UNIVERSITY OF CALABAR
CALABAR – NIGERIA
CALENDAR
2011 – 2015
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ADDRESSES
The University Postal Address:
The University of Calabar
P.M.B. 1115, Calabar, Nigeria
Cables & Telegrams:
Unical, Calabar
Telephone/Fax:
00234-087-223969,
00234-04665150
E-mail:
[email protected]
Abuja Office:
Plot 222
Fort Lammy Crescent
Zone 6, Wuse
Abuja – Nigeria
Telephone/Fax:
00234-09-5237773
Solicitor:
Kanu G. Agabi Chambers
Auditors:
Messrs Peat, Marwick, Ani,
Oguride & Co.
Overseas Offices of the National
Universities Commission
U.S.A.
Office of the Education Attache
Embassy of Nigeria
2010 Massachusetts Ave., N.W.
4th Floor
Washington, D.C. 20036
England
The Education Attache
Nigeria Universities Commission
180 Tottenham Court Road
London WIP, 9LE
England.
Correspondence:
All Communications should be addressed to:
The Registrar
University of Calabar
P.M.B. 1115
Calabar, Nigeria.
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C O N T E N T S
Address
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Visitor and Principal Officers …
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Historical Background …
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University of Calabar Decree 1979
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The Council of the University …
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Deans, Provost and Directors of Institutes (2010/2011) …
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Members of Senate, 2010/2011 Session …
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Committees of the University …
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General Information
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Academic Organization and Programmes
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Departmental Requirements
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Academic Regulations Governing First Degree Programmes
Schedule of Charges
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General Studies Programme
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The University Library …
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The University Bookshop
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The University of Calabar Farm Limited …
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The University Health Services Department
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University of Calabar Guest House
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The Computer Centre …
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Internal Audit Unit
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The Graduate School …
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Institute of Education …
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Institute of Oceanography
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Institute of Public Policy & Administration
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Faculty of Agriculture …
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Department of Agricultural Economics and Extension …
Department of Animal Science …
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Department of Crop Science
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Department of Forestry and Wildlife Resources Management
Department of Soil Science
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Faculty of Allied Medical Sciences
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Department of Medical Laboratory Science
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Department of Nursing Science …
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Department of Radiography
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Department of Environmental Health Science …
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Faculty of Arts …
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Department of English and Literary Studies
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Department of History and International Studies …
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Department of Modern Language and Translation Studies
Department of Linguistics
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Department of Religious Studies and Philosophy …
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Department of Theatre Arts
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Faculty of Basic Medical Science
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Department of Anatomy …
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Department of Biochemistry
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Department of Physiology
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Department of Pharmacology …
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Faculty of Clinical Sciences
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Department of Pathology
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Department of Chemical Pathology
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Department of Community Medicine
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Department of Anesthesiology …
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Department of Family Medicine …
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Department of Paediatrics
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Department of Haematology
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Department of Ophthalmology …
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Department of Internal Medicine
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Department of Surgery …
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Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology
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Department of Psychiatry
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Department of Radiology
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Department of Medical Microbiology/Parasitology
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Faculty of Education …
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Department of Adult and Continuing Education …
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Department of Curriculum and Teaching …
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Department of Educational Administration and Planning …
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Department of Educational Foundation, Guidance & Counselling …
Department of Human Kinetics and Health Education…
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Department of Vocational and Special Education…
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Faculty of Law …
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Faculty of Management Sciences
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Department of Accounting
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Department of Banking and Finance
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Department of Business Management …
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Department of Marketing
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Faculty of Sciences
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Department of Botany …
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Department of Pure and Applied Chemistry
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Department of Genetics and Biotechnology
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Department of Geology …
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Department of Maths/ Statistics and Computer Science …
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Department of Microbiology
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Department of Physics …
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Department of Zoology and Environmental Biology
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Faculty of Social Sciences
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Department of Economics
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Department of Geography and Environmental Science …
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Department of Political Science …
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Department of Sociology
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Non Teaching Units
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Estate Unit
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Works Department
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Academic Division
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Physical Planning Unit …
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Academic Planning Unit
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Staff List
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Index …
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Indexing Consultant: Prof. O. O. Lawal
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Change this Picture etc
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Alhaji (Dr.) Muhammadu Kabir Umar
The Emir of Katagum
Chancellor
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DR. ROLAND EHIGIAMUSOE
Pro Chancellor and Chairman of Council
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PROFESSOR JAMES E. EPOKE
Vice Chancellor
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PROFESSOR AUSTIN I. OBIEKEZIE
Deputy Vice Chancellor (Academic)
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PROFESSOR S. J. UTSALO
Deputy Vice Chancellor (Administration)
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MR. OBOT M. NSEOBOT
Bursar
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DR. (MRS) MARGARET EDEM
Librarian
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VISITOR
His Excellency, Dr. Goodluck Ebele Jonathan, GCFR
President and Commander-in-Chief of the Armed Forces
Federal Republic of Nigeria.
PRINCIPAL OFFICERS OF THE UNIVERSITY
CHANCELLOR
His Royal Highness
Alhaji (Dr.) Muhammadu Kabir Umar, CON
The Emir of Katagum
PRO-CHANCELLOR
Dr. Roland Ehigiamusoe
BSc. (Hons) Ibadan, Msc. (Manchester) PhD (Salford)
VICE-CHANCELLOR
Professor James E.Epoke
B.Sc (Nig), M.S C.(London), Ph.D (Lagos)
Deputy Vice Chancellor (Academic)
Professor Austin I. Obiekezie
Deputy Vice Chancellor (Administration)
Professor Simon J. Utsalo
REGISTRAR
Dr. (Mrs.) Julia D. Omang
B.A (Hons) PGDE, Ph.D
BURSAR
Mr. O. M. Nseobot
B.Sc., MBA, MSc., CAN, AMNIM
UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN
Dr. (Mrs) Margaret B. Edem
B.A(Hons) Calabar, MLS,Ph.D (Ibadan)
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HISTORICAL BACKGROUND
University of Calabar grew out of the Calabar campus of University of Nigeria, which began
functioning during the 1973 academic session with 154 students and a small cadre of academic,
administrative and professional staff. In April 1975, the Federal Military Government of Nigeria
announced that as part of the National Development Plan, seven new universities were to be established at
various locations in the country. The University of Calabar was one of the seven universities set up under
this programme.
Located in Calabar, an ancient city with a long tradition of culture and contact with western
civilization, the already developed area of the University occupies a 17-hectare site on the eastern side of
the town, between the Great Qua River and the Calabar River. Additional land has been acquired on both
sides of the Great Qua River for the development of the University.
Academic activities actually commenced in the 1973/74 session, in what was then a campus of the
University of Nigeria (UNN), Nsukka. However, the new autonomous Institution started academic work
with the Faculties of Arts, Science and Social Sciences in October 1976 with an initial enrolment of 896
students. Of this number, 406 students were carried over from the University of Nigeria. The teaching,
administrative and technical staff either transferred from the University of Nigeria or newly recruited,
numbered about 156. At the beginning of the 1977/78 academic year, the Department of Education,
formerly a part of Faculty of Arts, was upgraded to the Faculty of Education. In 1978/79 academic year,
the College of Medical Sciences was added, while the Faculty of Law, established during the 1979/80
academic year began offering courses in October 1980. The Faculty of Agriculture was established during
the 1980/81 academic year. Since then the University has been experiencing impressive growth.
The University now has one Graduate School, ten Faculties, and three Institutes. These are: the
Faculties of Agriculture, Arts, Education, Law, Management Sciences, Sciences, Social Sciences, Allied
Medical Sciences, Basic Medical Sciences, Clinical Sciences, Institute of Education, Institute of
Oceanography, and Institute of Policy and Administrative Studies. Academic programmes of the
University aim at laying a sound and broad undergraduate foundation upon which further intellectual and
professional pursuits can be based at the Graduate School level.
As any other university in the country, the University of Calabar places great premium not only on
learning, but also on character. The emphasis on character is to help provide the nation with learned
Nigerian men and women with a sense of responsibility, crying out against machiavelianism, bribery,
nepotism, and other forms of corruption. To encourage good character, the University established an
annual Pro-Chancellor’s prize for the best-behaved student of the graduating class.
As a Federal Institution, the University strives to bring about an atmosphere conducive to patriotic
interaction between people from all parts of the world including Nigerians from all States and language
groups. Therefore, all States of the federation are represented in the student population of the Institution.
On academic programming, the University adopts a flexible and forward-looking attitude. Thus,
from its inception, the University adopted the four-year integrated degree programme based on the
semester, and course system in the Faculties. The University also makes conscious use of local materials
for instructional purposes, in the sincere effort to make her programmes relevant to the needs of Nigeria.
