SARAH E. S. SINWELL
HOME ADDRESS
392 Benefit St.
Providence, RI 02903
(812) 361-5283
[email protected]
OFFICE ADDRESS
Program in Media and Screen Studies
Northeastern University
360 Huntington Ave.
114 Holmes Hall
Boston, MA 02115
EDUCATION
Ph.D., Indiana University
Department of Communication and Culture, Film and Media Studies
Minor, Feminist Critical Studies, Department of English
2007
M.A., Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Emory University
Film Studies
2000
B.S.F.S., School of Foreign Service, Georgetown University
Concentration in Culture and Politics, specifically Film Studies
1998
RESEARCH AND TEACHING INTERESTS
New Media and Digital Culture, Media Studies, Film Theory, History and Aesthetics, Cultural
Studies, Communication Studies, American Studies, Feminist, Gender and LGBTQ Studies,
YouTube, Independent Cinema, Queer Cinema, Queer Theory, Body Theory, Body Genres.
AWARDS
Favorite Professor Award, Northeastern University Cauldron, Spring 2013.
Northeastern University Excellence in Teaching Award Nominee, Spring 2012.
Favorite Professor Award, Northeastern University Cauldron, Spring 2012.
Outstanding Professor Award, Sigma Delta Tau, Northeastern University, Spring 2010.
Postdoctoral Teaching Fellowship, Northeastern University, 2008-2011.
Robert Gunderson Award in Public Culture, Department of Communication and Culture, Indiana
University, Spring 2005. (A self-nominated award for a graduate student paper written in a
Communication and Culture seminar, judged upon its quality of writing and research, originality of
its vision, risk taking, and its interdisciplinary contribution to public culture. The winner is given a
small honorarium.)
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Travel Grant, Society for Cinema and Media Studies, Spring 2005
Travel Grant, Department of Communication and Culture, Indiana University, Fall 2004
BOOK MANUSCRIPT
Indie Cinema Online. This book investigates the changing nature of independent cinema within the
context of new media and digital technologies. Focusing on the ways in which modes of distribution
and exhibition are shifting with the advent of online streaming, YouTube, and simultaneous release
strategies, this book analyzes independent cinema on YouTube, Hulu, Netflix and the Sundance
Channel website as a means of redefining independent cinema in a digital era. This book is currently
under review at Columbia University Press.
PUBLICATIONS
Sinwell, Sarah E. S. “Aliens and Asexuality: Media Representation, Queerness and Asexual Visibility.”
Forthcoming in Asexualities: Feminist and Queer Perspectives. NY and London: Routledge, 2013.
Sinwell, Sarah E. S. “Mapping the (Adolescent) Male Body: Queerness, Pedophilia, and Perversion in
L.I.E. and Mysterious Skin.” Forthcoming in Thymos: Journal of Boyhood Studies. Fall 2013.
Sinwell, Sarah E. S. “Race, Gender and the Queer Imaginary: Whiteness and the Asexual Visibility
and Education Network.” Forthcoming in The Intersectional Internet: Race, Gender and Culture Online.
Peter Lang, 2013.
Sinwell, Sarah E. S. “Now Streaming on a Device Near You: Instantly Viewing Indie Documentary
on Hulu." Forthcoming in Indie Docs. NY and London: Routledge, 2014.
Sinwell, Sarah E. S. “Written on the Child: Race, Class, Gender, and Sexuality in Gummo.” Lost and
Othered Children in Contemporary Cinema. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books, 2012.
Sinwell, Sarah E. S. “Sex, Bugs, and Isabella Rossellini: The Making and Marketing of Green Porno.”
Women’s Studies Quarterly, Fall/Winter 2010.
Sinwell, Sarah E. S. “The Art of Seduction: Film Spectatorship in the Age of the Cell Phone.” In
Media Res. December 13, 2010.
Sinwell, Sarah E. S. “Is Malkovich Malkovich? Sexual Identity on a String.” In Kylo Patrick Hart (ed.)
Film and Sexual Politics. Cambridge: Cambridge Scholarly Press, 2006.
Sinwell, Sarah E. S. “‘With the Boundaries Between Us Still Intact’: Mapping Memories of
Incestuous Desire in Eve’s Bayou.” Under revision and resubmitted at Feminist Media Studies.
