor.pdf
3C.1.b.13
Counseling 018 Course Outline of
Record
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accredit
ation/2013/evidence/3c/couns_018_cor.pdf
3C.1.b.14
Eureka Career Information
http://www.eureka.org/
3C.1.b.15
Instructional Technology Strategic
Plan
http://www.k16bridge.org
Standard IIIC.1.c
The institution systematically plans, acquires, maintains, and upgrades or replaces
technology infrastructure and equipment to meet institutional needs.
Descriptive Summary
West Valley College, in coordination with the district Information Systems (IS)
Department, plans, acquires maintains or replaces technology to meet institutional
needs. (3C.1.c.1)
Currently, the college relies primarily on Program Review information to asses
technology needs across campus. Information Technology staff also has its data for
monitoring and managing maintenance, upgrades or replacement of technology
and its infrastructure. With the retirement of Dean of Instructional Technology in
late fall 2013; the Instructional Technology team shifted its reporting to the vice
president of administrative services. This transition reaffirmed the college’s
commitment to stronger and better streamlined approach to planning and
managing technology infrastructure and equipment. The college’s Technology
Advisory Committee (TAC) (3C.1.c.2) is in the process of re-focusing its roles and
responsibilities for the college and through the participatory governance structure,
working
closely
with
the
Budget
and
Resource
Allocation
Committee (BRAC) that reports to the College Council.
Most of college classrooms now have instructional technology equipment
(instructor computer, internet access, data projector(s), document camera, and
sound systems), to provide students with a full multi-media experience. Several
rooms are also capable of lecture capture recordings, i.e. voice only,
voice/computer screen shots, and voice/video/computer screen shots. This
equipment was distributed based on faculty requests, building design teams and
available budget, and primarily funded by Facilities Bond Projects. (3C.1.c.3)
Standard III: Resources 367
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
College instructional software licenses are upgraded on a regular basis: examples
include recent purchases of a site license of the Adobe design software (Adobe
Cloud), AutoCad, Maya Animation, ArcGIS, etc. (3C.1.c.4)
As a part of Measure C bond funding of construction projects, each project includes
an amount of funding that, in part, is allocated to technology within each building.
Group I funding pertains to the physical infrastructure of buildings, including
networking and electrical work to support technology. Group II project budgets
cover the equipment inside the building, such as computers, A/V equipment, and
other post-construction installations. Both Group I and Group II planning occurs
through design teams comprised of participatory governance and administrative
members. Measure C also includes $1.35 million for a technology refresh of
classroom technology and computer labs. (3C.1.c.5) Specific plans for the
technology refresh bond funds have not been identified, but the focus will primarily
be for refreshing existing computer technology and not adding computers or
technology.
The district Information Systems (IS) Department is responsible for providing the
management, maintenance, and operation of the college technological
infrastructure and equipment through a centralized and collaboratively approached
IS system. (3C.1.c.6) District IS is responsible for operating and maintaining the
physical infrastructures required to service the district’s desktop computers,
servers/storage, and networks. The IS department also oversees the core business
and communication systems that include email, phone services, network, server,
computer equipment for non-instructional use, and Enterprise Resource Planning
(ERP) systems (student information, financial, and human resources).
The district’s Colleague enterprise system is secured by a full back-up each night
using the HP Data Protector software. (3C.1.c.7) Other windows systems and data
are secured by incremental back-ups each night using the Commvault software.
(3C.1.c.8) Back-ups are written to disk as well as tape, depending on the application
and frequencies needed to access the information. Archiving is performed, which
depends on the type of application and data. Archived data are accessible through
standard restore procedures from the appropriate backup tapes. In the near future,
data will be replicated between the two colleges across the network for failover and
disaster recovery purposes.
The college provides appropriate system reliability and emergency backup. All
hardware equipment located in the data centers is on a server room-based
uninterruptable power supplies (UPS) system and the IS buildings are tied to an
Standard III: Resources 368
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
emergency generator that is activated within seven seconds after a power failure to
the building. Critical network services are also supported by UPS systems
throughout the campus, providing variable durations of service during power
interruptions.
The data centers are equipped with a Halon fire suppression system. The Halon
system requires evacuation of the room once it is activated, and fire resistant walls
are installed in the data centers to prevent the spread of fire or of hazardous
materials to other areas of the building. Fire extinguishers are in visible locations
throughout the buildings and are clearly identified.
The college is currently refreshing the technology inventory in preparation for
development of a systemic technology maintenance plan.
Self-Evaluation
Fiscal resources have been a challenge for supporting technology during the recent
years of budget reductions. As a direct result of two facilities bonds, Measures H
and C, major renovations of instructional buildings have been accomplished, and
more are in the planning stages. A new Fox Technology Center building was
completed which includes significant technology to support teaching and learning.
All instructional classrooms in recently renovated Science/Math building and
Language Arts/Social Science building include audio visual multimedia systems.
Other selected classrooms across the campus have also been upgraded with
multimedia technology as funding permits.
The College’s Technology planning is undertaken in a number of forums. The
Technology Advisory Committee (TAC) meets to discuss technology implementation
needs and strategies for instructional and instructional support programs. The TAC
is positioned to re-focus its roles and responsibilities to be in coordination with the
college’s overall institutional planning process. The Budget and Resources Advisory
Council (BRAC) (3C.1.c.9), as part of the Integrated Planning and Resource
Allocation process, will review and prioritize college technology requests based
upon Program Review information in alignment with the college goals and budget
constraints. A VP-IS team, consisting of the District IS department and Vice
Presidents of the two colleges, meet monthly to review District IS project priorities.
In addition, the college’s Instructional Technology staff and District IS department
staff meet monthly to review, discuss, and plan issues regarding network, wireless,
connectivity, and coordination for technology and equipment planning for the new
buildings and building renovations.
Standard III: Resources 369
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Actionable Improvement Plans




Continue regular meetings between college instructional technology staff
and district operations/network staff to plan and support the technology
infrastructure at the college.
Continue to work on developing synergy between newly defined TAC and
Integrated Planning and Resource Allocation.
Complete the college’s Technology Plan via TAC.
District IS works with the colleges through its participatory governance
process to develop a comprehensive District-Wide Technology plan.
Evidence
3C.1.c.1
Instructional Technology Strategic
Plan
http://westvalley.edu/academics/instru_tech/instru_do
cuments/tac_stratgey_rev_spring_2011_addendum.pdf
3C.1.c.2
Technology Advisory Committee
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Technology_A
dvisory
3C.1.c.3
Facilities Bond Projects –
Technology List
http://westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2013/
evidence/3c/measure_h_technology_funds.pdf
3C.1.c.4
IT software
http://www.westvalley.edu/academics/instru_tech/inst
ru_documents/wvc_instructional_software_supported2
.pdf
3C.1.c.5
Measure C Technology Refresh
Funds
http://westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2013/
evidence/3c/technology_refresh_funds.pdf
3C.1.c.6
Information Systems Department
http://wvm.edu/is/
3C.1.c.7
HP Data Protector
http://www8.hp.com/us/en/softwaresolutions/software.html?compURI=1175640
3C.1.c.8
Commvault
http://www.commvault.com/simpanasoftware/features/backup-and-recovery
3C.1.c.9
Budget and Resources Advisory
Council
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/
2013/evidence/3b/brac_12_17_13.pdf
Standard IIIC.1.d
The distribution and utilization of technology resources support the development,
maintenance, and enhancement of its programs and services.
Descriptive Summary
The college and the district have taken steps to assure a robust and secure technical
infrastructure that provides maximum reliability for students and faculty. District IS
Standard III: Resources 370
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
made significant gains in upgrading its technology infrastructure since 2006, funded
primarily by Measure H. Furthermore, WVMCCD has grown more purposeful in its
planning and utilization of technology, sustaining and staying current with
established infrastructure, while adding significant enhancements and new
facilities. The current technology environment includes buildings, systems,
applications, hardware, and software.
Based on informed planning and decision making, the college has made deliberate
efforts to upgrade classrooms with audio visual technology. (3C.1.d.1) These
foundational improvements support the college’s primary focus as a teaching and
learning institution. College technology funds that become available, in addition to
building renovation funds, (e.g. Instructional Equipment Library Materials - IELM),
have been allocated based on discussions in the Technology Advisory Committee
(TAC) and via the college's Integrated Planning and Resource Allocation process.
(3C.1.d.2) Moving forward, the college’s Budget and Resource Advisory Council
(BRAC) is the forum for reviewing funding requests and allocations, with TAC
continuing to serve as the college’s forum for technology strategy discussions.
(3C.1.d.3)
The college makes decisions about use and distribution of its technology resources
by appraising program review technology requests informed by SLO/A assessment
results that pertain to classroom and instructional needs. The Office of
Administrative Services and the newly formed budget and resource allocation
committee (BRAC) review technology requests and make decisions that are
informed by a college wide participatory process.
Since October 2013, there have been a number of recent developments related to
technology enhancements:




Modifications to the wireless infrastructure (Areohive) have significantly
improved access to the wireless network, especially in the library.
Bradford Networks Network Access Control (NAC) was installed to provide
user identification for wireless access.
The main internet firewall is scheduled to be upgraded, which should
improve performance when accessing internet and instructional resources
on servers located on a protected leg of the firewall.
Funds were recently approved to upgrade the phone system to “voice over
IP”, which will improve capabilities and reduce maintenance of the phone
system.
Standard III: Resources 371
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014

The district is beginning to investigate Banner® by Ellucian to replace
Colleague for student information and administrative systems.
The college has policies and procedures in place to keep the infrastructure
reasonably current and sustainable. For the past several years, college faculty and
staff who determine a need for improved technology in their instructional or service
areas submit their requests, including a description of why this request is warranted
to their division's TAC representative. TAC representatives from all divisions bring
this information forward to the TAC meeting. Requests are addressed and fulfilled
based on a clear system of priorities established by the committee. Technology
decisions are also made via the Integrated Planning and Resource Allocation
process. Technology requests that are brought to light via the student learning
outcome assessment process are then requested in department program review
submissions. With an establishment of clearly defined Integrated Planning and
Resource Allocation Process in 2013-2014 year, Program review submissions are
reviewed by BRAC, the participatory governance committee ultimately responsible
for allocating funds, before making recommendations to College Council and the
President.
The college strategically aligned equipment needs for Distance Education as
demand for such an instructional method has increased in the last several years.
Assessment of equipment needs is jointly identified by the Distance Education
Committee, Office of Instruction in conjunction with the Division Chairs Council, and
in consultation with the Administrative Services Office. DE course offerings are
supported by Angel, which is now owned by Blackboard. (3C.1.d.4) The Angel
system is licensed to support all course offerings at both Mission and West Valley
College. As a result a large number of face-to-face course instructors utilize
features of Angel to “web-enhance” their course offerings. Since Angel is accessed
via a web browser, no specialized equipment is required to access course content.
The college has learned through student focus groups that some students access
their Angel course with their smart phones and tablets.
Technology is widely distributed and used effectively throughout the college.
Faculty integrate technology usage in their classroom lessons and students use
technology in class presentations and for note taking. Virtual classrooms make
excellent use of technology resources by utilizing the streaming video resources
available at the college to enrich online and face-to-face course content.
Standard III: Resources 372
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard. Technology resources are widely available to all
students, faculty, and staff. There are multiple committees in place to insure the
resources are used effectively and to provide support year round. The college’s
Integrated Planning and Resource Allocation will also ensure that technology
resources will continue to be distributed and utilized so as to support the
development, maintenance, and enhancement of its programs and services. The
college’s Instructional Technology team along with TAC is positioned to develop
college’s Technology Plan in addition to the existing Instructional Technology
Strategic Plan. The Technology Plan, in concert with the revised Educational and
Facilities Master Plan, will address procedures for technology resource support to
keep the infrastructure reasonably current and sustainable.
Actionable Improvement Plans



The college will develop a plan for allocating facilities bond Measure C
technology refresh funds through TAC and participatory governance
process.
The college will develop a Technology Plan based on the strategies identified
in the current Instructional Technology Strategic Plan.
The college will review and analyze staff, funding, and resource needs for
the Instructional Technology team and secure necessary staff and
operational funds for technology maintenance and repair work.
Evidence
3C.1.d.1
Classroom Technology
Standards
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2013/evi
dence/3c/WVC_AV_Standards_Dec_2013.pdf
3C.1.d.2
Integrated Planning Process
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/integrate
d_planning_diagram.html
3C.1.d.3
Technology Advisory
Committee
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Technology_Advisory/
3C.1.d.4
ANGEL webpage
http://wvmccd.angellearning.com/default.asp
Standard IIIC.2
Technology planning is integrated with institutional planning. The institution
systematically assesses the effective use of technology resources and uses the
results of evaluation as the basis for improvement.
Standard III: Resources 373
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Descriptive Summary
The college follows a clear and deliberate process to ensure that technology
decisions emanate from institutional needs and plans for improvement. Stemming
from the college's educational and facilities master plan (E&FMP) and the college's
Integrated Planning and Resource Allocation process, the college makes decisions
about technology improvements and growth by deliberating over program review
requests and student learning outcome assessment results. Thoughtful evaluation
of student learning outcome assessment results is central to effective institutional
planning and overall institutional effectiveness. The college's clear cycle of
Integrated Planning and Resource Allocation ensures that results gleaned from
student learning outcome assessments and faculty and staff's insightful program
review evaluations serve as a foundation for further discussions and decision
making about the college's essential technology needs. (3C.2.1)
There is evidence indicating that the college bases technology decisions on the
evaluation of program and service needs. At an institutional level, SLO/A
assessments of students' writing skills indicate that students would benefit from a
writing/tutoring lab focused on improving their foundational writing instruction and
practice. (3C.2.2) In response to this discerned need, that was also identified in
program review requests from multiple academic and student service programs,
(3C.2.3) the college established a writing lab equipped with state of the art
technology. The lab also includes ESL and World Language components. (3C.2.4)
The college determines that technology needs in program and service areas are met
effectively by reviewing ongoing feedback from faculty and student service program
areas via the college's Integrated Planning and Resource Allocation process. Within
the context of this process cycle, program owners write a full program review in
either the spring or fall semester and then they write a partial program review in
the alternating semester. (3C.2.5) This ongoing process of review and reassessment provides programs with ample opportunity to make improvements and
then to re-assess how successful those improvements were. An example that
illustrates the effectiveness of the college's iterative cycle of continually assessing
the need for current and improved technology is the collaborative and informed
effort that went into the design and day-to-day use of the Fox Center. The
classroom and conference room technology innovations in the Fox Center were
carefully planned in response to faculty, staff, student, and administrator needs for
the highest levels of institutional effectiveness. The Fox Center has state of the art
dual boot computers, multi-media capabilities, and cameras for classroom analysis
Standard III: Resources 374
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
of student presentations. The Fox conference room has internet, presentation,
telephone conferencing, and projection capabilities. From college-wide student
and employee surveys conducted by the OIRP about technology hardware and
software currency and usage, the college is able to ascertain satisfaction levels with
current technology offerings in order to make requested improvements. (3C.2.6)
The college prioritizes needs when making decisions about technology purchases by
reviewing program review requests and considering how frequently the same
request arises across programs. The program review committee discusses all
department program reviews and compiles summary trends indicating college-wide
needs. The program review committee's recommendations are presented at the
college council annual retreat in the fall of each year. (3C.2.7)
The November 8, 2013 Program Review Summary Report stated the following:
Technology integration and upgrade Technology is understood
differently across programs. For some programs, this involves the
creation of online components, while for other programs it means
experimenting with technology to increase student to student
interactions. Still others require specialty software applications
such as Rivet Architecture and Aplia. In addition to the integration
of new technology into courses, a number of programs are
struggling to update and replace older instructional software like
Quick Books and Auto CAD.
For programs that have requested specific software and hardware upgrades, the
college will address these needs via the Integrated Planning and Resource
Allocation process. The college addresses these needs as effectively as possible, in
the context of current fiscal restraints. On a positive note, the college works
through a clearly articulated and well documented Integrated Planning and
Resource Allocation process that has been communicated clearly to the college
community in participatory governance meetings and all college day presentations.
(3C.2.8)
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard. West Valley College has taken significant
preliminary steps to develop a plan to integrate technology with institutional
planning. (3C.2.9) This is evident with comprehensive Program Review and Student
Learning Outcome and Assessment processes that clearly address college-wide
Standard III: Resources 375
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
assessment of effective use of technology resources. Budget and Resource Advisory
Council (BRAC) as part of the college’s Integrated Planning and Resource Allocation
assures that systematic assessment of effective use of technology resources occur
on an annual basis. Planning begins for subsequent year based on the assessment
results to ensure continuous improvements.
Actionable Improvement Plans