Though not responsible to the Cross River State in which it is located, the University is responsive to the
genuine aspirations and interests of her immediate community and interacts freely with that community
through her programmes in Adult and Continuing Education, comprehensive health scheme, as well as
symposia, seminars and workshops organized frequently on and off-campus.
Founded at the peak of the cultural renaissance of the country, and situated in an area of the
country distinguished for her rich culture, the University prides itself as a significant academic custodian
of the rich culture of the people through the performances of the Department of Theatre Arts, which has
established an enviable record for itself within Nigeria and abroad.
Founded in 1975 under the National Higher Education Expansion Programme of the Federal
Military Government, the University of Calabar ranks among the leading and largest of Nigeria’s second
generation universities. It witnessed phenomenal physical, academic and staff growth in its first decade of
existence. Those were the halcyon days of the petroleum revenue boom, the third quinquennial National
Development Plan.
From its nucleus on the Duke Town Campus, the University rapidly expanded into a busy
academic community that is housed in a vast constellation of modern academic blocks, students’
residential halls and staff quarters. The student population rose from 896 in 1976, spread in the Faculties of
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Arts, Science and Social Sciences to over 30,000 full-time and part-time degree and diploma students in
the 2001/2002 session. By the 2003/2004 session, some Diploma programmes were phased out. Currently,
the student population stands at about 40,645.
University of Calabar Logo/Motto/Song
Logo:
Base: Manilla – traditional local currency
Inserts:
(i)
(ii)
(iii)
Cowries – Another traditional local currency
Palm fruit bunch – one of the major products of the area
Book - knowledge
Colours:
(i)
(ii)
Green – Agricultural Revolution
Blue – Water Resources
Interpretation: Invest knowledge in the development of the natural Aquarian and forest resources of the
Region.
Motto:
Knowledge for Service
University of Calabar Song
1.
Neath and broad expanse of Nigeria’s sky
Stands a school with a vision bright
Ever holding the banner of knowledge high,
We’ll go forward by wisdom’s might.
Chorus:
All hail to thee, Alma Mater
We have come from near and far
To unite in Calabar
We’ll work to build our Alma Mater
University of Calabar.
2.
May our quest for knowledge in every field,
Have its purpose to serve mankind.
With the fervent hope that our efforts yield
Fruit for all who will come behind.
3.
Mighty God, from whom all knowledge comes
Let thy wisdom us o’er flow:
May the knowledge gained in our campus here
Guide our steps as we onward go.
Vision, Mission, Philosophy and Objectives of the University
Vision, Mission, Philosophy and Objectives of the University
a)
b)
Vision of the University
To be a centre of excellence producing globally competitive graduates andf contributing
significantly to development through research.
Mission of the University
To produce high quality graduates and scholars in local areas of learning with theoretical, practical
and entrepreneurial skills for the world of work in a conducive environment through quality
research and teaching.
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c)
Philosophy of the University
The University is grounded on the pursuit of knowledge for enlightenment, freedom, and service
to humanity.
University of Calabar Aims and Objectives
As indicated in Decree No. 80 of 28th September, 1979, which gave legal backing to its
establishment, the objectives of the University are:
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
(e)
“To encourage the advancement of learning and to hold out to all persons without distinction of
race, creed, sex or political conviction, the opportunity of acquiring a higher and liberal education.
To provide courses of instruction and other facilities for the pursuit of learning in all its branches,
and to make those facilities available on proper terms to such persons as are equipped to benefit
from them.
To encourage and promote scholarship and conduct research in all fields of learning and human
endeavours.
To relate its activities to the social, cultural and economic needs of the people of Nigeria.
To undertake any other activities appropriate for a University of the highest standards”.
2011 – 2015 STRATEGIC PLAN
In recognition of the fact that planning is central to the success of any organization, barely a month
after taking over as the Vice Chancellor of the University of Calabar on the 1 st of December, 2010,
Prof. James Epoke inaugurated a committee to develop a strategic plan for the University. This
was necessitated by the challenges on ground and the need to chart a course for the University in
the next five years. The committee in undertaking its responsibility adopted a participatory
approach in the strategic planning process, which produced a logical framework for moving the
University in the following strategic directions in the next five years.
S/N
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STRATEGIC DIRECTIONS
Provide adeguate power and water supply
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Establish and maintain a disciplined and
motivated workforce
Reduce and eliminate examination
misconduct among staff and student
Release student results and certificates
timely
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Provide adequate ICT facilities for
computerization and networking of the
University system
Increase funding of research and
availability of instructional materials
Improve staff mix in line with NUC
guidelines
Provide
and
maintain
adequate
infrastructure for teaching, learning,
research and community service
OBJECTIVES
To provide stable 24 hour water and
power supply.
To maintain an efficient disciplined and
motivated workforce.
To attain zero tolerance for examination
misconduct in the University.
To achieve 100% computerization of
student records. To release results and
certificates timely.
To attain 100% digitalization of all the
processes in the University (Library,
Registry, Bursary, etc).
To significantly improve the quality of
research and instructional delivery.
To recruit and retrain staff in areas of
need in the University.
To provide and maintain adequate
infrastructure for teaching, learning,
research and community service.
Strategies for Stated Objectives
The mission of the University of Calabar shall be achieved through:
a)
Creation of Centres of excellence.
b)
Controlling and checking losses through brain drain.
c)
Strengthening and sustaining academic freedom and autonomy.
d)
Revamping, renovating, and maintaining international standards of infrastructures and facilities.
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e)
f)
Establishing and stabilizing the rich cultural heritage of the South-Eastern section of Nigeria
which is the location of the University.
Keeping abreast of global trends and changes.
c)
Philosophy of the University
The philosophy of the University of Calabar is to:
a) create a citizenry imbued with a high sense of duty and responsibility to the Nigerian nation
with character development receiving as much attention as academics.
b) establish a conducive campus atmosphere for the cultivation of healthy social interactions
among groups from all parts of Nigeria and elsewhere.
c) make conscious use of local materials for instructional purposes in an effort to make her
programme relevant to the needs of Nigeria.
d)
Objectives
The mission and philosophy of the University of Calabar as enunciated above cannot exist in
isolation but must take cognizance of the Nigerian national objectives as pertains to Higher
Education.
National Objectives
The Nigerian national objectives for Higher Education seek to, among others, encourage learning,
develop high level manpower, generate and disseminate knowledge, undertake research on
national and local development problems, maintain the national cultural heritage and render public
service. These objectives that sum up to teaching, research and service are expected to be attained
through a University System that will produce people of special motivation and qualification
equipping the individual to develop to his/her full potential for the service of self and the nation.
University of Calabar Aims and Objectives
In line with the overall philosophy of Nigerian education, the University of Calabar, a second generation
university, aims at providing specialized manpower needed for nation-building, promotion of economic
and social well-being of the nation, self-reliance and self-sufficiency. Specifically, the objectives of the
University as stated in University of Calabar Decree No. 80 of 28th September, 1979 are to:
a) Encourage the advancement of learning and to hold out to all persons without distinction of race,
creed, sex or political conviction, the opportunity of acquiring a higher and liberal education.
b) Provide courses of instruction and other facilities for the pursuit of learning in all its branches, and to
make those facilities available on proper terms to such persons as are equipped to benefit from them.
c) Develop new science and technology-related areas such as Forestry, Engineering and Marine
Sciences as well as Dentistry.
d) Encourage and promote scholarship and conduct research in all fields of learning and human
endeavour.
e) Relate its activities to the social, cultural and economic needs of the people of Nigeria.
f) Encourage and promote greater access of women to all Faculties in the University.
(g) Mount and promote consultancy services to embrace the immediate and farther communities around
the University.
(h) Revamp and develop post-graduate work that would broaden the areas in which such graduate
students can be of better service to the nation.
(j) Achieve and maintain staffing quotas in order to meet NUC Full-Time Equivalent (FTE)
requirements and staff/student ratio guidelines.
(j) Undertake cost-recovery and cost-saving measures as a means of reducing direct cost of government
spending on the University and increase internally-generated revenue percentage.
(k) Promote income-generating and fund-raising activities, including endowment to supplement
government funding.
(l) Redirect efforts in internal administration of the University to encourage deserving staff at all levels
to benefit from moral boosting incentives such as Staff Development Schemes, Conference and
Workshop participation, Sabbatical and other leaves.
(m) Develop and improve campus facilities for sports, entertainment and other extra-curricular activities.
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(n)
(o)
(p)
(q)
Enhance the general outlook of the campus by re-planning trading posts (kiosks) to achieve a cleaner
environment, controlled traffic, and classroom facilities.
Immediately decongest the Duke Town Campus.
Put in place an efficient, reliable Security System which, among other things, shall monitor and
control the movement of hawkers, traffic, activities around public halls, lecture rooms, and
Administrative buildings and offices.
Undertake any other activities appropriate for a university of the highest standard.