Sinwell, Sarah E. S. “A Sexuality without Orientation? “Coming Out” on the Asexual Visibility and
Education Network.” Under review at Public Media/Private Media. MIT Press.
Sinwell, Sarah E. S. “In Pursuit of Quality: YouTube and the Future of Independent Film
Distribution.” Under review at Communication and Critical/Cultural Studies
Sinwell, Sarah E. S. “Indie’s Net Gains: How the Independent Spirit Awards and Netflix (Re)Create
Independence.” Under review at Film Quarterly.
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CONFERENCE PAPERS AND PRESENTATIONS
“A Sexuality without Orientation: “Coming Out” on the Asexual Visibility and Education Network”
May 2013, MIT 8: Media in Transition International Conference, Boston, MA
“Now Streaming on a Device Near You: Instantly Viewing Indie Documentary on Hulu"
March 2013, Society for Cinema and Media Studies Conference, Chicago, IL
“Remembering the Life and Legacy of Alexander Doty,” Queer Caucus Event, Invited Panelist
March 2013, Society for Cinema and Media Studies Conference, Chicago, IL
“Making Media Studies Perfectly Queer: A Tribute to Alex Doty,” Invited Panelist
November 2012, FLOW Conference, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX
“Performing (A)sexual Identity on the Asexual Visibility and Education Network”
July 2012, Console-ing Passions International Conference on Television, Video, Audio, New Media, and Feminism,
Boston, MA
“From Amateurs to Auteurs: Life in a Day, YouTube, and the Future of Global Documentary”
March 2012, Society for Cinema and Media Studies Conference, Boston, MA
“Broadcast Yourself: YouTube, Self-distribution and the Small Screen”
March 2011, Society for Cinema and Media Studies Conference, New Orleans, LA
“Left Behind: Revisiting the Video Store”
September 2010, Flow Conference, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX
“The Art of Seduction: Bodies, Sex and Cinematic Storytelling in the Age of Cell Phones”
February 2010, Bodies Conference, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC
“Sex, Celebrity and Bugs: Isabella Rossellini and Green Porno”
November 2009, National Communication Association, Critical/Cultural Studies Division,
Chicago, IL
“Surf Safe, Wear Red: Girls, Sex and Danger in Hard Candy”
March 2009, Northeast Modern Language Association, Boston, MA
“Reel Girls Have Sex: (Re)Imagining Chicana Sexualities and Spaces in Quinceanera”
March 2008, Society for Cinema and Media Studies Conference, Queer Caucus, Philadelphia, PA
“Mapping the (Adolescent) Male Body:
Queerness, Pedophilia and Perversion in Gregg Araki's Mysterious Skin”
March 2007, Creative Bodies, Corporeal Knowledge: Pushing Boundaries Conference, Bloomington, IN
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“Spaces and Souvenirs:
Constructing Female Adolescent Subjectivity in Sofia Coppola’s The Virgin Suicides”
March 2007, Time/Passages Conference, English Department, Bloomington, IN
“Eight Desiring Bodies Multiplied: Queering Family Melodrama in Todd Solondz’s Palindromes”
March 2007, Society for Cinema Studies Conference, Chicago, IL
“Girlhood, Interrupted:
Queering Female Adolescence in Contemporary Independent American Cinema”
April 2006, Cultural Studies Association Conference, Washington, DC
“There’s Something about Touching Myself:
Masturbation in Contemporary American (Independent) Cinema”
April 2006, Pop Culture Association Conference, Eros, Pornography and Popular Culture Division, Atlanta, GA
“In Search of the Intelligible:
Memory, Trauma and Multiple Identification in Cinematic Narratives of Incest”
March 2006, Going Awry: A National Interdisciplinary Graduate Student Conference, Bloomington, IN
“‘With the Boundaries Between Us Still Intact’:
Mapping Memories of Incestuous Desire in Eve’s Bayou”
November 2005, National Communication Association Conference, Critical/Cultural Studies Division, Boston,
MA
“Sensation/Separation: Constructing Intimate Spaces in Darren Aronofsky’s Requiem for a Dream”
April 2005, Intimacy/Proximity Conference, Bloomington, IN
“In Touch with the Queer: Embodying Girlhood in Catherine Hardwicke’s thirteen”
March 2005, Society for Cinema and Media Studies Conference, London
“Is Malkovich Malkovich? Sexual Identity on a String”
October 2004, Screen Media and Sexual Politics Conference, Plymouth, NH
“Excesses, Bodies, Masculinities, Perversions: Coming to Todd Solondz’s Happiness”
June 2004, Crossroads in Cultural Studies Conference, Champaigne-Urbana, IL
“Coming to Happiness, Creating Perversion”
March 2004, Fraker Perversion Conference, Ann Arbor, MI
INVITED PRESENTATIONS AND GUEST LECTURES
“Broadcast Yourself: Redefining Independent Film in an Era of Convergence”
October 2012, Invited Presentation, Interactions Faculty Event, Northeastern University, Boston, MA
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“Sex Didn’t Start With You! Erotica, Short Films and Cinematic Histories of Queer Desire”
January 2008, Invited Presentation, Kinsey Institute, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN
“The Erotic Thriller”
Spring 2007, Invited Guest Lecturer, Media Genres, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN
“Porn and Society”
February 2007, IU Men’s Coalition Presentation at Indiana University, Bloomington, IN
“What is Pornography?”
