LDC Module
A Medieval Road Trip
Information Sheet for Informational/Explanatory Module
Module title:
A Medieval Road Trip
Module description
(overview):
In this module, students will conduct research on The Canterbury Tales and related literature to determine how it regards human morality. Students
will consider the human condition (focus on morality and religious beliefs) then and now. Are they related? If so, to what extent? Students will
grapple with the texts to glean this information for themselves and form an opinion based on the information found. Students will practice and apply
skills of close reading and writing according to information/explanatory text.
Template task
(include number,
type, level):
Task 21 Template: [Insert question] After reading ________ (literature or informational texts), write a/an ________ (report, essay or substitutes) that
addresses the question and analyzes ________ (content), providing examples to clarify your analysis. What conclusions or implications can you
draw? L2 In your discussion, address the credibility and origin of sources in view of your research topic. L3 Identify any gaps or unanswered
questions. Optional: Include ______ (e.g., bibliography). (Informational or Explanatory/Analysis)
Teaching task:
How does medieval literature regard human morality? After reading The Canterbury Tales and various related texts, write an essay that
addresses the question and analyzes this morality, providing examples to clarify your analysis. What conclusions or implications can
you draw? L2 In your discussion, address the credibility and origin of sources in view of your research topic. L3 Identify any gaps or
unanswered questions. Include a bibliography.
Grade(s)/Level:
12
Discipline:
English Language Arts
Course:
English 12
Author(s):
Sherry Williams
Contact
information:
[email protected]
Section 1: What Task?
TEACHING TASK
Teaching task:
Does medieval literature regard human morality? After reading The Canterbury Tales and various related texts, write an essay that addresses
the question and analyzes the human condition, providing examples to clarify your analysis. What conclusions or implications can you
draw? In your discussion, address the credibility and origin of sources in view of your research topic. Identify any gaps or unanswered
questions. Include a bibliography.
Reading texts:
Canterbury Cathedral Worship Pilgrimage Living History. Virtual tour of the Canterbury Cathedral. 2013.
http://www.canterbury-cathedral.org/visit/tour/.
Cathedral Murder at Canterbury YouTube video. 11 June 2011
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DtJX0430bQw.
A Knight’s Tale – YouTube movie trailer. 7 September 2007
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xNpGF4jFrfw.
Canterbury Tales – General Prologue in Middle English. YouTube video.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v-xpzfsY4bU.
The Canterbury Tales – Episode 1. YouTube video. 19 January 2013.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E3zUoNG_P_0.
The Canterbury Tales (“California Dreaming” by the Momas and the Papas)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vBa5nN_JyPk&feature=youtu.be
The Canterbury Tales Secondary Solutions. Literature Guide. 2011.
www.4secondarysolutions.com
Geoffery Chaucer: The Founder of Our Language. 20 January 2012.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uxqAwT5IpL8.
Luminarium: An Anthology of English Literature Geoffery Chaucer. Resources for Individual Canterbury Tales. 31 August 2012.
http://www.luminarium.org/medlit/chaucadd.htm
The Canterbury Tales, The Prologue. Prentice Hall Literature Timeless Voices, Timeless Themes The British Tradition. 2005. Pearson Education, Inc. Pearson
Prentice Hall, Upper Saddle River, New Jersey.
Student Research Sources:
The Canterbury Tales: General Prologue & Frame Story
http://www.shmoop.com/canterbury-tales-prologue/
Luminarium: Anthology of English Literature
http://www.luminarium.org/medlit/chaucer.htm
The Canterbury Tales
http://thebestnotes.com/booknotes/Canterbury_Tales/Canterbury_Tales01.html
About.com: Classic Literature
http://classiclit.about.com/od/canterburytales/fr/aa_canterbury.htm
Background information on characters
http://prezi.com/nvj9xfefan0m/copy-of-canterbury-tales-prologue/
Purdue Owl Writing Lab
https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/747/15/
Background to
share with
students:
Biographical information on Chaucer.
The foundation of the human condition has changed little over the centuries. Humanity today has the same basic needs as it did hundreds of years ago.