Continue to ensure that BRAC process serves as an institutional assessment
process for technology planning
Evidence
3C.2.1
Program Review Webpage
http://westvalley.edu/committees/program-review/
3C.2.2
SLO/A webpage
http://westvalley.edu/committees/Student_Learning_Outcome
s/
3C.2.3
Program Review Final Report 2012
http://westvalley.edu/committees/program-review/
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/programreview/documents/2012-final-report-for-integratedplanning.pdf
3C.2.4
Writing, ESL, and World
Language labs
http://westvalley.edu/caw
3C.2.5
Program Review and SLO
Assessment Master Calendar
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Student_Learning_Ou
tcomes/masterasessment.html
3C.2.6
OIRP webpage - Surveys
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/reports
_surveys.html
3C.2.7
Program Review Summary
Report 11-08-13
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2013/e
vidence/3c/Program_Review_2013_Final_Report_p5.pdf
3C.2.8
Integrated Planning and
Resource Allocation
Presentations
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2013/e
vidence/3c/08_24_12_accreditation_and_integrated_planning.
pptx
3C.2.9
Instructional Technology
Strategic Plan
http://westvalley.edu/academics/instru_tech/instru_document
s/tac_stratgey_rev_spring_2011_addendum.pdf
http://www.westvalley.edu/academics/language_arts/esl/skills
-lab.html
Standard III: Resources 376
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Standard IIID: Financial Resources
Financial resources are sufficient to support student learning programs and
services and to improve institutional effectiveness. The distribution of resources
supports the development, maintenance, and enhancement of programs and
services. The institution plans and manages its financial affairs with integrity and
in a manner than ensures financial stability. The level of financial resources
provides a reasonable expectation of both short-term and long-term financial
solvency. Financial resources planning are integrated with institutional planning
at both the college and district/system levels in multi-college systems.
Descriptive Summary
WVMCCD Board Policy (BP) and Administrative Procedure (AP) 6200 outlines the
criteria for maintaining fiscal stability while providing for student learning programs
and services including their development, maintenance, and enhancement. AP 6200
also contains the standards for the operating budget, revenue, debt and capital
release obligations, and capital budget. Additionally AP 6305, requires the District
to maintain a five percent (5%) reserve and a contingency reserve of no more than
three percent (3%). (3D.1) The District’s practice is to apply these percentages to
total unrestricted general fund (Fund 100) expenditures. This policy and practice,
along with prudent fiscal management and planning, promotes conservation of a
healthy fund balance and adequate reserves.
To achieve the state’s apportionment-funded full time equivalent student (FTES)
goal, directly related to revenue for the district’s General Fund (Fund 100), a District
Enrollment Management Committee (DEMC), reporting to District Council, meets to
review the state-determined FTES goal as it applies to each college, West Valley and
Mission. (3D.2) The DEMC determines the resident credit, non-resident credit,
exempt, and non-credit FTES goals for each college based on the individual college’s
enrollment strategies. The respective FTES targets are used to calculate each
college’s respective Full Time Equivalent Faculty (FTEF) required to produce the
FTES goals. This budgeting process is known as the Associate Faculty Funding
Model. (3D.3)
The Associate Faculty Funding Model is a part of the district’s Resource Allocation
Model (RAM), first presented to District Council on October 11, 2011 and formally
adopted by District Council on May 13, 2013 following nearly two years of
development and refinement by the District Council’s Resource Allocation Model
sub-committee, closely following the State of California’s funding model found in
Standard III: Resources 377
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Senate Bill SB361. (3D.4) As a subcommittee of the District Council, the “RAM Task
Force,” as this committee was known, fully represented all facets of the district’s
participatory governance constituencies. The district’s Tentative Budget for Fiscal
Year 2013-2014, approved by the Board of Trustees June 18, 2013, employs the
new Resource Allocation Model fully for the first time, replacing a previous method
of resource allocation. (3D.5)
Through the RAM process, Unrestricted General Fund revenue is apportioned first
to fund faculty FTEF, both full-time and associate instructors, to meet enrollment
targets. Other allocations are made to the district and then to each college. The
colleges share their discretionary apportionment based on the ratio of FTES as
approved by DEMC. The following chart illustrates the allocation process under
RAM:
Standard III: Resources 378
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
For Fiscal Year 2013-2014, the district’s total FTES goal was originally set to 16,098,
with West Valley College’s target set to 8,825 FTES and Mission at 7,273 FTES. With
the district now in a Basic Aid status, the FTES goal was reset to 15,898, a reduction
of 200 FTES allocated equally to both colleges. The FY2013-2014 goals are
therefore 8,725 for West Valley and 7,173 for Mission. On each campus, the
Performance Goals Committee, established as a requirement of the faculty labor
contract, Article 20, manages detailed enrollment oversight for the college. The
West Valley College Performance Goals Committee (PGC) considers factors such as
the productivity and success of programs as measured by efficiency and program
completion to inform decisions on faculty resource allocation. The foundation of
this process is service to students and high quality learning programs.
Both the Resource Allocation and Associate Faculty Funding Models are reviewed
annually through District Council with adjustments made as needed. (3D.6)
Currently, the Associate Faculty Funding Model’s rate for associate faculty is based
upon Step 9 of the 2008-2009 Associate Faculty Salary Schedule of the faculty labor
contract, Appendix BB, Schedule A. Previously, through FY2012-2013, funding was
set to Step 8 but, as a part of the review process developing the RAM process, it
was noted that the average associate pay exceeded Step 8; thus, the funding
adjusted to Step 9. The associate funding rate is scheduled for annual review with
adjustments as revenue permits.
Projections of revenues in all funds, unrestricted and restricted, are based upon the
best information available at the time of budget development. Restricted funds are
generally provided in support of educational programs proscribed by state and
federal regulations, donors, or other outside agencies that requires expenditures
according to specific purposes. The District’s RAM treats these fund sources as
“pass-through” funds, applying them as required by each fund source’s rules.
Significant Change of Fiscal Status – Basic Aid
By the conclusion of fiscal year 2012-2013, rising county property taxes and funds
distributed from the deactivated Redevelopment Agencies (RDAs) combined to
move the West Valley-Mission Community College District into Basic Aid status. This
change had been predicted to occur within the next two fiscal years, but the
recovering economy plus an attendant increased value in the real estate market
with renewed real estate transactions have increased assessed valuation, increasing
the revenues received by the district.
Standard III: Resources 379
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard.
Actionable Improvement Plans
None.
Evidence
3D.1
Board Policy and Administrative Procedure
6200; Administrative Procedure 6305
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accredita
tion/2013/evidence/3d/bp_6200_ap_6305.pdf
3D.2
District Enrollment Management Committee
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accredita
tion/2013/evidence/3d/District_Enrollment_Mana
gement_Committee/
3D.3
Associate Faculty Allocation Model
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accredita
tion/2013/evidence/3d/ram6_assoc_faculty_fundi
ng_model_narrative_02_11_13.pdf
3D.4
District Council Minutes re: RAM
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accredita
tion/2013/evidence/3d/dc_ram_minutes.pdf
3D.5
Tentative Budget for Fiscal Year 2013-2014
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accredita
tion/2013/evidence/3d/201314_tentative_budget.05.28.13.pdf
3D.6
Resource Allocation and Associate Faculty
Funding Models
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accredita
tion/2013/evidence/3d/dc_ram_minutes.pdf
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accredita
tion/2013/evidence/3d/ram6_assoc_faculty_fundi
ng_model_narrative_02_11_13.pdf
Standard IIID.1
The institution relies upon its mission and goals as the foundation for financial
planning.
Descriptive Summary
Planning for both district and college budget development relies upon an annual
review of the district’s and college’s mission statements, setting goals reviewed and
approved by the Board of Trustees, as the foundation of the financial planning
process. District and college budgets reflect the goals within strategic planning
processes embodied within participatory governance, which both helps to develop
the rationale for the mission statement and goals, and then employs them as
guidance for financial planning.
Standard III: Resources 380
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Financial planning is essentially a circular process, beginning with the board
approved mission statement and goals approved for both enrollment and fiscal
stability. (3D.1.1, 3D.1.2) Through the RAM and direct pass-through of funds
(3D.1.3), the college embarks upon a financial planning process, first through the
President’s cabinet and College Council, then to the Division Chair Council through
to the individual program departments. These proposed budgets are then reviewed
again through the participatory governance levels – Division Chair Council, College
Council and President’s cabinet – before being incorporated into the district’s
overall budget, which is presented for Board of Trustees’ approval. (3D.1.4)
Throughout the process, the institution’s mission and goals, as expressed in the
Educational and Facilities Master Plan, are reference points guiding the outcome.
(3D.1.5)
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard.
Actionable Improvement Plans
None.
Evidence
3D.1.1
WVC Goals and Objectives 2013-14
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accredita
tion/2013/evidence/3d/WVC_Goals_Objectives_20
13_2014.pdf
3D.1.2
Board Approval of District Goals
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accredita
tion/2013/evidence/3d/2013_14_district_goals.pdf
3D.1.3
Resource Allocation Model (RAM)
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accredita
tion/2013/evidence/3d/resource_allocation_model
_01_31_13.pdf
3D.1.4
2013-14 Tentative Budget
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accredita
tion/2013/evidence/3d/dc_ram_tent_budget_03_
04_13.pdf
3D.1.5
Educational and Facilities Master Plan
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accredita
tion/2013/evidence/3d/2009_wvc_educational_an
d_facilities_master_plan.pdf
Standard IIID.1.a
Financial planning is integrated with and supports all institutional planning.
Standard III: Resources 381
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Descriptive Summary
Integrated Planning and Resource Allocation is one of the three legs of Institutional
Effectiveness, along with the Student Success Team and Accreditation. Within the
Integrated Planning and Resource Allocation realm are the Student and Program
Learning Outcomes and Assessment, Program Review, and Budget Planning. These
three related processes occur in an annual cycle, demonstrated in the Integrated
Planning and Resource Allocation Process: Concept Map graphic, using the catch
phrase: “Plan, Do, Review.” It is useful to note that the cycle is re-entrant at any
phase: “Plan, Do, Review; “Review, Plan, Do;” “Do, Review, Plan”, giving credence
to the philosophy that this is an ever on-going process, not a simple one-time
annual event.
Student Learning Outcomes (SLO/As), along with the Program Learning Outcomes
(PLOs), set the foundation measurement of the college’s academic effectiveness.
To the degree that SLO/As and PLOs depict a program’s ability to adequately meet
their stated objectives, these measures help to identify resource requirements,
whether in terms of facilities use, equipment needs, staffing, supplies and
materials, or other potential resources to be employed by the program in order to
Standard III: Resources 382
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
achieve or to improve the program’s results. Program Reviews then explain more
specifically the resource requirements first identified in SLO/A/PLO as needed to
improve or expand program effectiveness while working to achieve the mission of
the college. (3D.1.a.1) Budgeting is the third part of the Integrated Planning and
Resource Allocation Framework and is the vehicle employed to express operations
and resource requests as a part of the college’s finances. Documentation is critical
to good budgeting and plays an important role in annual budget management.
(3D.1.a.2)
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard. The Integrated Planning and Resource Allocation
process is deliberately crafted as an evolutionary rather than static part of the
college’s planning activities. Since the model’s first introduction by then President
Lori Gaskin, an on-going Integrated Planning and Resource Allocation Team
regularly meets to reflect upon the process’s effectiveness, monitoring results and
modifying the process, incorporating changes to better meet the college’s
participatory governance model, address issues related to timing, and to better
integrate the various stages of the process for an improved final result, especially
for the college’s budget. (3D.1.a.3)
Within the past year, the model’s design was simplified to underscore the “Plan, Do,
Review” concept within the cycle. That concept will be further amplified by a
comprehensive combined calendar listing the SLO/A/PLO, Program Review, and
Budget timeline and workshops to facilitate the activities within the cycle.
Actionable Improvement Plans
None
Evidence
3D.1.a.1
Program Review questions
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/201
3/evidence/3d/intent-of-questions-instructional-1.pdf
3D.1.a.2
2013-14 Budget Process
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/201
3/evidence/3d/fy13-14_budget_process.pdf
3D.1.a.3
Integrated Planning and
Resource Allocation Team
Meeting Notes
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/201
3/evidence/3d/Integrated_Planning_Team_Meeting_Notes
.pdf
Standard III: Resources 383
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Standard IIID.1.b
Institutional planning reflects realistic assessment of financial resources
availability, development of financial resource, partnerships and expenditures
requirements.
Descriptive Summary
The district’s Fiscal Services staff regularly monitors all revenue expense, and fund
balances via quarterly financial and budget reports presented to the Board of
Trustees through its Audit and Budget Oversight Committee (ABOC), to the District
Council, and to both colleges’ executive teams. Revenue projections are based
upon the institution’s Second Principle (P2) Apportionment Report, submitted to
the state chancellor’s office, reflecting current FTES enrollment goals and status,
estimated property tax revenue from the County of Santa Clara, and other facts
known at the time of the report. (3D.1.b.1)
The Office of Administrative Services regularly provides monthly fund balance
projections of the general fund and periodic reports of other funds. This procedure
was key during the 3.39% workload reduction, implemented in 2009-10, as the
college continuously monitored the budget throughout the year. The Offices of
Instruction and Administrative Services established a process to monitor part-time
contracts, and the load allocation budget. (3D.1.b.2) The fund balance projections
are shared with the College Cabinet and the Office of the Vice Chancellor of
Administrative Services. With the college personnel specialist’s assistance, the
Faculty Obligation Number (FON) is calculated and validated with Human Resources
in order to ensure state compliance following a substantial number of early
retirement incentives. (3D.1.b.3)
State apportionment revenue contributions have declined significantly during the
past few years. This decline is influenced by two key factors: State budgets were
severely reduced with “workload reductions” and only recently has that trend been
reversed. The second factor is the proportion of General Fund revenue derived
from County of Santa Clara property taxes has measurably increased, with
indications that property tax revenues will continue to increase in forthcoming
years. At the time this report is being written, summer 2013, fiscal projections
indicate that the district will not receive any state general apportionment in fiscal
year 2013-2014. Educational Protection Account (EPA) funding from Proposition 30
should yield over $1.5 million. Other general fund revenues are projected to be
generated by property taxes and student enrollment fees.
Standard III: Resources 384
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Various campus-based enterprise activities generate additional revenue for the
college. Both student fees and the earnings from vendor service contracts for the
bookstore, cafeteria, and café largely underwrite student activities. The student
center and the college also benefit from a healthy facilities rental activity that
incorporates use by both private organizations and individual and community-based
activities such as softball, volleyball, and soccer leagues, cultural events, theater
performances, and a weekly farmers’ market.
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard.
Actionable Improvement Plans
None.
Evidence
3D.1.b.1
360 Apportionment Attendance Report
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accredita
tion/2013/evidence/3d/320_Apportionment_Atten
dance_Report_FY_2012-2013.pdf
3D.1.b.2
Cognos Enrollment Report,
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accredita
tion/2013/evidence/3d/Cognos_Enrollment_Repor
t_Fall_2013.xlsx
Part Time Allocation Model
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accredita
tion//2013/evidence/3d/201314_Final_Budget.08.14.13_page33-36.pdf
Pg. 33-36
3D.1.b.3
FON Report
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accredita
tion/2013/evidence/3a/fon_2013_14.xlsx
Standard IIID.1.c
When making short-range financial plans, the institution considers its long-range
financial priorities to assure financial stability. The institution clearly identifies
and plans for payment of liabilities and future obligations.
Descriptive Summary
Historically the district has met long-term obligation requirements and, per Board
Policy 6305, maintains a reserve of five-percent of budgeted expenditures plus a
contingency reserve not to exceed three-percent for unanticipated changes that
would significantly reduce operations or services. (3D.1.c.1)
Standard III: Resources 385
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Annually, the district’s Vice Chancellor for Administrative Services reviews for the
Board of Trustees the district’s long-term liabilities. For the board meeting of May
30, 2013, the Vice Chancellor’s review of long-term liabilities include the following:
(3D.1.c.2, 3)
Faculty Bank Leave
Per ACE Bargaining Agreement, Article 38: “Banked load leave is leave which is
earned and results from an accumulation of overload, summer and/or wintersession assignments which the member has chosen to ‘bank’ rather than receive
payment.” As of Fiscal Year 2012-3013, total Banked Leave liability is $10.1 million,
of which short-term of $0.5 million and long-term liability of $5.6 million are
funded, approximately 60% of the total liability.
Vacations
Managers, Confidential, and Teamsters unit employment agreements include
provision for annual vacation, accumulated as hours per employee. The following
table shows the vacation carryover per employee unit, currently totaling
approximately $3.0 million, of which 6% is funded as current vacation pay-out,
leaving approximately 94% unfunded and treated as an annual expense to the
district as vacation occurs.
Standard III: Resources 386
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
3D.1.d.6
Lease Revenue Bonds
In 2009, $55 million of Lease Revenue Bonds were issued to fund state capital
outlay projects and $1.12 million for the Campus Center at West Valley College.
The bond debt is repaid from two sources: The larger bond amount is paid from the
general fund and from federal subsidy under the Build America Bond program.
Campus Center debt is repaid from Student Center Fees.
Standard III: Resources 387
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
In 2011, a $9.905 million Lease Revenue Bond was issued to fund solar projects on
both district campuses. The resulting debt is being repaid from federal subsidy
under the Clean Renewable Energy Bond, utility savings from the use of solar
energy, and from local energy rebates.
Standard III: Resources 388
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
OPEB
As of June 30, 2012, there are 519 retirees currently covered by OPEB, and 117
eligible active employees eligible for OPEB provisions. Employees hired after
January 1, 1994 are not eligible for post-retirement medical benefits. The actuarial
accrued liability was reduced from $124,279,282 in 2006 to $88,514,298 in 2011.
An updated actuarial study of retiree health liabilities is due to be completed during
2013. From the West Valley-Mission Community College District Annual Financial
Report, June 30, 2012, the following statement explicitly describes OPEB liability as
of the time of the district’s audit:
The District’s annual other postemployment benefit (OPEB) cost
(expense) is calculated based on the annual required contribution of
the employer (ARC), an amount actuarially determined in accordance
with the parameters of GASB Statement No. 45. The ARC represents
a level of funding that, if paid on an ongoing basis, is projected to
cover normal cost each year and amortize any unfunded actuarial
accrued liabilities (UAAL) (or funding excess) over a period not to
exceed thirty years.
The following table shows the components of the District’s annual
OPEB cost for the year, the amount actually contributed to the Plan
and changes in the District’s net OPEB obligation to the Plan:
Annual OPEB Costs as of June 30, 2012
Annual required contribution
Contributions made
Change in net OPEB liability
Net OPEB liability, beginning of year
Net OPEB assets, end of year
(6,570,773)
22,416,516
15,845,743
17,823,320
33,669,063
Standard III: Resources 389
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
CalPERS and CalSTRS
Both state-funded retirement programs were changed as a result of recent
elections, thus creating two-tiered retirement systems. One result of the elections
as well as the current market conditions is a near-certain increase in employer
contributions to both of these plans. Currently, these contributions are:
•
CalPERS Contribution for FY 12/13
Employee: 7.0% (9.0% for Public Safety Officers)
Employer: 11.42% (36.03% for Public Safety Officers)
• CalSTRS Contribution for FY 12/13
Employee: 8.0%
Employer: 8.25%
Projected contribution rate changes are as of this writing unknown, but the
district’s best estimates are shown on the following charts:
Standard III: Resources 390
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Standard III: Resources 391
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard. The college and district plan for short and long
term obligations to ensure the financial stability. The obligations and plans are
communicated to the college, district and community via Board presentations and
OPEB Actuarial Reports. (3D.1.c.4)
Actionable Improvement Plans
None.
Evidence
3D.1.c.1
Policy 6305
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation
/2013/evidence/3d/AP_6305.pdf
3D.1.c.2
Board Meeting Minutes - June 4,
2013
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation
/2013/evidence/3d/bot_minutes_06_04_13.pdf
3D.1.c.3
Board Presentation – District
Liabilities
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation
/2013/evidence/3d/201314_tentative_budget.05.28.13.pdf
3D.1.c.4
OPEB Actuarial Report - 2013
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation
/documents/actuarial_report2013.pdf
Standard III: Resources 392
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Standard IIID.1.d
The institution clearly defines and follows its guideline and processes for financial
planning and budget development, with all constituencies having appropriate
opportunities to participate in the development of the institutional plans and
budgets.
Descriptive Summary
The college has implemented guidelines and processes that bring together
participatory governance committees in a manner that offers multiple avenues for
input.
Financial Planning and Budget Development are highly participatory processes.
Student/Program Learning Outcomes and Program Review are directed by a
subcommittee of the college’s Academic Senate and, as such, primarily represent
faculty perspectives. However, these reviews incorporate participation from all
segments of the college community, including students, classified staff, and
administration, as well as faculty. Results from SLO/A, PLO, and Program Review
are presented college-wide and in College Council, the college’s top-level
participatory governance body.
Budget development is deliberately a college-wide activity that does involve
participation from all segments of the college community. (3D.1.d.1)
Standard III: Resources 393
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Based on the outcomes of SLO/A, PLO, and Program Review processes, the budget
is built on identified college priorities, following the college’s mission statement and
strategic plans. The budgeting process of FY2013-2014 was a modified via a zerobased process; only salaries based on position control and certain mandated costs
were budgeted outside of direct participation. All programs and cost centers were
provided a budgeting worksheet to develop budgets based upon their program’s
needs, supported by resource requirements outlined in Program Review.
Explanation and supporting evidence was asked for every proposed expense.
Standard III: Resources 394
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Each individual proposed budget was consolidated into a college-wide worksheet,
presented to Division Chair Council (3D.1.d.2) and eventually to College Council for
review. Final decisions were made within the President’s Cabinet, communicated
through College Council, prior to forwarding to the district’s offices for inclusion
into the district’s overall budget. (3D.1.d.3)
District- and college-level participatory governance and administrative processes
work in tandem in budget development. The district develops an annual Budget
Calendar, used as an overall guide by the district and both colleges to ensure that
both Tentative and Final Budgets are completed by the Board of Trustees’ deadline
for adoption. Budget preparation processes for the district and colleges are
explicitly stated in Administrative Procedure 6200. (3D.1.d.4) The College Council,
Division Chair Council, and Performance Goals Committee communicate and
recommend budgetary priorities. Through the timelines set by these bodies,
coordinated with the district’s calendar, and through budget workshops
communicated and orchestrated by the VP of Administrative Services, the entire
college is included in these processes. (3D.1.d.5) In addition, Student Learning
Outcomes and Program Review are core parts of the Integrated Planning and
Resource Allocation Process, as described earlier in this document. Since the last
accreditation in 2007, there have been several changes in leadership; however,
guidelines and processes for financial planning and budget development processes
have been well-communicated and maintained and demonstrated ongoing
improvement.
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard. Budget and financial planning processes for the
college are well-established and documented, as well as widely distributed to the
college at-large. All college constituencies are invited to participate and collaborate
on the development of fiscal plans.
Actionable Improvement Plans


Continue an analysis of the possibility of reinstating a district-wide budget
advisory committee which has been incorporated in the function of the
District Council.
Complete establishing the college’s Budget and Resource Advisory Council
(BRAC) as part of the Integrated Planning and Resource Allocation Process
by the end of February 2014.
Standard III: Resources 395
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Evidence
3D.1.d.1
Budget Process Memo
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/
2013/evidence/3d/20132014_budget_process_memo.pdf
3D.1.d.2
Division Chair Council Minutes
re: Budget Development
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/
2013/evidence/3d/DCCPGC_summary_11_13_13_approved.pdf
3D.1.d.3
West Valley College Budget
2013-2014
http://westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2013/
evidence/3d/2013-14_Final_Budget.08.14.13.pdf
3D.1.d.4
Administrative Policy 6200
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/
2013/evidence/3d/ap_6200.pdf
3D.1.d.5
2013-14 Budget Process
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/
2013/evidence/3d/fy13-14_budget_process.pdf
Standard IIID.2
To assure the financial integrity of the institution and responsible use of its
resources, the financial management system has appropriate control mechanisms
and widely disseminates dependable and timely information for sound financial
decision making.
The key to institutional financial integrity begins with a well-documented and
transparent budgeting process, followed by implementing an enterprise reporting
system, which in this district is the Colleague (formerly Datatel) system that
provides accurate budget and expenditure tracking within each of the college’s
many cost centers. By providing position control through Analytic software, and
purchasing requisition management, budget monitoring, and compliance with
Colleague, the institution’s intended allocation of resources is ensured. The system
allows each budget manager at any time to have clear visibility of their financial
picture, comparing budgeted to encumbered and actual expenses via the
MyWVMPortal link to Colleague. (3D.2.1) Additionally, the college’s Office of
Administrative Services provides assistance monitoring and adjusting budgets and
expenses to dynamically reflect changing circumstances within a cost center.
Standard III: Resources 396
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
The district’s Vice Chancellor of Administrative Services publishes quarterly and
annual district financial reports comparing budgeted and actual expenditures as
well as an annually audited financial report to District Council the Audit and Budget
Oversight Committee (ABOC), and to the Board of Trustees (3D.2.2). Any report
presented at a Board meeting is available to the public. The Board also complies
with CCR Section 58307 through monthly reports of budget transfers between
major expenditure classifications as defined in the California Community College
Budget and Accounting Manual.
Given the importance of Colleague financial management and reporting system, the
district Information Services unit continuously updates the system software, adding
new capabilities and services as available. Through funding provided by both
Measure H and Measure C bonds, new computing hardware has been purchased to
improve Colleague operations and planned upgrades include migration to the SQL
database for improved data access and warehousing, and implementation of both
Human Resources and On-Line Purchase Requisition models. (3D.2.3) The Human
Resources module provides integrated position control and assignment contract
management, while the On-Line Purchase Requisition module performs real-time
monitoring of funds availability as well as purchase order tracking.
Systems supporting the budgeting and financial operations have limited authorized
access. Individuals requiring access must obtain prior approval before being
granted log in authorization, and the systems are not generally accessible offcampus or through non-administrative campus networks. Colleague has been
successfully employed to provide ad hoc, monthly, quarterly, and annual reports for
financial management as well as for state and federal compliance reporting.
Analytic software, an even more highly restricted software system, is used to
monitor position control, develop and analyze budgets, and provide analytical
financial reporting. COGNOS is used as a data-mining tool to access the data base
repository from Colleague for specialized and analytical financial and enrollment
reporting.
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard. The 2006 FCMAT report (3D.2.4) prepared for the
district states: “The district uses different financial systems for different functions.
The lack of a single system significantly increases the probability of error. The
district should identify the best single financial system for its needs and purchase it,
or add modules and capacity to the current Datatel system.” During Fiscal years
2011-12 and 2012-13, improvements and upgrades to district systems replaced the
Standard III: Resources 397
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
PARIS reporting tools and eliminated the multi-system reporting concerns.
Colleague is now the primary tool for financial management, providing a database
from which reports are derived based upon consistent data.
Actionable Improvement Plans
None.
Evidence
3D.2.1
MyWVM Portal link to
Colleague
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2
013/evidence/3d/Portal_Link_to_Budget_Information.pn
g
3D.2.2
District Financial Report 2013
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2
013/evidence/3d/FY_12-13_Audit_Report.pdf
3D.2.3
Colleague migration memo
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2
013/evidence/3d/ellucian_migration-memo.pdf
3D.2.4
FCMAT Executive Summary
Executive Summary, page 4, 6th
paragraph.
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2
013/evidence/3d/3D26_fcmat_final_report_page12.pdf
Standard IIID.2.a
Financial documents, including the budget and independent audit, have a high
degree of creditability and accuracy and reflect appropriate allocation and use of
financial resources to support student learning programs and services.
Descriptive Summary
Financial documents, in their best form, are a collective portrayal of the institution’s
participatory governance process by which resources are allocated in support of
student success. Ultimately, all resources, whether human, physical, or fiscal, are
reflected by financial measures; therefore, the budget reflects the intended
allocation of resources while the audited results chronicle the actual employment
of those resources. The annual independent audit validates the district’s and
college’s internal accounting practices have followed applicable practices, including
generally accepted auditing practices, the California Community Colleges Budget
and Accounting Manual, Governmental Accounting Standards Board (GASB), and
applicable regulatory compliance. The 2011-2012 annual audit (3D.2.a.1) was
completed with the following comments from the auditors to the district’s Board of
Trustees:
Standard III: Resources 398
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
We conducted our audits in accordance with auditing standards
generally accepted in the United States of America and the standards
applicable to financial audits contained in Government Auditing
Standards, issued by the Comptroller General of the United States.
The financial statements of the West Valley-Mission Community
College Foundation and the Mission-West Valley Land Corporation
were not audited in accordance with Government Auditing
Standards, but were audited in accordance with auditing standards
generally accepted in the United States of America for
nongovernmental entities. Those standards require that we plan and
perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the
financial statements are free of material misstatement. An audit
includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts
and disclosures in the financial statements. An audit also includes
assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates
made by management, as well as evaluating the overall basic
financial statement presentation. We believe that our audits provide
a reasonable basis for our opinions. (3D.2.a.2)
In our opinion, the basic financial statements referred to above
present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of West
Valley-Mission Community College District and its discretely
presented component units as of June 30, 2012 and 2011, and the
respective changes in financial position and cash flows, for the years
then ended in conformity with accounting principles generally
accepted in the United States of America.
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard. Resource allocations through the budgeting
process follow a participatory governance model wherein multiple governance
bodies contribute to the overall result. Those participatory bodies include:







District Executive Management Team
District Council
Enrollment Management Committee, reporting through District Council
College President’s Cabinet
College Council
Academic Senate
Classified Senate
Standard III: Resources 399
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014


College Division Chair Committee
College Performance Goals Committee
Actionable Improvement Plans
None
Evidence
3D.2.a.1
West Valley-Mission Community College
District Annual Financial Reports
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/fid
uciary_documents.html
3D.2.a.2
Independent Auditors' Report, page 2
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/20
13/evidence/3d/audit_report_fy_11-12_page2.pdf
Standard IIID.2.b
Institutional responses to external audit findings are comprehensive, timely, and
communicated appropriately.
Descriptive Summary
The college’s Administrative Services, in concert with the District’s Administrative
Services office, ensure that institutional responses to external audit findings are
comprehensive, timely, and communicated appropriately with accompanied
supporting documents.
The Auditor’s Annual Financial Report for June 30, 2012 and 2011 contained very
few external findings or questioned costs. (3D.2.b) No findings or questioned costs
were noted for federal awards; two findings were noted for state awards for 2012
and follow-up reporting for two findings from 2011 were included. It must be
noted that the Auditor’s report is for the district as a whole, not per college within
the district; thus, the management response and corrective plan involves Mission
and West Valley College as well as the district offices. Concise, detailed, and timely
responses to the following topics questioned in the audits are found in the District’s
response to the Auditor’s Annual Financial Report:



State general apportionment funding system regarding daily and positive
attendance
Financial aid cluster, Pell grants
Hours By Arrangement (HBA)