Strategies for Stated Objectives
The mission of the University of Calabar shall be achieved through:
(a) Creation of Centres of excellence.
(b) Controlling and checking losses through brain drain.
(c) Strengthening and sustaining academic freedom and autonomy.
(d) Revamping, renovating, and maintaining international standards of infrastructures and facilities.
(e) Establishing and stabilizing the rich cultural heritage of the South-Eastern section of Nigeria which
is the location of the University.
(f) Keeping abreast of global trends and changes.
Planning and Development
Detailed planning work for the University of Calabar began in December 1976, by an interdisciplinary team of planners led by Project Group International Limited, in accordance with the guidelines
evolved by the National Universities Commission’s Academic Planning Group. The master plan that has
been developed sets out a framework for the development of a new academic campus for 10,000 students,
students housing for 10,000 students and as much housing as possible on a site within a few minutes’ walk
of the existing campus. Other principal criteria evolved in the master plan include the development of a
new campus on a 50 hectare site that is closely integrated with the existing campus on the West, the
Teaching Hospital on the North and the Great Qua River on the East.
The physical development of the University had to focus initially, on the expansion of the facilities
at the existing campus site in order to meet academic requirements. Several interim buildings had to be
constructed at the same time as work on the main campus was progressing. At present, several definitive
halls of residence, a students’ centre, senior staff quarters and an elementary school have been completed
on the west bank campus. Conscious effort is being made to complete the various academic buildings on
the main campus. However, the Teaching Hospital, College of Medical Sciences, a definitive Library, and
the Faculties of Arts and Science buildings have been completed.
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UNIVERSITY OF CALABAR DECREE 1979
Decree No. 80
(28th September, 1979)
THE FEDERAL MILITARY GOVERNMENT
hereby decrees as follows:
Constitution and functions of the University and its constituent Bodies, etc.
1. There is hereby established the University of Calabar (hereafter in this Decree referred to as “the
University”) which shall be a body corporate with perpetual succession and a common seal.
2. The University may sue or be sued in its corporate name.
3. The objects of the University shall bea. To encourage the advancement of learning and to hold out to all persons without distinction of
race, creed, sex or political conviction the opportunity of acquiring higher and liberal education;
b. To provide courses of instruction and other facilities for the pursuit of learning in all its branches,
and to make those facilities available on proper terms of such persons as are equipped to benefit
from them;
c. To encourage and promote scholarship and conduct research in all fields of learning and human
endeavour;
d. To relate its activities to the social, cultural and economic needs of the people of Nigeria; and
e. To undertake any other activities appropriate for a university of highest standard.
4. The University shall consist of –
(a) A Chancellor;
(b) A Pro-Chancellor and a Council;
(c) A Vice-Chancellor and a Senate;
(d) A body to be called Congregation;
(e) A body to be called Convocation;
(f) The campuses and colleges of the University;
(g) The faculties, schools, institutes and other teaching and research units of the University;
(h) The persons holding the office constituted by Schedule 1 to this Decree other than those
mentioned in paragraphs(a) to (c) above;
(i) All graduates and undergraduates; and
(j) All other persons who are members of the University in accordance with provisions made by
statute in that behalf.
5. Schedule 1 to this Decree shall have effect with respect to the principal officers of the University therein
mentioned.
6. Provision shall be made by statute with respect to the constitution of the following bodies, namely the
Council, the , Congregation and Convocation.
(I)
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
(e)
(f)
For the carrying out of its objects as specified in section 1 of this Decree the University shall be
empowered;
to establish such campuses, colleges, faculties, institutes, schools, extra-mural departments and other
teaching and research units within the University as may from time to time seem necessary or
desirable subject to the approval of the National Universities Commission;
to institute professorships, readerships, lectureships and other posts and
offices and to make
appointments thereto;
to institute and award fellowships, scholarships, exhibitions, bursaries medals, prizes and other titles,
distinctions, awards and forms of assistance;
to provide for the discipline and welfare of members of the University;
to hold examinations and grant degrees, diplomas, certificates and other distinctions to persons who
have pursued a course of study approved by the University and have satisfied such other
requirements as the University may lay down;
to grant honorary degrees, fellowships or academic titles;
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(g) to demand and receive from any student or any other person attending the University for the purpose
of instruction such fees as the University may from time to time determine subject to the overall
directive of the Commissioner;
(h) subject to section 19 of this Decree, to acquire, hold, grant, charge or otherwise deal with or dispose
of movable and immovable property wherever situate;
(i) to accept gifts, legacies and donations, but without obligation to accept the same for a particular
purpose unless it approves the terms and conditions attaching thereto;
(j) to enter into contracts, establish trusts, act as trustee, solely or jointly with any other person, and
employ and act through agents;
(k) to erect, provide, equip and maintain libraries, laboratories, lecture halls, halls of residence,
refectories, sports ground, playing fields and other buildings or things necessary or suitable or
convenient for any of the objects of the University;
(l) to hold public lectures and to undertake printing, publishing and book selling;
(m) subject to any limitations or conditions imposed by statute, to invest any moneys appertaining to the
University by way of endowment, whether for general or special purposes, and such other moneys as
may not be immediately required for current expenditure, in any investments or securities or in the
purchase or improvement of land, with power from time to time to vary and such investments, and to
deposit any moneys for the time being uninvested with any bank on deposit or current account;
(n) to borrow, whether on interest or not and if need be upon the security of any or all of the property
movable or immovable of the University, such moneys as the council may be from time to time in its
discretion find it necessary or expedient to borrow or to guarantee any loan advances or credit
facilities;
(o) to make gifts for any charitable purpose;
(p) to arrange for the general welfare of children of members of staff;
(q) to do anything which it is authorized or required by this Decree or by statute to do; and
(r) to do all such acts or tings, whether or not incidental to the foregoing powers, as may advance the
objects of the University.
(II) Subject to the provisions of this Decree and of the statutes and without prejudice to section 7.(2) of
this Decree, the powers conferred on the University by subjection (1) above shall be exercisable on
behalf of the University by the council or by the or in any other manner which may be authorized by
statute
(III) The power of the University to establish further campuses and colleges within the University shall be
exercisable by statute and not otherwise.
(IV) a. The chancellor shall, in relation to the University take precedence before all other members of the
University and when he is present shall preside at all meetings of convocation held for conferring
degrees.
b. The pro-chancellor shall, in relation to the University, take precedence before all other members
of the University except the chancellor and except the Vice-Chancellor when acting as chairman of
congregation or convocation and the pro-chancellor shall, when he is present, be the chairman at all
meetings of the council.
(V) a. Subject to the provisions of this Decree relating to the visitor, the council shall be the
governing
body of the University and shall be charged with the general control and superintendence of the
policy, finances and property of the University, including its public relations.
b. There shall be a committee of the council, to be known as the finance and general purposes
committee, which shall be subject to the directions of the council, exercise control over the property
and expenditure of the University and perform such other functions of the council as the council may
from time to time delegate to it.
(3) Provision shall be made by statute with respect to the constitution of the finance and general purposes
committee.
21
(4) The council shall ensure that proper accounts of the University are kept and that the accounts of the
University are audited annually by an independent firm of auditors approved by the council and that
an annual report is published by the University together with certified copies of the said accounts as
audited.
(5) Subject to this Decree and the statutes, the council and the finance and general purposes committee
may each make rules for the purpose of exercising any of their respective functions or of regulating
their own procedure.
(6) Rules made under subsection (5) above by the finance and general purposes committee shall not come
into force unless approved by the council; and in so far and to the extent that any rules so made by the
committee conflict with any directions given by the council (whether before or after the coming into
force of the rules in question), the directions of the council shall prevail.
(7) There shall be paid to the members respectively of the council, of the finance and general purposes
committee and of any other committee set up by the council allowances in respect of traveling and
other reasonable expenses, at such rates as may from time to time be fixed by the council.
(8) The council shall meet as and when necessary for the performance of its functions under this Decree,
and shall meet at least three times in every year.
(9) If requested in writing by any five members of the council, the chairman shall within twenty-eight
days after the receipt of such request call a meeting of the council. The request shall specify the
business to be considered at the meeting and no business not so specified shall be transacted at that
meeting.
VI. (a) Subject to section 5 of this Decree and sub-sections (3) and (4) below, and to the provisions of this
Decree relating to the visitor, it shall be the general function of the Senate to organize and control
the teaching by the University, the admission (where no other enactment provides to the contrary)
of students and the discipline of students, and to promote research at the University.