Acceptance, love, basic needs (food, shelter, etc.) and the belief in a higher power are as viable today as yesterday.
Extension
(optional):
Students create a movie trailer for one of the tales.
CONTENT STANDARDS FROM STATE OR DISTRICT
Standards
source:
NUMBER
CONTENT STANDARDS
SL 1112.1a.
Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text,
including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they
interact and build on one another to produce a complex account; provide an objective summary of the text. (Literary)
Analyze the impact of the author’s choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama (e.g., where a story is set, how
the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed).
Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact
of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or
beautiful (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors.)
Analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a text (e.g., the choice of where to begin or end a story, the
choice to provide a comedic or tragic resolution) contribute to its overall structure and meaning as well as its aesthetic impact. (Literary)
Analyze a case in which grasping a point of view requires distinguishing what is directly stated in a text from what is really meant (e.g., satire,
sarcasm, irony, or understatement
Analyze multiple interpretations of a story, drama, or poem (e.g., recorded or live production of a play or recorded novel or poetry),
evaluating how each version interprets the source text. (Include at least one play by Shakespeare and one play by an American dramatist.)
(Literary)
Demonstrate knowledge of eighteenth-, nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century foundational works of American literature, including how
two or more texts from the same period treat similar themes or topics.
By the end of grade 11, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the grades 11–CCR text complexity band
proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range. By the end of grade 12, read and comprehend literature, including
stories, dramas, and poems, at the high end of the grades 11–CCR text complexity band independently and proficiently.
Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text,
including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain. (Literary)
Determine two or more central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and
build on one another to provide a complex analysis; provide an objective summary of the text. (Literary)
Analyze a complex set of ideas or sequence of events and explain how specific individuals, ideas, or events interact and develop over the
course of the text. (Literary)
Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze
how an author uses and refines the meaning of a key term or terms over the course of a text
Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text in which the rhetoric is particularly effective, analyzing how style and content
contribute to the power, persuasiveness or beauty of the text.
By the end of grade 11, read and comprehend literary nonfiction in the grades 11–CCR text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as
needed at the high end of the range. By the end of grade 12, read and comprehend literary nonfiction at the high end of the grades 11–CCR
text complexity band independently and proficiently.
Come to discussions prepared having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence
from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas.
SL 1112.1b.
Work with peers to promote civil, democratic discussions and decision-making, set clear goals and deadlines, and establish individual roles as
needed.
SL 11-12.1c
Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that probe reasoning and evidence; ensure a hearing for a full range of positions
RL 11-12.1.
RL 11-12.2.
RL 11-12.3
RL 11-12.4
RL 11-12.5
RL 11-12.6
RL 11-12.7
RL 11-12.9.
RL 1112.10
RI 11-12.1
RI 11-12.2.
RI 11-12.3
RI 11-12.4
RI 11-12.6
RI 1112.10.
on a topic or issue; clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions; and promote divergent and creative perspectives.
SL 11-12.1d Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives; synthesize comments, claims, and evidence made on all sides of an issue; resolve
contradictions when possible; and determine what additional information or research is required to deepen the investigation or complete
the task.
Make strategic use of digital media (e.g., textual, graphical, audio, visual, and interactive elements) in presentations to enhance
SL 11-12.5
understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence and to add interest.
SL 11-12.6. Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating a command of formal English when indicated or appropriate
L 11-12.1.
Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
L 11-12.1a.
Apply the understanding that usage is a matter of convention, can change over time, and is sometimes contested
L 11-12.1b.
L 11-12.2.
Resolve issues of complex or contested usage, consulting references (e.g., Merriam-Webster’s Dictionary of English Usage, Garner’s Modern
American Usage) as needed.
Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing
L 11-12.2b
Spell correctly
L 11-12.3.
Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style,
and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening.
L 11-12.4
Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grades 11–12 reading and content,
choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.
Use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence, paragraph, or text; a word’s position or function in a sentence) as a clue to the meaning
of a word or phrase.
Identify and correctly use patterns of word changes that indicate different meanings or parts of speech (e.g., conceive, conception,
conceivable).