Course material fees
Standard III: Resources 400
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard. Whether the findings from the audit pertain to one
or both colleges or to the district, the findings are shared with all relevant members
of the institution’s community in order to identify areas for improvement overall.
The findings serve as solid objective warning for developing a corrective action and
inspect, as well as improve all related procedures. Specifically, during regular CBO
meetings between the Vice Chancellor for Administrative Services and the two
college Vice Presidents for Administrative Services, the audit findings are reviewed
in detail so that due diligence is followed for any corrective actions to be
implemented. The auditor’s report indicates that corrective actions have been
successfully implemented for each of the identified findings.
Actionable Improvement Plans

Continue effort to improve accuracy and efficiency of data entry by
maintaining a monthly meeting among the district’s Information Systems
department and college Administrative Services and Office of Instruction.
Evidence
3D.2.b
June 30, 2012 and 2011 Audit
Report
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/docume
nts/2012_audit.pdf
Standard IIID.2.c
Appropriate financial information is provided throughout the institution in a
timely manner.
Descriptive Summary
Through careful planning and fiscal management, the district has over the years
maintained a healthy fund balance and sufficient cash reserves including recent
years where the state-wide budget reductions were experienced. The institution
always seeks to ensure stability by developing a strategy that result in a balanced
operating budget. The board of trustees has a practice of maintaining a minimum
reserve equal to 5% of the general fund budget. Continuous review of financial
conditions and state funding levels by the College and District’s Business Officers
group, College Council, and the District Council prior to the board review provide
timely, ongoing assessments of the potential risks. Financial emergencies can
therefore be minimized and unforeseen occurrences can be handled by adjusting
priorities as needed.
Standard III: Resources 401
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
The district receives its revenues from several sources: federal revenues, state
apportionment, local property taxes, and student fees, and private revenues (other
financing sources). Each month, the Board of Trustees is asked to approve requests
to amend the adopted budget to recognize new federal, state special purpose
grants as well as local contract revenue.
Financial information for the college and district begins with the annual budgeting
process, following a budget calendar developed district-wide. The district’s Vice
Chancellor of Administrative Services conducts budget workshops for each college
and for the Board of Trustees, which the public is able to attend. Budget
information is published in both Tentative and Final forms in a report presented to
and approved by the Board of Trustees. The budget, in both hard copy and
electronic form, are available to all members of the college community –
employees, students, and members of the community alike. (3D.2.c.1) Detailed
posting is made to all cost center accounts, both for the tentatively approved
budget at the start of the fiscal year, and for the adjusted final budget when
approved by the Board of Trustees in early September.
As of June 2013, the district’s General Fund Balance was $10,805,000 and consisted
of the following components:
•$ 4,419,806
•$ 129,262
•$ 152,041
•$ 5,683,749
•$ 134,562
•$ 285,580
District’s budgeted 5% reserves
Contingency Reserve
Non spendable fund balance
Banked Leave liability
Fund 100/017
Faculty Travel and Conference
The last two years’ ending balances of the unrestricted general fund (fund 100) are
$ 11,760,102 in 2010-2011 and $ 10,805,000 in 2011-2012. Currently, the district
has sufficient cash flow to meet all spending obligations. With these amounts of
ending balances in the last three years, the district maintains the 5% contingency
reserve that is recommended by the State Chancellors Office. Both the district
office and the college monitor the cash flow policy and procedures on a monthly
basis through the district-wide through the College Business Officers (CBO) meeting.
A cash flow statement and the formal budget reports are presented to the
chancellor and the Board of Trustees quarterly to better track our fiscal position
throughout the year. Each report always presents revenues and expenditures of
the current year and forecasts revenues and expenditures for the next year.
Standard III: Resources 402
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
WVMCCD became a Basic Aid district in 2012-2013 which changed the district’s way
of receiving revenue. The majority of the District's general revenue is now derived
from Santa Clara and Santa Cruz County property taxes. Categorical, Lottery, and
grant revenues continue to come from federal, state, or other sources and student
fees also comprise a significant revenue stream. Although property tax revenues
can vary from year-to-year, property tax revenues tend to be more stable, longterm, than funds allocated through the state's budget process. Property tax
revenues from the two counties in which West Valley-Mission CCD is situated have
recovered from the recent recession and are forecasted to continue to increase at,
very conservatively, at least three-percent per year, and doubtless more than that
rate. The greater unknown impact is from the distribution of Redevelopment
Agency Successor funds. The outlook for the next several years does not portend
any cash flow difficulties for the district.
To deal with other unforeseen occurrences, the district’s budget provides for a 5%
reserve as stated above to address financial emergencies. Also, as a back-up plan,
the district participates in the Tax Revenue Anticipation Notes (TRAN), which allows
short-term, borrowing, to support possible operational cash flow shortages arising
from fluctuations in annual tax or revenue receipts that the general fund is
dependent upon during the fiscal year.
The district also has an immediate cash plus investments with the Santa Clara
County Treasurer’s Office, as well as revenues from the Land Corporation funds.
Risk Management policies exist, and the district vice chancellor of administrative
services has the responsibility to protect and preserve the people and assets of the
district. Currently, WVMCCD maintains adequate levels of various types of
insurance, including employee health benefits, and a worker’s compensation plan.
Safety training and frequent monitoring for potential safety issues is also a major
component of Risk Management function. In the event of major catastrophes, the
district insurance plans will cover the property and any liability.
Using Colleague, the user interface for the district’s enterprise reporting system, all
faculty, staff, and administrative employees are able to inspect the details of at
least the budget and accounting for their own cost center. Greater access to
financial data, in more detail, is provided through access controls set within the
Colleague system and is granted to each cost center’s budget manager. Within
administrative functions, budget and accounting data is also accessible by senior
office coordinators, administrative assistants, and key members in support roles.
Standard III: Resources 403
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Additionally, the college’s Office of Administrative Services assists budget managers
with account analysis and special needs as these arise.
The district’s Vice Chancellor of Administrative Services office also publishes
quarterly budget to actual variance analysis, (3D.2.c.2) distributed to District
Council, the Vice Presidents of Administrative Services of both colleges, as well as to
the Board of Trustees through the Board of Trustee’s Audit and Budget Oversight
Committee.
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard. The college and the district have multiple levels of
oversight at all levels and appropriate financial information is provided throughout
the institution in a timely manner.
Actionable Improvement Plans
None.
Evidence
3D.2.c.1
WVMCCD Budgets
http://wvm.edu/documents.aspx?fid=26638&doc=2664
0&year=2013
3D.2.c.2
Quarterly Budget to Actual Variance
Reports
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/
2013/evidence/3d/Annual_311_Report_FY_12-13.pdf
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/
2013/evidence/3d/Actuarial_Report.2013.pdf
Standard IIID.2.d
All financial resources including long and short term debt instruments (such as
bonds and Certificates of Participation) auxiliary activities, fund-raising efforts
and grants are used with integrity in a manner consistent with the intended
purpose of the funding source.
Descriptive Summary
The distribution of funds from auxiliary activities and grants is managed by the Vice
President of Administrative Services, in cooperation with the Vice President of
Student Services, the Vice President of Instruction, and responsible area deans. All
activities are conducted in concert with college mission and goals. In addition, all
allocation decisions and activities occur in accordance with state law, GASB, and the
Budget Accounting Manual. (3D.2.d.1)
Standard III: Resources 404
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
All budgets are monitored by the Vice President of Administrative Services.
Restricted fund programs are established for the purpose of providing specialized
services, funded by revenues collected from program participants or from revenues
provided by a state or local agency grants. Restricted funds may only be used to pay
for the costs of providing services appropriate to the restrictions of the fund source.
Revenues from college proprietary activities are shown in the following table
together with the Campus Center fiduciary fund with income from student fees and
campus center-related activities: (3D.2.d.2, 3)
District and college fund-raising efforts involving events and other donor-related
activities are managed by the West Valley-Mission Foundation, not by the colleges.
West Valley-Mission Community College District
Tentative Budget 2013-2014
Proprietary and Fiduciary Funds Revenues
Actual
2010-11
$ 252,952
Actual
2011-12
$ 534,926
Final Budget
2012-13
$ 475,095
Tentative
Budget
2013-14
$ 484,063
912,080
76,751
54,982
1,043,813
Fund 596 - Contract Education-CDAAP
163,541
Fund 597 - Entrepreneurial
479
Total Proprietary Funds Revenues $ 1,460,785
912,080
53,012
34,277
999,369
237,680
698,851
$ 2,470,826
912,080
678,134
142,222
1,732,436
195,668
707,824
$ 3,111,023
912,080
222,222
70,417
1,204,719
194,616
540,583
$ 2,423,981
$
$
$
West Valley College
Fund 591 - Community Education
Fund 595 - Contract Education
4800: Federal
4860: State
4880: Local
Fund 731 West Valley College Campus Center
$
692,503
541,291
605,283
631,883
(Tentative Budget 2013-2014, Section VIII Exhibit 2A, 3A, 3C, 4A, pages 91-103; Section IX, Exhibit 4A, page 112)
Final Budget 2013 - 2014
Proprietary and Fiduciary Funds Revenues
Actual
Actual
Actual
Final Budget
West Valley College
2010-11
2011-12
2012-13
2013-14
Fund 591 - Community Education
252,952
534,924
342,071
484,063
Fund 595 - Contract Education
4800: Federal
912,080
912,080
912,080
912,080
4860: State
76,751
53,021
57,742
37,315
4880: Local
54,982
34,277
3,556
4890: Transfers In
85,604
1,043,813
999,378 1,058,982
949,395
Fund 596 - Contract Education-CDAAP
Fund 597 - Entrepeneurial
Total Proprietary Funds
Fund 711 Assoc. Student Body Trust Fund
Fund 731 - Campus Center
Funds 759 & 760 - Scholarship
163,541
479
1,460,785
237,680
698,851
2,470,833
169,751
714,416
2,285,220
194,616
329,715
1,957,789
96,236
692,503
158,662
947,401
85,264
541,291
201,267
827,822
79,689
552,371
72,131
704,191
99,000
631,883
243,803
974,686
Other Fiduciary Funds are maintained districtwide; see Final Budget July 1, 2013-June 30, 2014.
Sources: Tentative and Final Budgets July 1, 2013-June 30, 2014, Section VIII and Section IX
Standard III: Resources 405
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
These funds are audited annually.
Citizen’s Bond Oversight Committee (CBOC): The district’s construction bond
measures, Measure H and Measure C, are overseen by the Citizen’s Bond Oversight
Committee, which meets regularly to appraise the district’s application of bond
monies to the priority list of projects.
The Annual Report of the Citizens’ Bond Oversight Committee (CBOC) is required by
law in the language of Measure H, which was passed by the voters on November 2,
2004, and the language of Measure C, which was passed by the voters on June 5,
2012 by at least 55% of the votes cast. The CBOC is governed by the Brown Act of
1971 (The Open Meetings Act) and all meeting agendas are published and publicly
placed at least 72 hours prior to any scheduled meeting where official business is to
be transacted. The general public is invited to attend all meetings. There are no
closed sessions of the CBOC.
Concluding its eighth year, the CBOC continued with its program of oversight and
review of Measure H expenditures. The compliance to Measure H priorities and
procedures by the District Staff and the CBOC was validated by the recent audit
performed by Vavrinek, Trine, Day & Company LLP, which was presented to the
CBOC on March 13, 2013. The auditors conducted a Measure H Performance Audit
to measure compliance with Proposition 39 and concluded that the District
expended funds only for the specific projects approved by the voters. A separate
Financial Audit was conducted and concluded that the Financial Statements of the
Measure H Fund accurately present its financial status. At the time the audit report
was prepared, there had been no expenditures of Measure C funds. Subsequently,
beginning later in 2013, Measure C projects have started and will be included in
future CBOC meeting reports. (3D.2.d.4) Through regular meetings and a variety of
reports that the CBOC helped draft, the oversight process was timely and
consistent.
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard.
Actionable Improvement Plans
None.
Standard III: Resources 406
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Evidence
3D.2.d.1
2012-13 Budget
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2013/evi
dence/3d/2012-13_Final_Budget.08.17.12.rev.pdf
3D.2.d.2
2013-14 Tentative Budget
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2013/evi
dence/3d/2013-14_tentative_budget.05.28.13.pdf
3D.2.d.3
2013-14 Final Budget
http://westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2013/evidenc
e/3d/2013-14_Final_Budget.08.14.13.pdf
3D.2.d.4
CBOC Report
http://www.wvm.edu/WorkArea/DownloadAsset.aspx?id=6750
Standard IIID.2.e
The institution’s internal control systems are evaluated and assessed for validity
and effectiveness and the results of this assessment are used for improvement
Descriptive Summary
Adherence to appropriate internal control procedures are one aspect of the annual
audit process, but audits are not the sole means by which adherence to proper
internal controls are measured. Application of internal control must begin as an
inherent part of the institution’s fiscal management culture, pervasively integrated
through all aspects of administrative procedure. This is especially true when
addressing compliance issues with regard to reporting on federal or state grants,
special fund allocations, application of funds sourced from local bonds, and the use
of any funds for which there are specific restrictions.
Within the annual auditor’s report, “Internal Control over Financial Reporting” is
specifically addressed with respect to the auditor’s tests in accordance with
government accounting standards:
Internal Control over Financial Reporting
The management of West Valley-Mission Community College District is
responsible for establishing and maintaining effective internal control
over financial reporting. In planning and performing our audits, we
considered West Valley-Mission Community College District's internal
control over financial reporting as a basis for designing our auditing
procedures for the purpose of expressing our opinions on the financial
statements, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the
effectiveness of West Valley-Mission Community College District's
internal control over financial reporting.
Standard III: Resources 407
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Accordingly, we do not express an opinion on the effectiveness of West
Valley-Mission Community College District's internal control over
financial reporting. …
Our consideration of internal control over financial reporting was for the
limited purpose described in the first paragraph of this section and was
not designed to identify all deficiencies in internal control over financial
reporting that might be deficiencies, significant deficiencies or material
weaknesses. We did not identify any deficiencies in internal control over
financial reporting that we consider to be material weaknesses, as
previously defined.
Compliance and Other Matters
As part of obtaining reasonable assurance about whether West ValleyMission Community College District's financial statements are free of
material misstatement, we performed tests of its compliance with
certain provisions of laws, regulations, contracts, and grant agreements,
noncompliance with which could have a direct and material effect on
the determination of financial statement amounts. However, providing
an opinion on compliance with those provisions was not an objective of
our audits and, accordingly, we do not express such an opinion. The
results of our tests disclosed instances of noncompliance or other
matters that are required to be reported under Government Auditing
Standards and which are described in the accompanying schedule of
findings and questioned costs as items 2012-1 and 2012-2.
Although the intent of an audit is to test the accuracy of financial information
portrayed in the auditor’s report, auditors, by necessity, must also sufficiently
sample and test the procedures employed within the organization so as to be able
to validate that the information derived from the financial transactions behind the
reported information follow all applicable accounting standards, compliance to
regulations. On that basis, auditors have found very few procedural issues with the
district’s internal control systems. Those that have been identified as a part of
testing for compliance with reporting attendance, grants, or similar tasks have been
addressed and corrected.
In 2008, a report was prepared for the district by the California Collegiate Brain
Trust (CCBT). (3D.2.e.1) The focus of the report was “to prepare recommendations
to help solve the financial deficit being experienced by the district and to help
improve institutional effectiveness.”
One aspect of that report was to
Standard III: Resources 408
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
“Recommend organizational changes that will improve accountability for both
external and internal stakeholders.” The majority of CCBT recommendations have
since been implemented, key among which are the Revenue Allocation Model and a
position control system. Other recommendations have been far more complicated
to implement, a significant example of which implementation of the Colleague
Human Resources module.
In 2006, the Financial Crisis and Management Assistance Team (FCMAT) was
engaged to study district fiscal processes and stability. This study agreement
requested that FCMAT: (3D.2.e.2)
Conduct an analysis (including processes and procedures used to develop the
budget) of the district annual budget and prepare a multiyear financial forecast.
The analysis should include the following:




Review the district for effective use of resource management.
Evaluate the budget decision-making/management process.
Prioritization of resources.
Complete a Fiscal Health Analysis of the district using the California
Community Colleges Sound Fiscal Management Self-Assessment Checklist to
determine the district’s current level of financial risk.
 Review of the financial measurement system (actual to budget comparison).
 Review of the accountability system (enforcement of processes).
 Review Fund 17.
 Review parameters of the 50% law as it relates to:
 Procedures regarding entrepreneurial activities (Fund 17).
 Note: Since the FCMAT report was published, the district reclassified
entrepreneurial activities to Fund 597; Fund 17 now represents solely
student materials fees.
 Lottery.
 Explore best practices for a board of trustees in fiscal management
 Review the district allocation of resources model.
FCMAT listed fourteen recommendations for internal controls in its report, each of
which has been reviewed and implemented. The recommendations consist mainly
of “best practice” control processes and are frequently reviewed in the context of
on-going discussions such as the regularly scheduled CBO meetings that include the
district’s vice chancellor and both college vice presidents of administrative services.
(3D.2.e.3)
Standard III: Resources 409
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard.
Actionable Improvement Plans
None.
Evidence
3D.2.e.1
CCBT 2008 report, opening paragraph,
page 5.
3D.2.e.2
FCMAT report – November 22 2006
letter to Stan Arterberry, then
chancellor of WVM
3D.2.e.3
FCMAT report, pages 41-42
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accredit
ation/2013/evidence/3d/ccbt_report_page5.pdf
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accredit
ation/2013/evidence/3d/FCMAT_Report_Letter_
to_Stan_Arterberry.pdf
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accredit
ation/2013/evidence/3d/FCMAT_Final_Report_P
g.41-42_11-22-06.pdf
Standard IIID.3
The institution has policies and procedures to ensure sound financial practices and
financial stability.
Standard IIID.3.a
The institution has sufficient cash flow and reserves to maintain stability,
strategies for appropriate risk management, and realistic plans to meet financial
emergencies and unforeseen occurrences.
Descriptive Summary
Following a conservative philosophy towards maintaining the stability of the
district’s financial picture, District Policy BP6200 and AP6305 require a five percent
budgeted reserve in designated unrestricted fund balances, per the standard set at
the California Community College Chancellor’s Office. Additionally, a contingency
reserve of no greater than three percent is maintained. (3D.3.a.1) Continuous
review of financial conditions and state funding levels by the District Council and
Chief Budget Officer’s meeting and the board provides timely, ongoing assessments
of the potential risks. Information relative to the fiscal condition is then
disseminated for review, discussion, and planning at the college level through
College Council, Division Chairs Council, Performance Goals Committee, and
Student Services Council.
Standard III: Resources 410
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
The two following tables, excerpted from the district’s Tentative Budget for fiscal
year 2013-2014, document general fund balances and revenues:
West Valley - Mission Community College District
Final Budget 2013 - 2014
Unrestricted General Fund 100
Actual
Actual
Actual
Final Budget
Consolidated for All Locations
2010-11
2011-12
2012-13
2013-14
Nonspendable Fund Balance
Prepaids
$
$
152,041 $
105,600 $
105,600
Assigned Fund Balance
Assigned to Banked Leave Liability
5,683,749
5,683,749
5,683,749
Assigned to Fund 100/017
114,450
134,562
104,577
104,577
Assigned to Faculty Travel & Conference
257,999
285,580
295,027
295,027
Unassigned Fund Balance
Reserve at 5%
4,611,719
4,419,806
4,495,224
4,508,323
Contingency Reserve
1,256,000
129,262
655,672
582,574
Unspent Growth Funding
1,906,000
Basic Aid Funds
927,522
1,069,030
1.57% COLA Holding
1,252,517
Debt Service Reserve - LRB 2011 (Utilities)
337,298
337,298
Board Elections
113,036
173,036
Undesignated Fund Balance
1,806,967
ACE & POA 12/13 Concessions
(1,000,000)
(1,000,000)
Total Fund Balance
9,953,135
10,805,000
11,717,705
13,111,731
Sources: Tentative and Final Budgets July 1, 2013-June 30, 2014, Section III, Exhibit 1
Consolidated for All Locations
West Valley-Mission Community College District
Tentative Budget 2013-2014
Unrestricted General Fund 100
Actual
Actual
Final Budget
2010-11
2011-12
2012-13
Nonspendable Fund Balance
Prepaids
$
Assigned Fund Balance
Assigned to Banked Leave Liability
Assigned to Fund 100/017
114,450
Assigned to Faculty Travel & Conference
257,999
Unassigned Fund Balance
Reserve at 5%
4,611,719
Contingency Reserve
1,256,000
Unspent Growth Funding
1,906,000
Undesignated Fund Balance
1,806,967
Projected Shortfall (Budget Reduction Plan)
Total Fund Balance
$9,953,135
$
$
152,041
$
152,041
Tentative Budget
2013-14
$
152,041
5,683,749
134,562
285,580
5,683,749
134,562
285,580
5,683,749
285,580
4,419,806
129,262
10,805,000
4,419,806
94,199
10,769,937
4,544,045
(1,405,043)
9,260,372
$
$
(Tentative Budget 2013-2014, Section III, Exhibit 1, page 25)
Standard III: Resources 411
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
West Valley-Mission Community College District
Tentative Budget 2013-2014
Summary of Revenue Projections
Final Budget
2012-2013
Tentative Budget
2013-2014
Consolidated for All Locations
On-Going Revenue
State Computational Revenue
State Apportionment
5,423,072
Educational Protection Account (EPA)
Enrollment Fees
9,200,000
Property Taxes
65,155,247
Less Property Taxes Excess
Total Computational Reveue 79,778,319
Other State Apportionment Revenue
Part-Time Faculty Office Hours
100,000
Part-Time Faculty Parity
200,000
Lottery Estimated Funding
1,839,714
Mandated Cost Block Grant @ $28/FTES
450,744
Other Local Revenue
Non-Resident Tuition @$204/unit
Interest
Misc. Student Fees (web processing, NSF fee)
Land Corporation Stabilization Support (2 of 3)
Land Corporation Stabilization Support (additional one-time)
Land Corporation Lease Revenue Income
Total Other Revenue
25,819
1,609,800
8,615,000
69,700,000
79,950,619
100,000
200,000
1,988,880
450,744
2,308,260
200,000
135,000
1,500,000
380,384
7,114,102
1,908,216
235,000
135,000
1,500,000
1,500,000
427,643
8,445,483
86,892,421
88,396,102
Revenue with Offsetting Expenditures
ACE Re-assigned time reimbursement
52,000
Utilities Rebates - Solar Project
683,000
Transfer In -RAM Transition Fund 597 WVC (one-time)
150,000
Sub-Fund 017
583,638
Total Revenues with Offsetting Expenditures 1,468,638
Total Unrestricted General Fund Revenue 88,361,059
52,000
809,143
240,241
1,101,384
89,497,486
Designated for Contingency Reserve
Total On-Going Unrestricted General Fund Revenue
(Tentative Budget 2013-2014, Section III, Exhibit 3, page 29)
Standard III: Resources 412
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
31
Through realistic budgets and well-planned risk management, the district and
colleges have been able to weather California’s fiscal storms.
Standard III: Resources 413
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
The district’s cash balance is invested, as provided in the state education code,
through the Santa Clara County Office of Education Treasurer. In the event of
emergencies that cannot be handled with the current resources, the district
continues to benefit from help from the Land Corporation with one-time funds for
meeting cash flow.
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard. The district successfully weathered the stated
fiscal and budget uncertainties during 2011-12 and 2012-13 using the Land
Corporation revenue, as well as delivering the college’s 2012-13 budget reduction
plans to meet the fund balance.
Actionable Improvement Plans
None.
Evidence
3D.3.a.1
BP6200 and AP6305
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2013/eviden
ce/3d/bp_6200_ap_6305.pdf
Standard IIID.3.b
The institution practices effective oversight of finances, including management of
financial aid, grants, externally funded programs, contractual relationships,
auxiliary organizations, or foundations, and institutional investments and assets.
Descriptive Summary
To ensure oversight of finances including financial aid, grants, externally funded
programs, contractual relationships, foundations, and investments, the college and
the district have an annual, comprehensive, external audit prepared in concert with
generally accepted accounting principles. (3D.3.b.1)
The auditors give feedback on the financial statements and the adequacy of the
accounting procedures and internal controls. As required by state law, the district
retains an independent auditor who performs separate audits of bond funds
(Measure C) and investments annually. (3D.3.b.2) The audit report as of June 30,
2012 indicated unqualified opinions with no material weakness.
Standard III: Resources 414
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
In addition to the annual external audit, the district’s CPA firm is engaged as needed
to perform internal audits for key areas of fiscal operations. The Audit and Budget
Oversight Committee and Citizen’s Bond Oversight Committee, subcommittees of
the Board of Trustees, review audit reports, as well as their review process to
ensure that district financial resources are used ethically and in compliance with the
law. Committee reports are given on a regular basis at the Board of Trustees
meeting.
Oversight and management of fiscal resources begins at the district level under the
direction of the Vice Chancellor of Administrative Services in cooperation with the
Vice President of Administrative Services at the college. Effective oversight begins
with board policy. District Fiscal Services is responsible for interpreting board policy
by establishing and monitoring the internal control policies that protect the assets
of the district and the colleges. (3D.3.b.3) An independent certified public
accountant performs the annual audit of all financial records including the auxiliary
accounts. (3D.3.b.4) District- and College-level participatory governance entities
such as the District Council and College Council are informed of the financial status
on a regular basis. (3D.3.b.5) College level oversight is led by the Vice President of
Administrative Services and college Fiscal Services Office working jointly with
District Administrative and Fiscal Services.
Institutional investments are managed by the Vice Chancellor of Administrative
Services who is the Chief Financial Officer of the district, utilizing the Santa Clara
County investment pool and other investment options as appropriate so as to earn
additional revenue. Interests and overall investment updates are reviewed on a
regular basis by the Board of Trustees.
The Financial Aid (FA) Department works in conjunction with District Fiscal Services
to ensure that appropriate procedures are in place and are followed. The FA
department is part of the annual financial audit process where its compliance with
state and federal law and regulations, use of funds, and process are thoroughly
reviewed on an annual basis which serves as its systemic assessment process of the
proper use of fiscal resource. (3D.3.b.6)
District Administrative Services publishes three annual budget reports: Tentative,
Mid-year and Final. The reports contain timely and useful information on the
budget, financial reports by fund and FTES enrollment data, as well as grant and
categorical funds information. Each report is presented to the District Council and
the Board of Trustees and is available to the public via the district website.
(3D.3.b.7)
Standard III: Resources 415
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard. West Valley College and the district have multiple
levels of oversight to assure ethical and transparent fiscal management of all
finances, including financial aid, grants and externally funded programs and
auxiliary services. There is a mechanism established to monitor student loan
defaults and the revenue streams and assets. The college regularly assesses its
processes and uses the results of the assessment to revise and improve its
processes. Financial and resource needs are assessed year-round through the
participatory governance process starting with the Program Review, department
and division chairs, the president’s cabinet, and the college council. Audits are
conducted to ensure that ongoing assessment of the fiscal and financial resource
for the college and the district are efficiently managed and in compliance.
Actionable Improvement Plans
None.
Evidence
3D.3.b.1
Audit Reports
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/fiduci
ary_documents.html
3D.3.b.2
Citizen Bond Oversight
Committee Report
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2013/
evidence/3d/cboc_report_2012-13.pdf
3D.3.b.3
District Fiscal Services
http://wvm.edu/group.aspx?id=2222&linkidentifier=id&itemi
d=2222
3D.3.b.4
Audit and Budget Oversight
Committee Documents
http://wvm.edu/documents.aspx?fid=26758&doc=26759&ye
ar=2013
3D.3.b.5
Citizen’s Bond Oversight
Committee Agendas, Minutes
and Annual Report
http://wvm.edu/documents.aspx?fid=26344&doc=26346&ye
ar=2013&category=39548&excludeyear=0
3D.3.b.6
Audit Reports
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2013/
evidence/1a/fy13_14_budget_process.pdf
3D.3.b.7
Annual Budget Reports
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2013/
evidence/3d/District_Budgets/
Standard IIID.3.c
The institution plans for and allocates appropriate resources for the payment of
liabilities and future obligations, including Other Post-Employment Benefits
(OPEB), compensated absences, and other employee obligations.
Standard III: Resources 416
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Descriptive Summary
Historically the district has met long-term obligation requirements and, per Board
of Trustee Policy 6200 and Administrative Procedure 6305, maintains a reserve of
five-percent of budgeted expenditures plus a contingency reserve not to exceed
three-percent of budgeted expenditures for unanticipated changes that would
significantly reduce operations or services. In addition, BP 6200 requires budget
projections to address long term goals and commitments. (3D.3.c.1)
Annually, the district’s Vice Chancellor for Administrative Services reviews for the
Board of Trustees the district’s long-term liabilities. For the board meeting of May
30, 2013 (3D.3.c.2), the Vice Chancellor’s review of long-term liabilities includes the
following:
Faculty Bank Leave
Per ACE Bargaining Agreement, Article 38: “Banked load leave is leave which is
earned and results from an accumulation of overload, summer and/or wintersession assignments which the member has chosen to ‘bank’ rather than receive
payment.” As of Fiscal Year 2012-3013, total Banked Leave liability is $10.1 million,
of which short-term of $0.5 million and long-term liability of $5.6 million are
funded, approximately 60% of the total liability.
Vacations
Managers, Confidential, and Teamsters unit employment agreements include
provision for annual vacation, accumulated as hours per employee. The following
Standard III: Resources 417
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
table shows the vacation carryover per employee unit, currently totaling
approximately $3.0 million, of which 6% is funded as current vacation pay-out,
leaving approximately 94% unfunded and treated as an annual expense to the
district as vacation occurs.
Lease Revenue Bonds
In 2009, $55 million of Lease Revenue Bonds were issued to fund state capital
outlay projects and $1.12 million for the Campus Center at West Valley College.
The bond debt is repaid from two sources: The larger bond amount is paid from the
Standard III: Resources 418
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
general fund and from federal subsidy under the Build America Bond program.
Campus Center debt is repaid from Student Center Fees.
In 2011, a $9.905 million Lease Revenue Bond was issued to fund solar projects on
both district campuses. The resulting debt is being repaid from federal subsidy
under the Clean Renewable Energy Bond, utility savings from the use of solar
energy, and from local energy rebates.
Standard III: Resources 419
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
OPEB
As of June 30, 2012, there are 519 retirees currently covered by OPEB, and 117
eligible active employees eligible for OPEB provisions. (3D.3.c.3) Employees hired
after January 1, 1994 are not eligible for post-retirement medical benefits. The
actuarial accrued liability was reduced from $124,279,282 in 2006 to $88,514,298 in
2011. An updated actuarial study of retiree health liabilities is due to be completed
during 2013. From the West Valley-Mission Community College District Annual
Financial Report, June 30, 2012, the following statement explicitly describes OPEB
liability as of the time of the district’s audit:
The District’s annual other postemployment benefit (OPEB) cost
(expense) is calculated based on the annual required contribution of
the employer (ARC), an amount actuarially determined in accordance
with the parameters of GASB Statement No. 45. The ARC represents
a level of funding that, if paid on an ongoing basis, is projected to
cover normal cost each year and amortize any unfunded actuarial
accrued liabilities (UAAL) (or funding excess) over a period not to
exceed thirty years.
The following table shows the components of the District’s annual
OPEB cost for the year, the amount actually contributed to the Plan
and changes in the District’s net OPEB obligation to the Plan:
Standard III: Resources 420
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Annual OPEB Costs as of June 30, 2012
Annual required contribution
Contributions made
Change in net OPEB liability
Net OPEB liability, beginning of year
Net OPEB assets, end of year
(6,570,773)
22,416,516
15,845,743
17,823,320
33,669,063
CalPERS and CalSTRS
Both state-funded retirement programs were changed as a result of recent
elections, thus creating two-tiered retirement systems. One result of the elections
as well as the current market conditions is a near-certain increase in employer
contributions to both of these plans. Currently, these contributions are:
•
•
CalPERS Contribution for FY 12/13
Employee: 7.0% (9.0% for Public Safety Officers)
Employer: 11.42% (36.03% for Public Safety Officers)
CalSTRS Contribution for FY 12/13
Employee: 8.0%
Employer: 8.25%
Standard III: Resources 421
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Projected contribution rate changes are as of this writing unknown, but the
district’s best estimates are shown on the following charts:
Standard III: Resources 422
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Fund analysis by the college includes review of current, past, and projected fund
balances by administrative areas and shared governance structures. Expenditure
patterns, FTES, salary and benefit compensation, audit findings, internal controls,
and other factors are considered as well in planning for and assuring financial
stability. Enrollment management has been developed and is a key part of
maximizing revenue through strategies to boost enrollment. Identification and
planning for payment of liabilities and future obligations has also been
accomplished through annual allocations by Land Corporation to fund special
projects, such as small capital improvements. (3D.3.c.4) Bond funds have been
secured for various future authorized construction projects.
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard.
Actionable Improvement Plans
None.
Evidence
3D.3.c.1
Board Policy 6200,
Administrative Policy 6305
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2
013/evidence/3d/bp_6200_ap_6305.pdf
Standard III: Resources 423
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
3D.3.c.2
Board of Trustees Meeting –
May 30, 2013 Minutes
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2
013/evidence/3d/bot_minutes_06_04_13.pdf
3D.3.c.3
OPEB Reports
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2
013/evidence/3d/OPEB_Report_from_FY_1112_Final_Audit.pdf
3D.3.c.4
Land Corporation Allocation
Funding Policy
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2
013/evidence/3d/land_corp_allocation_policy.pdf
Standard IIID.3.d
The actuarial plan to determine Other Post-Employment Benefits (OPEB) is
prepared, as required by appropriate accounting methods.
Descriptive Summary
The District’s annual other postemployment benefit (OPEB) cost (expense) is
calculated based on the annual required contribution of the employer (ARC), an
amount actuarially determined in accordance with the parameters of GASB
Statement No. 45. The ARC represents a level of funding that, if paid on an ongoing
basis, is projected to cover normal cost each year and amortize any unfunded
actuarial accrued liabilities (UAAL) (or funding excess) over a period not to exceed
thirty years. (3D.3.d.1)
The following table shows the components of the District’s annual OPEB cost for the
year, the amount actually contributed to the Plan and changes in the District’s net
OPEB obligation to the Plan: (3D.3.d.2)
Annual OPEB Costs as of June 30, 2012
Annual required contribution
Contributions made
Change in net OPEB liability
Net OPEB liability, beginning of year
Net OPEB assets, end of year
(6,570,773)
22,416,516
15,845,743
17,823,320
33,669,063
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard.
Actionable Improvement Plans
None.
Standard III: Resources 424
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Evidence
3D.3.d.1
OPEB Actuarial Plan
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/documents/
actuarial_report2013.pdf
3D.3.d.2
OPEB Report
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2013/evide
nce/3d/OPEB_Report_from_FY_11-12_Final_Audit.pdf
Standard IIID.3.e
On an annual basis the institution assesses and allocates resources for the
repayment of any locally incurred debt instruments that can affect the financial
condition of the institution.
Descriptive Summary
Per the District’s Annual Audited Financial Report, long-term obligations are
serviced annually, depending on the specific obligation:
Payments on the 2006 general obligation bonds are made by the Measure H Debt
Services - Bond Interest and Redemption Fund with local revenues. Payments on
the 2009A revenue bonds are made by the Student Representation Fee Funds.
Payments on the 2009A-1 revenue bonds are made by the general fund. Capital
leases payments are made by the General Fund. The compensated absences and
other post-employment benefits will be paid by the fund for which the employee
worked.
General obligation bonds were approved by a local election in November 2004. The
total amount approved by the voters was $235,000,000. At June 30, 2012,
$235,000,000 had been issued and $213,233,623 was outstanding. Interest rates on
the bonds range from 1.83 percent - 5.00 percent.
Revenue bonds were issued in November 2009 for $55,000,000 to provide funding
for retiree benefits, $1,120,000 for the West Valley Student Center, and in October
2011 for $9,905,000 for solar projects. Interest rates on the bonds range from 2.00
percent to 8.253 percent and will be partially offset by federal subsidies under the
Build America Bond program.
Standard III: Resources 425
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard. Through the district’s Annual Financial Report and
acknowledged in the district’s annual budget the district assesses and allocates
funds for repayment of all debt. (3D.3.e.1)
Actionable Improvement Plans
None.
Evidence
3D.3.e.1
Audit – Annual Financial Report 2012
page 48 “Description of Debt”.
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accr
editation/2013/evidence/3d/audit_report_fy_
11-12.pdf
Standard IIID.3.f
Institutions monitor and manage student loan default rates, revenue streams, and
assets to endure compliance with federal requirements.
Descriptive Summary
Per the Cohort Default Rate History List report accessed from the National Student
Loan Data System (NSLDS), the 2010 three-year official default rate is 30%.
(3D.3.f.1) The college has entered into a California Community College Chancellor’s
Office sponsored agreement to provide default prevention services to colleges and
districts, including analysis, evaluation, and recommendations of default prevention
Standard III: Resources 426
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
options to reduce defaults by borrowers who obtained higher education loans for
enrollment at the college. (3D.3.f.2)
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard.
Actionable Improvement Plans
None
Evidence
3D.3.f.1
NSLDS report
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accredit
ation/2013/evidence/3d/NSLDS_report.pdf
3D.3.f.2
CCCCO Default Prevention
Agreement
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accredit
ation/2013/evidence/3d/CCCCO_Default_Prevent
ion_Agreement.pdf
Standard IIID.3.g
Contractual agreements with external entities are consistent with the mission and
goals of the institution, governed by institutional policies, and contain appropriate
provisions to maintain the integrity of the institution.
Descriptive Summary
Board of Trustees’ Policies 6330: Purchasing and 6340: Contracts, combined with
Administrative Procedures 6330 through 6370, govern the authority and process of
entering into contractual agreements with external entities. These policies are
founded upon Education Code Sections 81641 et seq,; and Public Contract Code
Sections 20650 et seq. Following the board’s rules (3D.3.g.1, 3D.3.g.2, 3D.3.g.3):



The Board delegates to the Chancellor the authority to enter into
contracts on behalf of the District and to establish administrative
procedures for contract awards and management, subject to the
following:
Contracts are not enforceable obligations until they are ratified by the
Board, except as required by law or Board policy.
Contracts for work to be done, services to be performed, or for goods,
equipment, or supplies to be furnished or sold to the District that exceed
the amounts specified in Public Contract Code Section 20651 shall
require prior approval by the Board.
Standard III: Resources 427
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014

When bids are required according to Public Contract Code Section
20651, the Board shall award each such contract to the lowest
responsible bidder who meets the specifications published by the
District and who shall give such security as the Board requires, or rejects
all bids.
California Education Code, Section 81644, explicitly constrains contract terms not to
exceed five years. Thus, all continuing contracts are periodically reviewed for
compliance. Per Administrative Policy 6340, “Continuing contracts for work or
services furnished to the district are not to exceed five years. Contracts for
materials and supplies are not to exceed three years.” All changes to or
termination of contracts must be board approved.
These policies are managed by the district’s Office of Administrative Services under
supervision by the Director of General Services and the Purchasing Department. All
requests for proposals (RFP) and contracts of all types are first reviewed for form
and an evaluation of risk by General Services before being released for bid or signed
by district representatives. The General Services office is designated as the official
repository of bid documents and contracts.
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard. A review of processes and documentation indicate
that guidelines and controls are in effect to assure the integrity of the contractual
agreements. A significant number of major contractual agreements have been
associated with the construction activity related to Measure H and C projects. These
contractual agreements have direct relationship to the goals of the Educational and
Facilities Master Plan that reflects the college’s mission and goals. Each of these
contracts has undergoes review by the Citizens Bond Oversight Committee and is
approved by the Board of Trustees.
Actionable Improvement Plans
None.
Evidence
3D.3.g.1
BP 6330: Purchasing
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditati
on/2013/evidence/3d/3D3g1_BP_6330.pdf
3D.3.g2
BP 6340: Contracts
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditati
on/2013/evidence/3d/3D3g2_BP_6340.pdf
3D.3.g.3
Administrative Procedures 6330
through 6370
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditati
on/2013/evidence/3d/3D3g3_AP_6330-6370.pdf
Standard III: Resources 428
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Standard IIID.3.h
The institution regularly evaluates its financial management practices, and the
results of the evaluation are used to improve internal control systems.
Descriptive Summary
Board of Trustees’ Policies BP6200, BP6250, and BP6300, plus their related
Administrative Policies (AP6200, AP6250, and AP6300), and relevant sections of
both Title 5 and California Education Code, govern the rules and procedures used
for budget and fiscal management of the district and thus the two colleges.
(3D.3.h.1)
Evaluating the college’s financial management is an ongoing process, The Audit and
Budget Oversight Committee (ABOC) of the district’s Board of Trustees establishes
an expectation of continuous improvement as they regularly evaluate financial
management processes. (3d.3.h.2, 3) ABOC reports their discussions and actions to
the Board of Trustees at large, including ABOC’s analysis of both Tentative and Final
Budgets, regular reporting to the state, annual audit results, and audit findings.
(3D.3.h.4)
Working together with the district Fiscal Services Office, the Office of Administrative
Services at the college is responsible for providing financial and accounting services
to the college and district. The college’s Vice President of Administrative Services
routinely attends ABOC sessions and reports on questions related to the college’s
budget and fiscal issues. The Vice President also routinely meets with the district’s
Vice Chancellor of Administrative Services, district financial staff, and Mission
College Vice President of Administrative Services, at the Vice Chancellor’s Chief
Business Officer (CBO) meetings, at which budget, fiscal, and administrative
questions are discussed. As a part of these discussions, ways to improve the
financial system, managerial controls, and efficiency are discussed.
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard.
Actionable Improvement Plans
None.
Standard III: Resources 429
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Evidence
3D.3.h.1
Board Policy and Administrative Procedure
6200, 6250, 6300
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Ac
creditation/2013/evidence/3d/3D2h1_BP_
6200.pdf
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Ac
creditation/2013/evidence/3d/3D2h1_BP_
6250.pdf
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Ac
creditation/2013/evidence/3d/3D2h1_BP_
6300.pdf
3D.3.h.2
Audit and Budget Oversight Committee
http://wvm.edu/group.aspx?id=3178
3D.3.h.3
Audit And Budget Committee Agendas and
Minutes
http://wvm.edu/documents.aspx?fid=2675
8&doc=26759&year=2013
3D.3.h.4
Board Meeting Minutes – ABOC Reports
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Ac
creditation/2013/evidence/3d/aboc_budge
t_audit_reports.pdf
Standard IIID.4
Financial planning is integrated with institutional planning. The institution
systematically assesses the effective use of financial resources and uses the results
of the evaluation as the basis for improvement of the institution.
Descriptive Summary
In a report requested of the Fiscal Crisis Management Assistance Team (FCMAT) in
November 2006, a recommendation was made that the college eliminate the
practice of simply rolling over department and college budgets. (3D.4.1) As a result,
the college has adopted a new convention to address program and budgetary
needs. Each discipline/department documents unmet resource needs through
Program Review. (3D.4.2) The method provides an opportunity for the shifting of
resources from one programmatic area to another to meet changing conditions and
directions and provides an increased knowledge about the budget structure and
process. It also adds transparency to budgets, promoting cooperative sharing and
use of resources. (3D.4.3)
Financial planning is closely integrated with planning for full-time faculty
equivalents, facilities, and technology. The college’s Office of Administrative
Services and the district’s Fiscal Services Office provide the college community with
consistent, reliable revenue projections upon which the budgets are based.
Standard III: Resources 430
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
The district employs the Resource Allocation Model (RAM) mechanism to distribute
funds between the colleges as has been elsewhere in Standard 3D. Working from
district and college goals, planning is conducted from each department/cost center,
through Division Chair Council and Performance Goals Committee, to College
Council, through the president’s cabinet, to District Council for approval and
incorporation into the district’s budget.
The district uses the Colleague enterprise reporting system (formerly Colleague).
This system allows all personnel to have authorized access to the budget. The
college updates its financial plan, submitting adjustments to fiscal services for
budget and expense transfers as needed throughout the year. The entries in the
budget are recorded and maintained in accordance with district policy, the state
education code, generally-accepted accounting standards, and federal, state, and
local funding agency regulations.
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard.
Actionable Improvement Plans
None.
Evidence
3D.4.1
FCMAT Report
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accredit
ation/2013/evidence/3d/fcmat_final_report_11_
22_06.pdf
3D.4.2
Program Review – resource and
budget allocation
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accredit
ation/2013/evidence/3d/program_review_resour
ce_request.pdf
3D.4.3
Budget Planning Memo
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accredit
ation/2013/evidence/3d/20132014_budget_process_memo.pdf
Standard III: Resources 431
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Standard IV: Leadership and Governance
The institution recognizes and utilizes the contributions of leadership throughout
the organization for continuous improvement of the institution. Governance roles
are designed to facilitate decisions that support student learning programs and
services and improve institutional effectiveness, while acknowledging the
designated responsibilities of the governing board and the chief administrator.
Standard IVA: Decision-Making Roles and Processes
The institution recognizes that ethical and effective leadership throughout the
organization enables the institution to identify institutional values, set and
achieve goals, learn, and improve.
Standard IVA.1
Institutional leaders create an environment for empowerment, innovation, and
institutional excellence. They encourage staff, faculty, administrators, and
students, no matter what their official titles, to take initiative in improving the
practices, programs, and services in which they are involved. When ideas for
improvement have policy or significant institution-wide implications, systematic
participative processes are used to assure effective discussion, planning and
implementation.
Descriptive Summary
West Valley College is firmly committed to an inclusive leadership structure that
brings together a number of institutional leaders who work closely together to
create an effective environment in which to foster a commitment to student
learning and success and is reflected in the college’s mission statement updated in
fall 2011:
The West Valley College community supports students along their pathways to
reach transfer and career goals in an environment of academic excellence.
The update to the mission statement included the addition of the college’s
Institutional Learning Outcomes/Institutional Core Competencies:
 Critical Thinking and Information Literacy
 Quantitative and Qualitative Reasoning
 Effective Communication
Standard IV: Leadership and Governance 432
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014