November 2006, Collins Living and Learning Center Presentation at Indiana University, Bloomington, IN
“The Body, Gender, and The Gaze in Kieslowski’s A Short Film About Love”
Spring 2006, Invited Guest Lecturer, The Body in Polish Film and Culture, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN
“Queer Cinema”
Spring 2006, Invited Guest Lecturer, Introduction to Media, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN
“Creating Syllabi and Applying for Teaching Positions at the Collins Living and Learning Center”
Spring 2006, Invited Guest Lecturer, Advanced Graduate Seminar in Pedagogy, Indiana University, Bloomington,
IN
“What is Queer Cinema?”
January 2006, Presentation, Panel at Pride Film Festival, Bloomington, IN
“‘With the Boundaries Between Us Still Intact’:
Mapping Memories of Incestuous Desire in Eve’s Bayou”
September 2005, Robert Gunderson Award Colloquium Presentation at Indiana University, Bloomington, IN
Fall 2005, Panelist, Graduate Student Brownbag on Conferences, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN
“Gender and Sexuality in the Classroom”
Fall 2005, Invited Guest Lecturer, Pedagogy in Communication and Culture, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN
“Addicted to Abjection: Varying Depictions of (Ab)Used Bodies”
Spring 2004, Colloquium Presentation with Megan Fogarty at Indiana University, Bloomington, IN
“Introduction to Public Speaking and the First Day of Classes”
Fall 2003-2007, Panelist and Guest Lecturer, New Associate Instructor Orientation, Indiana University,
Bloomington, IN
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TEACHING EXPERIENCE
Northeastern University, Assistant Academic Specialist (2012 - present)
Program in Media and Screen Studies
Theories of Media and Culture
This course provides an overview of the key theories and ideas supporting the critical analysis of
the media. Unlike other courses in the media studies concentration it is organized around theories,
not specific media. Including such concepts as ideology, Marxist theory, gaze theory, critical race
theory, feminist theory, queer theory, and postmodern theory, this course focuses on theories that
help us understand the role of media in culture. In this course, we analyze the ways in which
theory as an object can be studied as a means of studying the culture that surrounds us.
Media, Culture and Society
This course assesses developments in the mass media in order to provide a broader understanding
of communication, cultural meanings, and social interaction. The course examines the emergence
of new means of communication at various historical junctures and critically analyzes the
implications of media technologies and the institutions and structures of the mass media.
Throughout the semester we will examine the means by which various media and their supportive
industries influence cultural practices with attention to the ways that the media helped shape
society in the past and the ways that continue to influence our daily lives.
Media and Identity
This course examines representations of identity (gender, race, sexuality, and class) in the media,
investigates their influences, and considers their repercussions. The class especially focuses on
understanding identity as a construction, rather than as inherently “natural.” Broadly, we discuss
the relationship between identity and media representations; more specifically, we look at cultural
texts, sites, and practices where the existing gender and racial categories mix, merge, and/or rub
up against each other in ways that problematize the naturalness of essentialized identities.