Consult general and specialized reference materials (e.g., dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses), both print and digital, to find the
pronunciation of a word or determine or clarify its precise meaning, it’s part of speech, its etymology, or its standard usage.
Verify the preliminary determination of the meaning of a word or phrase (e.g., by checking the inferred meaning in context or in a
dictionary).
Analyze nuances in the meaning of words with similar denotations
L 11-12.4a.
L 11-12.4b
L 11-12.4c
L 11-12.4d
L 11-12.5b
COMMON CORE STATE STANDARDS
READING STANDARDS FOR INFORMATIONAL OR EXPLANATORY
“Built In” Reading Standards
1 – Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical
inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to
support conclusions drawn from the test.
2 – Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development;
summarize the key supporting details and ideas.
“When Appropriate” Reading Standards
3 – Analyze how and why individuals, events, and ideas develop and interact
over the course of a text.
5 – Analyze the structure of texts, including how specific sentences, paragraphs,
and larger portions of the text (e.g. a section, chapter, scene, or stanza) relate
to each other and the whole.
to each other and the whole.
4 – Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including
determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how
specific word choices shape meaning or tone.
6 – Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the content and style of a
text.
10 – Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts
independently and proficiently.
7 – Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse formats and media,
including visually and quantitatively, as well as in words.
8 – Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text,
including the validity of the reasoning as well as the relevance and sufficiency
of the evidence.
9 – Analyze how two or more texts address similar themes or topics in order
to build knowledge or to compare the approaches the authors
take.
WRITING STANDARDS FOR INFORMATIONAL OR EXPLANATORY
dently and proficiently. “Built-in” Writing Standards
“When Appropriate” Writing Standards
2 – Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas 1 – Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or
and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection,
texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
organization, and analysis of content.
4 – Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization 3 – Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using
and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.
5 – Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing,
rewriting, or trying a new approach.
6 – Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing and
to interact and collaborate with others.
9 – Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis,
reflection, and research.
7 – Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects based on
focused questions, demonstrating understanding of the subject under
investigation.
8 – Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources, assess
the credibility and accuracy of each source, and integrate the information while
avoiding plagiarism.
10 – Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection,
and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a
range of tasks, purposes, and audience.
SCORING RUBRIC FOR INFORMATIONAL OR EXPLANATORY TEMPLATE TASKS
Scoring
Elements
Focus
Controlling
Not Yet
1
Development
Organization
Content
Understanding
2
2.5
3
Advanced
3.5
4
Addresses prompt appropriately,
Addresses prompt appropriately and
lacks focus or is off-task.
but with a weak or uneven focus.
Establishes a controlling idea with a
maintains a clear, steady focus.
Addresses all aspects of prompt
appropriately and maintains a strongly
developed focus.
Establishes a controlling idea
with a clear purpose maintained
throughout the response.
Establishes a strong controlling idea
with a clear purpose maintained
throughout the response.
Presents information from reading
materials relevant to the prompt
with accuracy and sufficient detail.
(L2) Addresses the credibility of
sources when prompted.
Accurately presents information
relevant to all parts of the prompt with
effective selection of sources and details
from reading materials. (L2) Addresses
the credibility of sources and identifies
salient sources when prompted.
Presents thorough and detailed
Attempts to establish a controlling
idea, but lacks a clear purpose.
general purpose.
Attempts to present information in
response to the prompt, but lacks
connections or relevance to the
purpose of the prompt. (L2) Does
not address the credibility of
sources as prompted.
Attempts to provide details in
response to the prompt, including
retelling, but lacks sufficient
development or relevancy. (L2)
Implication is missing, irrelevant,
or illogical. (L3) Gap/unanswered
question is missing or irrelevant.
Presents information from reading
materials relevant to the purpose
of the prompt with minor lapses
in accuracy or completeness. (L2)
Begins to address the credibility of
sources
when prompted.
Presents
appropriate
details to
support the focus and controlling
idea. (L2) Briefly notes a relevant
implication or (L3) a relevant gap/
unanswered question.