Technological competency
Personal Responsibility
Social Responsibility
Global Awareness and Diversity
Creative Problem Solving
The mission statement of West Valley College is prominently highlighted in campus
literature, the website, catalog, printed schedules and other publications. A
proactive campaign was unveiled in fall 2013 to promote awareness of the revised
mission statement by distributing bookmarks that featured the mission statement
throughout the college community. The college’s website proudly showcases the
mission statement and annual goals and objectives, which are used as the basis for
planning and evaluation at the division, program, and department levels.
Mandatory All College Day (Flex days) are used for disseminating information and
refining institutional focus for the upcoming year and semester, assuring that all
college faculty, staff, and administrators will have the opportunity to participate.
The college ensures effective leadership based on a participatory governance
structure that provides for systematic discussion, planning, and implementation of
college initiatives by all constituencies at the college and results in decisions driven
by the mission statement and annual goals and objectives. Annual goals and
objectives are carefully assessed every fall semester while a new goal is established
for the subsequent year for the purpose of achieving excellence in all areas of
operation that pertain to teaching and learning, student services programs,
business operations, community outreach, and participatory governance entities
within the college.
Standard IV: Leadership and Governance 433
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
This process is defined by a system of institutional councils that work together to
ensure systematic participation across the entire college in discussion, planning,
and implementation of initiatives. These councils include the Student Services
Council, the Division Chair Council, the Academic Senate, the Classified Senate, the
Associated Student Organization, and the Executive Staff Council/President’s
Cabinet. Each council also provides representatives to College Council, which
serves as the college’s highest participatory governance body and an advisory to the
President. College Council, which is chaired by the college president, meets twice
monthly during the academic year and during the summer break, as needed. Within
this established framework of participatory governance, the college practices
effective communication that is open and transparent with public agendas, open
Standard IV: Leadership and Governance 434
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
meetings, public minutes, and membership by representatives of faculty,
administration, classified staff, and students.
The President is very committed to the participatory governance process and has
made himself accessible to the faculty, staff, and students through office
appointments, frequent visits to shared governance committee meetings, and
regular meetings with operational units at the college. The President has scheduled
town hall meetings on topics that are critically important to the college community
such as the fiscal reduction plan and organizational restructuring process, providing
opportunities for the college community to voice their opinions, ideas,
recommendations, and thoughts relative to the topics. (4A.1.1) The President
regularly communicates with the Chancellor and Governing Board, and meets
weekly with his cabinet and the executive management team at the district.
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard. However, funding reductions have resulted in
position and program reduction, and restructuring of college operations.
Decreased funding challenges institutional leaders to create an environment of
empowerment and innovation. The college has worked diligently to be creative and
resourceful with this process.
The 2012 Employee Accreditation Survey found that the majority of employees
(76%) strongly agreed or agreed that WVC demonstrates a commitment to
institutional excellence by encouraging individuals from all college constituent
groups to engage in improving the practices, programs, and services in which they
are involved. (4A.1.2)
Progress on the action plan from the 2007 Accreditation Report, to develop a
regular and ongoing training program for new campus leaders, department heads,
and division chairs, has been substantial and is ongoing. Professional development
continues to support empowerment, innovation and institutional excellence.
Professional Development programs include New Employee Orientation (District),
New Faculty Orientation (College), and new division and department chairs
orientation and training will commence in fall 2013 for spring 2014 semester under
the leadership of the new Vice President of Instruction.
New faculty members participate in a new faculty orientation program that takes
place over the course of the faculty member's first academic year. The purpose of
this orientation program is to help facilitate a new faculty member's transition into
full-time teaching at the college. Topics covered in this orientation include a general
Standard IV: Leadership and Governance 435
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
overview of the college, participatory governance processes at the college, the role
of the faculty union, the role of the Academic Senate, classroom management
techniques, and the use of technology in the classroom. (4A.1.3)
West Valley College has also provided regular training for department chairs and
division chairs every semester since 2007. The trainings typically last 4-6 hours and
have been well attended. (4A.1.4) The Office of Instruction develops different topics
for each training session depending upon input and requests for information from
division chairs. These trainings are ongoing. Examples of training topics include
budgetary planning, student learning outcomes, the curriculum change process,
program review, and enrollment management.
Beginning in June 2013, the Classified Senate has provided online training to staff
through Lynda.com. (4A.1.5) Lynda offers more than 2000 courses including many
that are applicable to leadership skills. This service is paid for by the Senate using
fundraising monies. Since instituting the program, all seats have been filled each
time a new session begins demonstrating the need of classified employee training
that is flexible with work assignments.
Actionable Improvement Plans

Continue to fine-tune new faculty orientation and department chairs
training.
Evidence
4A.1.1
Town Hall Meeting Announcements
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accredita
tion/2013/evidence/1b/FAIT/FAIT_Town_Hall_Mee
ting_Announcement_10-24-13.pdf
4A.1.2
Employee Survey -Accreditation
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accredita
tion/2013/evidence/4a/accreditation_survey_empl
oyee_final_7312.pdf
4A.1.3
Faculty Handbook
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accredita
tion/2013/evidence/3a/faculty_handbook_complet
e_2010-2011.pdf
4A.1.4
Division Chair Training
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accredita
tion/2013/evidence/3a/Division_Chair_Retreats/
4A.1.5
Lynda.com Training
http://www.lynda.com/
Standard IV: Leadership and Governance 436
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Standard IVA.2
The institution establishes and implements a written policy providing for faculty,
staff, administrator, and student participation in decision-making processes. The
policy specifies the manner in which individuals bring forward ideas from their
constituencies and work together on appropriate policy, planning, and specialpurpose bodies.
Descriptive Summary
The decision-making structure at West Valley College relies on the participatory
governance process and the strong participation of faculty, staff, administrators and
students. All governance groups are supported and encouraged to contribute in the
process of problem solving, developing policies and creating solutions to improve
student learning, success and to enhance campus life at WVC by making concrete
recommendations to the administration and the Board of Trustees.
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard. Title 5 and Board Policy 2510 provides for student,
faculty, and staff participation in participatory governance. (4A.2.1) In addition,
each participatory governance body has bylaws specifying how individuals bring
forward ideas and recommendations as outlined in the WVC Shared Decision
Making Plan. (4A.2.2)
Actionable Improvement
None.
Evidence
4A.2.1
Board Policy 2510 – Local Decision
Making
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accredita
tion/2013/evidence/4a/bp_ap_2510.pdf
4A.2.2
WVC Shared Decision Making Plan
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accredita
tion/2013/evidence/4a/wvc_shared_governance_p
lan_2011.pdf
Standard IV: Leadership and Governance 437
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Standard IVA.2.a
Faculty and administration have a substantive and clearly defined role in
institutional governance and exercise a substantial voice in institutional policies,
planning, and budget that relate to their areas of responsibility and expertise.
Students and staff also have established mechanisms or organizations for
providing input into institutional decisions.
Descriptive Summary
The college is dedicated to meaningful institutional governance roles for faculty,
staff and students. The processes are described on the West Valley College
participatory governance webpage detailing these roles.
Participatory governance roles are outlined in District Board Policy 2510. (4A.2.a.1)



Classified (Classified Senate)
Faculty (Academic Senate)
Students (Associated Student Organization)
Administrative Roles and Responsibilities are addressed in the WVMCCD
Administrative Handbook. (4A.2.a.2)
West Valley College’s Shared Decision Making Plan illustrates the constituency
groups that participate in participatory governance. (4A.2.a.3)
The College Council is comprised of representatives from each of the college
constituent groups. (4A.2.a.4) College Council advises the presidents, senates, WVC
Associate Student Organization (WVCASO) and other college groups with
responsibility for policy development matters pertaining to planning, budgeting,
and accountability. The College Council also makes recommendations to the
president on the proposals from the Budget and Resource Advisory Council (BRAC).
(4A.2.a.5)
The Academic Senate is the primary conduit for faculty participation in the
formation of college and district policies on academic and professional matters.
(4A.2.a.6) It is the responsibility of the Academic Senate to make recommendations
to the appropriate college and district administrators and management teams, the
board of trustees, and state educational agencies on local and statewide
community college educational issues such as
1. Curriculum, degree and certificate requirements
2. Grading policies
Standard IV: Leadership and Governance 438
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
3. Educational program development
4. Standards regarding student participation and success
5. Governance structures of the college
6. Accreditation
7. Faculty professional development activities
8. Policies for Program Review
9. Processes for institutional planning and budget development
10. Other academic and professional matters mutually agreed upon
between the Board and the Academic Senate
West Valley College’s Classified Senate is organized to represent the viewpoints of
the classified professionals and to participate in the college and district governance
structure. The Classified Senate Constitution (4A.2.a.7) further defines the role of
the senate as one that promotes the interests of classified professionals in the
development and formulation of policy and practice related but not limited to the
following:





Selection, evaluation and retention of administrators
In-service education and training
Facilities and services
Student/classified and faculty/classified relations
Finance and budget
Classified employees also have representation through the WVMCEA Collective
Bargaining Contract. (4A.2.a.8) In accordance with Article 7.11, WVMCEA may
appoint a member to the following standing committees:



District Committees
o Faculty and Staff Diversity Advisory Committee
o District Council
o District Budget Advisory Committee
West Valley College Committees
o College Council
Mission College Committees
o Mission College Budget Advisory Committee
In addition, there are a number of advisory committees to further expand
participation, which include:

Division Chair Council
Standard IV: Leadership and Governance 439
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014







Curriculum Committee
Facilities and Safety Advisory Council
Technology Advisory Committee
Accreditation Steering Committee
Professional Development
Student Services Council
Executive Staff Council/President’s Cabinet
West Valley College’s Associated Student Organization (WVCASO) represents
students’ interests on college and district policy development committees. The
WVCASO Senate is comprised of five Executive Officers, four Directors and up to ten
senators, all of whom are elected or appointed annually according to the WVCASO
Election Code. (4A.2.a.9)
The Associated Student Organization (ASO) is the governing body responsible for
representing the students of the college. Its members, both elected and appointed,
have many opportunities as student leaders to shape the campus community.
(4A.2.a.10)
The organization does this by representing its interests on participatory governance
committees, allocating its budget to advance the interests of the WVCASO,
undertaking projects and actions in advocacy of those stances, and holding events
deemed to serve the best interest of the WVCASO. The WVCASO is represented on
the following participatory governance committees: Board of Trustees, District
Council, College Council, Academic Senate, Classified Senate, Student Services
Council, Division Chair Council, Facility and Safety Committee, Matriculation
Committee, Student Equity and Success Committee, Student Learning Outcomes &
Assessment Committee, and Global Citizenship Committee.
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard. The employee survey conducted in spring 2012
indicates that 75% of the WVC community agree that the college’s participatory
governance structure is working well, and ensures participation and shared decision
making on college governance matters. (4A.2.a.11)
Actionable Improvement Plans
None.
Standard IV: Leadership and Governance 440
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Evidence
4A.2.a.1
Board Policy 2510
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2
013/evidence/4a/bp_ap_2510.pdf
4A.2.a.2
WVMCCD Administrative
Handbook
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2
013/evidence/4a/wvc_shared_governance_plan_2011.pd
f
4A.2.a.3
WVC Shared Decision Making
Plan
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2
013/evidence/3a/admin_section_3.pdf
4A.2.a.4
College Council Membership
http://westvalley.edu/committees/College_Council/mem
bers.html
4A.2.a.5
Budget and Resource Advisory
Council
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2
013/evidence/recommendations/brac_12_17_13.pdf
4A.2.a.6
Academic Senate Constitution,
Article II
http://www.westvalley.edu/wvcas/documents/Senate_D
ocuments/wvc_academic_senate_constitution_and_byla
ws_amended_2009_approved.pdf
4A.2.a.7
WVC Classified Senate
Constitution
http://www.westvalley.edu/wvccs/documents/Senate_D
ocuments/wvccs_constitution_ratified_june_2010.pdf
4A.2.a.8
WVMCEA Bargaining Contract Article 7.11
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2
013/evidence/4a/wvmcea_contract_2012_15_final_web
_article7.11.pdf
4A.2.a.9
WVCASO Election Packet
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2
013/evidence/4a/aso_election_packet_2012.pdf
4A.2.a.10
ASO Webpage
http://westvalley.edu/studentactivities/aso.html
4A.2.a.11
WVC Employee Survey 2012
http://westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/docum
ents/surveys/accreditation_survey_employee_07_12.pdf
Standard IVA.2.b
The institution relies on faculty, its academic senate or other appropriate faculty
structures, the curriculum committee, and academic administrators for
recommendations about student learning programs and services.
Descriptive Summary
WVMCCD Board Policy 4020 states that the district shall accord the Academic
Senate rights in the areas of course, program, and curriculum development as
outlined under the Academic and Professional matters in BP 2510. (4A.2.b.1) The
Academic Senate also approves new course and programs and approves minor
course changes, edits, and program deletions. The Academic Senate’s primarily
responsibility lies in academic and professional matters involving student learning
Standard IV: Leadership and Governance 441
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
programs and services. There are several additional Board Policies and
Administrative Procedures outlining the role of the faculty and the Academic Senate
in institutional planning (e.g. the Educational Master Plan) and student learning
programs and services included below:









BP AP 3250 Institutional Planning
BP AP 4020 Program, Curriculum, and Course Development
AP 4021 Program Discontinuance
AP 4022 Program, Curriculum, And Course Approval
BP 4025 Philosophy and Criteria for Associate Degree and General
Education
BP AP 4100 Graduation Requirements for Degrees and Certificates
BP AP 4220 Standards of Scholarship
BP AP 4235 Credit by Examination
BP AP 4260 Prerequisites and Co-Requisites
Moreover, faculty and administrative roles in decision making for student learning
programs and services are delineated in the WVMCCD Faculty Handbook (4A.2.b.2),
and WVMCCD Administrative Handbook. (4A.2.b.3)
The Academic Senate provides oversight of the Curriculum Committee, the Program
Review Committee, the Professional Development Committee, the Distance
Education Committee, and the Student Learning Outcomes and Assessment
Committee. (4A.2.b.4)
The Academic Senate makes recommendations in
institutional policy pertaining to academic issues related to pedagogy, student
services, and student success. The Academic Senate appoints the faculty chair of
the Curriculum Committee, and coordinators for the Program Review, and Student
Learning Outcome/Assessment Committees.
The mission of the Curriculum Committee directly supports and reflects the mission
of West Valley College and strives to ensure that curriculum is academically sound,
comprehensive, and responsive to the evolving needs and multiple perspectives of
the community. (4A.2.b.5) The Curriculum Committee is a standing committee of
the Academic Senate and has primary oversight for the course development and
approval process which has ensured that the institution relies on its faculty, its
Academic Senate, and the Curriculum Committee for recommendations concerning
student learning and services. The committee is chaired by a faculty member and is
largely composed of faculty representatives from each division. (4A.2.b.6) The Vice
Standard IV: Leadership and Governance 442
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
President of Instruction and Dean of Instruction are ex-officio members of the
Curriculum Committee.
The Student Learning Outcome and Assessment process plays a vital role, as part of
the college’s Integrated Planning and Resource Allocation and Resources Allocation
framework, in informing program reviews of ongoing findings relative to
instructional, pedagogical, and student success. (4A.2.b.7) The valuable insights and
conclusions arrived at via faculty assessments of student learning lead to
improvements in class and program offerings that affect curricular decisions for
modifying courses, degrees, and certificates in response to changing student needs
and improving student success. The Program Review Process provides an
opportunity for assessment of academic and administrative programs. (4A.2.b.8)
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard. West Valley College relies on its faculty through
the Academic Senate for recommendations about student learning programs and
services as evidenced in the work of the Student Learning Outcomes and
Assessment (SLO/A) Committee and the Curriculum Committee. Board Policy 2510
is in alignment with the Title 5 and the Academic Senate develops policies and
procedures related to student learning programs and services.
The Academic Senate continues to work with the Curriculum committee on the fastchanging state and legislative mandates such as Associate Degree for Transfer (ADT)
development including Course Identification Number System (C-ID) and Articulation
approval processes, institutional Curriculum record accountability projects,
implementation of new CTE course and program approval standards to include
additional evidence and data on job availability, salary, and link to the programs
offered at the college. In addition, the Academic Senate adopted a new Program
Discontinuance Policy in spring 2013 to streamline and strengthen the process.
(4A.2.b.9)
The Academic Senate has established an Academic Directions Committee (ADC) in
fall 2012 to advise and assist programs which are not meeting performance goals
and expectations. (4A.2.b.10) This faculty-led committee meets regularly to
collaborate with academic programs that are struggling to achieve success and
effectiveness. The ADC is an advisory subcommittee of the Academic Senate.
Standard IV: Leadership and Governance 443
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Actionable Improvement Plans

Program discontinuance and/or consolidation of programs, services and
positions may come under review if state budget crisis worsens. The
Academic Directions Committee, under the purview of Academic Senate will
take a leadership role in facilitating the process.
Evidence
4A.2.b.1
Board Policy 2510
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditatio
n/2013/evidence/4a/bp_ap_2510.pdf
4A.2.b
BP AP 3250 Institutional Planning
http://wvm.edu/documents.aspx?fid=26324&doc=26
745&year=0&excludeyear=1
BP AP 4020 Program, Curriculum,
and Course Development
AP 4021 Program Discontinuance
http://wvm.edu/documents.aspx?fid=26324&doc=26
746&year=0&excludeyear=1
AP 4022 Program, Curriculum, And
Course Approval
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditatio
n/2013/evidence/4a/bp_ap_3250.pdf
BP 4025 Philosophy And Criteria For
Associate Degree and General
Education
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditatio
n/2013/evidence/4a/bp_ap_4020.pdf
BP AP 4100 Graduation
Requirements for Degrees and
Certificates
BP AP 4220 Standards of Scholarship
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditatio
n/2013/evidence/4a/ap_4021.pdf
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditatio
n/2013/evidence/4a/ap_4022.pdf
BP AP 4235 Credit by Examination
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditatio
n/2013/evidence/4a/bp_ap_4025.pdf
BP AP 4260 Prerequisites and CoRequisites
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditatio
n/2013/evidence/4a/bp_ap_4100.pdf
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditatio
n/2013/evidence/4a/bp_ap_4220.pdf
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditatio
n/2013/evidence/4a/bp_ap_4235.pdf
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditatio
n/2013/evidence/4a/bp_ap_4260.pdf
4A.2.b.2
Faculty Handbook
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditatio
n/2013/evidence/4a/faculty_handbook_complete_20
10-2011.pdf
4A.2.b.3
Administrative Handbook
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditatio
n/2013/evidence/4a/admin_handbook.pdf
4A.2.b.4
Academic Senate Committees
http://westvalley.edu/wvcas/committees.html
4A.2.b.5
Curriculum Committee
http://westvalley.edu/committees/Curriculum/index.
Standard IV: Leadership and Governance 444
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
html
4A.2.b.6
Curriculum Committee Membership
http://www.curricunet.com/westvalley/
4A.2.b.7
Integrated Planning and Resource
Allocation Webpage
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditatio
n/integrated-planning.html
4A.2.b.8
Master Program Review and SLO/A
Assessment Schedule
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditatio
n/2013/evidence/recommendations/Master_Progra
m_Review_and_SLO_Assessment_Schedule_01-072014_External.pdf
4A.2.b.9
Program Discontinuance Policy
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditatio
n/2013/evidence/4a/program_discontinuance_policy
_04_2013.pdf
4A.2.b.10
Academic Direction Committee
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Academic_D
irections/
Standard IVA.3
Through established governance structures, processes, and practices, the
governing board, administrators, faculty, staff, and students work together for
the good of the institution. These processes facilitate discussion of ideas and
effective communication among the institution's constituencies.
Descriptive Summary
West Valley College has a collaborative decision-making model in which all
constituencies work together, share ideas and encourage input for the betterment
of the institution. The college continues to affirm its commitment to participatory
governance by assuring opportunities for all constituent groups to become involved
in governance through committee participation. (4A.3.1)
In accordance with Title 5 (53200, Article 2 Academic Senates, 51023.5, Staff, and
51023.7, Students), the West Valley Mission Community College District developed
and implemented Board Policy 2510, which includes the role of students in
governance, the role of the Academic Senate in academic and professional matters,
and the role of Classified Senate in governance. (4A.3.2)
Constituencies appoint representatives to college and district governance
committees. The Academic Senate selects faculty to serve on committees, as does
the Association of College Educators (ACE); the WVC Associate Student
Organization (WVCASO) appoints students to committees, the Classified Senate and
the Classified Employees Association (CEA) appoints classified professionals to serve
on committees, and administrators are appointed to committees by their respective
Standard IV: Leadership and Governance 445
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
supervisors. Each constituency has processes included in their bylaws and/or
constitution by which they appoint their representatives to committees.
West Valley College’s established governance structures include:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Associated Student Senate
Academic Senate
Classified Senate
Executive Staff Council/President’s Cabinet
Division Chair Council
Student Services Council
The membership, structure and role of each of these bodies are described in
individual council bylaws and/or manuals and in the West Valley College Shared
Decision-Making Plan, and are assisted through a number of standing and ad hoc
committees:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Curriculum Committee
Facilities and Safety Advisory Council
Student Equity, Access, and Success Committee
Sustainability Committee
Technology Advisory Committee
Each group works to meet the yearly goals and objectives of the college, and
ultimately the mission of the college. Discussion concerning assessment of goal
achievement allows for improvement in processes and practices.
Recommendations are sent to College Council (4A.3.3) for final approval and
forwarded to the President, Chancellor, and Board of Trustees as appropriate.
At the District level, the college participates in district-wide decision making and
develops policy recommendations primarily through the District Council (4A.3.4),
which is supported by a number of standing and ad hoc committees, such as the
Revenue Allocation Model task force, Chancellor’s Roundtable, and weekly Chief
Business Officers (CBO) and Executive Management Team meetings.
The West Valley College president also informs the college community about
college and district matters through reports to participatory governance entities,
campus-wide e-mail messages, town hall meetings, reports to the Board of
Trustees, and reports to College and District Councils. Moreover, the president
Standard IV: Leadership and Governance 446
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
provides college updates and priorities based on annual Goals and Objectives at All
College Day (ACD = Flex day) each semester. (4A.3.5)
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard. There is an established governance process that is
inclusive of all constituents, governance committees that are transparent in their
decision-making, and a campus culture that supports continuous quality
improvement. The college currently enjoys and appreciates the open and
transparent communication the current President provides, as well as his high level
of engagement and commitment to the participatory governance structure and
process.
The 2007 action plan to consider whether the current governance councils are
sufficient in number, assignment, and purview to effectively ensure that all
operational and programmatic need of the college are adequately represented in
the participatory governance process was reexamined in the 2011 Midterm Report.
(4A.3.6) It was determined that the governance councils of the college are well
established and continue to function effectively.
However, the college continues to improve its governance structure to effectively
ensure that all operational and programmatic needs of the college are adequately
represented in the participatory governance process.
1. The District Academic Senate has reconvened in 2012-2013, revising its
constitution and bylaws to define its structure, and is currently meeting
on a regular basis. (4A.3.7)
2. Revision of the Educational and Facilities Master Plan for West Valley
College was completed in July 2009 (4A.3.8), planned for further revision
in 2014-2015 year.
3. Budget Reduction Plan for 2012-13 (4A.3.9)
4. Budget Reduction Plan for 2014-2015 (4A.3.10)
Actionable Improvement Plans
None.
Evidence
4A.3.1
WVC Committees
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/
4A.3.2
Board Policy 2510
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/
2013/evidence/4a/bp_ap_2510.pdf
Standard IV: Leadership and Governance 447
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
4A.3.3
College Council Operational
Structure
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/
2013/evidence/4a/college_council_operations.pdf
4A.3.4
District Council Operating
Procedures
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/
2013/evidence/4a/district_council_operating_principles
.pdf
4A.3.5
All College Day Agendas
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/
2013/evidence/2a/ACCJC_Status_Report_SLO_Impleme
ntation/14_All_College_Day_Schedules/
4A.3.6
2011 Midterm Report
http://westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/docu
ments/wvc_midterm_report_03_2011.pdf
4A.3.7
District Academic Senate
Constitution and Bylaws
http://missioncollege.org/senate/documents/DAS_Cons
titution_Revised_and_Approved_Fall_2010.pdf
4A.3.8
2009 Educational And Facilities
Master Plan
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/
2013/evidence/3d/2009_wvc_educational_and_facilitie
s_master_plan.pdf
4A.3.9
2011/2012 Budget Reduction Plan
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/College_Counc
il/Documents/Committee_Documents/Survey_Results_
Budget_Reduction_2010-2011.pdf
4A.3.10
2013 FAIT Outcomes for 2014-15
Budget Reduction
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/
2013/evidence/1b/FAIT/FAIT_Reductions_Revised_1003-13.pdf
Standard IVA.4
The institution advocates and demonstrates honesty and integrity in its
relationships with external agencies. It agrees to comply with Accrediting
Commission standards, policies, guidelines, and Commission requirements for
public disclosure, self-study and other reports, team visits, and prior approval of
substantive changes. The institution moves expeditiously to respond to
recommendations made by the Commission.
Descriptive Summary
West Valley College communicates with appropriate local, state, and federal
agencies, and complies with agency policies and guidelines. West Valley College
develops and sustains relationships with external agencies with honesty and
integrity.
The college produced and continues to produce necessary information and reports
in accordance with the Accreditation Commission standards, policies, guidelines,
and requirements. The college was successfully affirmed in 2007, a follow-up
report was submitted in 2009 followed by the regularly scheduled Midterm report
Standard IV: Leadership and Governance 448
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
in 2011. (4A.4.1) West Valley College expeditiously responded to recommendations
made by the commission. Work on the recommendations and planning agenda
items (now actionable improvement plan) continues and is included in this report.
Board Policy 3200 clearly outlines the role and responsibilities of the Board of
Trustees, Chancellor, and Colleges in the Accreditation process. (4A.4.2) Board
policy states the institution in its entirety shall comply with Accrediting Commission
standards, policies, and guidelines. The Chancellor provides the Board with the:
1. Status of all accrediting institutional entities
2. Summaries of all accreditation reports and actions required
3. Requirements of board participation in the accreditation process
The Board Policy sets standards and expectations for the colleges to apply
consistency in complying all ACCJC, state, and federal regulations to all accrediting
agencies, communicating any changes in accreditation status, disclosing all
information to the accrediting agencies.
West Valley College advocates and demonstrates honesty and integrity in its
relationship with ACCJC. The college has been fully accredited and operational since
September 1964. The accrediting process is crucial in assessing the many functions
of the college, and as such is given high priority.
The college ensures that it meets compliance with the U.S. Department of
Education (USDE) regulations. The college’s Financial Aid Office stays current with
Federal Financial Aid regulation changes and applies them accordingly with clear
and timely communication with students. (4A.4.3) Recently identified Distance
Education Federal regulations are carried out for timely implementation and
ongoing evaluation by the college’s Distance Education Committee. (4A.4.4)
The college’s preparation period, the Self-Study Report submission, and the visit
coincided with a state-wide political controversy relative to ACCJC. West Valley
College made a strong commitment to stay on course with the ACCJC’s current
standards and requirements in preparation for the March 2014 visit. It reflects on
the college’s commitment to focusing on inclusive and widely participated
preparation process. Preparation for the 2014 Accreditation Report began in spring
2012. The Institutional Accreditation Liaison Officer (the Vice President of
Instruction) and faculty co-chair established an Accreditation Steering Committee
with wide representation from constituent groups. (4A.4.5) Key personnel attended
training workshops sponsored by the State Academic Senate and ACCJC to acquire
the information needed to prepare the self-evaluation and to understand new
Standard IV: Leadership and Governance 449
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
requirements. Accreditation Steering Committee meetings and documents are
posted online (4A.4.6), and the report has been posted for feedback from the
college community during the course of preparation period.
Moreover, West Valley College supports and participates in the mission of ACCJC by
faculty and administrators taking part in visiting teams for the accreditation process
of other community colleges.
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard.
Actionable Improvement Plans
None.
Evidence
4A.4.1
Past Reports to ACCJC
http://westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/re
ports_surveys.html
4A.4.2
Board Policy 3200
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditati
on/2013/evidence/4a/bp_ap_3200.pdf
4A.4.3
Financial Aid Convocation Presentation
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditati
on/2013/evidence/2b/FinAid_outreach_Convocatio
n_13-14.ppt
4A.4.4
Distance Education Committee Goals
2013-14
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Distance_L
earning_Committee/Documents/Committee_Docum
ents/dlc_strategic_plan-dec_12_2013.doc
4A.4.5
Accreditation Steering Committee
Membership
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditati
on/members.html
4A.4.6
Accreditation Steering Committee
meetings and documents
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditati
on/meetings.html
Standard IVA.5
The role of leadership and the institution's governance and decision-making
structures and processes are regularly evaluated to assure their integrity and
effectiveness.
The institution widely communicates the results of these
evaluations and uses them as the basis for improvement.
Standard IV: Leadership and Governance 450
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Descriptive Summary
West Valley College regularly evaluates participatory governance and decisionmaking structures and processes. This evaluation process occurs during annual
retreats of the College Council. (4A.5.1)
Part of the retreat agenda is a review of current participatory governance structures
and their effectiveness and whether they are sufficient in number, assignment, and
purview. Furthermore, the college’s annual goals and objectives for the coming year
are developed at these retreats in conjunction with the identification of roles and
responsibilities of the participatory governance committees for the annual goals
and objectives. (4A.5.2) Any recommendations for changes in the governance
structure along with the current developed objectives are disseminated through the
existing participatory governance structure and process to the college-wide
community.
College representatives to District Council meet the week prior to each Board
meeting to review the pre-Board agenda and provide input and advice to the
Chancellor on matters of district-wide importance. Additionally, college
representatives participate in District Council orientation sessions for new members
and review of the operating principals which include mission, purpose, ground
rules, operational guidelines, and membership.
As part of the District Council Operational Guidelines, the following evaluations
occur:
1. The first meetings of October and February are designated for team building
and reviewing DC’s mission, goals, and the way business is conducted.
2. The membership will evaluate the functioning of the District Council each
year according to criteria developed by the Council. The evaluation will be
completed by the end of May each year.
Decisions and recommendations made by the District Council including any changes
in structure, processes, goals, or objectives are dispersed by council members to
their appropriate constituency group or through email (4A.5.3)
In concert with the Accreditation Self-Study cycle, the college conducts Employee
and Student Surveys (every 6 years) to evaluate the role of leadership and
governance decision-making structures and processes. (4A.5.4) Results of the
surveys are shared and reviewed by the college-community through the
participatory governance process. Areas of concerns/weaknesses identified in the
Standard IV: Leadership and Governance 451
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
surveys are discussed and solutions and improvements are developed for
implementation.
Self- Evaluation
The college meets this standard.
In 2011-12, the District Council membership was evaluated and revised to ensure
equal representation among all constituent groups. The revised District Council
Orientation and Evaluation Operational Guidelines were adopted on March 12,
2012. (4A.5.5)
A 2011 review of the college mission statement was prompted by the change in the
overall mission of the California Community College system. (4A.5.6) The college’s
process for periodic review of its mission statement is effective as it aligns with the
state’s priorities and student’s learning and success needs. The college process
firmly adheres to participatory governance principles and the resulting statement
was vetted and supported by a substantial population of college stakeholders and
unanimously adopted on October 27, 2011. (4A.5.7)
All council and senate meetings are open to foster a participatory governance
atmosphere and encourage input from all constituencies. Weaknesses found in
governance and decision making structures and processes may be brought forward
by any college community member to the councils for evaluation and action if
necessary. (4A.5.8)
The successful recruitment and hiring of the new President who previously served
as Vice Chancellor of Human Resources for WVMCCD and Interim President of West
Valley College ensures an institutional history that is valuable in evaluating
effectiveness of governance and decision making structures.
The Employee Accreditation Survey found that exactly half (50%) of respondents
strongly agreed or agreed, 31% were neutral, and 14% disagreed that the systematic
evaluation of the role of leadership and the college’s governance and decision making
structures for improvement purposes occurs. (4A.5.9)
Actionable Improvement Plans