Film Theory
This course will provide an overview of the key theories and ideas supporting the critical analysis
of film. It explores the movement from the modernist concern with film as an art object to
postmodern concerns with subjectivity and spectatorship, race, and gender. Focusing on theories
that help us understand the role of film in culture, it also posits that cultural and historical context
frames the ways in which we view and critique film texts. Through a variety of theoretical
perspectives, this course explores theories such as genre theory, theories of spectatorship,
ideology, auteurism, star studies, Marxist theory, feminist film theory, critical race theory, queer
theory, new media theory, and reception studies
Television: Text and Context
This course introduces students to the history, theory, and criticism of television texts. The
readings focus on visual analysis, television as a meaning-making medium, and the relationship of
television to culture and ideology. In this course, we use various critical methodologies to examine
television: semiotics, myth and narrative, genre, ideology, feminism, politics, economics, and
postmodernism.
Northeastern University, Lecturer (2011 - 2012)
Northeastern University, Postdoctoral Fellow (2008 - 2011)
Department of Communication Studies
Theories of Media and Culture
Media, Culture and Society
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Convergence Cultures
This graduate course provides an overview of the key theories and ideas supporting the critical
analysis of convergence cultures. Addressing the sociocultural implications of the intersections
between cinema studies and digital culture, this course addresses the ways in which discourses of
power, identity and location become visible through new media and communication
technologies. Emphasizing the ways in which the forms and technologies of popular culture have
changed during the age of the internet, this course will interrogate such issues as convergence,
digitality, emergence, fan cultures, paratexts, etc.
International Communication Abroad
This course addresses the way the localization of media and the cultural and communication
industries is a key component of communication studies. It examines theories around the global
and local through the lens of glocalization. Drawing on Australian cultural policy concerns it
looks at specific industries such as the film and television, new technology and broadcasting. It
includes a focus on Aboriginal and indigenous struggles over identity and cultural preservation.
Dialogue of Civilization: Global Issues in Comparative Perspective
This course addresses the international and global challenges that are an increasingly powerful
force in media production, and the cultural and communication industries. The course offers
students the opportunity to understand through the use of theory and practice, the key
developments in these fields and how issues relevant to those concerns are manifest in a non-US
context.
Communication and Gender
This class explores the personal and social dimensions of gender, culture, and communication, and
the intersection of these three areas in our lives. In order to do this, we look at various areas of
daily life, including media, public and private spaces, such as home and work, politics, and other
cultural and social experiences. In doing so, we seek to understand the influences between
culture, gender and communication, how gender shapes communication and culture, and how
communication creates, recreates, sustains, challenges and changes the meaning of gender.
Advertising and Promotional Culture
This class undertakes a close study of advertising’s history and contemporary industry to help us
understand promotional culture through the viewpoint of critical theory. Throughout the
semester, we consider how advertisements are used as a form of communication, and further, how
our systems of media and communication are impacted by the dominance of commercial interests
in our culture. This course focuses on the material advertisement itself as well as its relationship to
larger questions of identity, citizenship and power.
Introduction to Communication Studies
This course provides an overview of the principal areas and concentrations in the study of
communication. It introduces the foundations of Public Communication (speech and rhetoric),
Media Studies, and Organizational Communication. The course is designed to introduce the
theories, concepts, and principles of each area and help students make connections between them
in critical ways.
Public Speaking
This course develops skills in public speaking and communication. The course includes topics
such as choosing and researching a topic, organizing and delivering a speech, handling speech
anxiety, listening critically, and adapting language to an audience.
Introduction to College
This course will help students majoring in communication studies transition to college life,
introducing services and resources available on campus. It will also begin a discussion of what
career opportunities are on the horizon for communication majors.
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Indiana University, Visiting Lecturer (2007-2008)
Department of Gender Studies
Representation and the Body (G310)
A course of my own design, this course concentrates on the creation and institutionalization of
sexual difference through representations of the body and also examines attempts to challenge
these representations. Topics addressed include chronic dieting, sports and fitness; racially and
culturally specific body alterations; cross-dressing and transsexualism; the commodification of
reproduction; and ‘alternative’ sexualities.
Gender, Sexuality and Popular Culture (G225)
A course of my own design, this course examines representations of gender and sexuality in
American film, television, and print media. Topics addressed include: gender and the power of the
image; sex and spectatorship; melodrama and soap operas; psychoanalytic film theory and the
gaze; men’s magazines and the male consumer; the romance novel and the slasher film; race, age
and representation; masculinity and femininity; and violence and pornography.