Presents appropriate and sufficient
details to support the focus and
controlling idea. (L2) Explains
relevant and plausible implications,
and (L3) a relevant gap/unanswered
question.
information to strongly support
the focus and controlling idea. (L2)
Thoroughly discusses relevant and
Uses an appropriate organizational
structure to address the specific
requirements of the prompt, with
some lapses in coherence or
awkward use of the organizational
structure
Maintains an appropriate
organizational structure to address
the specific requirements of the
prompt.
salient
implications
or consequences,
Maintains
an organizational
structure
that intentionally and effectively
and (L3)
one or
significantofgaps/
enhances
themore
presentation
information as required by the specific
unanswered
questions.
prompt.
Attempts to demonstrate standard
English conventions, but lacks
cohesion and control of grammar,
usage, and mechanics. Sources are
used without citation.
Demonstrates an uneven command
of standard English conventions and
cohesion. Uses language
Demonstrates a command of
standard English conventions
and cohesion, with few errors.
Response includes language and
Demonstrates and maintains a welldeveloped command of standard English
conventions and cohesion, with few
errors. Response includes language
and tone consistently appropriate
to the audience, purpose, and
Attempts to include disciplinary
content in explanations, but
understanding of content is weak;
content is irrelevant, inappropriate,
or inaccurate.
Briefly notes disciplinary content
relevant to the prompt; shows
basic or uneven understanding of
content; minor errors in
explanation.
tone appropriate to the audience,
purpose, and specific requirements
of the prompt. Cites sources using
an appropriate format with only
minor
errors.
Accurately
presents
disciplinary
Attempts to organize ideas, but
lacks control of structure.
Conventions
1.5
Meets Expectations
Attempts to address prompt, but
Idea
Reading/
Research
Approaches Expectations
and tone with some inaccurate,
inappropriate, or uneven features.
Inconsistently cites sources.
content relevant to the prompt
with sufficient explanations that
demonstrate understanding.
specific requirements of the prompt.
Consistently
cites sources
using an
Integrates relevant
and accurate
appropriate
format.
disciplinary content with thorough
explanations that demonstrate in-depth
understanding.
7
Section 2: What Skills?
SKILL
DEFINITION
SKILLS CLUSTER 1: PREPARING FOR THE TASK
1. Task engagement
Ability to connect the task and new content to existing knowledge, skills, experiences, interests, and concerns.
2. Task analysis
Ability to understand and explain the task’s prompt and rubric.
SKILLS CLUSTER 2: READING PROCESS
1. Active reading
Ability to identify the central point and main supporting elements of a text. L2 Ability to identify and analyze the credibility and origin of sources. L3
Ability to identify gaps or unanswered questions.
2. Essential vocabulary
Ability to identify and master terms essential to understanding a text.
3. Academic integrity
Ability to use and credit sources appropriately.
4. Note-taking
Ability to select important facts and passages for use in one’s own writing
SKILLS CLUSTER 3: TRANSITION TO WRITING
1. Bridging
Ability to begin linking reading results to writing task.
SKILLS CLUSTER 4: WRITING PROCESS
1. Thesis Statement
Ability to establish a thesis statement and consolidate information relevant to task.
2. Planning
Ability to develop a line of thought and text structure appropriate to an informational/explanatory task.
3. Development
Ability to construct an initial draft with an emerging line of thought and structure. L2 Ability to analyze the credibility and origin of sources. L3 Ability to
identify gaps or unanswered questions.
4. Revision
Ability to refine text, including line of thought, language usage, and tone as appropriate to audience and purpose.
5. Editing
Ability to proofread and format a piece to make it more effective.
6. Completion
Ability to submit final piece that meets expectations.
8
Section 3: What Instruction?
PACING
SKILL AND DEFINITION
PRODUCT AND PROMPT
SCORING (PRODUCT “MEETS
EXPECTATIONS” IF IT…)
INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES
Students respond to Anticipation Guide in
their writer’s notebook/small group
discussion. Points will be given for
completion of guide.
Model response for anticipation guide.
SKILLS CLUSTER 1: PREPARING FOR THE TASK
Day 1-2
1. Task engagement
Ability to connect the task and
new content to existing
knowledge, skills, experiences,
interests, and concerns.
