Wyong High School
Advanced English
Preliminary Course
Overview and Assessment Tasks
2014
1
Scope and Sequence
Week
1
Term 1- 2014
Term 2- 2014
Term 3- 2014
Term 4- 2014
Course outline and
introduction.
Comparative Study
of Text and
Context:
Critical Study of
Text:
HSC course
begins.
Prescribed texts:
Shakespeare and
film.
Prescribed text:
Prose Fiction or
Poetry
Issue course booklet.
Area of Study:
Changing Self
Prescribed text:
Film.
Task 2
2
(week 1/2)
Half Yearly Exam
3
4
5
Task 4
6
V/R Speech
7
Task 3
8
Listening/Writing
9
10
Task 1
Task 5
Reading/Writing/
Viewing/Representing
Yearly exam
11
2
PRELIMINARY ENGLISH COURSE OUTLINE 2013
ADVANCED ENGLISH
AREA OF STUDY
In the Area of Study, students explore and examine relationships between language and text, and
interrelationships among texts. They examine closely the individual qualities of texts while considering the
texts’ relationship to the wider context of the Area of Study. They synthesise ideas to clarify meaning and
develop new meanings. They take into account whether aspects such as context, purpose and register, text
structures, stylistic features, grammatical features and vocabulary are appropriate to the particular text.
AREA OF STUDY: CHANGING SELF
The Area of Study is focussed on the central concept of Changing Self. Through this focus, students explore
the ways in which texts depict changing self. It requires students to focus on the ways in which texts and,
more specifically, the language and construction of texts, helps the student in their understanding of the
concept of Changing Self. Changing Self is a process, not necessarily an end in itself. Therefore students
need to explore Changing Self through a comparative look at the two states (the before and after ‘change’)
and also focus on what is undergone or experienced in order to bring about the change. Analysis of the
Prescribed Text and Related Texts should focus on how meaning is made, therefore students learn how to
deconstruct texts, in terms of their purpose and audience, and the forms, features and structures of
language. Students study ONE prescribed text: film.
Students are required to supplement this study with texts of their own choosing (at least TWO) related to
the Area of Study
MODULE A Comparative Exploration of Texts and Contexts
This module requires students to explore how meanings of a pair of texts can be shaped and reshaped by
considering the nature of the connections between them. Students compare texts in order to explore them
in relation to their contexts. Students will develop an understanding of the effects of context, genre and
questions of value. Students examine and evaluate a pair of texts and consider the ways in which
appropriations generate reflections on texts, contexts, and the ways in which texts can be appropriated to
contemporary situations. Students study TWO texts: Shakespeare and Film.
MODULE B Close Study of Text
This module requires students to engage with and develop an informed personal understanding of a prose
fiction text. Through critical analysis and evaluation of its language, content and construction, students will
develop an appreciation of the textual integrity of the text. Students refine their own understanding and
interpretations of the text. Students explore how context influences their own and other’s responses to the
text and how the text has been received and valued. Students study a Prose Fiction Text or Poetry Text.
3
1
The Higher School Certificate Program of Study
The purpose of the Higher School Certificate program of study is to:

provide a curriculum structure which encourages students to complete secondary education;

–
–
–
–
–
foster the intellectual, social and moral development of students, in particular developing their:
knowledge, skills, understanding and attitudes in the fields of study they choose
capacity to manage their own learning
desire to continue learning in formal or informal settings after school
capacity to work together with others
respect for the cultural diversity of Australian society;

–
–
–
provide a flexible structure within which students can prepare for:
further education and training
employment
full and active participation as citizens;

provide formal assessment and certification of students’ achievements;

provide a context within which schools also have the opportunity to foster students’ physical and
spiritual development.
4
2
Rationale for English in Stage 6 Curriculum
The study of English is central to the learning and development of students in NSW and is the
mandatory subject in the Stage 6 curriculum. The importance of English in the curriculum is a
recognition of its role as the national language and increasingly as the language of international
communication. Proficiency in English enables students to take their place as confident, articulate
communicators, critical and imaginative thinkers and active participants in society.
English involves the study and use of language in its various textual forms, encompassing written,
spoken and visual texts of varying complexity, including the language systems of English through
which meaning is conveyed, interpreted and reflected.
The study of English enables students to recognise and use a diversity of approaches and texts to
meet the growing array of literacy demands, including higher-order social, aesthetic and cultural
literacy. This study is designed to promote a sound knowledge of the structure and function of the
English language and to develop effective English communication skills*. The English Stage 6
courses develop in students an understanding of literary expression and nurture an appreciation of
aesthetic values. Through reading, writing, listening, speaking, viewing and representing
experience, ideas and values, students are encouraged to adopt a critical approach to all texts and
to distinguish the qualities of texts. Students also develop English language skills to support their
study at Stage 6 and beyond.
In Stage 6, students come to understand the complexity of meaning, to compose and respond to
texts according to their form, content, purpose and audience, and to appreciate the personal,
social, historical, cultural and workplace contexts that produce and value them. Students reflect on
their reading and learning and understand that these processes are shaped by the contexts in which
they respond to and compose texts.
The study of English enables students to make sense of, and to enrich, their lives in personal, social
and professional situations and to deal effectively with change. Students develop a strong sense of
themselves as autonomous, reflective and creative learners. The English Stage 6 syllabus is
designed to develop in students the faculty to perceive and understand their world from a variety
of perspectives, and it enables them to appreciate the richness of Australia’s cultural diversity.
The syllabus is designed to develop enjoyment of English and an appreciation of its value and role in
learning.
* Some students with special education needs communicate through a variety of verbal or nonverbal
communication systems or techniques. It is important to take account of the individual communication
strategies
used by students within the context of the English Stage 6 Syllabus.
5
3
Aim
The aim of English Stage 6 is to enable students to understand, use, enjoy and value the English
language in its various textual forms and to become thoughtful, imaginative and effective
communicators in a diverse and changing society.
4
The Study of English
Meaning is central to the study of English. The study of English makes explicit the language forms
and processes of meaning. English Stage 6 develops this by encouraging students to explore,
critically evaluate and appreciate a wide variety of the texts of Australian and other societies, in
various forms and media, including multimedia.
The study of English involves exploring, responding to and composing texts
 in and for a range of personal, social, historical, cultural and workplace contexts
 using a variety of language modes, forms, features and structures.
Meaning is achieved through responding and composing, which are typically interdependent and
ongoing processes.
5
Key Terms in the Study of English
This syllabus uses some terms in specific ways to describe complex processes and concepts. A
detailed glossary appears in Section 16 for reference purposes. Key terms used to describe the
study of English in the syllabus are outlined below.
Responding is the activity that occurs when students read, listen to, or view texts. It encompasses
the personal and intellectual connections a student makes with texts. It also recognises that
students and the texts to which they respond reflect social contexts. Responding typically involves:


reading, listening and viewing that depend on, but go beyond, the decoding of texts
identifying, comprehending, selecting, articulating, imagining, critically analysing and
evaluating.
Composing is the activity that occurs when students produce written, spoken, or visual texts.
Composing typically involves:



the shaping and arrangement of textual elements to explore and express ideas, emotions and
values
the processes of imagining, drafting, appraising, reflecting and refining
knowledge understanding and use of the language forms, features and structures of texts.
6
Texts in English Stage 6 are communications of meaning produced in any medium that incorporates
language, including sound, print, film, electronic and multimedia. Texts include written, spoken,
nonverbal or visual communication of meaning. They may be extended unified works or presented
as a series of related pieces.
Context is used in its broadest sense. It refers to the range of personal, social, historical, cultural
and workplace conditions in which a text is responded to and composed.
Language modes refers to the modes of listening, speaking, reading, writing, viewing and
representing*. These modes are often integrated and interdependent activities used in responding
to and composing texts in order to shape meaning.
It is important to realise that:


any combination of the modes may be involved in responding to or composing print, sound,
visual or multimedia texts; and
the refinement of the skills in any one of the modes develops skills in the others. Students need
to build on their skills in all language modes.
*Representing is the language mode that involves composing images by means of visual or other texts. These images
and their meaning are composed using codes and conventions. The term can include activities such as graphically
presenting the structure of a novel, making a film, composing a web page, or enacting a dramatic text.
Language forms and features is the term used to refer to the symbolic patterns and conventions
that shape meaning in texts. These vary according to the particular mode or medium of production
and can include written, spoken, nonverbal or visual communication of meaning.
Structures of texts is the term used to refer to the relationship of different parts of a text to each
other, and to the text as a complex whole.
7
English (Advanced) Overview
Preliminary English (Advanced) course (120 indicative hours)
In the Preliminary English (Advanced) course, students explore the ways events, experiences, ideas,
values and processes are represented in and through texts and analyse the ways texts reflect
different attitudes and values.
Content common to the Standard and Advanced courses – AREA OF STUDY




Provides students with the opportunity to explore, analyse and experiment with:
meaning conveyed, shaped, interpreted and reflected in and through texts
ways texts are responded to and composed
connections between and among texts.
45
indicative
hours
ELECTIVES


–
–
–
–

Each of the electives provides students with:
a range of texts to enable them to develop and demonstrate an understanding of ways
representation occurs in texts
opportunities through their response to and composition of texts to explore, analyse and
evaluate:
effects of textual forms in their personal, social, historical, cultural and workplace contexts
ways texts are modified to suit different audiences and contexts
ways technologies influence the structure and language of texts
ways language forms and structures are used for meaning
opportunities for imaginative and affective expression in their response to and composition of
texts.
75
indicative
hours

Area(s) of Study and texts ARE NOT prescribed for the Preliminary common content and the electives.
Structure
The Preliminary English (Advanced) course consists of 120 indicative hours of study.
Study in the Preliminary course requires completion of:
Preliminary
45 indicative hours
common content
Electives
75 indicative hours
8
Rationale
The Preliminary and HSC English (Advanced) courses are designed for students to become critical
and sophisticated users of English in order to enhance their personal, social and vocational lives.
These courses provide students who have a particular interest and ability in the subject with
challenging learning experiences and opportunities to enjoy the breadth and variety of English
texts, through the integration of the modes of reading, writing, speaking, listening, viewing and
representing.
Students explore language forms, features and the structures of a variety of texts in a range of
personal, social, historical, cultural and workplace contexts. They refine their understanding of the
relationships between language and meaning. They respond to and compose texts critically and
imaginatively, in order to extend experience, gain access to and evaluate ideas and information,
and synthesise the knowledge gained from a range of sources to fulfill a variety of purposes.
Students learn to use language in complex and subtle ways to express experiences, ideas and
feelings. They engage in close study of texts and extend their knowledge of personal, social,
historical, cultural and workplace contexts to understand how these influence the composition of
and response to texts.
These courses foster an appreciation of aesthetic values and provide students with opportunities
for enhancing their understanding of literary expression. Students explore the different ways in
which texts rewrite and represent conventions used in other texts, and they consider how these
representations achieve meaning. They learn that different ways of reading may produce different
meanings and may reflect attitudes and values.
Students are encouraged to value a range of approaches to texts so that they may become flexible
and critical thinkers, capable of appreciating the variety of cultural heritages and differences that
make up Australian society. These courses also encourage the development of skills in both
collaborative and independent learning. Such skills form the basis of sound practices of
investigation and analysis required for adult life, the world of work and post-school training and
education. These courses encourage students to reconsider and refine meaning and to reflect on
their own processes of responding, composing and learning.
9
English (Advanced) Objectives
Objectives are general statements, organising the more specific learning goals contained in the
English (Advanced) outcomes.
Students will develop knowledge and understanding of:


the purposes and effects of a range of textual forms in their personal, social, historical, cultural
and workplace contexts
the ways language forms and features, and the structures of texts shape meaning in a variety of
textual forms.
Students will develop skills in:





responding to and composing a range of complex texts
effective communication at different levels of complexity
independent investigation, individual and collaborative learning
imaginative, critical and reflective thinking about meaning
reflection as a way to evaluate their processes of composing,
responding and learning.
Students will come to value and appreciate:








the role of language in developing positive interaction and cooperation
their developing skills as users of English
the pleasure and diversity of language and literature
the role of language and literature in their lives
the study and use of English as a key to learning
reflection on their own processes of responding, composing and learning
English as a language of communication and culture
appropriateness, subtlety and aesthetics in language use.
10
English (Advanced) Outcomes
These outcomes are derived from the English (Advanced) Objectives and the content of the
Preliminary and HSC courses. They specify the intended result of student learning.
Preliminary
HSC
1. A student describes and explains the relationships 1. A student explains and evaluates the effects of
between composer, responder, text and context in
different contexts of responders and composers on
particular texts.
texts.
2. A student describes and explains relationships
2. A student explains relationships among texts.
among texts.
2A. Advanced only
A student recognises different ways in which
particular texts are valued.
3. A student develops language relevant to the study 3. A student develops language relevant to the study
of English.
of English.
4. A student describes and explains the ways in which4. A student explains and analyses the ways in which
language forms and features, and structures of
language forms and features, and structures of
particular texts shape meaning and influence
texts shape meaning and influence responses.
responses.
5. A student demonstrates an understanding of the 5. A student explains and evaluates the effects of
ways various textual forms, technologies and their
textual forms, technologies and their media of
media of production affect meaning.
production on meaning.
6. A student engages with a wide range of texts to 6. A student engages with the details of text in order
develop a considered and informed personal
to respond critically and personally.
response.
7. A student selects appropriate language forms and 7. A student adapts and synthesises a range of textual
features, and structures to explore and express
features to explore and communicate information,
ideas and values.
ideas and values, for a variety of purposes,
audiences and contexts.
8. A student articulates and represents own ideas in 8. A student articulates and represents own ideas in
critical, interpretive and imaginative texts.
critical, interpretive and imaginative texts from a
range of perspectives.
9. A student assesses the appropriateness of a range 9. A student evaluates the effectiveness of a range of
of processes and technologies in the investigation
processes and technologies for various learning
and organisation of information and ideas.
purposes including the investigation and organisation
of information and ideas.
10. A student analyses and synthesises information and
10. A student analyses and synthesises information and
ideas from a range of texts for a variety of
ideas into sustained and logical argument for a
purposes, audiences and contexts.
range of purposes, audiences and contexts.
11. A student draws upon the imagination to transform11. A student draws upon the imagination to transform
experience into text.
experience and ideas into text demonstrating
control of language.
12. A student reflects on own processes of responding12. A student reflects on own processes of responding
and composing.
and composing.
12A. Advanced only
12A. Advanced only
A student demonstrates a capacity to understand
A student explains and evaluates different ways of
and use different ways of responding to and
responding to and composing text.
composing particular texts.
13. A student reflects on own processes of learning. 13. A student reflects on own processes of learning.
11
Preliminary English (Advanced) Course Requirements
In the Preliminary English (Advanced) course students explore the ways events, experiences, ideas,
values and processes are represented in and through texts and analyse the ways texts reflect
different attitudes and values.
Course Requirements
The Preliminary English (Advanced) course is designed by teachers. In designing the course they
need to address the objectives of Stage 6 English (Advanced) and assist their students to achieve
the course outcomes.
In the Preliminary English (Advanced) course, students are required to:
 study Australian and other texts
 explore a range of types of text drawn from prose fiction, drama, poetry, nonfiction, film, media
and/or multimedia texts
 undertake wide reading programs involving texts and textual forms composed in and for a wide
variety of contexts
 integrate the modes of reading, writing, listening, speaking, viewing and representing as
appropriate
 engage in the integrated study of language and text.
The course has two sections and the requirements listed above apply to both sections.
Section 1
Content common to the Standard and Advanced courses
is undertaken through a unit of work called an Area of
Study.
Students explore texts and develop skills in synthesis.
The common content comprises 40% of the course
content.
Students undertake at least one Area of Study.
Section 2
Electives
Students explore, examine and analyse texts. They analyse
the ways that texts and contexts shape and are shaped by
different attitudes and values.
The electives comprise 60% of the course content.
Preliminary electives are not to duplicate the prescribed
HSC modules, electives or texts.
Students also have opportunities to:
 enhance their understanding of Australian and other cultures
 study units of work that will meet industry competency standards relating to communication.
(See section 14 of this syllabus.)
12
Preliminary English (Advanced) Course Content
Area of Study
An Area of Study is the exploration of a concept that affects our perceptions of ourselves and our
world.
Students explore, analyse, question and articulate the ways in which perceptions of this concept
are shaped in and through a variety of texts.
Areas of Study are developed by teachers and require students to explore a concept through:





close study of one text
responding to and composing a wide range of related texts
making connections between texts and the area of study
synthesising aspects of a variety of texts
presenting coherently integrated interpretations of the concept.
The number and content of Areas of Study are not prescribed in the Preliminary English (Advanced)
course. Teachers design Areas of Study that will, in length, content and focus, provide an
appropriate language learning environment for students.
Electives
The electives require students to explore the ways particular texts, forms, media, contexts or
aspects of language shape meaning.
The electives are developed by teachers to allow for:




their students’ needs, interests and abilities
choice of approach
choice of texts for study
student-teacher negotiation of content.
13
Preliminary English (Advanced) Course Objectives, Outcomes
and Content
The table below sets out the content of the Preliminary English (Advanced) course and illustrates
the relationship between the objectives, the outcomes and the Content. Students will work to
achieve the outcomes by responding to and composing increasingly complex texts in a variety of
modes and media.
English (Advanced)
Objectives
Students will develop
1.
knowledge and
understanding of the
purposes and effects of a
range of textual forms in
their personal, social,
historical, cultural and
workplace contexts.
Preliminary English
(Advanced) Outcomes
A student describes and 1.
explains the relationships
between composer,
1.1
responder, text and
context in particular texts.
1.2
1.3
2. A student describes and 2.
explains relationships
among texts.
2.1
2.2
2.3
Students will develop
3. A student develops
3.
knowledge and
language relevant to the
understanding of the
study of English.
3.1
ways in which language
3.2
forms, features and
structures shape
meanings in a variety of
3.3
textual forms.
3.4
3.5
4. A student describes and 4.
explains the ways in which
language forms and
features, and structures 4.1
of
particular texts shape
meaning and influence 4.2
responses.
4.3
Preliminary English (Advanced) Content
Students learn about the relationships between
composer, responder, text and context by:
identifying and describing the situational, historical and
cultural contexts of responding to and composing
particular texts
changing elements of audience, purpose and context in a
range of texts
explaining the ways meaning is reshaped as a result of the
changes in these elements.
Students learn to describe and explain the relationships
among texts by:
identifying and describing similarities in and differences
between texts
identifying and describing the connections between texts
identifying and describing the ways in which particular
texts are influenced by other texts and contexts.
Students learn the language relevant to their study of
English including:
its terminology
language for making connections, questioning, affirming,
challenging, speculating about and generalising about
texts
language of personal, social, historical, cultural and
workplace contexts
language of critical expression
conventions of language.
Students learn about the ways in which language forms
and features, and the structures of particular texts shape
meaning and influence responses by:
identifying and describing a variety of language forms and
features, and structures of particular texts
describing the effects of the language forms and features,
and the structures of particular texts
using various language forms and features, and structures
of particular texts to shape meaning.
14
English (Advanced)
Objectives
Preliminary English
(Advanced) Outcomes
5. A student demonstrates5.
an understanding of the
ways various textual
forms, technologies and5.1
their media of production
affect meaning.
5.2
5.3
5.4
6. A student engages with a6.
wide range of texts to
develop a considered and
6.1
informed personal
response.
6.2
6.3
6.4
Students will develop
7.
skills in responding to and
composing a range of
complex texts.
Students will develop
skills in effective
communication at
different levels of
complexity.
A student selects
7.
appropriate language
forms and features, and
structures to explore and7.1
express ideas and values.
7.2
8. A student articulates and8.
represents own ideas in
critical, interpretive and 8.1
imaginative texts.
8.2
8.3
8.4
8.5
Preliminary English (Advanced) Content
Students learn about the ways information, ideas and
values are represented in and through various textual
forms, technologies and media of production by:
describing the effects of different textual forms,
technologies and media of production on the language
and structure of particular texts
describing the effects of different textual forms,
technologies and media of production on meaning in
personal, social, historical, cultural and workplace
contexts
composing a variety of texts using a range of textual
forms, technologies and media of production
reflecting on the effects of a change in textual form,
technology and medium of production through their own
composing.
Students learn about the ways in which texts can be
responded to by:
engaging with a wide range of texts in personal, social,
historical, cultural and workplace contexts
relating responses to aspects of human experience
composing personal responses to texts and considering
the responses of others
discussing and reflecting on the wider issues arising from
their engagement with texts.
Students learn to communicate information, ideas and
values for a variety of purposes, audiences and contexts
by:
identifying and describing the effects of language forms
and features, and structures of particular texts
composing and adapting texts to address different
purposes and audiences.
Students learn to compose imaginative, personal and
critical texts through:
engaging with complex texts
expressing complex ideas for a range of audiences and
purposes in personal, social, historical, cultural and
workplace contexts
using and manipulating some generic forms for different
audiences and purposes
controlling a range of language features to meet
requirements of composing in a range of modes and
media
shaping compositions appropriately to purpose, audience,
medium and context.
15
English (Advanced)
Objectives
9.
Preliminary English
(Advanced) Outcomes
A student assesses the 9.
appropriateness of a range
of processes and
9.1
