Name: ___________________________________________________
Date: _____________________
Candace and Julia are fourth graders at different schools. Candace attends East
Elementary School and Julia is a student at West Elementary School.
 East Elementary has 5 fourth grade classes with 21 students in each class.
 West Elementary has 3 fourth grade classes with 31 students in each class.
Candace wants to figure out how many more fourth grade students are at East
Elementary than West Elementary. Figure out the difference between the number
of 4th grade students at the two schools. Fill in the blank with your answer. Use the
space to show your thinking.
East Elementary has
_______ more 4th graders
than West Elementary.
Name: ___________________________________________________
Date: _____________________
Candace and Julia are fourth graders at different schools. Candace attends East
Elementary School and Julia is a student at West Elementary School.
 East Elementary has 5 fourth grade classes with 21 students in each class.
 West Elementary has 3 fourth grade classes with 31 students in each class.
Candace wants to figure out how many more fourth grade students are at East
Elementary than West Elementary. Figure out the difference between the number
of 4th grade students at the two schools. Fill in the blank with your answer. Use the
space to show your thinking.
East Elementary has
_______ more 4th graders
than West Elementary.
 Elementary Mathematics Office • Howard County Public School System • 2013-2014
Teacher notes:
• Students may do calculations on the paper, either to solve or to check their work. You may also
choose to give students extra paper on which they can do their work. Encourage your students to
show all of their thinking as they work since they can earn partial credit if their answer is
incorrect but their work shows that they were on the right track.
• The target concept of this task is described in 4.OA.4: Solve multistep word problems posed with
whole numbers and having whole-number answers using the four operations, including problems in
which remainders must be interpreted.
• answer: There are 12 more 4th graders at East Elementary than West Elementary.
• Due to the fact that this task requires multiple steps, you may choose to use the level of student
work to distinguish between a 3 and a 2 or a 2 and a 1 when scoring. If you decide to account for
the student’s work when grading, it is important to make sure the students know in advance of
working that the task will be graded based on the correct answers and their work.
• Since the target concept is problem solving, not fluent computation (which is covered by the
standards 4.NBT.4 and 4.NBT.5), then if the student’s answer is incorrect, it is important to
consider how he or she arrived at an incorrect answer. If the work shows an understanding of the
logic of the problem (i.e., that the number of students can be found by multiplication or repeated
addition and the difference between the numbers can be found by subtracting or counting up), but
he or she has an incorrect answer because of a minor computation error, you may consider that
the student “got” the target concept but needs feedback in the form of computational practice. On
the other hand, a student will have shown that he or she did not “get” the concept by using an
incorrect operation, ignoring a key step of the process, etc.
Not yet: Student shows evidence of
misunderstanding, incorrect concept or
procedure.
0 Unsatisfactory:
1 Marginal:
Little
Partial
Accomplishment
Accomplishment
Got It: Student essentially understands the
target concept.
The task is attempted
and some
mathematical effort is
made. There may be
fragments of
accomplishment but
little or no success.
Further teaching is
required.
Student could work to
full accomplishment
with minimal feedback
from teacher. Errors
are minor. Teacher is
confident that
understanding is
adequate to
accomplish the
objective with minimal
assistance.
Part of the task is
accomplished, but
there is lack of
evidence of
understanding or
evidence of not
understanding. Further
teaching is required.
2 Proficient:
Substantial
Accomplishment
3 Excellent:
Full Accomplishment
Strategy and execution
meet the content,
process, and
qualitative demands of
the task or concept.
Student can
communicate ideas.
May have minor errors
that do not impact the
mathematics.
Adapted from Van de Walle, J. (2004) Elementary and Middle School Mathematics: Teaching Developmentally. Boston: Pearson Education, 65
 Elementary Mathematics Office • Howard County Public School System • 2013-2014
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Assessment Task 1 - Grade 4 Common Core Math