(b) Without prejudice to the generality of subsection (1) above and subject as there mentioned, it shall
in particular be the function of the to make provision for:a. The establishment, organization and control of campuses, colleges, faculties, departments,
schools, institutes and other teaching and research units of the University, and the allocation of
responsibility for different branches of learning;
b. the organization and control of courses of study at the University and of the examinations held
in conjunction with those courses, including the appointment of examiners, both internal and
external;
c. the award of degrees, and such other qualifications as may be prescribed, in connection with
examinations held as aforesaid;
d. the making of recommendations to the council with respect to the award to any person of an
honorary fellowship or honorary degree or the title of professor emeritus;
e. the establishment, organization and control of halls of residence and similar institutions at the
University;
f. the supervision of the welfare of students in the University and the regulation of their conduct;
g. the granting of fellowships, scholarships, prizes and similar awards in so far as the awards are
within the control of the University; and
h. determining what descriptions of dress shall be academic dress for the purposes of the
University, and regulating the use of academic dress.
(3)
The Senate shall not establish any new campus, college, faculty, department, school, institute or
other teaching and research units of the University, or any hall of residence or similar institution at
the University, without the approval of the council.
(4)
Subject to this Decree and the statutes, the Senate may make regulations for the purpose of
exercising any function conferred on it either by the foregoing provisions of this section or
otherwise or for the purpose of making provision for any matter for which provision by regulations
is authorised or required by this Decree or by statute.
(5)
Regulations shall provide that at least one of the persons appointed as the examiners at each final
or
professional examination held in conjunction with any course of study at the University is
22
not a teacher at the University but is a teacher of the branch of learning to which the course relates
at some other university of high repute.
(6)
Subject to a right of appeal to the council from a decision of the Senate under this subsection, the
Senate may deprive any person of any degree, diploma or other award of the University which has
been conferred upon him if after due enquiry he is shown to have been guilty of dishonourable
scandalous conduct in gaining admission into the University or obtaining
that award.
7) (a) The Vice-Chancellor shall, in relation to the University, take precedence before all other members of
the University except the chancellor and, subject to section 4 of this Decree, except the prochancellor and any other person for the time being acting as chairman of the council.
(b)
Subject to sections 5, 6 and 13 of this Decree, the Vice-Chancellor shall have the general function,
in addition to any other functions conferred on him by this Decree or otherwise, of directing the
activities of the university, and shall to the exclusion of any other person or authority be the chief
executive and academic officer of the University and ex-officio chairman of the Senate.
Transfer of Property, etc. to the University
8) (a) All property held by or on behalf of the provisional council shall, by virtue of this subsection and
without further assurance, vest in the University and be held by it for the purposes of the
University.
(b) The provisions of Schedule 2 to this Decree shall have effect with respect to, and to matters arising
from, the transfer of property by this section and with respect to the other matters mentioned in
that schedule.
Statutes of the University
9) (a) Subject to this Decree, the University may make statutes for any of the following purposes, that is
to say
–
i. making provision with respect to the composition and constitution of any authority of the
University;
ii. specifying and regulating the powers and duties of any authority of the University, and
regulating any other matter connected with the University or any of its authorities;
iii. regulating the admission of students where it is done by the University and their discipline and
welfare;
iv. determining whether any particular matter is to be treated as an academic or a non-academic
matter for the purposes of this Decree and of any statute, regulation or other instrument made
thereunder; or
v. making provision for any other matter for which provision by statute is authorised or required by
this Decree.
(b) Subject to section 22(6) of this Decree, the Interpretation Act 1964 shall apply in relation to any
statute made under this section as it applies to a subsidiary instrument within the meaning of
section 27(1) of that Act.
(3)
The statute contained in Schedule 3 to this Decree shall be deemed to have come into force on the
commencement of this Decree and shall be deemed to have been made under this section.
(4)
The power to make statutes conferred by this section shall not be prejudiced or limited in any way
by reason of the inclusion or omission of any matter in or from the statute contained in Schedule 3
to this Decree or any subsequent statute.
10) (a) The power of the University to make statutes shall be exercised in accordance with the provisions
of this section and not otherwise.
(b) A proposed statute shall not become law unless it has been approved –
23
i.
ii.
(c)
at a meeting of the Senate, by the votes of not less than two-thirds of the members present and
voting; and
at a meeting of the council, by the votes of not less than two-thirds of the members present and
voting.
A proposed statute may originate either in the Senate or in the council, and may be
approved as required by subsection (2) above by either one of those bodies before the
other.
(d) A statute which –
i. makes provision for or alters the composition or constitution of the council, the Senate or any
other authority of the University; or
ii. provides for the establishment of a new campus or college or for the amendment or revocation of
any statute whereby a campus or college is established, shall not come into operation unless it
has been approved by the Federal Executive Council.
(e)
For the purposes of section 1 (2) of the Interpretation Act 1964, a statute shall be treated as being
made on the date on which it is duly approved by the council after having been duly approved by
the Senate, or on the date on which it is duly approved by after having been duly approved by the
council, as the case may be or, in the case of a statute falling within subsection (4) above, on the
date on which it is approved by the Federal Executive Council.
11) A statute may be proved in any court by the production of a copy thereof bearing or having affixed to
it a certificate purporting to be signed by the Vice-Chancellor or the registrar to the effect that the copy
is a true copy of the state of the University.
12) (a) In the event of any doubt or dispute arising at any time as to the meaning of any provision of a
statute, the matter may be referred to the visitor, who shall take such advice and make such
decision thereon as he shall think fit.
(b) The decision of the visitor on any matter referred to him under this section shall be binding upon
the authorities, staff and students of the University, and where any question as to the meaning of
any provision of a statute has been decided by the visitor under this section, no question as to the
meaning of that provision shall be entertained by any court of law in Nigeria. Provided that
nothing in this subsection shall affect any power of a court of competent jurisdiction to determine
whether any provision of a statute is wholly or partly void as being ultra vires or as being
inconsistent with the Constitution of the Federation.
(c) The foregoing provisions of this section shall apply in relation to any doubt or dispute as to whether
any matter is for the purpose of this Decree an academic or a non-academic matter as they apply in
relation to any such doubt or dispute as is mentioned in subsection (1) above: and accordingly the
references in subsection (2) to any question as to the meaning of any provision of a statute shall
include references to any question as to whether any matter is for the said purposes an academic or
a non-academic matter.
13) (a) The Head of State of Nigeria shall be the visitor of the University.
(b) The visitor shall as often as the circumstances may require, not being less than once every five
years, conduct a visitation of the University or direct that such a visitation be conducted by such
persons as the visitor may deem fit and in respect of any of the affairs of the University.
(c) It shall be the duty of the bodies and persons comprising the University.
i. to make available to the visitor, and to any other persons conducting a visitation in pursuance
of this section, such facilities and assistance as he or they may reasonably require for the
purposes of visitation; and
ii. To give effect to any instructions consistent with the provision of this Decree which may be
given by the visitor in consequence of a visitation.
24
14) (a) If it appears to the council that a member of the council (other than the Pro-Chancellor or the ViceChancellor) shall be removed from office on the ground of misconduct or inability to perform the
functions of his office or employment, the council shall make a recommendation to that effect
through the Commissioner to the Federal Executive Council and if the Federal Executive Council,
after making such enquiries (if any) as may be considered appropriate, approves the
recommendation it may direct the removal of the person in question from office.
(b) It shall be the duty of the Commissioner to use his best endeavours to cause a copy of the
instrument embodied under subsection (1) above to be served as soon as reasonably practicable on
the person to whom it relates.
15) (a) If it appears to the council that there are reasons for believing that any person employed as a
member of the academic or administrative or professional staff of the University, other than the
Vice-Chancellor, should be removed from his office or employment on the ground of misconduct
or of inability to perform the functions of his office or employment, the council shall –
i. Give notice of those reasons to the person in question;
ii. Afford him an opportunity of making presentations in person on the matter to the council; and
(b) If he or any three members of the council so request within the period of one
month
beginning with the date of the notice, make arrangementsi. For a joint committee of the council and the Senate to investigate the matter and to report on it
to the council; and
ii. For the person in question to be afforded any opportunity of appearing before and being heard
by the investigating committee with respect to the matter; and if the council, after considering
the report of the investigating committee, is satisfied that the person in question should be
removed as aforesaid, the council may so remove him by an instrument in
writing signed
on the directions of the council.
(c) The Vice-Chancellor may, in a case of misconduct by a member of the staff which in the opinion
of the Vice-Chancellor is prejudicial to the interests of the University, suspend such a member and
any such suspension shall forthwith be reported to the council.
(d) For good cause, any member of staff may be suspended from his duties or his appointment may be
terminated by council; and for the purposes of this subsection “good cause” meansi. Conviction for any offence which the council considers to be such as to render the person
concerned unfit for the discharge of the functions of his office; or
ii. Any physical or mental incapacity which the council, after obtaining medical advice,
considers to be such as to render the person concerned unfit to continue to hold his office; or
iii. Conduct of a scandalous or other disgraceful nature which the council considers to be such
as to render the person concerned unfit to continue to hold his office; or
iv. Conduct which the council considers to be such as to constitute failure or inability of the
person concerned to discharge the functions of his office or to comply with the terms and
conditions of his service.