Students will:





Day 3
2. Task analysis
Ability to understand and
explain the task’s prompt and
rubric.
Respond to Anticipation
Guide
View YouTube video of A
Knight’s Tale and respond to
the statement: “Does ‘old’
literature exist in today’s
society?”
You Tube video of The
Prologue in old English
View YouTube video on
biographical information of
Chaucer – fill “cheat sheet”
note card
Complete exit slip
Read the task prompt, and in your
own words, paraphrase/summarize
the task prompt in writer’s
notebook.
Read/analyze the scoring guide
(rubric) in small groups. In your
own words, describe the important
features of an effective response to
this prompt. Students write in
writer’s notebook.
Exit slip – write 2 complete sentences –
something you didn’t know!
Facilitate small group discussion.
Model notes over biographical video.
Facilitate think-pair-share
Give example of exit slip.
Teacher checks writers’ notebooks.
Share examples of type of text students
will produce (either from past students
or from professional writers).
Have students read examples of writing
and use rubric for scoring.
SKILLS CLUSTER 2: READING PROCESS
9
Day 4-5
1. Text selection
Students will:
Ability to identify appropriate
texts.
Navigate a virtual tour and complete a
map of Canterbury Cathedral.
Points will be given for completion of
the map and tour response paragraph.
2. Active reading
Ability to identify the central
point and main supporting
elements of a text.
L2 Ability to identify and
analyze the credibility and
origin of sources.
L3 Ability to identify gaps
and unanswered question.
Silent active reading of lines 1-42 of
The Prologue. Students grapple with
the text individually. Complete guided
questions/character chart in pairs.
Students work in pairs to create a
presentation of their assigned
“pilgrim”.
Students will choose from several of
the “Tales” to read and present the
story to whole class.
Day 14
(Ongoing)
Day 1516
3. Essential vocabulary
Ability to identify and master
terms essential to
understanding a text.
4. Academic integrity
Ability to use and credit
sources appropriately.
Students keep a list of unfamiliar
words/phrases – define
Facilitate whole class discussion
Points will be given for successful
completion of the guided questions.
Exit Slip
1-something you learned
2-something you still question
Points will be given for presentation of
character.
Students will review appropriate MLA
format.
Facilitate think-pair-share
Facilitate small group work.
Facilitate pairs/small groups.
Facilitate jigsaw activity
Monitor appropriate use of technology
for presentations.
Points given for re-telling of tale and
completion of guided questions.
Points for vocabulary linking activity =
Students complete vocabulary linking
activity in pairs.
Students define “plagiarism” in
writer’s notebook.
Model response to tour paragraph.
Facilitate think/Pair share
Students write a detailed paragraph in
response to the tour in their writer’s
notebook.
Day 613
Model how to complete Cathedral map.
Facilitate Pair/Share unfamiliar words
and definitions.
Facilitate pairs.
Model vocabulary linking activity
Provides accurate definition of
plagiarism.
Facilitate discussions of plagiarism and
academic penalties for plagiarism.
Model proper MLA works cited page, intext citations, and formatting.
Model “Easybib.com”
10
Day 1719
5. Note-taking
Ability to select important
facts and passages for use in
one’s own writing.
As presentations/videos occurred,
students should complete
character/tales charts noting specific
details.
Use credible sources strategies.
Identify key elements from texts and
videos.
Accurate citations (in-text and works
cited)
Model note-taking format
Model paraphrasing/summarizing
Model choosing relevant information that
supports a thesis.
Teach “4 Square Method” of analysis.
SKILLS CLUSTER 3: TRANSITION TO WRITING
Day 2023
1. Bridging
Ability to begin linking reading
results to writing task.
Students participate in Socratic Circles
to gather more information
Active participation in circles.
4 Square Activity for important
quotes.
Reflection in writer’s notebook.
Model Socratic Circles
Model 4 Square
Write in writer’s notebook.
SKILLS CLUSTER 4: WRITING PROCESS
Day 2427
1. Thesis/Topic
Ability to establish a thesis
statement and consolidate
information relevant to task.