technologies in the
investigation and
organisation of
9.2
information and ideas.
9.3
Students will develop 10. A student analyses and 10.
skills in independent
synthesises information
investigation, individual
and ideas from a range of
10.1
and collaborative
texts for a variety of
learning.
purposes, audiences and
contexts.
10.2
10.3
Students will develop 11. A student draws upon the
11.
skills in imaginative,
imagination to transform
critical and reflective
experience into text. 11.1
thinking about meaning.
11.2
11.3
Students will develop 12. A student reflects on own
12.
skills in reflection as a way processes of responding
to evaluate their
and composing.
12.1
processes of composing,
responding and learning.
12.2
12.3
12.4
Preliminary English (Advanced) Content
Students learn to evaluate the effectiveness of processes
and technologies by:
using, individually and in groups, different available
technologies to investigate, clarify, organise and present
ideas
using individual and collaborative processes to generate,
clarify, organise, refine and present ideas
monitoring and assessing the most appropriate
technologies and processes for particular purposes of
investigating, clarifying, organising and presenting ideas in
personal, social, historical, cultural and workplace
contexts.
Students learn to analyse and synthesise information and
ideas by:
collecting, selecting, interpreting and drawing conclusions
about information and ideas in a range of texts in
personal, social, historical, cultural and workplace
contexts
making connections between information and ideas and
synthesising these in a range of texts
developing and presenting information and ideas in a
range of texts and in analytic, expressive and imaginative
ways.
Students learn to draw upon the imagination in
responding to and composing texts by:
making connections between life experience and
imagined experience
experimenting with ways of transforming experience into
imaginative texts in different contexts for specified
audiences
recreating texts into new texts by changing perspective
and context.
Students learn to reflect on their own processes of
responding and composing by:
assessing and evaluating the compositional style of others
in order to experiment with their own texts
editing their work to correct errors, reshape structure and
refine style
assessing and engaging with the strengths and
weaknesses of their own compositional style
amending their compositions as a result of the process of
reflection.
16
English (Advanced)
Objectives
12A.
Preliminary English
(Advanced) Outcomes
A student demonstrates
12A.a
capacity to understand
and use different ways
12A.1
of
responding to and 12A.2
composing particular
texts.
12A.3
12A.4
13. A student reflects on own
13.
processes of learning.
13.1
13.2
13.3
13.4
13.5
Preliminary English (Advanced) Content
Students learn to understand and use different ways of
responding to particular texts by:
articulating the ways they approach texts
responding to and composing texts from a range of
perspectives, using different images and through different
voices
explaining the effects of different images, perspectives
and voices on meaning in and through particular texts
describing a range of ways in which particular texts can be
responded to and composed.
Students learn to reflect on their own processes of
learning by:
identifying various ways they approach texts
articulating and monitoring their own understanding
comparing their own learning processes with those of
others
writing
reflecting on the influence of their expanding knowledge
and skills on their own learning.
17
Preliminary Assessment Schedule
Advanced English
Task 1
Task 2
Task 3
Topic/Content
Topic/Content
Topic/Content
Topic/Content
Task 4
Topic/Content
Task 5
Area of
Study
Area of
Study
Comparative
study
Critical study
Area of
Study
Comparative
Study
Assessment
Syllabus
Component
Critical Study
Course
Outcomes
Course
Outcomes
Course
Outcomes
Course
Outcomes
Course
Outcomes
1,2,3,4,5,6,
7,9,10,12,13
4,6,7,10,11
1,2,4,5,6,7,
10
7,8,10,11,12,
12a,13
1-13
Task Type:
Task Type:
Task Type:
Task Type:
Task Type:
Feature
Article
Half yearly
exam
Listening and
writing task
Visual
Yearly exam
representation,
speaking and
writing
Syllabus
Weighting
15%
Listening
15%
Speaking
Reading
15%
25%
Writing
30%
Viewing &
Representing
15%
15%
10%
5%
5%
5%
5%
10%
Total
100%
Date Due:
25%
Date Due:
5%
10%
10%
5%
10%
20%
Date Due:
18
Date Due:
25%
Date Due:
20%
Date Due:
Wyong High School Assessment Task
ASSESSMENT TASK: PRELIMINARY ENGLISH
COURSE: ADVANCED
TASK: Feature Article
TASK NO: 2
DATE: Week 10, Term 1
WEIGHT: 25%
TASK
You have been considering and exploring the issue of Change in your Area of Study.
You have developed a number of understandings about the concept of Change based on written, spoken and
visual texts.
As a journalist, compose a feature article for a magazine about Change in which you communicate your
understanding of Change. In your article you must refer to the Prescribed Text and three pieces of related
material.
In your article you should explain how the Prescribed text and related texts are related to the issue of Change
and how they are composed. You should also note their relationship to each other.
Your Feature Article may address a broad understanding of Change.
Write approximately 1000 words
Remember to give your Feature Article an appropriate title.
Select a relevant graphic to accompany the article. You could draw/design this yourself or choose a cartoon,
photograph or picture.*
The sourcing of the related text should be included in the article.
* NB: You are not being assessed on the artistic merit of the graphic you include, but on its relevance to the
article content.
ASSESSMENT CRITERIA
You will be assessed on how well you:
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demonstrate an understanding of Change
explain the relationship/relevance of texts to the issue of Change and refer to relationship between texts
make reference to how texts are composed
use the structure and language features of a feature article
adapt your choice of language for the note to the editor
use a graphic related to the content of the feature article you write
explain the relationship between the graphic and the article
provide a Bibliography of related material
19
NOTE WELL THE FOLLOWING:
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You will have 2 periods only in the library for preparation. No other class time will be allocated for
writing the feature article
The completed task, handed to your teacher, must be the student’s own work
Computer malfunction (of any kind) will not be accepted as an excuse for non-completion of the task
by the due date.
NB: IN THE ABSENCE OF APPROPRIATE DOCUMENTATION, FAILURE TO COMPLETE THE TASK ON THE SET
DATE, OR FAILURE TO ATTEMPT THE TASK IN A SERIOUS AND/OR SATISFACTORY MANNER WILL RESULT IN
A N-AWARD WARNING LETTER. A MEDICAL CERTIFICATE IS NECESSARY SHOULD YOU MISS THE TASK DUE
TO ILLNESS
MARKING CRITERIA
MARKS
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Demonstrates an insightful understanding of the issue of Change
Explains skilfully the relationship between texts and their relationship to the issue of Change
Refers effectively to how texts are composed
Skilfully composes written texts using appropriate structure and language features
Composes/select visual text perceptively and explains its relationship to the feature article
Skilfully adapts choice of language for note to the editor
Provides a correctly sourced bibliography
Demonstrates a well-developed understanding of the issue of Change
Explains competently the relationship between texts and their relationship to the issue of Change
Competent reference to how texts are composed
Competently composes written texts using appropriate structure and language features
Composes/select visual text thoughtfully and explains its relationship to the feature article
Competently adapts choice of language for note to the editor
Provides a correctly sourced bibliography
Demonstrates some understanding of the issue of Change
Gives some explanation of the relationship between texts and their relationship to the issue of Change
Some reference to how texts are composed
Adequately composes written texts using appropriate structure and language features
Composes/select an appropriate visual text and explains its relationship to the feature article
Adequately adapts choice of language for note to the editor
Provides an adequately sourced bibliography
Demonstrates a limited understanding of the issue of Change
Limited reference to the relationship between texts and/or their relationship to the issue of Change
Limited reference to how texts are composed
Attempts to compose written texts showing limited use of appropriate structure and language features
Composes/select a visual text and makes a limited attempt to describe its relationship to the feature article
Limited attempt to adapt choice of language for note to the editor
Provides a limited sourced bibliography
Demonstrates an elementary understanding of the issue of Change
Elementary description of the relationship between texts and their relationship to the issue of Change
Elementary reference to how texts are composed
Attempts to compose written texts showing elementary use of appropriate structure and language
Composes/select a visual text and makes an elementary attempt to describe its relationship to the feature
article
Elementary or no attempt to adapt choice of language for note to the editor
No bibliography or very elementary attempt to source a bibliography
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Non-Attempt, virtual non-attempt, non-serious attempt
25-30
19-24
13-18
7-12
1-6
0
Refers effectively to how texts are composed = technique is accurately identified and student gives an
indication of how it has shaped meaning.
20
Wyong High School Assessment Task
ASSESSMENT TASK: PRELIMINARY ENGLISH
COURSE: ADVANCED
TASK: Half Yearly Examination
TASK NO: 2
DATE: Week 1-2, Term 2
WEIGHT: 10%
.
The Preliminary English Yearly Examination will have the following sections:
Section I – Reading – short answer questions
Section II – Creative Writing
Section III – Area of Study – Changing Self –
PLUS 1 x Related text
Section I, II and III are common to Advanced and Standard.
Sections II and III will ask for an extended response, in a nominated text type e.g.
speech, essay, article, interview, letter etc, to a particular question.
Working time is 2 HOURS, with an additional 10 minutes reading time
.
NB: IN THE ABSENCE OF APPROPRIATE DOCUMENTATION, FAILURE TO COMPLETE
THE TASK ON THE SET DATE, OR FAILURE TO ATTEMPT THE TASK IN A SERIOUS
AND/OR SATISFACTORY MANNER WILL RESULT IN AN N-AWARD WARNING LETTER.
A MEDICAL CERTIFICATE IS NECESSARY SHOULD YOU MISS THE TASK DUE TO
ILLNESS. AN APPEAL MUST BE SUBMITTED TO THE HEAD TEACHER ENGLISH ON THE
FIRST DAY OF RETURN TO SCHOOL.
21
Wyong High School Assessment Task
ASSESSMENT TASK: PRELIMINARY ENGLISH
COURSE: ADVANCED
TASK: LISTENING/WRITING
TASK NO: 3
DATE: Week 8, Term 2
WEIGHT: 20%
Compose an extended response to the following statement:
‘A deeper understanding emerges from considering the parallels between texts.’
How does the text you have heard enhance your understanding of the texts studied in this module?
In your answer you should discuss the connections between the texts and the influence of context
on meaning as well as an analysis of the language forms and features and how they shape
meaning.
LISTENING TASK PROCEDURE
1. STUDENTS WILL BE GIVEN 50 MINUTES TOCOMPLETE ALL ASPECTS OF THE TASK.
2. STUDENTS WILL LISTEN TO AN EXTRACT FROM AN UNSEEN TEXT ON DVD. STUDENTS ARE NOT
ALLOWED TO WRITE DURING THE FIRST VIEWING.
3. THE TEACHER WILL READ THROUGH THE QUESTION.
4. STUDENTS WILL LISTEN TO THE EXCERPT AGAIN. DURING THIS TIME, STUDENTS ARE ALLOWED
TO TAKE NOTES. STUDENTS ARE NOT PERMITTED TO WRITE THE ANSWER IN THE ANSWER
SECTION DURING THE SECOND VIEWING.
5. STUDENTS ARE GIVEN THE REMAINDER OF THE LESSON TO WRITE THEIR ANSWER IN THE
ANSWER SECTION.
OUTCOMES TO BE ASSESSED
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1. A student explains and evaluates the effects of different contexts of responders and
composers on texts.
2. A student explains relationships among texts.
4. A student describes and explains the ways in which language forms and features, and
structures of particular texts shape meaning and influence responses.
6. A student engages with the details of text in order to respond critically and personally.
10. A student analyses and synthesises information and ideas into sustained and logical
argument for a range of purposes, audiences and contexts.
IN THE ABSENCE OF APPROPRIATE DOCUMENTATION, FAILURE TO COMPLETE THE TASK ON THE