(e) Any person suspended pursuant to subsection (2) or (3) above shall be on half pay and the
councilshall before the expiration of a period of three months after the date of such suspension
consider the case against that person and come to a decision as toi. Whether to continue such a person’s suspension and if so on what terms (including the
proportion of his emoluments to be paid to him);
ii. Whether to reinstate such a person in which case the council shall restore his full emoluments
to him with effect from the date of suspension;
iii. Whether to terminate the appointment of the person concerned in which case such a person
will not be entitled to the proportion of his emoluments withheld during the period of
suspension; or
iv. Whether to take such lesser disciplinary action against such person (including the restoration
of such proportion of his emoluments that might have been withheld) as the council may
determine; and in any case where the council, pursuant to this section, decides to continue a
person’s suspension or decides to take further disciplinary action against a person, the council
25
shall before the expiration of a period of three months from such decision come to a final
determination in respect of the case concerning any such person.
(f) It shall be the duty of the person by whom an instrument of removal is signed in pursuance of
subsection (1) above to use his best endeavours to cause a copy of the instrument to be served as
soon as reasonably practicable on the person to whom it relates.
(g) Nothing in the foregoing provisions of this section shall prevent the Council from making
regulations for the discipline of other categories of staff and workers of the University as may be
prescribed.
16) (a) If, on the recommendation of the Senate, it appears to the Vice-Chancellor that a person appointed
as an examiner for any examination of the University ought to be removed from his office or
appointment, then, except in such cases as may be prescribed, he may, after affording the examiner
an opportunity of making representations in person on the
matter to the Vice-Chancellor,
remove the examiner from the appointment by an instrument in writing signed by the ViceChancellor and, subject to the provisions of regulations made in pursuance of section 6(5) of this
Decree, the Vice-Chancellor may, on the recommendation of the Senate, appoint an appropriate
person as examiner in the place of the examiner removed in pursuance of this subsection.
(b) It shall be the duty of the Vice-Chancellor, on signing an instrument of removal in pursuance of
this section, to use his best endeavours to cause a copy of the instrument to be served as soon as
reasonably practicable on the person to whom it relates.
17) (a) Subject to the provisions of this section, where it appears to the Vice-Chancellor that any student of
the University has been guilty of misconduct, the Vice-Chancellor may, without prejudice to any
other disciplinary powers conferred on him by statute or regulations, direct –
i. that the student shall not, during such period as may be specified in the direction, participate
in such activities of the University, or make use of such
facilities of the University, as my
be so specified; or
ii. that the activities of the student shall, during such period as may be specified in the direction,
be restricted in such manner as may be so specified; or
iii. that the student be rusticated for such period as may be specified in the direction or
iv. that the student be expelled from the University.
(b) Where a direction is given under subsection (1) (c) or (d) above in respect of any student, the
student may, within the prescribed period and in the prescribed manner, appeal from the direction
to the council; and where such an appeal is brought the council shall, after causing inquiry to be
made in the matter as the council considers just, either confirm or set aside the direction or modify
it in such manners as the council thinks fit.
(c)
The fact that an appeal from a direction is brought in pursuance of the last foregoing subsection
shall not affect the question of the direction while the
appeal is pending.
(d)
The Vice-Chancellor may delegate his powers under this section to a disciplinary board consisting
of such members of the University as he may nominate.
(e)
Nothing in this section shall be construed as preventing the restriction or termination of a student’s
activities at the University otherwise than on the grounds of misconduct.
(f)
It is hereby declared that a direction under subsection (1) (a) above may be combined with a
direction under subsection (1) (b) above.
18)
Miscellaneous and General
No person shall be required to satisfy requirements as to any of the following matters, that is to
say, race (including ethnic grouping), sex, place of birth or of family origin or religious or political
persuasion, as a condition of becoming or continuing to be a student at the University, the holder
26
of any degree of the University or of any appointment or employment at the University, or a
member of any body established by virtue of this Decree; and no person shall be subjected to any
disadvantage or accorded any advantage in relation to the University by reference to any of those
matters:
Provided that nothing in this section shall be construed as preventing the University from
imposing any disability or restriction on any of the aforementioned person where such person
willfully refuses or fails on grounds of religious belief to undertake any duty generally and
uniformly imposed on all such persons or any group of them which duty, having regard to its
nature and the special circumstances pertaining thereto, is in the opinion of the University
reasonably justifiable in the national interest.
19)
Without prejudice to the provisions of the Land Use Decree 1978, the University shall not dispose
of or charge any land or an interest in any land (including any land transferred to the University by
the Decree) except with the prior written consent, either general or special, of the Federal
Executive Council:
Provided that such consent shall not be required in the case of any lease or tenancy at a
rack-rent for a term not exceeding twenty-one years or any lease or tenancy to a member of the
University for residential purposes.
20)
Except as may be otherwise provided by statute or by regulations, the quorum and procedure of
any body of persons established by this Decree shall be such as may be determined by that body.
21) (a) Any body of persons established by this Decree shall, without prejudice to the generality of the
powers of that body, have power to appoint committees, which need not consist exclusively of
members of that body, and to authorize a committee established by it –
i. To exercise, on its behalf, such of its functions as it may determine;
ii. To co-opt members, and may direct whether or not co-opted members (if any) shall be entitled
to vote in that committee.
(b) Any two or more such bodies may arrange for the holding of joint meetings of those bodies, or for
the appointment of committees consisting of members of those bodies, for the purpose of
considering any matter within the competence of those bodies or any of them, and either of dealing
with it or of reporting on it to those bodies or any of them.
(c)
Except as may be otherwise provided by statute or by regulations, the quorum and procedure of a
committee established or meeting held in pursuance of this section shall be such as may be
determined by the body or bodies which have decided to establish the committee or hold the
meeting.
(d)
Nothing in the foregoing provisions of this section shall be construed as –
i. enabling statutes to be made otherwise than in accordance with section 10 of this Decree; or
ii. enabling the Senate to empower any other body to make regulations or to award degree or
other qualifications.
(e)
The pro-chancellor and the Vice-Chancellor shall be members of every committee of which the
members are wholly or partly appointed by the council (other than a committee appointed to
inquire into the conduct of the officer in question); and the Vice-Chancellor shall be a member of
every committee of which the members are wholly or partly appointed by the Senate.
22) (a) The seal of the University shall be such as may be determined by the council and approved by the
chancellor; and the affixing of the seal shall be authenticated by any member of the council and by
the Vice-Chancellor, registrar or any other person authorised by statute.
(b) Any document purporting to be a document executed under the seal of the University shall be
received in evidence and shall, unless the contrary is proved, be deemed to be so executed.
27
(c)
Any contract or instrument which, if made or executed by a person not being a body corporate,
would not be required to be under seal may be made or executed on behalf of the University by
any person
generally or especially authorised to do so by the council.
(d)
The validity of any proceedings of any body established in pursuance of this Decree shall not be
affected by any vacancy in the membership of the body, or by any defect in the appointment of a
member of the body or by reason that any person not entitled to do so took part in the proceedings.
(e)
Any member of any such body who has a personal interest in any matter proposed to be
considered by that body shall forthwith disclose his interest to the body and shall not vote on any
question relating to that matter.
(f)
Nothing in section 12 of the Interpretation Act 1964 (which provides for the application, in
relation to subordinate legislation, of certain incidental provisions) shall apply to statutes or
regulations made in pursuance of this Decree; but the power conferred by this Decree to make
statutes or regulations shall include power to revoke or vary any statute (including the Statute
contained in Schedule 3 of this Decree) or any regulation by a subsequent statute or, as the case
may be, by a subsequent regulation, and statute and regulations may make different provisions in
relation to different circumstances.
(g)
No stamp or other duty shall be payable in respect of any transfer of property to the University by
virtue of section 8, section 19 or Schedule 2 of this Decree.
i. Any notice or other instrument authorized to be served by virtue of this Decree may, without
prejudice to any other mode of service, be served by post.
23) (a) In this Decree, unless the context otherwise requires –
“CAMPUS” means any campus which may be established by the University;
“COLLEGE” means any college which may be established by the University;
“The COMMISSIONER” means the Federal Commissioner charged with responsibility for
higher education;
“THE COUNCIL” means the council established by this Decree for the University;
“GRADUATE” means a person on whom a degree (other than an honorary degree) has been
conferred by the University;
“NOTICE” means notice in writing;
“OFFICE” does not include the visitor;
“PRESCRIBED” means prescribed by statute or regulations;
“PROFESSOR” means a person designated as a professor of the University in accordance with
provisions made in that behalf by statute or by regulations;
“PROPERTY” includes rights, liabilities and obligations;
“THE PROVISIONAL COUNCIL” means the provisional council appointed for the
University by the Federal Executive Council with effect from 1st June 1976;
“REGULATIONS” means regulations made by the Senate or Council;
“THE SENATE” means the of the University established pursuant of section 2(1) (c) of this
Decree.