Girls and Girlhood Studies (G104)
Delving into an understanding of girlhood that also takes into account understandings of both
childhood and adulthood, this self-designed course explores girlhood as a transitional and liminal
space within our cultural imaginary. Using film, literature, television, art, cartoons, advertisements,
music, etc., this course investigates the ways in which girlhood has been constructed within
contemporary American popular culture. Topics addressed in this course include: tomboys, final
girls, girlhood sexualities, girl-made media, zines, girlhood ideas of beauty, girlhood body ideals,
teen dramas, dolls, Lolitas, child beauty pageants, tween culture, girls' fan cultures, girls'
subcultures, music videos, etc.
Indiana University, Associate Instructor (2002 – 2007)
Department of Gender Studies
Representation and the Body (G310) (Spring 2006 – Spring 2007
Independent Research and Readings: Violence Against Latinas (G495) (Summer 2006)
This course explores aspects of what it means to be Latina in the United States. It also covers
topics such as domestic violence, human trafficking, and racism within the United States.
Domestic violence is covered by conducting research at a domestic violence shelter, along with
personal interviews.
Department of Communication and Culture and Department of Gender Studies (Summer 2006)
Media Genres/Topics in Gender Studies:
Body Genres: Melodrama, Horror, and Pornography (C392/G302)
A course of my own design, this course was competitively selected among graduate students in
CMCL who are ABD and cross-listed between the two departments. The course focuses on
melodrama, horror and pornography as film genres that are especially prone to excess, as well as
to the incorporation of the spectator’s body. Screenings include Far From Heaven, The Killer,
Candyman, Romance and Old Boy. Readings include Linda Williams’ “Film Bodies: Gender, Genre,
Excess,” Thomas Schatz’s “The Family Melodrama,” Barbara Creed’s “Horror and the
Monstrous-Feminine,” and Linda Williams’ Porn Studies.
Collins Living-Learning Center (Fall 2005)
Mediated Bodies in Contemporary Cinema (L320)
A course of my own design, this course was competitively selected and compiled for Honors
Students in the Collins Living-Learning Center. This course investigates the ways in which bodies
are mediated within cinema through the lenses of gender, sexuality, race, class, disability,
technology, etc. Screenings include Fight Club, sex, lies, and videotape, thirteen, Dead Ringers, and Boys
Don’t Cry. Readings include Laura Mulvey’s “Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema,” Steve Neale’s
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“Masculinity as Spectacle: Reflections on Men and Mainstream Cinema,” Harry Benshoff and
Sean Griffin’s Queer Cinema: The Film Reader, and E. Ann Kaplan’s Feminism and Film.
Department of Communication and Culture (Fall 2002 – Spring 2007)
Business and Professional Communication (C223) (Spring 2007, Fall 2005, Spring 2004, Fall 2003)
Introduction to Media (C190) (Fall 2004, Spring 2003)
Public Speaking (C121) (Summer 2004, Fall 2002, Spring 2003)
Jagiellonian University, Poland, Assistant Professor (Fall 2000 – Summer 2002)
English Department, NKJO (Teacher’s Training College of Foreign Languages), Sucha Beskidzka
Graduate and Undergraduate courses in:
American Culture
American Literature
British History
Writing
Conversation
Integrated Skills (Writing, Reading, Grammar and Conversation)
KONTEKST Center for Teaching Foreign Languages, Poland, Private Instructor
(Fall 2001 – Spring 2002)
English Grammar, Writing and Conversation to students of all levels of English
Sucha Beskidzka, Poland, Private Instructor (Fall 2000 – Summer 2002)
English Grammar, Writing and Conversation to students of all levels of English
Emory University, Teaching Assistant (Fall 1999 – Spring 2000)
Department of Film Studies
Violence in American Film and History (Spring 2000)
Introduction to Film (Fall 1999)
SERVICE
Faculty Mentor, Program in Media and Screen Studies, Northeastern University, 2012-present
Reviewer, Popular Communication: The International Journal of Media and Culture, 2012-present
Reviewer, New Cinemas: Journal of Contemporary Film, 2012-present
Reviewer, South African Review of Sociology, 2011-present
Member, Society for Cinema and Media Studies Host Committee, 2011-2012
Reviewer, Critical and Cultural Studies Division, National Communication Association Conference,