SET DATE, OR FAILURE TO ATTEMPT THE TASK IN A SERIOUS AND/OR SATISFACTORY MANNER WILL
RESULT IN AN N-AWARD WARNING LETTER.
A MEDICAL CERTIFICATE IS NECESSARY SHOULD YOU MISS THE TASK DUE TO ILLNESS.
22
Marking Guidelines
Criteria
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Demonstrates insightful knowledge and perceptive understanding of the connections between
texts and relationships between contexts and texts.
Shows a highly developed ability to describe and analyse the structures, language forms and
features of texts and the way these shape meaning and influence responses.
Selects insightful, appropriate and detailed evidence from the texts to support ideas.
Communicates a sustained personal point of view arising from sophisticated interpretation and
analysis of the question.
Demonstrates imagination, flair and sophisticated control of language appropriate to audience,
purpose and form.
Demonstrates detailed knowledge and strong understanding of the connections between
texts and relationships between contexts and texts.
Shows a well-developed ability to describe and analyse the structures, language forms
and features of texts and the way these shape meaning and influence responses.
Selects appropriate and detailed evidence from the texts to support ideas.
Communicates a sustained personal point of view based on effective interpretation and
analysis of the question.
Demonstrates sustained and effective control of appropriate to audience, purpose and
form.
Demonstrates sound knowledge and of the connections between texts and relationships
between contexts and texts.
Shows a sound ability to describe and analyse the structures, language forms and
features of texts and the way these shape meaning and influence responses.
Selects some appropriate and detailed evidence from the texts to support ideas
Communicates a personal point of view based on sound interpretation and analysis of
the term of the question
Demonstrates soundcontrol of language appropriate to audience, purpose and form.
Demonstrates basic knowledge and understanding of the connections between texts
and relationships between contexts and texts.
Shows a basic ability to describe the structures, language forms and features of texts.
Makes some reference to the texts.
Communicates an elementary response to the question with little or no interpretation or
analysis
Demonstrates basic control of language appropriate to form.
Demonstrates limited knowledge and understanding of the connections between texts
and relationships between contexts and texts.
Shows a limited ability to describe and analyse the structures, language forms and
features of texts and the way these shape meaning and influence responses
Uses minimal evidence from the texts to support ideas
Communicates a personal point of view based on limited interpretation and analysis
that attempts to address the question
Demonstrates limited control of language appropriate to audience, purpose and form.
Non- attempt, a virtual non-attempt or non-serious attempt.
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Marks
20-17
16-13
12-9
8-5
4-1
0
Wyong High School Assessment Task
ASSESSMENT TASK: PRELIMINARY ENGLISH
COURSE: ADVANCED
TASK: Speaking, Representing and writing task
TASK NO: 4
DATE: Week 6, Term 3
WEIGHT: 25%
Task Description
This is a three (3) part assessment task. Each part must be submitted separately.
Part 1: Representing (5 marks)
You are required to create a visual representation that represents one of the poems studied during
this module.
Your visual representation should be based on ONE poem by the poet you have studied in class.
The visual representation should reflect the THEMES (at least 2 themes but no more than 3
themes) explored in the poem.
Your visual representation should be a minimum of A4 in size and no bigger than a standard sheet
of cardboard. Your visual representation must NOT be 3-dimensional, it must be flat.
Part 2: Writing (10 marks)
You are required to compose an extended piece of writing in the speech text type. Your written
response should be approximately 1-1 ½ A4 (12 point font-arial, single spaced) typed pages and
when spoken should go for three (3) minutes. Your response must not be longer than 1 ½ pages in
length. Any information after this point WILL NOT be marked.
Your response should consider the following:
1. Explain how the visual representation relates to the issues/themes of the chosen poem
2. Discuss how the poet presents these themes/issues
3. Comment on the poet’s perspective as delivered through the poem
Part 3: Speaking (5 marks)
You are required to present a 3 minute speech in which you are assessed on the manner and time
in which you present your written response. Your response must not be longer than 3 minutes. Any
information after this point WILL NOT be marked.
NB: IN THE ABSENCE OF APPROPRIATE DOCUMENTATION, FAILURE TO COMPLETE THE
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TASK ON THE SET DATE, OR FAILURE TO ATTEMPT THE TASK IN A SERIOUS AND/OR
SATISFACTORY MANNER WILL RESULT IN AN N-AWARD WARNING LETTER. A MEDICAL
CERTIFICATE IS NECESSARY SHOULD YOU MISS THE TASK DUE TO ILLNESS
Procedure
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All students are to be prepared to present their speech and visual representation to on the due date.
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Each section of the task must be handed in separately. You will be handing in three (3) separate items.
1.
2. Your written response should be TYPED (12 point ARIAL, single spaced).
3. Your visual representation should be a minimum of A4 in size and no bigger than a standard sheet of
cardboard. Your visual representation must NOT be 3-dimensional, it must be flat.
4. Your speech version of the written task should be handed in in a form suitable for you to use during your
speaking task. The presentation of your speaking task MUST be based on the written task.
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The completed task is to be handed to your English teacher at the beginning of the English period on the due
date.
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Failure to submit any section of written task, speech or visual representation will result in a zero mark
being awarded for that section.