2. Planning
Ability to develop a line of
thought and text structure
appropriate to an
informational/explanatory
task.
Read several examples of introductory
paragraphs.
Review student’s individual 4 Square
Follow LTF method of thesis/topic
development (in combination with 4
Square)
Outline points to include in essay
based on readings, your notes, note
supporting evidence.
Revisit task analysis
Active participation in small group
discussion
Teacher will provide examples of
thesis/topic statement development
through 4 square method
Facilitate small group discussion
Points given for concise thesis/topic
statement and introductory paragraph
Identify key elements that support thesis
Outline of essay supports controlling idea
Model creating an outline
11
3. Development
Ability to construct an initial
draft with an emerging line of
thought and structure.
L2 Ability to analyze the
credibility and origin of
sources.
Construct rough draft – include
introduction, body paragraphs, and
conclusion.
Provides complete draft
Include in-text citations
Appropriate citations
Adhere to MLA format
Thesis supported with body paragraphs.
Monitor/differentiate according to
students’ needs
Conference one-on-one with students
Draft points =
L3 Ability to identify gaps or
unanswered questions.
4. Revision
Peer edit according to peer edit form
Ability to refine text, including
line of thought, language
usage, and tone as
appropriate to audience and
purpose.
5. Editing
Ability to proofread and
format a piece to make it
more effective.
6. Completion
Ability to submit final piece
that meets expectations.
Provides complete draft.
Provide useful feedback
Supports opening with body paragraphs
Model peer revision
Improves upon earlier draft
Revise for standard grammatical
conventions
Adjust format as needed
All drafts, peer edits, and final draft
turned in with appropriate citations
Provides improved draft
Facilitate peer edit one additional time
Follows format
Fits the “Meets Expectations” category
in the rubric for the teaching task
Final essay points =
Total project points =
FOR TEACHERS
MATERIALS, REFERENCES, AND SUPPORTS
FOR STUDENTS
12
Anticipation Guide.
Students work in pairs to label blank cathedral map. * Handout
Must write a detailed response to the tour.
13
Section 4: What Results
STUDENT WORK SAMPLES
[Include at least two samples of student work at each scoring level.]
CLASSROOM ASSESSMENT TASK (OPTIONAL: MAY BE USED AS PRE-TEST OR POST-TEST)
Classroom assessment
task
Students will write a short reflection in which they address morality during the middle ages. Did the morality of the time reflect in their religious
beliefs?
Background to share
with students
(optional):
Reading texts:
Canterbury Cathedral Worship Pilgrimage Living History. Virtual tour of the Canterbury Cathedral. 2013.
http://www.canterbury-cathedral.org/visit/tour/.
Cathedral Murder at Canterbury YouTube video. 11 June 2011
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DtJX0430bQw.
A Knight’s Tale – YouTube movie trailer. 7 September 2007
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xNpGF4jFrfw.
Canterbury Tales – General Prologue in Middle English. YouTube video.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v-xpzfsY4bU.
The Canterbury Tales – Episode 1. YouTube video. 19 January 2013.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E3zUoNG_P_0.
The Canterbury Tales Secondary Solutions. Literature Guide. 2011.
www.4secondarysolutions.com
14
Geoffery Chaucer: The Founder of Our Language. 20 January 2012.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uxqAwT5IpL8.
Luminarium: An Anthology of English Literature Geoffery Chaucer. Resources for Individual Canterbury Tales. 31 August 2012.
http://www.luminarium.org/medlit/chaucadd.htm
The Canterbury Tales, The Prologue. Prentice Hall Literature Timeless Voices, Timeless Themes The British Tradition. 2005. Pearson Education, Inc.
Pearson Prentice Hall, Upper Saddle River, New Jersey.
15
Teacher Work Section
Here are added thoughts about teaching this module.
16
Appendix
The attached materials support teaching this module.
NEED TO ATTACH:






Anticipation Guide
Cathedral Tour Map
4 Square Handout
Prologue Pilgrim Handout
Moral Thermometer Handout
Character Analysis Handout
17
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A Medieval Road Trip - Arch Ford Education Service Cooperative