2009
Member, Public Speaking Curriculum Committee, Northeastern University, 2008-2012
Undergraduate Curriculum Committee, Department of Gender Studies, Indiana University, 20072008
MFA Committee Advisor, Indiana University, 2006-2007
Planner and Coordinator, Kinsey Institute Screening of Queer Erotica and Pornography, 2007-2008
Moderator, Director’s Panel, Pride Film Festival, Bloomington, IN, Spring 2007
Member, Pride Film Festival Steering Committee and Film Solicitation Committee, Bloomington,
IN, 2005-2008
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Reviewer, Critical and Cultural Studies Division Student Section, National Communication
Association Conference, Fall 2005
Official Judge, Union Board Film Festival, Indiana University, Spring 2003
Committee Member, City Lights Student Film Association, 2003-2006 (responsibilities included
selecting and screening film prints for screenings each semester, creating a bi-annual promotional
program for the series, and public relations with both campus and community organizations)
Film Klub Organizer, NKJO Sucha Beskidzka, Poland, 2000-2002
Writer, Georgetown University’s feminist journal, The New Press, 1994
Member, Women’s Empowerment League, Georgetown University, 1994-1996
Writer, Women’s Center Newsletter, Georgetown University, 1994
PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
Presenter, Teaching Portfolios for Job Seekers Seminar, Indiana University, Fall 2007
Participant, First Day of Classes Seminar, Indiana University, Fall 2007
Participant, Teaching Portfolios for Job Seekers Seminar, Indiana University, Fall 2006
Participant, Preparing Future Faculty Conference, Indiana University, Spring 2006-Spring 2007
Participant, The Lively Discussion Seminar, Indiana University, Fall 2005-Fall 2007
Participant, Course Design Seminar, Indiana University, Summer 2005
ADDITIONAL PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE
WTIU/WFIU, ”See It or Skip It,” Bloomington, IN (2007 - 2008)
Film Reviewer
Review films for podcast and episodes of The Weekly Special on PBS TV
National Geographic Children’s Television, Washington, DC (Spring 1997)
Intern
Assist in production and post-production of children’s television shows “Really Wild Animals” and
“Amazing Planet”; watch and review program acquisitions for possible future production
Humanities Council of Washington, DC (1996)
Intern
Review and write summaries of videos and books in Humanities Council Resource Center Directory;
assist Program officer in writing press releases; write and edit articles for newsletter
Ties to Rachel, independent film, various locations, RI (Summer 1996)
Production Assistant
Assist Producer in all aspects of behind-the-scenes filmmaking
LANGUAGES
Proficient in Spanish (speaking, reading and writing)
Knowledgeable in Polish (speaking, reading and writing)
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ORGANIZATIONAL AFFILIATIONS
Society for Cinema and Media Studies
National Communication Association
Northeast Modern Language Association
Association of Cultural Studies
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REFERENCES
Dr. Marcus Breen
Professor, Associate Dean and Head of School
Bond University
Communication and Media
Gold Coast, Australia 4229
(+61) 7 5595 5035
[email protected]
Dr. Joan Hawkins
Associate Professor
Indiana University
Department of Communication and Culture
800 E. Third St.
Bloomington, IN 47405
(812) 855-1548
[email protected]
Dr. Barbara Klinger
Professor
Indiana University
Department of Communication and Culture
800 E. Third St.
Bloomington, IN 47405
(812) 855-7282
[email protected]
Dr. Karma Lochrie
Chair, Department of Gender Studies
Indiana University
Department of English
442 Ballantine Hall
1020 E. Kirkwood Ave.
Bloomington, IN 47405
(812) 855-5430
[email protected]
Dr. Phaedra Pezzullo
Associate Professor
Indiana University
Department of Communication and Culture
800 E. Third St.
Bloomington, IN 47405
(812) 855-2106
[email protected]
Dr. Craig Robertson
Associate Professor and Director,
Program in Media and Screen Studies
Northeastern University
360 Huntington Ave.
204 Lake Hall
Boston, MA 02115
(617) 373-7246
[email protected]
Dr. Yannis Tzioumakis
Senior Lecturer in Media and Communication
Studies
University of Liverpool
Department of Communication and Media
School of the Arts
19 Abercromby Square
Liverpool, United Kingdom L69 7ZQ
(+01) 51 7942897
[email protected]