“THE STATUTES” mean all such statutes made by the University under section 9 of this
Decree and in accordance with the provisions of section 10 of this Decree, and “the statutes”
means all such statutes as are in force from time to time;
“TEACHER” means a person holding a full time appointment as a member of the teaching or
research staff of the University;
“UNDERGRADUATE” means a person in statu pupillari at the University, other than –
i. a graduate; and
ii. a person of such description as may be prescribed for the purposes of this definition.
“THE UNIVERSITY” means the University of Calabar as incorporated and constituted by this
Decree.
28
(b) It is hereby declared that where in any provision of this Decree it is laid down that proposals are
to be submitted or a recommendation is to be made by one authority to another through one or
more intermediate authorities, it shall be the duty of every such intermediate authority to forward
any proposals or recommendations received by it in pursuance of that provision to the appropriate
authority; but any such intermediate authority may, if it thinks fit, forward therewith its own
comments thereon.
24)
This Decree may be cited as the University of Calabar Decree 1979.
SCHEDULES
SCHEDULE 1
Section 2 (2)
Principal Officers of the University
The Chancellor
The Chancellor shall be appointed by the Head of State of Nigeria.
1) The Chancellor shall hold office for a period of five years.
2) If it appears to the Visitor that the Chancellor should be removed from his office on Grounds of
misconduct or of inability to perform the functions of his office, the Visitor may by notice in the
Gazette remove the Chancellor from office.
The Pro-Chancellor
3) (a) The pro-chancellor shall be appointed or removed by the Federal Executive Council on the
recommendation of the Commissioner.
(b) Subject to the provisions of this Decree, the Pro-chancellor shall hold office for a
four years beginning with the date of his appointment.
period of
The Vice-Chancellor
4) (a) Subject to the provisions of this paragraph, the Vice-Chancellor shall be appointed or removed from
office by the Supreme Military Council after consultation with the University Council.
(b)
The Vice-Chancellor shall hold office for four years in the first instance and shall be eligible for
re-appointment for a second term of three years, thereafter he shall no longer be eligible for
appointment until at least four years have elapsed since he last held office as Vice-Chancellor.
(c)
Subject to this paragraph, the Vice-Chancellor shall hold office on such terms as to emoluments
and otherwise as may be specified in this instrument of appointment.
5) (a)
Other Principal Officers of the University
There shall be a registrar, who shall be the chief administrative officer of the University and shall
be responsible to the Vice-Chancellor for the day-to-day administrative work of the university
except as regards matters for which the bursar is responsible in accordance with sub-paragraph (3)
below.
(b)
The person holding the office of registrar shall by virtue of that office be secretary to the council,
the Senate, Congregation and Convocation.
(c)
There shall be a bursar, who shall be the chief financial officer of the University and shall be
responsible to the Vice-Chancellor for the day-to-day administration and control of the financial
affairs of the University.
(d)
There shall be a librarian who shall be responsible to the Vice-Chancellor for the administration of
the University library and the co-ordination of all library services in the University and its
29
campuses, colleges, faculties, schools, departments and institutes and other teaching or research
units.
(e)
The officers aforesaid shall be appointed in such manner as may be specified by statute and shall
hold office for such period and on such terms as to the emoluments of their offices and otherwise
as may be specified.
(f) Any question as to the scope of the responsibilities of the aforesaid office shall be determined by
the Vice-Chancellor.
Resignation and Re-appointment
6) (a) Any officer mentioned in the foregoing provision of this Schedule may resign his officei. in the case of the Chancellor, by notice to the Head of State; and
ii. in any other case, by notice to the council and the council shall immediately notify the
Commissioner in the case of the Vice-Chancellor.
(b) Subject to paragraph 4 above, a person who has ceased to hold an office so mentioned otherwise
than by removal for misconduct shall be eligible for re-appointment to that office.
SCHEDULE 2
Section 8 (2)
Transitional Provisions as to
Property, Functions, etc.
Transfer of Property to University
1) Without prejudice to the generality of section 8(1) of this Decree i. the reference in that subsection to property held by the Provisional Council shall include a reference
to the right to receive and give a good discharge for any grants or contributions which may have
been voted or promised to the Provisional Council;
ii. all debts and liabilities of the provisional council outstanding shall become debts or liabilities of the
University.
2) (a) All agreements, contracts, deeds and other instruments to which the Provisional Council was a party
shall so far as possible and subject to any necessary modifications, have effect as if the University
had been a party thereto in place of the Provisional Council.
(b) Documents not falling within sub-paragraph (1) above, including enactments, which refer whether
specially or generally to the Provisional Council, shall be constructed in accordance with that subparagraph so far as applicable.
(c) Any legal proceedings or application to any authority pending by or against the Provisional Council
may be continued by or against the University.
Registration of Transfers
3) If the law in force at the place where any property transferred by this Decree is situated provides for
the registration of transfer of property of the kind in question (whether by reference to an instrument of
transfer or otherwise), the law shall, so far as it provides for alterations of a register (but not for
avoidance of transfers, the payment of fees or any other matter) apply with the necessary modifications
to the transfer of the property aforesaid; and it shall be the duty of the body to which any property is
transferred by this Decree to furnish the necessary particulars of the transfer to the proper officer of the
registration authority and of that officer to register the transfer accordingly.
Transfer of Functions, etc.
4) (a) The first meeting of the Council shall be convened by the Pro-Chancellor on such date and in such
manner as he may determine.
30
(b) The persons who were members of the Provisional Council shall be deemed to constitute the council
until the date when the council set up under Schedule 3 of this Decree shall have been duly
constituted.
(c) The first meeting of the Senate as constituted by this Decree shall be convened by the ViceChancellor on such date and in such manner as he may determine.
(d) The persons who were members of the Senate immediately before the coming into force of this
Decree shall be deemed to constitute the Senate of the University until the date when the as set up
under Schedule 3 of this Decree shall have been duly constituted.
(e) Subject to any regulations which may be made by the Senate after the date on which this Decree is
made, the faculties, faculty boards and students of the University immediately before the coming
into force of this Decree shall on that day become faculties, faculty boards and students of the
University as constituted by this Decree.
(f) Persons who were deans or associate deans of faculties or schools or members of faculty boards shall
continue to be deans or associate deans or become members of the corresponding faculty boards,
until new appointments are made in pursuance of the statutes.
(g) Any person who was a member of the staff of the University as established or was otherwise
employed by the provisional council shall become the holder of an appointment at the University
with the status, designation and functions which correspond as nearly as may be to those who
appertained to him as a member of that staff or as such employee.
SECTION 3
Section 9 (3)
University of Calabar Statute No. 1
Arrangement of Articles
Article
The Council
The Finance and General Purposes Committee
The Senate
Congregation
Convocation
Organisation of Faculties and Branches thereof
Faculty Boards
Dean of the Faculty
Selection of Certain Principal Officers
Creation of Academic Posts
Appointment of Academic Staff
Appointments of Administrative and Professional Staff
Interpretation
Citation
The Council
1) (a) The council shall consist of –
i. The Pro-Chancellor;
ii. The Vice-Chancellor and the deputy Vice-Chancellor;
iii. Six persons representing a variety of interests and broadly representative of the whole Federal
Executive Council;
iv. Four persons appointed by the Senate from among the members of that body;
v. One person appointed by congregation from among the members of that body;
31
vi. The Permanent Secretary, Federal Ministry of Education or, in his absence, such member of his
Ministry as he may designate to represent him; and
vii. One person to represent the armed forces of the Federation and the Nigeria Police Force
(b) Any member of the council holding office otherwise than in pursuance of paragraph (1) (a), (b),
or (h) above may, by notice to the council, resign his office.
(g)
(c) A member of the council holding office otherwise than in pursuance of paragraph (1) (a), (b), (g) or
(h) above shall, unless he previously vacates it, vacate that office on the expiration of the period
of four years beginning with effect from 1st of August in the year in which he was appointed.
(d) Where a member of the council holding office otherwise than in pursuance of paragraph (1) (a), (b),
(g) or (h) above vacates office before the expiration of the period aforesaid, the body or person by
whom he was appointed may appoint a successor to hold office for the residue of the term of his
predecessor.
(e) A person ceasing to hold office as a member of the council otherwise than by removal for misconduct
shall be eligible for re-appointment for only one further period of four years.
(f) The quorum of the council shall be five at least one of whom shall be a member appointed pursuant to
paragraph 1 (c), (f), (g) and (h) above.