The college continues to fine-tune the participatory governance evaluation
process to be more systemic and streamlined.
Standard IV: Leadership and Governance 452
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Evidence
4A.5.1
College Council Annual Retreat
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/accreditation/2013/e
vidence/4a/college_council_retreat_11-04-2011.pdf
4A.5.2
College Goals and Objectives
http://westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/goals_object
ives.html
4A.5.3
Email re: District Council Goals
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/accreditation/2013/e
vidence/4a/district_council_operating_principles.pdf
4A.5.4
Accreditation Surveys
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/accreditation/2013/e
vidence/4a/email_district_council_goals_2013-14.pdf
4A.5.5
District Council Operating
Procedures
http://westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/reports_surv
eys.html
4A.5.6
CCCCO Mission
http://www.cccco.edu/
4A.5.7
College Council Mission
Statement Approval
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/accreditation/2013/e
vidence/1a/college_council_mission_approval.pdf
4A.5.8
WVC Committee Website;
Meeting Minutes
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/
4A.5.9
Employee Accreditation Survey
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2013/
evidence/3a/accreditation_survey_employee_final_7312.pdf
Standard IVB: Board and Administrative Organization
In addition to the leadership of individuals and constituencies, institutions
recognize the designated responsibilities of the governing board for setting
policies and of the chief administrator for the effective operation of the
institution. Multi-college districts/systems clearly define the organizational roles
of the district/system and the colleges.
Standard IVB.1
The institution has a governing board that is responsible for establishing policies
to assure the quality, integrity, and effectiveness of the student learning programs
and services and the financial stability of the institution. The governing board
adheres to a clearly defined policy for the selecting and evaluating the chief
administrator for the college or the district/system.
Standard IV: Leadership and Governance 453
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Descriptive Summary
WVMCCD Board Policy Manual, Chapter 2, contains all policies required for the
functions of the Board of Trustees. Specifically Board Policy 2200 relates the Duties
and Responsibilities of board members. (4B.1.1) The district mission statement
demonstrates and affirms the Board’s commitment to assuring the quality,
integrity, and effectiveness of student learning programs and services. It states that
The West Valley Mission Community College District is committed to
achieving student success through innovative and effective lifelong
education and career opportunities, which include associate degrees,
certificates, transfer, occupational programs, workforce development,
pre-collegiate, global, and community education programs. The District
strives to maintain and support institutional integrity, mutual respect,
diversity, tolerance, rigorous evaluation, an exceptional workforce of
faculty and staff, and partnerships between students, faculty, staff,
administrators, the Board of Trustees, and the community. The district
promotes an environment conducive to open dialogue and the free
exchange of ideas leading to the achievement of successful student
learning outcomes.
Board Policy 2010 also states that the West Valley-Mission Community College
Governing Board shall consist of seven members elected by qualified voters of the
district. (4B.1.2) The seven board members represent seven geographic areas
within the community college district. In addition to the regular Board members, a
student trustee is elected from each college—West Valley and Mission—annually
by the student body pursuant to Board Policy 2015. (4B.1.3) Bi-Monthly meetings
are held on 1st and 3rd Tuesdays for the public, and the place of the meeting
alternates monthly between the Trustee Boardroom at the District office on the
WVC campus, and Telecommunications (TAV) room 130 on the Mission College
campus.
Board Policy 2431 assures the Board will fill a Chancellor vacancy through a fair and
open search process. (4B.1.4) The Chancellor is the Chief Executive Officer whose
principal responsibility is leadership of the educational program. In accordance with
Board Policy 2435, the Board of Trustees conducts an annual evaluation of the
Chancellor. (4B.1.5, 6) A process has been developed that fosters open
communication, establishes clear direction, provides constructive and supportive
feedback, and strengthens the Board/Chancellor relationship. The process includes
Standard IV: Leadership and Governance 454
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
the development of annual goals for the Chancellor, mid-year discussion of progress
toward goals, an annual constituent survey regarding the Chancellor’s effectiveness
as CEO, the Board’s completion of an evaluation instrument, and an annual
evaluation and goal development meeting. The Chancellor’s evaluation and all
input into the evaluation, is confidential and takes place in Closed Session. The
annual evaluation is generally completed by the end of June but may continue into
July, and the goals adoption process is generally completed by August. The Board
and Chancellor may vary the timeline and modify the process by mutual agreement,
but are committed to completing an annual evaluation in a timely manner. When a
new Chancellor is appointed by the Board and begins service with the District, he or
she meets with the Board in Closed Session to discuss and develop annual goals.
Generally, the Chancellor prepares a mid-year goals update and meets with the
Board in early spring to discuss progress toward goals.
In late spring, confidential input regarding the Chancellor’s effectiveness in a
number of areas is requested from the Academic, Classified, and Student Senate
Presidents of each college; the administrators and staff reporting directly to the
Chancellor; and input from three to five members of the community selected by the
Chancellor. This confidential input is gathered via an on-line survey designed to
measure the Chancellor’s effectiveness in several areas, including leadership,
collaboration, communication, fiscal management, and professionalism.
Also in late spring, the Chancellor prepares a final report regarding his/her annual
goals.
The annual evaluation is a two-step process. At its first meeting in June, the Board
meets with the Chancellor to discuss his/her final goals update and to review the
confidential constituent input.
Each Board member then completes a
comprehensive CEO evaluation instrument designed to measure the Chancellor’s
achievement of his/her goals and to rate professional characteristics including
integrity, leadership, labor relations, fiscal management, relationship with the
Board of Trustees, and community relations. The results are compiled and returned
to the Board for review.
At the second meeting in June, the Board meets with the Chancellor to provide
evaluative feedback, to discuss and assess the previous year, to discuss the
upcoming year, and to begin development of the Chancellor’s goals for the
upcoming year.
Standard IV: Leadership and Governance 455
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Self-Evaluation
The board meets this standard. It ensures that policies are accessible and available
to the college and district communities by posting item to the district website.
(4B.1.7) In addition, during 2012-2013 academic year, the Board of Trustees began
having Strategic Conversation meetings with college and district employees creating
more direct communication with employees on topics relevant to their day to day
work and reality. (4B.1.8)
Actionable Improvement Plans
None.
Evidence
4B.1.1
Board Policy 2200
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/
2013/evidence/4b/BP_2200.pdf
4B.1.2
Board Policy 2010
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/
2013/evidence/4b/4B12_BP_2010.pdf
4B.1.3
Board Policy 2015
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/
2013/evidence/4b/4B13_BP_2015.pdf
4B.1.4
Board Policy 2431 - Chancellor
selection
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/accreditation/
2013/evidence/4b/bp_2431.pdf
4B.1.5
Board Policy 2435 - Chancellor
evaluation
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/accreditation/
2013/evidence/4b/bp_2435.pdf
4B.1.6
Administrative Policy 2435 –
Evaluation of the Chancellor
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/accreditation/
2013/evidence/4b/ap_2435.pdf
4B.1.7
District Board Policies Webpage
http://wvm.edu/documents.aspx?fid=26324&doc=2674
5&year=0&excludeyear=1
4B.1.8
Board of Trustees Community
Meetings
http://westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2013/
evidence/4b/Board_Focus_Topic_Meetings
Standard IVB.1.a
The governing board is an independent policy-making body that reflects the public
interest in board activities and decisions. Once the board reaches a decision, it
acts as a whole. It advocates for and defends the institution and protects it from
undue influence or pressure.
Descriptive Summary
The Board of Trustees serves as an independent policy-making body that reflects
the public interests. Voters in communities of the West Valley-Mission Community
Standard IV: Leadership and Governance 456
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
College District elect the trustees, and have a long history of electing professional,
policy-oriented community members to the board. The working relationships
among trustees, the administration, and staff are cooperative and effective.
The Board of Trustees is directly elected by the voters residing in the West ValleyMission Community College District. Each of the seven regular members is elected
by residents who live in the corresponding geographically bound district. (4B.1.a.1)
The geographic areas include the areas served by three major high school districts:
Campbell Union, Los Gatos-Saratoga Joint Union, and Santa Clara Unified. Each
Board member serves a four-year term and the terms are staggered to ensure
continuity. (4B.1.a.2) These arrangements establish the board as an independent
body and enable broad representation of the district. Board duties and
responsibilities require the board to represent the public interest and advocate and
defend the District (4B.1.a.3), and this is further addressed in the Code of Ethics.
(4B.1.a.4) Additionally, Conflict of Interest Policy and Procedures (4B.1.a.5) assure
the institution is protected from undue influence or pressure.
Each college has a student trustee representing the interests of the students on the
Board; each student trustee is elected by students from their respective campuses.
The term of office for the student trustees is one year commencing on June 1.
Student trustees may make and second motions and cast advisory votes. However,
their votes are not formally counted, and they are precluded from attending closed
sessions of the board. (4B.1.a.6)
Self-Evaluation
The board meets this standard. It continues to serve as an independent policymaking body that works in the public interest and on behalf of the college. Trustees
have served in statewide advocacy roles.
Actionable Improvement Plans
None.
Evidence
4B.1.a.1
Board Policy 2010
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accre
ditation/2013/evidence/4b/4B12_BP_2010.pdf
4B.1.a.2
Board Policy 2100
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accre
ditation/2013/evidence/4b/bp_2100.pdf
4B.1.a.3
Board Policy 2200
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accre
ditation/2013/evidence/4b/BP_2200.pdf
Standard IV: Leadership and Governance 457
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
4B.1.a.4
Board Policy 2715
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accre
ditation/2013/evidence/4b/bp_2715.pdf
4B.1.a.5
Board Policy and Administrative Procedure
2710
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accre
ditation/2013/evidence/4b/AP_BP_2710.pdf
4B.1.a.6
Board Policy 2015; Board Policy and
Administrative Procedure 2105
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accre
ditation/2013/evidence/4b/BP_2015_AP_2105
.pdf
Standard IVB.1.b
The governing board establishes policies consistent with the mission statement to
ensure the quality, integrity, and improvement of student learning programs and
services and the resources necessary to support them.
Descriptive Summary
The Board of Trustees adopts, revises and reaffirms policies that are consistent with
the district mission statement, which supports student learning programs and
services.
Board Policy 2410 discusses the development and revision of board policy and
administrative procedures. (4B.1.b.1) It clearly defines:
The Board is ultimately responsible for the approval, review,
amendment, and deletion of general policies which govern the
operations of the District. Making and carrying out policy is a shared
responsibility of the Board, the faculty, the classified staff, and the
administration. However, monitoring the execution of policy is
exclusively the prerogative of the Board and critical to the role of
trustee.
The current mission statement for the district was adopted by the Board in 2011.
(4B.1.b.2) In meeting its mission to “achieving student success through innovative
and effective lifelong education and career opportunities” and “the achievement of
successful student learning outcomes,” the District and Board work to assure the
quality, integrity, and improvement of student learning programs and services.
Furthermore, the duties of the Board as outlined in Board Policy 2200, require the
board to monitor institutional effectiveness, educational quality, and assure the
fiscal health and stability of the district; each of these responsibilities adds to the
effectiveness of the district in providing services to the community it serves.
(4B.1.b.3)
Standard IV: Leadership and Governance 458
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Through administration of Chapter 4 – Academic Affairs and Chapter 5 – Student
Services of the WVMCCD Board Policies, the Board of Trustees further ensures the
quality of learning programs and services offered through the college. (4B.1.b.4)
The annual establishment of District Goals occurs through the participatory
governance process. The colleges and District Administrative Services Council
review and develop annual goals. The District Council then receives reports on
these goals, reviews them, and makes recommendations regarding proposed
District Goals. Once these goals are set by the District Council, they are sent to the
Board for review, discussion and adoption in alignment with Board Policy 2200 –
Board Roles and Responsibilities—and Board Policy 3200 – Accreditation—which
relate to establishment, development, and approval of goals.
Various mechanisms inform the Board of Trustees of standards set by the
respective institutions and analysis of results for improvement of student
achievement and learning. At each Board meeting, constituency groups, college
presidents, and district’s vice chancellors report highlights and information relating
to college-set standards and student achievement and learning. Annual Scorecard
data discussion (formally known as ARCC: Accountability Report for Community
Colleges) prepared by the California State Chancellor’s office with the Board of
Trustees in each spring also inform them about how our students are doing in their
learning process based on the standards set by the college. (4B.1.b.5)
Self-Evaluation
The Board meets this standard. The approval of the 2013 -14 District Goals,
provides for the improvement of student learning programs and services with the
resources to support them. (4B.1.b.6) Through the participatory governance
process these goals are aligned with the Integrated Planning and Resource
Allocation and goals at the college level. Use of the SMART metric (Specific,
Measurable, Attainable, Realistic, Timely) by the District Council assures that the
goals may be evaluated for effectiveness and quality improvement.
Actionable Improvement Plans
None.
Evidence
4B.1.b.1
Board Policy 2410
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/
2013/evidence/4b/BP_2410.pdf
4B.1.b.2
Board Policy 1200 - Mission statement
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/
2013/evidence/4b/bp_1200.pdf
Standard IV: Leadership and Governance 459
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
4B.1.b.3
Board Policy 2200 – Board Roles and
Responsibilities
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/
2013/evidence/4b/BP_2200.pdf
4B.1.b.4
Chapters 4 and 5 of WVMCCD Board
Policy Manual
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/
2013/evidence/4b/BP_CH_4_5.pdf
4B.1.b.5
Student Success Scorecard
http://scorecard.cccco.edu/scorecardrates.aspx?Colleg
eID=493
4B.1.b.6
Board Approval of 2013-14 District
Goals
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/
2013/evidence/4b/2013_14_district_goals.pdf
Standard IVB.1.c
The governing board has ultimate responsibility for educational quality, legal
matters and financial integrity.
Descriptive Summary
The roles and responsibilities of the Board specify that educational quality, legal
matters and financial integrity are within the purview of the board and the board
has the ultimate authority in these matters.
The Board of Trustees derives its authority and duties from Education Code 70902
(4B.1.c.1) and sets it forth in the WVMCCD Policy Manual Chapter 2; Board Policy
2200 addresses the roles and responsibilities of board members (including
educational, legal, and financial matters) and standards of practice as outlined in
Standard IVB.1 of this report. (4B.1.c.2) Chapter 6: Business and Fiscal Affairs
provides guidance to the Board in fiscal matters and establishes its responsibility in
the financial integrity of the institution (4B.1.c.3):


BP 6200 Budget Preparation - The Board authorizes the establishment and
maintenance of general unrestricted, general restricted, debt service,
special revenue, capital projects, enterprise, internal service, trust, and
agency funds. Each year, the Board will adopt a budget calendar and identify
Board budget priorities. The budget calendar will provide adequate time for
Board study and for the early establishment of Board Budget Priorities.
BP 6250 Budget Management - Board approval is required for changes
between major expenditure classifications. Transfers from the reserve for
contingencies to any expenditure classification must be approved by a twothirds vote of the members of the Board. Transfers between expenditure
classifications must be approved by a majority vote of the members of the
Standard IV: Leadership and Governance 460
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Board. State quarterly and annual financial reports shall be approved by the
Board.