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Students will be given 5 minutes to review their speech and visual representation immediately prior to their
speaking presentation.
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NOTE –Students will be chosen to present their speech and visual representation to the class in random
order.
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Students may be called to give their speech and visual representation during any English lesson from
the due date until all speeches are completed.
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Students who are absent on the day they are called to present their speech and/or visual
representation must complete an Assessment Appeal form with the appropriate documentation. This Appeal
Form must be given to their English teacher within 48 hours of their return to school.
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MARKING GUIDELINES
WRITTEN RESPONSE (SPEECH TEXT TYPE)
Criteria
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Demonstrates an extensive understanding of the themes of the poem
Demonstrates an extensive understanding of the poet’s purpose
Demonstrates an extensive understanding of the visual literacy
techniques used in the poem
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Organises, develops and expresses ideas extensively using language appropriate to audience,
context and form
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Demonstrates a thorough understanding of the themes of the poem
Demonstrates a thorough understanding of the poet’s purpose
Demonstrates a thorough understanding of the visual literacy
techniques used in the poem
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Mark
10-9
8-7
Organises, develops and expresses ideas thoroughly using language appropriate to audience,
context and form
Demonstrates a sound understanding of the themes of the poem
Demonstrates a sound understanding of the poet’s purpose
Demonstrates a sound understanding of the visual literacy techniques
used in the poem
6-5
Organises, develops and expresses ideas soundly using language appropriate to audience,
context and form
Demonstrates a basic understanding of the themes of the poem
Demonstrates a basic understanding of the poet’s purpose
Demonstrates a basic understanding of the visual literacy techniques
used in the poem
4-3
Organises, develops and expresses ideas basically using language appropriate to audience,
context and form
Demonstrates a limited understanding of the themes of the poem
Demonstrates a limited understanding of the poet’s purpose
Demonstrates a limited understanding of the visual literacy techniques
used in the poem
Organises, develops and expresses ideas partially using limited
language and form
Non-attempt/Non-serious Attempt
2-1
0
Comments:
______________________________________________________
______________________________________________________
______________________________________________________
______________________________________________________
______________________________________________________
______________________________________________________
______________________________________________________
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SPOKEN PRESENTATION
Criteria
Fluency and tone
Eye contact
Stance
Ability to meet time requirements
0
0
0
0
Mark
1
1
1
1
2
n/a
n/a
n/a
Comments:
______________________________________________________
______________________________________________________
______________________________________________________
VISUAL REPRESENTATION
Demonstrates an extensive ability to shape a visual representation appropriate to
purpose, audience and content. The visual representation shows evidence of originality
and flair.
Demonstrates a thorough ability to shape a visual representation appropriate to purpose,
audience and content. The visual representation shows evidence of flair.
Demonstrates a sound ability to shape a visual representation appropriate to purpose,
audience and content. The visual representation shows some evidence of flair.
Demonstrates a basic ability to shape a visual representation appropriate to purpose,
audience and content. The visual representation shows limited evidence of flair.
Demonstrates an elementary ability to shape a visual representation appropriate to
purpose, audience and content. The visual representation shows no evidence of flair.
Non Attempt/Non-serious attempt.
Mark
5
4
3
2
1
0
COMMENTS:
______________________________________________________
______________________________________________________
______________________________________________________
______________________________________________________
______________________________________________________
______________________________________________________
______________________________________________________
______________________________________________________
WRITTEN RESPONSE:
/10 VISUAL REPRESENTATION:
TOTAL:
27
/5 SPEECH PRESENTATION: /5
/20
Wyong High School Assessment Task
ASSESSMENT TASK: PRELIMINARY ENGLISH
COURSE: ADVANCED
TASK: Yearly Examination
TASK NO: 5
DATE: Week 9-10, Term 3
WEIGHT: 20%
Time: 2 hours 30 minutes (plus 10 minutes reading time)
SECTION 1:
Reading Comprehension- based on the Area of Study: Changing Self. In this paper you will be
required to respond to a range of texts and to answer questions on language, composing
techniques and effectiveness. (Allow 35 Minutes)
SECTION 2:
Creative Writing – can be in a range of text types and will focus on the Area of Study – Changing
Self.
(Allow 35 Minutes)
SECTION 3:
Module A- Students will be required to compose an extended response to the Module question.
Be prepared to write in a range of text types.
Students may be asked to write about their core text and TWO pieces of related material. (Allow 40
minutes)
SECTION 4:
Module BStudents will be required to compose an extended response to the Module question.
Be prepared to write in a range of text types.
(Allow 40 minutes)
Close Study of Text: Standard: Poetry – John Foulcher
Critical Study of Text: Advanced: Poetry – Bruce Dawe
N.B. IN THE ABSENCE OF APPROPRIATE DOCUMENTATION, FAILURE TO COMPLETE THE TASK ON
THE SET DATE OR FAILURE TO ATTEMPT THE TASK IN A SERIOUS OR SATISFACTORY MANNER
WILL RESULT IN AN N-AWARD WARNING LETTER.
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Preliminary English (Advanced) course