(g) If the pro-chancellor is not present at a meeting of the council, such other member of the council
present at the meeting as the council may appoint in respect of that meeting shall be the chairman at
the meeting and subject to section 4 of the Decree and the foregoing provisions of this paragraph, the
council may regulate its own procedure.
(h) Where the council desires to obtain advice with respect to any particular matter, it may co-opt not
more than two persons for the purpose; and the persons co-opted may take part in the deliberations of
the council at any meeting but shall not be entitled to vote.
The Finance and General Purposes Committee
2) (a) The finance and general purposes committee of the council shall consist of –
i. The Pro-Chancellor, who shall be the chairman of the committee at any meeting at which he is
present;
ii. The Vice-Chancellor and deputy Vice-Chancellor;
iii. Six other members of the council appointed by the council, two of whom shall be selected from
among the four members of the council appointed by the Senate and one member appointed to
council by the congregation.
iv. The Permanent Secretary, Federal Ministry of Education or, in his absence, such member of his
Ministry as he may designate to represent him.
v. The quorum of the committee shall be five.
vi. Subject to any directions given by the council, the committee may regulate its own procedure.
The Senate
3) (a) The Senate shall consist of –
i. The Vice-Chancellor and the deputy Vice-Chancellor;
ii. The deans of the several faculties;
iii. The directors of the several institutes;
iv. The professors;
v. The librarian;
vi. The persons for the time being holding such appointments on the staff of the University as may
be specified by the Vice-Chancellor; and
vii. Such teachers (of senior lecturer rank and above and not being more than two in respect of
each faculty) as may be elected from among the members of each faculty, the total number
thereof to be determined from time to time by the Senate.
32
(b) The Vice-Chancellor shall be the chairman at all meetings of the Senate when he is present; and in
his absence such other member of the Senate present at the meeting as the Senate may appoint for
that meeting, shall be the chairman at the meeting.
(c) The quorum of the Senate shall be one-quarter (or the nearest whole number less than one quarter);
and subject to paragraph (2) above, the Senate may regulate its own procedure.
(d) An elected member may, by notice to the Senate, resign his office.
(e) Subject to paragraph (7) below, there shall be election for the selection of elected members which
shall be held in the prescribed manner on such day in the month of May or June in each year as the
Vice-Chancellor may from time to time determine.
(f)
An elected member shall hold office for the period of two years beginning with 1 st August in the
year of his election, and may be a candidate at any election held in pursuance of paragraph (5)
above in the year in which his period of office expires, so however that no person shall be such a
candidate if at the end of his current period of office he will have held office as an elected member
for a continuous period of six years or would have so held office if he had not resigned it.
(g) No election shall be held in pursuance of this article in any year if the number specified in the
certificate given in pursuance of paragraphs (9) below does not exceed by more than one the figure
which is thrice the number of those elected members holding office on the date of the certificate
who do not vacate office during that year in pursuance of paragraph (6) above; but for the
avoidance of doubt it is hereby declared that no person shall be precluded from continuing in or
taking office as an elected member by reasons only of a reduction in the total of non-elected
members occurring on or after 30th April in any year in which he is to continue in or take office as
an elected member.
(h)
If so requested in writing by any ten members of the Senate; the Vice-Chancellor, or in his absence
a person duly appointed by him, shall convene a meeting of the Senate to be held not later than the
tenth day following that on which the request was received.
(i)
In this article “total of non-elected members’ means as respects any year, such number as may be
certified by the Vice-Chancellor on the 30th April of that year to be the number of persons holding
office as members of the Senate on the day otherwise than as elected members.
4) (a)
Congregation
Congregation shall consist of –
i. the Vice-Chancellor and the deputy Vice-Chancellors;
ii. the full time members of the academic staff;
iii. the registrar;
iv. the bursar; and
v. every member of the administrative staff who holds a degree of any university recognized for
the purposes of this statute by the Vice-Chancellor, not being an honorary degree.
(b)
Subject to section 4 of the Decree, the Vice-Chancellor shall be the chairman at all meetings of
congregation when he is present; and in his absence such other member of congregation present at
the meeting as congregation may appoint for that meeting, shall be the chairman at the meeting.
(c)
The quorum of t he congregation shall be one-third (or the whole number nearest to one-third) of
the total number of members of the congregation or fifty, whichever is less.
(d)
A certificate signed by the Vice-Chancellor specifying –
i. the total number of members of congregation for the purpose of any particular meeting or
meetings of congregation; or
ii. the names of the persons who are members of congregation during a particular period; shall
be conclusive evidence of that number or, as the case may be, of the names of those persons.
33
(e) Subject to the foregoing provisions of this article, congregation may regulate its own procedure.
(f)
Congregation shall be entitled to express by resolution or otherwise its opinion on all matters
affecting the interest and welfare of the University and shall have such other functions in addition
to the function of electing a member of the council, as may be provided by state or regulations.
Convocation
5) (a) Convocation shall consists of –
i. the officers of the University mentioned in Schedule to the Decree;
ii. all teachers within the meaning of the Decree; and
iii. all other persons whose names are registered in accordance with paragraph (2) below.
(b) A person shall be entitled to have his name registered as a member of convocation if –
i. he is either a graduate of the University or a person satisfying such requirements as may be
prescribed for the purpose of this paragraph; and
ii. he applies for the registration of his name in the prescribed manner and pays the prescribed
fees; and regulations shall provide for the establishment and maintenance of a register for the
purposes of this paragraph and, subject to paragraph (3) below, may provide for the payment
from time to time of further fees by persons whose names are on the register and for the
removal from the register of the name of any person who fails to pay those fees.
(c) The person responsible for maintaining the register shall, without the payment of any fees, ensure
that the names of all persons who are for the time being members of convocation by virtue of
paragraph (1) (a) or (b) above are entered and retained on the register.
(d)
A person who reasonably claims that he is entitled to have his name on the register shall be
entitled on demand to inspect the register, or a copy of the register at the principal offices of the
University at all reasonably times.
(e)
The register shall, unless the contrary is proved, be sufficient evidence that any person named
therein is, and that any person not named therein is not, a member of convocation; but for the
purpose of ascertaining whether a particular person was such a member on a particular date, any
entries in and deletions from the register made on or after that date shall be disregarded.
(f)
The quorum of convocation shall be fifty or one- third (or the whole number nearest to one-third)
of the total number of members of convocation, which ever is less.
(g) Subject to section 4 of the Decree, the chancellor shall be chairman at all meetings of convocation
when he is present, and in his absence the Vice-Chancellor shall be the chairman at the meeting.
(h) Convocation shall have such functions, in addition to the function of appointing a member of the
council, as may be provided by statute.
Organisation of Faculties and Branches thereof
Each faculty shall be divided into such number of branches as may be prescribed.
6)
7) (a) There shall be established in respect of each faculty a faculty board, which subject to the provision
of this statute, and subject to the directions of the Vice-Chancellor, shalli. regulate the teaching and study of, and the conduct of examinations connected with, the
subjects assigned to the faculty;
ii. deal with any other matter assigned to it by statute or by the Vice-Chancellor or by the Senate,
and
iii. advice the Vice-Chancellor or the Senate on any matter referred to it by the Vice-Chancellor or
the .
(b)
Each faculty board shall consist of –
34
i. the Vice-Chancellor;
ii. the persons severally in charge of the branches of the faculty;
iii. such of the teachers assigned to the faculty having the prescribed qualifications as the board
may determine and
iv. such persons whether or not members of the University as the board may determine with the
general or special approval of the Senate.
(c)
The quorum of the board shall be eight members or one-quarter (whichever is greater) of the
members for the time being of the board; and subject to the provisions of this statute and to any
provision made by regulations in that behalf, the board may regulate its own procedure.
The Dean of the Faculty
8) (a) The dean of a faculty shall be a professor elected by the faculty board and such dean shall hold
office for a term of two years. He will be eligible for re-election for another term of two years after
which he may not be elected again until two years have elapsed.
(b)
If there is no professor in a faculty, the office of the dean of the faculty shall be held in rotation by
members of the faculty holding the ranks of reader or senior lecturer on the basis of seniority as
determined by the Senate.
(c)
The dean shall be the chairman at all meetings of the faculty board when he is present and he shall
be member of all committees and other boards appointed by the faculty.
(d)
The dean of a faculty shall exercise general superintendence over the academic and administrative
affairs of the faculty. It shall be the function of the dean to present to convocation for the
conferment of degrees persons who have qualified for the degrees of the University at
examinations held in the branches of learning for which responsibility is allocated to that faculty.
(e)
There shall be a committee to be known as the committee of deans consisting of all the deans of
the several faculties and that committee shall advise the Vice-Chancellor on all academic matters
and on particular matters referred to the University council by Senate.