BP 6300 Fiscal Management - As required by law, the Board shall be
presented with a quarterly report showing the financial and budgetary
conditions of the District.
BP 6320 Investments - Investments which have a maturity of more than one
year or which are not specifically approved in this section will be brought to
the Board for prior approval. Quarterly information reports on investments
will be provided to the Board. These reports shall include information on
investments of all auxiliary organizations.
BP 6340 Contracts - Contracts are not enforceable obligations until they are
ratified by the Board, except as required by law or Board policy.
BP 6600 Capital Construction - The Board provides general direction for
facilities development, construction, and renovation for the District.
Facilities planning activities include, but are not limited to:
o The development and continuous appraisal (every five years) of longrange Educational and Facilities Master Plans for land use, utility
services, buildings, roads, pedestrian walks, outdoor recreational
areas, parking areas, and open natural areas developed using State
Chancellor’s Office guidelines; (See BP/AP 3250 titled Institutional
Planning)
o The design, plans, and construction or major alteration of buildings,
other structures, and site improvements;
o The planning, specification, and acquisition of equipment and
furniture; and
o The identification of resources for implementation of a plan.
o The Board shall approve and submit to the Board of Governors a fiveyear capital construction plan as required by law. The Chancellor or
Vice Chancellor shall annually update the plan and present it to the
Board for approval. The plan shall address, but not be limited to, the
criteria contained in law.
BP 6620 Naming of Facilities & Other Naming Opportunities – The Board of
Trustees shall have final authority
BP 6740 Citizens’ Bond Oversight Committee - The Board of Trustees shall
establish a Citizens’ Bond Oversight Committee in accordance with the
applicable law and necessary regulations.
BP 6750 Parking - The Board may establish parking and permit fees as
provided by the Education Code as well as regulations for their use.
Standard IV: Leadership and Governance 461
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Self-Evaluation
The Board meets this standard. The Board of Trustees exercises final authority on
district policies and contracts, legal, educational quality of student learning, fiscal
health and stability of the district, personnel decisions, and advocacy for the district
in the community and in legislative arenas within parameters set by district policy
and state statutes. The Board ensures the creation of oversight committees,
including the Audit and Budget Oversight Committee on which three trustees sit.
Citizens Bond Oversight Committee was established to monitor the Measure H and
Measure C Proposition bonds.
Actionable Improvement Plans
None.
Evidence
4B.1.c.1
Education Code 70902
http://www.leginfo.ca.gov/cgibin/displaycode?section=edc&group=7000171000&file=70900-70902
4B.1.c.2
Board Policy 2200 – Board
Roles and Responsibilities
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/201
3/evidence/4b/4B1c2_BP_2200.pdf
4B.1.c.3
WVMCCD Board Policy –
Chapter 6: Business and Fiscal
Affairs
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/201
3/evidence/4b/4B1c3_BP_CH6.pdf
Standard IVB.1.d
The institution or the governing board publishes the board bylaws and policies
specifying the board's size, duties, responsibilities, structures, and operating
procedures.
Descriptive Summary
The Board publishes policies which specify the Board’s organizational procedures
and framework. The policies are contained in Chapter 2 of the Governing Board
Policy Manual. These policies specify the size, duties, responsibilities, structure,
and operating procedures of the Board and the District which are also delineated in
the following sections of the Education code: 72101-72104 Membership of the
Governing Board, 72121-72129 Meetings and the Governing Board, and 5000-5442
Elections.
The Board of Trustees maintains a website which lists the names and provides
contact information for each member of the Board. (4B.1.d.1) In addition to the
Standard IV: Leadership and Governance 462
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Board policies, meeting minutes are regularly posted for viewing by interested
members of the community (4B.1.d.2). Furthermore, Administrative Procedures
related to the Board Policies are also posted on the Board of Trustees webpage.
(4B.1.d.3) Policy affecting students, such as academic regulations and student
services, are on pages 174 – 193 of the 2013-14 West Valley College Catalog
(4B.1.d.4) as well as on the WVC Student Services District Policy webpage. (4B.1.d.5)
A few examples include academic standards, admissions eligibility, and the
grievance process.
The board website is updated regularly to include current agendas, minutes, as well
as the District Mission, Goals and Objectives, Strategic Plan and meeting schedule.
Self-Evaluation
The Board meets this standard.
Actionable Improvement Plans
None.
Evidence
4B.1.d.1
Website for Board of Trustees
http://www.wvm.edu/group.aspx?id=36
4B.1.d.2
Board Minutes
http://www.wvm.edu/documents.aspx?fid
=26324&doc=26745&year=0&excludeyear=
1
4B.1.d.3
WVMCCD Board Policies
http://www.wvm.edu/documents.aspx?fid
=26324&doc=26746&year=0&excludeyear=
1
4B.1.d.4
2013-2014 West Valley College Catalog
(p. 174-p. 193)
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/A
ccreditation/2013/evidence/4b/2014_Catal
og_page174-193.pdf
WVC Student Services District Policy
webpage
http://westvalley.edu/services/policy/inde
x.html
4B.1.d.5
Standard IVB.1.e
The governing board acts in a manner consistent with its policies and bylaws. The
board regularly evaluates its policies and practices and revises them as necessary.
Standard IV: Leadership and Governance 463
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Descriptive Summary
The Board of Trustees acts in a manner consistent with its policies and makes
decisions in accordance with its policies. In addition, the board regularly evaluates
its policies and practices and revises them as necessary. Once the Board approves
or revises new policies, it directs its administration to implement the policies and
practices in a timely and efficient manner. Board Policy 2410 states, “The Board
may adopt such policies as are authorized by law or determined by the Board to be
necessary for the efficient operation of the District.” (4B.1.e.1) The policies
adopted by the Board are consistent with the provisions of the law. In 2012, the
Board adopted a complete conversion to the template of the CCLC, bringing the
policy manual into better alignment with many of its fellow community college
districts. (4B.1.e.2) Furthermore, the Board requires that these policies be
reviewed semi-annually ensuring that updates align with the Community College
League of California (CCLC) Policy and Procedure model to revise existing policies
and procedures in accordance with Board Policy and Administrative Policy 2410.
The Board may review each of the seven chapters of the Board Policy Manual up to
twice each year (based on recommended new, revised, or deleted policies noticed
in the CCLC updates) with an eye to improving service to the community in general
and to the students in particular. In addition, the administration submits
recommendations for policy and revisions as necessary. Each policy describes the
expected responsibilities, processes, and outcomes.
The Board of Trustees conducts meetings and administers the business of the
college system. The WVMCCD board meetings minutes are maintained and
published following each meeting and are available on the district website.
(4B.1.e.3) Board Policy 2745 addresses the Board Self Evaluation. (4B.1.e.4) The
policy includes an annual self-evaluation; this process assures the board is acting
consistently with its policies and bylaws.
Self-Evaluation
The Board meets this standard. It undertakes regular self-evaluation, most recently
at the July 16, 2013 board meeting.
Actionable Improvement Plans
None.
Evidence
4B.1.e.1
Board Policy 2410
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/
Standard IV: Leadership and Governance 464
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
2013/evidence/4b/BP_2410.pdf
4B.1.e.2
WVMCCD Board Policy Manual
http://westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2013/
evidence/4b/Board_Evaluations/
4B.1.e.3
Board Meeting Minutes
http://wvm.edu/documents.aspx?fid=26324&doc=2641
6&year=2013
4B.1.e.4
Board Policy 2745
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/
2013/evidence/4b/4B1e2_4B1e2_BP_2745.pdf
Standard IVB.1.f
The governing board has a program development and new member orientation.
It has a mechanism for providing continuity of board membership and staggered
terms of office.
Descriptive Summary
The West Valley-Mission Community College District has a seven member Board of
Trustees selected to represent seven geographic locations within the district.
(4B.1.f.1) Included on the Board, as outlined in BP 2015, are two student trustees
who are elected annually by the student body. Staggered terms of four years
provide for continuity of Board membership; if there is an unscheduled vacancy or
resignation, the Board may either call an election or make a provisional
appointment to fill the vacancy, as outlined in Board policy.
Governing Board Policy BP 2740 provides for new trustee orientation for new
Governing Board members. (4B1.f.2) New board members are provided documents
that include the following: annual budgets, organizational charts, college catalogs,
class schedules, Educational and Facilities Master Plans, facilities and modernization
documents, and Board Policies. The Chancellor, Vice Chancellor of Administrative
Services and the Associate Vice Chancellor of Human Resources provide an
orientation session to newly elected members, sharing an overview of district and
college functions as well as a review of the above-mentioned documents. (4B.1.f.3)
New members are also encouraged to attend the Community College League of
California’s Effective Trustee Workshop, in addition to other conferences designed
to educate new and veteran Trustees about critical issues that involve community
colleges.
The district encourages Board members to participate in professional development
activities, providing support to attend meetings, conferences and workshops. New
board members are particularly encouraged to attend workshops provided by the
Community College League of California.
Standard IV: Leadership and Governance 465
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Each Board meeting contains either a ‘Focus Topic’ presentation or an ‘Educational
and Student Services’ presentation. Focus Topic presentations are designed to
provide the Board with information on strategic topics such as textbook
affordability, the Student Success Initiative, accreditation, and emergency
preparedness. Educational and Student Services presentations allow the Colleges’
programs and service areas to highlight their programs to the Board.
As for Accreditation specific training for the Board of Trustees, on June 19, 2012,
the Board held a special meeting for an Accreditation Workshop. This workshop was
facilitated by John Nixon of ACCJC; the topic of his presentation was Accreditation
and Trustee Roles and Responsibilities. (4B.1.f.4) In addition to the valuable
information in the presentation, the Board was also provided with several
documents to assist them in their responsibilities in terms of accreditation.
(4B.1.f.5) Most recently, WVMCCD Trustees participated in the CCLC conference
focusing on Accreditation Standards and Processes. (4B.1.f.6)
Self-Evaluation
The Board meets this standard. It is effective in its orientation of new members and
continuing education regarding board responsibilities, goals and operations, and
provides for staggered terms of election. Vacancies are addressed in an expeditious
and public manner.
Actionable Improvement Plans
None.
Evidence
4B.1.f.1
Board Policy 2100
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/accreditation/20
13/evidence/4b/bp_2100.pdf
4B.1.f.2
Board Policy 2740
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/20
13/evidence/4b/4B1f2_BP_2740.pdf
4B.1.f.3
New Trustee Orientation
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/20
13/evidence/4b/4B1f.1_New_Trustee_Orientation_Model
_Agenda.doc
4B.1.f.4
ACCJC presentation Accreditation and Trustee Roles
and Responsibilities
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/accreditation/20
13/evidence/4b/accjc_accreditation_trustee_roles_resps_
06_14_12.pdf
4B.1.f.5
Board ACCJC Workshop
Documents
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/accreditation/20
13/evidence/4b/bot_accjc_workshop_documents.pdf
4B.1.f.6
CCLC Conference
http://www.ccleague.org/i4a/pages/index.cfm?pageid=32
77
Standard IV: Leadership and Governance 466
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Standard IVB.1.g
The governing board's self-evaluation processes for assessing board performance
are clearly defined, implemented, and published in its policies and bylaws.
Descriptive Summary
District policy BP 2745 clearly defines a self-evaluation process for assessing board
performance. (4B.1.g.1) The policy mandates that the Board, which includes the
student trustees, shall participate in an annual board self-evaluation process. The
purpose of the Board Self-Evaluation is to identify those areas that are working well
and those that need improvement, as well as to increase communication and
understanding among board members.
As part of its annual self-evaluation process, the Board develops and approves
annual performance goals, works toward those goals throughout the year, solicits
constituent groups’ input regarding its performance as a Board, conducts an annual
self-evaluation meeting, and develops goals for the next year. At its discretion, the
Board may vary the timeline but is committed to completing an annual selfevaluation in a timely manner. The process of evaluation is recommended to and
approved by the Board.
In the spring of each year, the Board solicits constituent input regarding its
performance during the academic year. (4B.1.g.2) Students, faculty, staff, and
administrators, individually and through constituent groups, are encouraged to
participate in an online survey that requests input regarding areas in which the
Board:

Is serving the District well in meeting its governance responsibilities to the
community, students, and WVMCCD employees.

Can improve its governance performance to better serve the community,
students, and WVMCCD employees.

Should focus future efforts to improve its effectiveness as the District’s
governing body.
In late summer or early fall, the Board conducts an annual self-evaluation at a
public meeting at which it reviews the input provided by students, faculty, and staff
via the spring survey; discusses and assesses its goals completion and overall
performance as a Board over the past year; and begins development of goals for
the upcoming year; goal development may take more than one meeting.
Standard IV: Leadership and Governance 467
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
In late summer or early fall of each year, the Board develops and adopts its selfevaluation goals for the upcoming year. (4B.1.g.3) The proposed goals are shared
with District Council, the District’s highest-level participatory group, prior to
adoption. Following approval, the Board’s annual performance goals are posted on
the District website for information and coordination of goal-alignment and
planning activities at the District and the Colleges. (4B.1.g.4)
Self- Evaluation
The Board meets this standard. The Board assesses itself annually at a regularly
scheduled open board meeting. A board self-evaluation was discussed at the July
16, 2013 meeting.
BP 2745 lays out the chronological benchmarks for the self-evaluation.
Additionally, the Board is subject to penalties for standards violations set forth in
California Education Code and California Government Code. (4B.1.g.5)
Actionable Improvement Plans
None.
Evidence
4B.1.g.1
BP 2745
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/accreditation/2013/
evidence/4b/bp_2745.pdf
4B.1.g.2
Board Evaluation Email
http://westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2013/evide
nce/4b/Board_Evaluations/
4B.1.g.3
Board Minutes re: goal
development and approval
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/accreditation/2013/
evidence/4b/board_goal_approval.pdf
4B.1.g.4
Board Annual Goals
http://wvm.edu/WorkArea/linkit.aspx?LinkIdentifier=id&Ite
mID=6990
4B.1.g.5
Board of Trustees Selfevaluation 2013
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2013
/evidence/4b/BOT_Meeting_Agenda_Packet_2013-0716_page9.pdf
Standard IVB.1.h
The governing board has a code of ethics that includes a clearly defined policy for
dealing with behavior that violates its code.
Descriptive Summary
On January 17, 2012, the WVMCCD Board of Trustees adopted a new Code of
Ethics/ Standards of Practice replacing existing WVMCCD Policies 1.5.1, 1.5.2, and
Standard IV: Leadership and Governance 468
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
1.6.6. (4B.1.h.1) The new Code of Ethics can be found in Chapter 2, BP 2715 of the
District Policies Manual. (4B.1.h.2) All Board members are committed to
maintaining the highest standards in order to promote trust, confidence, and
integrity in the working relationship between Trustees and staff. Other pertinent
sections include Governing Board policy BP 2710 which covers areas relating to
confidentiality, and conflict of interest. The Board performs a self-evaluation
process to monitor performance and effectiveness every year. Additionally, the
Board is subject to penalties for standards violations set forth in California
Education Code and California Government Code. The policy reports the manner in
which the violations will be addressed.
Self-Evaluation
The Board meets this standard.
Actionable Improvement Plans
None.
Evidence
4B.1.h.1
Board of Trustees Meeting Minutes:
January 17, 2012
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accr
editation/2013/evidence/1a/bot_mission_app
roval.pdf
4B.1.h.2
BP 2715
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accr
editation/2013/evidence/4b/bp_2715.pdf
Standard IVB.1.i
The governing board is informed and involved in the accreditation process.
Descriptive Summary
In accordance with Board Policy 3200, the Chancellor works closely with the Board
on Accreditation processes. (4B.1.i.1) The college President ensures that the
Chancellor is informed about and involved in the college’s accreditation process.
The Board provides input to Self-Study reports and approves the document, as well
as Mid-term and Follow-up Reports. Accreditation updates were presented to the
Board on November 19, 2013 and December 10, 2013. (4B.1.i.2)
The Board of Trustees receives regular updates on the accreditation process and is
involved in the Self-Evaluation and related reports and updates as noted in BP 3200.
The Chancellor keeps the Board informed of approved accrediting organizations and
the status of accreditations and ensures that the Board is involved in any
Standard IV: Leadership and Governance 469
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
accreditation process in which Board participation is required. The Chancellor also
provides the Board with a summary of any accreditation report and any actions
taken or to be taken in response to recommendations in an accreditation report.
On June 19, 2012, the Board attended a workshop presented by ACCJC entitled
Accreditation and Trustee Roles and Responsibilities. (4B.1.i.3) In addition to the
valuable information in the presentation, the Board was also provided with several
documents to assist them in their responsibilities in terms of accreditation.
(4B.1.i.4)
Self-Evaluation
The Board meets this standard. The board gets involved throughout the Self-Study
reporting and accreditation processes. Board certification of the Self-Study is
scheduled on January 7, 2014.
Actionable Improvement Plans
None.
Evidence
4B.1.i.1
Board Policy 3200
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditati
on/2013/evidence/4a/bp_ap_3200.pdf
4B.1.i.2
Board Accreditation Presentation –
November 19, 2013
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditati
on/2013/evidence/4b/BOT_Accreditation_Presentat
ion_WVC_11-19-13.pdf
4B.1.i.3
ACCJC Presentation Accreditation and
Trustee Roles and Responsibilities
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/accreditati
on/2013/evidence/4b/accjc_accreditation_trustee_r
oles_resps_06_14_12.pdf
4B.1.i.4
Board ACCJC Workshop Documents
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/accreditati
on/2013/evidence/4b/bot_accjc_workshop_docume
nts.pdf
Standard IVB.1.j
The governing board has the responsibility for selecting and evaluating the
district/system chief administrator (most often known as the chancellor) in a
multi-college district/system or the college chief administrator (most often known
as the president) in the case of a single college. The governing board delegates
full responsibility and authority to him/her to implement and administer board
policies without board interference and hold him/her accountable for the
operation of the district/system or college respectively. In multi-college
Standard IV: Leadership and Governance 470
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
district/systems, the governing board establishes a clearly defined policy for
selecting and evaluating the presidents of the college.
Descriptive Summary
The Board has established policy language addressing the District’s administrative
organization, the Chancellor, and senior executive management evaluations.
(4B.1.j.1) These policies include chancellor selection and succession (BP 2431),
delegation of responsibilities BP 2430, and annual evaluation requirements (BP AP
2435).
A national search for a new chancellor was conducted in spring 2012. The board led
the search and followed an inclusive process that involved West Valley and Mission
College students, faculty, and staff. A search committee composed of employees
from West Valley College, Mission College, and the district, as well as community
members, recommended four final candidates to the Board. The Board considered
recommendations, interviewed finalists and selected the chancellor. In July 2012, a
new chancellor began serving as the chief administrative officer for the district.
Upon hiring, the board delegated to the chancellor the full responsibility and
authority to implement and administer board policies.
In accordance with Board Policy 2435, the Board of Trustees conducts an annual
evaluation of the Chancellor. (4B.1.j.2) A process has been developed that fosters
open communication, establishes clear direction, provides constructive and
supportive feedback, and strengthens the Board/Chancellor relationship.
The process includes the development of annual goals for the Chancellor, mid-year
discussion of progress toward goals, an annual constituent survey regarding the
Chancellor’s effectiveness as CEO, the Board’s completion of an evaluation
instrument, and an annual evaluation and goal development meeting.
The Chancellor’s evaluation, and all input into the evaluation, is confidential and
takes place in Closed Session. The annual evaluation is generally completed by the
end of June but may continue into July, and the goals adoption process is generally
completed by August. The Board and Chancellor may vary the timeline and modify
the process by mutual agreement, but are committed to completing an annual
evaluation in a timely manner.
When a new Chancellor is appointed by the Board and begins service with the
District, he or she meets with the Board in Closed Session to discuss and develop
annual goals.
Standard IV: Leadership and Governance 471
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Generally, the Chancellor prepares a mid-year goals update and meets with the
Board in early spring to discuss progress toward goals.
In late spring, confidential input regarding the Chancellor’s effectiveness in a
number of areas is requested from the Academic, Classified, and Student Senate
Presidents of each college; the administrators and staff reporting directly to the
Chancellor; and input from three to five members of the community selected by the
Chancellor. (4B.1.j.3) This confidential input is gathered via an on-line survey
designed to measure the Chancellor’s effectiveness in several areas, including
leadership, collaboration, communication, fiscal management, and professionalism;
community members are sent hard copies of the survey. Also in late spring, the
Chancellor prepares a final report regarding his/her annual goals.
The annual evaluation is usually a two-step process. At its first meeting in June, the
Board meets with the Chancellor to discuss his/her final goals update and to review
the confidential constituent input. Each Board member then completes a
comprehensive CEO evaluation instrument designed to measure the Chancellor’s
achievement of his/her goals and to rate professional characteristics including
integrity, leadership, labor relations, fiscal management, relationship with the
Board of Trustees, and community relations. The results are compiled and returned
to the Board for review.
At the second meeting in June, the Board meets with the Chancellor to provide
evaluative feedback, to discuss and assess the previous year, to discuss the
upcoming year, and to begin development of the Chancellor’s goals for the
upcoming year. (4B.1.j.4)
The Board delegates to the Chancellor the executive responsibility for administering
policies adopted by the Board and executing all decisions of the Board requiring
administrative action through BP 2430. (4B.1.j.5) In turn the Chancellor delegates
authority to the college presidents for the development of educational and student
services programs and operations of the college.
The selection of the presidents of the college is administered through BP 7120.
(4B.1.j.6) There is a clearly defined procedure for the evaluation of the President of
West Valley College as articulated in AP 2435. (4B.1.j.7) The President is evaluated
annually based on performance goals and objectives. The evaluation process
includes input from the Academic, Classified, Student Senates, reporting staff and
administrators, and three to five members of the community.
Standard IV: Leadership and Governance 472
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Self-Evaluation
The Board meets this standard. The current Chancellor has been in office since
2012. The Board of Trustees has been diligent in exercising its role in requiring
accountability from the Chancellor for the operation of the district.
Actionable Improvement Plans
None.
Evidence
4B.1.j.1
Board Policy 3100 –
Organizational Structure
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2013/
evidence/4b/4B1j1_BP_3100.pdf
4B.1.j.2
Evaluation of the Chancellor
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2013/
evidence/4b/bp_2435.pdf
4B.1.j.3
Email of Evaluation Survey
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2013/
evidence/4b/chancellor_evaluation_email.pdf
4B.1.j.4
Board Minutes re: Chancellor
evaluation and goals
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2013/
evidence/4b/board_minutes_chancellor_evaluation.pdf
4B.1.j.5
Delegation of Authority to
the Chancellor
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2013/
evidence/4b/4B1j5_BP_2430.pdf
4B.1.j.6
Selection of the President –
BP 7120
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2013/
evidence/4b/bp_7120.pdf
4B.1.j.7
Evaluation of the President
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2013/
evidence/4b/ap_2435.pdf
Standard IVB.2
The President has primary responsibility for the quality of the institution he/she
leads. He/she provides effective leadership in planning, organizing, budgeting,
selecting and developing personnel, and assessing institutional effectiveness.
Descriptive Summary
The current college president led West Valley College in an interim capacity during
2012-2013 and became a permanent president as of summer 2013. Since his arrival
in 2012, the President has brought strong, stable, and collaborative leadership to
West Valley College. The President is delegated authority per District Administrative
Policy 2430. (4B.2.1) The President has the primary responsibility for institutional and
academic leadership and for facilitating a working relationship among
administrators, faculty, classified staff, students, and the district, as well as the
community at large. The goal of the President is to work towards fulfillment of the
college’s mission, goals, and objectives.
Standard IV: Leadership and Governance 473
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
The President is responsible for overseeing the college’s budget, always ensuring
fiscal stability while also seeking ways to enhance outside funding and ensures that
FTES, efficiency, and enrollment goals are met. (4B.2.2) Furthermore, the President
is responsible for ensuring that district policies and procedures are implemented
and followed. The role also requires working with college constituencies and the
district to develop long-range planning and goals, all the while working in a climate
of participatory governance. The position also entails academic leadership to
ensure that the college meets the learning needs of its students and community.
The President appropriately delegates authority to the college’s administrators,
consistent with their responsibilities. (4B.2.3) The college has three vice president
positions, reporting to the President, in the areas of Instruction, Student Services,
and Administrative Services. At the next level of administration, a total of three
deans, directors, and managers report to these vice presidents. These positions,
and the operations of the administration, are described more fully in Standard
IV.2.B below.
The President utilizes the participatory governance process on a consistent and
meaningful basis. West Valley College participatory governance process involves
the participation of representatives from appropriate constituent groups who
engage in open discussion and timely decision making. (4B.2.4) Through this
process, the committees of the college plan, analyze, and dialogue in their
respective fields of focus, making recommendations through the College Council to
the college President. The College Council serves as the top participatory
governance body and provides recommendations to the President on all major
decisions. (4B.2.5) Members of College Council include representatives from
Administration, Student Services Council, Division Chair Council/Performance Goals
Council, Academic Senate, Classified Senate and the Associated Student Organization,
as well as advisory ex-officio members.
The President regularly and meaningfully involves the College Council and relevant
committees in the earlier stages of planning and decision-making, soliciting the
advice of its constituency representatives on matters of importance to the college.
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard. The college has been led by three presidents since
the last accreditation with the most recent hire approved by the Board on May 22,
2013. (4B.2.6)
Standard IV: Leadership and Governance 474
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Actionable Improvement Plans
None.
Evidence
4B.2.1
Administrative Policy 2430
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation
/2013/evidence/4b/4B21_AP_2430.pdf
4B.2.2
Enrollment Goals
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation
/2013/evidence/1b/FAIT/13-14_WVC_FTES_goals_3-813.pdf
4B.2.3
Organizational Chart
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation
/2013/evidence/4b/wvmccd_org_chart_2012_13.pdf
4B.2.4
WVC Shared Decision Making Plan
http://westvalley.edu/about/governance.html
4B.2.5
College Council Agendas and
minutes
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/College_Coun
cil/
4B.2.6
Board Approval of New President
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation
/2013/evidence/4b/wvc_president_hire.pdf
Standard IV: Leadership and Governance 475
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Standard IVB.2.a
The President plans, oversees, and evaluates an administrative structure
organized and staffed to reflect the institution's purposes, size, and complexity.
He/she delegates authority to administrators and others consistent with their
responsibilities, as appropriate.
Descriptive Summary
The President is responsible for the oversight of the college and all operations. To
assist in the performance of these duties, the President delegates duties as
appropriate. (4B.2.a.1) Three Vice Presidents, the Director of Research and
Institutional Effectiveness, and the Director of Athletics report directly to the
college president. The Vice President of Instruction is responsible for all
instructional programs, curriculum, and Learning Resources including Distance
Learning, Student Success Initiative, the Library and Learning Resource
Center/Tutorial Center, and Community and Contract Education and Workforce
Development. The Vice President of Student Services oversees Admissions and
Records and its related functions, Financial Aid/Scholarships, Counseling, Student
Development, EOP&S, DESP, SUCCESS, Puente, Veterans, and Trio programs. The
vice president of Administrative Services is the chief finance and budget officer,
responsible for budget and personnel, educational resources, emergency
preparedness, and facilities including Measure C projects—technology resources
and sustainability.
West Valley College went two recent budget reduction processes in 2012-13 and in
2014-2015 academic year. Starting in spring 2013, the President began leading a
college-wide inclusive and transparent discussion and planning relative to the
reorganization of the college structure. (4B.2.a.2) This is a reflective process led by
the president to review and analyze institution’s purposes, size, and complexity as
an organization as the priorities are redefined at the State level for the California
Community Colleges, as well as addressing recent enrollment decline Preliminary
recommendation of the restructuring plan will be submitted to the District’s
executive team in early spring 2014.
The President and the college’s Executive Staff Council (President’s Cabinet) meet
weekly to address college-wide concerns, and provide updates on all areas of
college operations. The well-qualified executive management team strategizes
plans and consults on all aspects of college operations. The Executive Staff Council
consists of the following personnel:
Standard IV: Leadership and Governance 476
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014

President (chair)

Vice President of Instruction

Vice President of Student Services

Vice President of Administrative Services

Dean of Instruction

Dean of Career Programs and Workforce Development

Dean of Student Services (4B.2.a.3)
Led by the President, the Cabinet engages in bi-annual off-site retreats to assess
current year’s goals and objectives and define goals and objectives for the
subsequent academic year. In response to the recent decrease in funding provided
to the statewide community college system, the number of executive staff
members has been reduced and job responsibilities were restructured to effectively
manage the college with fewer administrators.
The President consistently communicates institutional values, goals, and priorities.
He chairs and serves on key college committee such as the College Council. The
President communicates regularly with the Governing Board in addition to
attending regular board meetings.
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard. Most of the President’s Cabinet have been in their
positions for over two years, providing the college stable leadership. The Cabinet
works well together as a cohesive, proactive management team.
Actionable Improvement Plans

Continue to review and assess organizational structure to increase efficiency
and effectiveness during the restructuring effort.
Standard IV: Leadership and Governance 477
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Evidence
4B.2.a.1
WVC Organizational Chart
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation
/2013/evidence/4b/WVC_Organizational_Chart_Spring
_2014.pdf
4B.2.a.2
FAIT Process
http://westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2013
/evidence/4b/FAIT_Process/
4B.2.a.3
Shared Decision Making Plan –
Executive Council
http://westvalley.edu/about/governance.html
Standard IVB.2.b
The President guides institutional improvement of the teaching and learning
environment by the following:
•
•
•
•
establishing a collegial process that sets values, goals, and priorities;
ensuring that evaluation and planning rely on high quality research and
analysis on external and internal conditions;
ensuring that educational planning is integrated with resource planning
and distribution to achieve student learning outcomes; and
establishing procedures to evaluate overall institutional planning and
implementation efforts.
Descriptive Summary
The President has guided and supported the process of revising the college mission
(4B.2.b.1), annual Goals and Objectives (4B.2.b.2) (i.e. values, goals and priorities),
Educational and Facilities Master Plan (4B.2.b.3) (soon to be revised in 2014-2015),
and the inception of the Student Success Team as one of the three critical
components of Institutional Effectiveness. The college’s Integrated Planning and
Resource Allocation process (4B.2.b.4) is also supported by the President and
includes Program Review, Student Learning Outcome and Assessment, as well as
the college resource allocation process. The college mission was revised in fall 2011
and adopted by the Board. The President continues to hold annual goals and
objective setting sessions with the College Council where the previous year’s goals
and objectives are reviewed, assessed, and discussed and the subsequent year’s
goals and objectives are developed based on the college’s mission and priorities.
(4B.2.b.5)
With full support of the President, the Institutional Effectiveness framework was
created in fall 2012, reviewed and approved by the college’s participatory
Standard IV: Leadership and Governance 478
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
governance process, as a roadmap for the college to focus on its priorities.
(4B.2.b.6) It includes three components: Integrated Planning and Resource
Allocation (PR, SLO/A, and Budget allocation process), Student Success Team, and
Accreditation ensuring continuous sustainable institutional improvement.
The establishment of the Student Success Act of 2012 gave West Valley College
impetus to further emphasize its commitment to Student Success. The Student
Success Team was established as part of the Institutional Effectiveness Framework
and is an integration of formally existing committees: Basic Skills Advisory,
Matriculation, and Student Equity and Success committees. (4B.2.b.7) This
positioned the college to be ready for implementation of the Student Success Act of
2012 requirements, as well as focusing the college’s priority on teaching and
learning. The President, in consultation with constituency groups, supported the
establishment of a faculty Student Success Coordinator who will facilitate this
process with the existing Student Success Team effective spring 2014. (4B.2.b.8)
This team consists of faculty and administrators from Student Services and
Instruction. The work team will consist of a combination of staff, faculty,
administrators, and students.
The President supports and strengthens the participatory governance processes by
ensuring that the work of the College Council, the central recommending body in
the process, is accessible with bi-monthly council agendas and minutes posted on
the college’s website. (4B.2.b.9) The President also ensures that the college
community understands the importance of the Institutional Effectiveness
framework: Integrated Planning and Resource Allocation, Student Success Team,
and Accreditation through its bi-monthly council agendas and minutes. The
President leads the participatory governance process emphasizing a collegial
environment which is well defined in the West Valley College Shared Decision
Making Plan. (4B.2.b.10)
The President led the college to engage in a data-driven culture using accurate
analytical metrics to evaluate and plan college operations on all levels. The Director
of Research, Planning, and Institutional Effectiveness directly reports to the
President and also works closely with the Vice President of Instruction. The
Director of Research, Planning, and Institutional Effectiveness provides Program
Review, Student Learning Outcome and other base-line data for faculty and
administrators. (4B.2.b.11) The newly instituted Scorecard data provided by the
State Chancellor’s office is located on the homepage of the college website.
(4B.2.b.12) The Student Success Coordinator and its team will continue to use data
Standard IV: Leadership and Governance 479
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
readily available to the college community and beyond. The President ensured that
the Scorecard data was widely discussed through the participatory governance
process and encouraged further discussion and planning using both quantitative
and qualitative department data to review, analyze, and assess student success
from a holistic perspective.
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard. Through appropriate planning and evaluation, the
President guides institutional improvement of the teaching and learning
environment. The President and the constituency groups at the college share a
commitment to working together collaboratively to set values, goals, and priorities.
The college constituency groups appoint representatives to existing college-wide
committees.
Actionable Improvement Plans
None.
Evidence
4B.2.b.1
WVC Mission
http://www.westvalley.edu/mission.html
4B.2.b.2
WVC Annual Goals and Objectives
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accredi
tation/documents/201314_go_matrix_10_28_13.pdf
4B.2.b.3
WVC Educational and Facilities Master
Plan
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accredi
tation/2013/evidence/3d/2009_wvc_educationa
l_and_facilities_master_plan.pdf
4B.2.b.4
Integrated Planning and Resource
Allocation Process
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accredi
tation/integrated_planning_diagram.html
4B.2.b.5
College Council Retreat Agenda
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/College
_Council/Documents/College_Council_Retreats/
4B.2.b.6
Institutional Effectiveness Framework
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accredi
tation/2013/evidence/recommendations/Institu
tional_Effectivenss_SS_Team_11-6-12.pdf
4B.2.b.7
Student Success Team Framework
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accredi
tation/student_success_diagram.html
4B.2.b.8
Student Success Coordinator
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accredi
tation/2013/evidence/4b/Student_Success_Coor
dinator.pdf
4B.2.b.9
College Council Agendas and Minutes
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/College
_Council/
Standard IV: Leadership and Governance 480
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
4B.2.b.10
West Valley College Shared Decision
Making Plan
http://westvalley.edu/about/governance.html
4B.2.b.11
Office of Institutional Research and
Planning
http://www.westvalley.edu/research/
4B.2.b.12
Student Success Scorecard
http://scorecard.cccco.edu/scorecardrates.aspx?
CollegeID=493
Standard IVB.2.c
The President assures the implementation of statutes, regulations, and governing
board policies and assures that institutional practices are consistent with
institutional mission and policies.
Descriptive Summary
The President assures the implementation of statutes, regulations, and governing
board policies and assures that institutional practices are consistent with
institutional mission and policies through various methods.
The President meets with the Executive Management Team (EMT) of the district
and of the college to discuss these matters and issues of consistency and
effectiveness of implementation. The President meets weekly with the College
Cabinet (3 Vice Presidents and Deans). In addition, the President and his staff are in
regular contact with the State Chancellor’s Office. The Vice President of Instruction
is active on the state-wide Implementation and Oversight Committee for The
Student Transfer Achievement Reform Act (SB 1440), and the Vice President of
Student Services is active on the state-wide Student Success Task Force focusing on
Recommendation #4—Aligning Courses to meet Student Needs and Basic Skills etools Task Force all of which provide access to information on pending changes or
additions to the state statues, initiatives, and/or regulations that could potentially
impact the college.
Board Policy 2430 designates the Chancellor as the sole employee and Chief
Executive of the district. (4B.2.c.1) The policy in effect gives the Chancellor
executive responsibility of administrating the policies adopted by the Board. The
President may delegate any powers of duties entrusted to his office by the Board,
but he is specifically responsible to the Chancellor for the execution of such
delegated duties and powers. The Chancellor is empowered to reasonably interpret
Board Policy, and in some situations where there is no Board direction, the
Standard IV: Leadership and Governance 481
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Chancellor has the power to carry out actions to address problems or issues that
affect the district.
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard. The President and his staff ensure that they are
informed about state statutes, regulations, and board policies and communicate
these in staff meetings and participatory governance groups, and that law and
policies are adhered to in practice. All college work is based upon the college
mission and the Educational Master Plan, which also includes the college’s annual
Goals and Objectives and metrics. (4B.2.c.2, 3) Feedback is incorporated into the
participatory governance process on a regular basis.
Actionable Improvement Plans
None.
Evidence
4B.2.c.1
Board Policy 2430
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2013/eviden
ce/4b/4B1j5_BP_2430.pdf
4B.2.c.2
Educational and
Facilities Master Plan
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2013/eviden
ce/3d/2009_wvc_educational_and_facilities_master_plan.pdf
4B.2.c.3
Annual Goals and
Objectives
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/goals_objecti
ves.html
Standard IVB.2.d
The President effectively controls budget and expenditures.
Descriptive Summary
The President efficiently manages fiscal resources under his supervision. Working
with the Vice President of Administrative Services and college administrative
services personnel, the President helps bring together the many pieces that
comprise the college budget. Priorities are set through institutional planning,
beginning with the college’s annual Goals and Objectives, which define its goals for
all student learning programs and services. (4B.2.d.1) To fulfill its goals, as part of
the Integrated Planning and Resource Allocation process, the college engages in
additional planning and evaluation to fully understand its needs, including Program
Review (4B.2.d.2), Student Learning Outcome and Assessment (4B.2.d.3), and the
Educational and Facilities Master Plan. (4B.2.d.4) In fall 2013, the college’s budget
Standard IV: Leadership and Governance 482
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
planning and allocation process was further developed and adopted by the
participatory governance groups making the college’s Integrated Planning and
Resource Allocation Plan a year-long continuous process. (4B.2.d.5) The Budget and
Resource Advisory Council (BRAC) is a participatory sub-committee of the College
Council, comprised of representation from the Academic Senate, Classified Senate,
Associate Students Organization (ASO) Student Senate, and college administration.
Based on the college mission, goals, and objectives, as well as informed by Program
Review, the BRAC reviews and evaluates budget and resource requests for the
coming fiscal year.
The product of the BRAC’s efforts is an advisory report
accompanying the college’s proposed tentative budget, presented to the College
Council and President. Similarly, the BRAC reviews and advises College Council for
the college’s Final Budget.
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard. The process is an effective and inclusive method
of controlling the budget due to a broad representation of faculty, staff,
administration, and students who extensively study and evaluate the programs as
part of the college’s Integrated Planning and Resource Allocation process. This
allows the College Council and President to make informed decisions. The
President effectively controls budget and expenditures in presenting balanced
budgets to the district.
Actionable Improvement Plans
None.
Evidence
4B.2.d.1
Annual Goals and Objectives
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/g
oals_objectives.html
4B.2.d.2
Program Review
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/programreview/
4B.2.d.3
SLO/A and Assessment
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Student_Learni
ng_Outcomes/
4B.2.d.4
Educational and Facilities Master
Plan
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2
013/evidence/3d/2009_wvc_educational_and_facilities_
master_plan.pdf
4B.2.d.5
Budget and Resource Allocation
Council document
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditation/2
013/evidence/3d/brac_12_17_13.pdf
Standard IV: Leadership and Governance 483
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Standard IVB.2.e
The President works and communicates effectively with the communities served
by the institution.
Descriptive Summary
The President frequently attends community meetings, holds Town Hall meetings
and e-mails faculty and staff to communicate important information or discuss
community college issues. (4B.2.e.1)
The President is deeply committed to keeping the local communities informed
about West Valley College, as illustrated by his involvement with a variety of
organizations. The President participates in the Rotary Clubs of Saratoga and
Campbell, and maintains memberships to the Chambers of Commerce for Saratoga,
Los Gatos, and Campbell. The President frequently participates with surrounding
City Councils and four-year institutions. The college hosts an annual Saratoga
Chamber of Commerce mixer, and in 2012, the college hosted a joint mixer
including the Scotts Valley, Los Gatos, Campbell, and Saratoga Chambers of
Commerce in the new campus center. The President participates in the logistics of
the annual Saratoga Rotary Art Show (4B.2.e.2), hosted on the West Valley Campus
and with a portion of the wine sale proceeds donated to support the college.
The President actively supports the college's efforts to establish "Entrepreneurship"
as a core competency and an institutional value for the college community and its
students. To this end, the president advocates for the following important
entrepreneurship activities: college membership in the National Association of
Community College Entrepreneurs (NACCE); college sponsorship of the Silicon
Valley StartUp Cup Business Model coaching sessions and competitions; and a
growing partnership with the Kauffmann Foundation, the nation's premier
educational organization for entrepreneurship. The college hosts regular
community events promoting entrepreneurship, innovative business opportunities,
and global business partnerships. (4B.2.e.3)
The President meets quarterly with the City of Saratoga Manager and local
superintendents and principals of the Campbell and Saratoga/Los Gatos High School
Districts. West Valley has a strong Middle College Program, and hosts an annual
High School Counselors’ conference. The President serves on the West Valley
Mission Foundation Board and collaborates with district and college personnel and
Foundation Board members promoting college programs and services while raising
money for special projects on campus. (4B.2.e.4) The most notable example of this
Standard IV: Leadership and Governance 484
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
being a gift from a private donor in the amount of $3.5 million given in 2012-2013
toward the renovation of the planetarium, and its promotion to the local
community once completed.
The President’s office is heavily involved in planning and hosting special fundraising
events for specific academic programs at the college which are open to the public:
Musical Theater Galas, and a Harvest Festival held at a local winery. (4B.2.e.5) The
college hosts a weekly Saratoga Farmers’ Market, annual American Heart
Association Heart Walk, the annual “Clash” high school debate competition, and
supports the participation of college faculty and staff on a Leukemia Lymphoma
Walk-For-A-Cure team.
Local neighbors and community members receive invitations from the president’s
office for ribbon-cutting ceremonies for new and renovated buildings on campus,
enabling them to better understand how their community-supported Measures H
and C bond funding has been used to upgrade our facilities and infrastructure.
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard. The President communicates extensively with the
college community in various formats. The President is also involved in a wide
variety of community and business partnerships.
Actionable Improvement Plans
None.
Evidence
4B.2.e.1
Town Hall Meetings emails etc.
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accredit
ation/2013/evidence/1b/FAIT/FAIT_Town_Hall_M
eeting_Announcement_10-24-13.pdf
4B.2.e.2
Rotary Art Show
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accredit
ation/2013/evidence/4b/Rotary_Art_Show.pdf
4B.2.e.3
Start Up Cup
http://siliconvalley.startupcup.com/
4B.2.e.4
West Valley Mission Foundation
http://www.wvm.edu/foundation/
4B.2.e.5
Musical Theater Gala
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accredit
ation/2013/evidence/2b/sweet_charity.pdf
Standard IV: Leadership and Governance 485
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Standard IVB.3
In multi-college districts or systems, the district/system provides primary
leadership in setting and communicating expectations of educational excellence
and integrity throughout the district/system and assures support for the effective
operation of the colleges. It establishes clearly defined roles of authority and
responsibility between the colleges and the district/system and acts as the liaison
between the colleges and the governing board.
Standard IVB.3.a
The district/system clearly delineates and communicates the operational
responsibilities and functions of the district/system from those of the colleges and
consistently adheres to this delineation in practice.
Descriptive Summary
The district does not have specific policies on the delineation between its
operations and those of the colleges, but the separate nature of these
responsibilities and functions is clearly communicated to the college community,
district personnel, and the public through the West Valley Mission Community
College (WVMCCD) Organizational Chart. (4B.3.a.1) This chart maps out the
structures of the district office and both colleges and is displayed prominently on
the district website.
In addition, the district-college delineation is clearly
communicated through other published materials, structures, and practices. The
role of each institution are regularly discussed and communicated between the
district and colleges at the weekly with the district Executive Management Team
(EMT) meetings as well as in district committee meetings and other discussions. An
Organizational Review and a new annual Goals and Objectives for both colleges
completed since the last accreditation process further articulate responsibilities.
(4B.3.a.2, 3) Regular meetings of the EMT and district participatory governance
groups, such as District Council, reinforce and help maintain clarity in the area of
responsibility delineation.
In preparation for this Self Study, the college and district jointly developed the
District Function Map. (4B.3.a.4) This matrix was developed and agreed upon in
several meetings between the college accreditation co-chairs and district
administrators, including the Chancellor, the Vice Chancellors of Administrative
Services and Human Resources. The West Valley College Accreditation Steering
Committee reviewed, approved, and followed the District Function Map as a guide
Standard IV: Leadership and Governance 486
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
for the appropriate division of responsibilities during the preparation of this Self
Study.
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard. The delineation of district-college operation is
clearly communicated in published materials, structures, and practices. Discussions
are ongoing about further clarifying these roles.
Actionable Improvement Plans
None
Evidence
4B.3.a.1
WVMCCD Organizational Chart
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accredit
ation/2013/evidence/4b/wvmccd_org_chart_201
2_13.pdf
4B.3.a.2
Organizational Review
http://www.westvalley.edu/commitees/Accredita
tion/2013/evidence/1b/ccbt_report.pdf
4B.3.a.3
Goals and Objectives
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accredit
ation/goals_objectives.html
4B.3.a.4
District Function Map
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accredit
ation/2013/evidence/4b/DIST_DISJ_Functional_M
ap_Table_20121017_final.pdf
Standard IVB.3.b
The district/system provides effective services that support the colleges in their
missions and functions.
Descriptive Summary
The district provides centralized support for the colleges (West Valley College and
Mission College) in the areas of Human Resources, Information Systems (IS),
Administrative (Fiscal) Services, Payroll Services, Purchasing, Reprographic Services,
Business Services, Facility Operation and Services, and Campus Police Services.
(4B.3.b.1) The district services provide infrastructure and support to the colleges
that allows effective teaching and learning services to students in the district. The
Chancellor has ultimate oversight for the district and at the same time provides
leadership to the colleges and support to the Board of Trustees.
Standard IV: Leadership and Governance 487
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
Chapters 6 and 7 of District policy explicitly address the provision of comprehensive
services to each college and the central offices of the district. (4B.3.b.2) Centralized
services include the following:








Advancement Office
District Police
Facilities, Construction and Maintenance
Fiscal Services
General Services
Human Resources
Information Systems
Public Information
The Vice Chancellor of Administrative Services reports directly to the Chancellor
and oversees Fiscal Services and Facilities and Operation Services. Fiscal Services
includes Accounting, Budget, , finance, grants, payroll, Police and risk management.
(4B.3.b.3) Facilities provide centralized support to both colleges in the areas of
engineering, facilities planning, and construction management services, Custodial
and Maintenance and Grounds. (4B.3.b.4)
Human Resources is currently headed by the interim Associate Vice Chancellor, who
reports directly to the Chancellor. (4B.3.b.5) The position oversees the areas of
employment services, retirement services, benefit services, and the collective
bargaining process. The Associate Vice Chancellor of Human Resources serves as
the chief negotiation officer for the district
The IS department was directly reporting to the Vice Chancellor of Administrative
Services until spring 2013; however, the reporting structure changed, and it is now
directly reporting to the Chancellor. The director of this unit is directly responsible
for providing technology services and support throughout the district, and advises
the Chancellor on district wide technology decisions.
Self-Evaluation
The college meets this standard. The district provides support in the areas of
Administrative and Business Services, Human Resources, Information Systems,
Fiscal Services, Payroll services, Purchasing, and Campus Police Services. Face-toface meetings between executives, presidents, and directors provide an
opportunity for dialogue regarding these district services to the colleges.
Standard IV: Leadership and Governance 488
[West Valley College Self Evaluation Report] March 2014
District Services had key leadership changes in the last two years. A new Chancellor
arrived in July 2012; the Associate Vice Chancellor of Human Resources has been
occupied by a temporary and interim individual since July 2012.
Actionable Improvement Plans
• Deeply and critically examine and raise the standard of operations within
the Information Systems (IS) unit at the district.
Evidence
4B.3.b.1
WVMCCD Organizational Chart
4B.3.b.2
WVMCCD Board Policy - Chapters 6
and 7
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditatio
n/2013/evidence/4b/wvmccd_org_chart_2012_13.pd
f
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditatio
n/2013/evidence/4b/4B3b2_BP_CH6.pdf
http://www.westvalley.edu/committees/Accreditatio
n/2013/evidence/4b/4B3b2_BP_CH6.pdf
4B.3.b.3
Vice Chancellor of Administrative
Services
4B.3.b.4
Facilities Department
http://wvm.edu/group.aspx?id=176&linkidentifier=id
&itemid=176
4B.3.b.5
Human Resources
http://wvm.edu/group.aspx?id=178&linkidentifier=id
&itemid=178
http://wvm.edu/content.aspx?id=3793
Standard IVB.3.c
The district/syste