(f)
The dean of a faculty may be removed from office for good cause by the faculty board after a vote
would have been taken at a meeting of the board, and in the event of a vacancy occurring
following the removal of a dean, an acting dean may be appointed by the Vice-Chancellor
provided that at the next faculty board meeting an election shall be held for a new dean.
(g)
In this article, “good cause” has the same meaning as in section 15(3) of the Decree.
Selection of Certain Principal Officers
9) (a) When a vacancy occurs in the office of the registrar, bursar, librarian, or director of works, a
selection board shall be constituted by the council and shall consist of –
i. The Pro-Chancellor;
ii. The Vice-Chancellor;
iii. Two members appointed by the council, not being members of the Senate; and
iv. Two members appointed by the Senate.
(b)
10)
The selection board, after making such inquiries as it thinks fit, shall recommend a candidate to the
council for appointment to the vacant office; and after considering the recommendation of the
board the council may make an appointment to that office.
Creation of Academic Posts
Recommendations for the creation of posts other than those mentioned in article 9 of this Statute
shall be made by the Senate to the council through the finance and general purposes committee.
Appointment of Academic Staff
35
11)
Subject to the Decree and the statutes, the filling of vacancies in academic posts (including newly
created ones) shall be as prescribed from time to time by statutes.
Appointment of Administrative and Professional Staff
12) (a) The administrative and professional staff of the University, other than those mentioned in article 9
of this Statute, shall be appointed by the council or on its behalf by the Vice-Chancellor or the
registrar in accordance with any delegation of powers made by the council in that behalf.
(b) In the case of administrative or professional staff who have close and important contacts with the
academic staff, there shall be Senate participation in the process of selection.
13)
14)
Interpretation
In this Statute, the expression “the Decree” means the University of Calabar Decree 1979 and any
expression defined in the Decree has the same meaning in this Statute.
The Statute may be cited as University of Calabar Statute No. 1.
MADE at Lagos this 28th day of September 1979.
GENERAL O. OBASANJO
Head of the Federal Military Government,
Commander-in-Chief of the Armed Forces,
Federal Republic of Nigeria
EXPLANATORY NOTE
(This note does not form part of the above Decree but is intended to explain its purport)
The Decree provides for the establishment and incorporation of the University of Calabar and
makes comprehensive provisions for its due administration.
36
THE COUNCIL OF THE UNIVERSITY
COUNCIL MEMBERS (CONSTITUTED IN 2009)
1.
Dr. Roland Ehigiamusoe (Pro-Chancellor)
- Chairman
2.
Professor James E. Epoke (Vice-Chancellor)
- Member
3.
Professor Austin I. Obiekezie (Deputy Vice-Chancellor[Academic])
- Member
4.
Professor Simon J. Utsalo (Deputy Vice-Chancellor[Admin])
- Member
5.
Chief Richard M. Otazi
- Member
6.
Barrister Hentry Idahagbon
- Member
7.
Dr (Mrs) Ezinwa Uzuegbunam (Rep. of Federal Ministry of Edu.)
- Member
8.
Professor Emeka E. Okwueze (Senate Representative)
- Member
11.
Professor Celestine Oyom Bassey (Senate Representative)
- Member
12.
Professor. S. O. Abang (Senate Representative)
- Member
13.
Professor Alphonsus E. Udoh (Senate Representative)
- Member
14.
Prof. Louisa Etubom Bassey Uwatt (Congregational Representative)
- Member
15.
Dr. Chike Ekeopara (Congregational Representative)
- Member
16.
Mr. Kennedy Dike (Convocation Representative)
- Member
17.
Dr. (Mrs.) Julia D. Omang ( Registrar)
- Member/Secretary
37
PROVOST DEANS, AND DIRECTORS OF INSTITUTES.
Provost, College of Medical Sciences Dean of Graduate School
Deans of Faculties
Agriculture
Allied Medical Sciences
Arts
-
Prof. S. J. Etuk
Prof. Francis E. Bisong
Basic Medical Sciences
-
Prof. Atim B. Antai
Clinical Sciences
-
Prof. E. U. Udoma
Education
-
Prof. (Mrs.) Eno M. Ukpong
Law
-
Prof. K. S. A. Ebeku
Management Sciences
-
Prof. E. J. Etuk
Sciences
-
Prof. Ani Nkang
Social Sciences
-
Prof. Eugene J. Aniah
Dean, Students’ Affairs
-
Prof. Eyong U. Eyong
Education
-
Prof. A. J. Isangedighi
Institute of Oceanography
-
Prof. U. I. Enin
Public Policy and
Administration
-
Dr. C. C. Ikeji
Prof. M. G. Solomon
Prof. Mildred John
Prof. Francis Angrey
Director of Institutes
MEMBERS OF SENATE: UNIVERSITY OF CALABAR
2010/2011 SESSION
Prof. James Epoke
Prof. A. I. Obiekezie
Prof. S. J. Utsalo
Prof. Francis E. Bisong
Prof. S. J. Etuk
Prof. (Mrs.) M. G. Solomon
Prof. Francis Angrey
Prof. Mildred John
Prof. (Mrs.) Atim B. Antai
Prof. E. U. Udoma
Prof. (Mrs.) Eno M. Ukpong
Prof. K. S. A. Ebeku
Prof. E. J. Etuk
Prof Ani Nkang
Prof. Eugene J. Aniah
Prof. Eyong U. Eyong
Revd. Prof. Imo E. Umoinyang Prof. U. I. Enin
-
Vice Chancellor
Deputy Vice Chancellor (Acad.)
Deputy Vice Chancellor (Admin.)
Dean, Graduate School
Provost, College of Medical Sciences
Dean, Faculty of Agriculture
Dean, Faculty of Arts
Dean, Faculty of Allied Medical Sciences
Dean, Faculty of Basic Medical Sciences
Dean, Faculty of Clinical Sciences
Dean, Faculty of Education
Dean, Faculty of Law
Dean, Faculty of Management Sciences
Dean, Faculty of Sciences
Dean, Faculty of Social Sciences
Dean, Student’s Affairs
Director, Institute of Education
Director, Institute of Oceanography
38
Prof. B. N. Ekwueme
Prof. Eze B. Eze
Dr. C. C. Ikeji
Dr. C. Ekeokpara
Dr. R. C. Okoro
Dr. Enu D. Bette
-
Director, UNICALCONS
Director, CES
Ag. Director, Institute of public policy and administration
Ag. Director, Centre for General Studies & Comm. Skills
Ag. Director, Information Communication Technology
Coordinator, Sandwich
Prof. I. Asouzu
Prof. G. O. Ozumba
Prof. Imeyen A. Noah
Prof. A. Uduigwomen
Prof. Ebele Eko
Prof. E. M. Uka
Prof. F. M. Mbon
Prof. Chris Nwamuo
Prof. Princewill I. Alozie
Prof. Dele Orisawayi
Dr. (Mrs.) Stella I. Ekpe
Prof. I. R. Amadi
Prof. M. M. Okon
Prof. Stella Effa-Attoe
Prof. E. A. Offiong
Prof. H. O. Anyanwu
Prof. C. O. Ijiomah
Prof. Udobata Onunwa
Prof. J. N. Ogu
Prof.(Mrs) G. E. Okereke
Prof. L. O. M. Enendu
Dr. Bassey O. Oben
Dr. Ndubuisi C. Osuagwu
Dr. Samuel L. Agada
-
FACULTY OF ARTS
Dept. of Philosophy
Head, Department of Philosophy
Dept. of Modern Lang. & Trans. Studies
Dept. of Philosophy
Dept. of English & Lit. Studies
Dept. of Rel. Cultural Studies
Dept. of Rel. & Cultural Studies
Head, Dept. of Theatre & Media Studies
Dept. of Rel. Studies/Philosophy
Dept. of English & Literary Studies
Dept of English & Literary Studies
Head, Dept. of History & Inter. Studies
Head Dept. of Linguistics & Comm.
Dept of History & Int. Studies
Head, Dept of Rel. & Cultural Studies
Dept of Rel. & Cultural Studies
Dept of Philosophy
Dept of Rel. & Cultural Studies
Dept of English & Lit. Studies
Dept of English & Lit. Studies
Dept of Theatre & Media Studies
Ag. Head of Modern Lang. & Trans. Studies
Ag. Head of English & Lit. Studies
Dept of Ling. & Comm. Studies
Prof. S. O. Abang
Prof. Ivara E. Esu (OFR)
Prof. U. C. Amalu
Prof. E. A. Agiang
Prof. A. E. Eneji
Prof. Mrs. S. B. A. Umoetok
Prof. B. I. Okon
Prof. U. E. Umoren
Dr. A. O. Angba
Dr. John Shiyam
Dr. O. S. Bello
Dr. A. A. Ayuk
Prof. E. I. Inah
-
Prof. (Mrs) Akon. E. O. Esu
Prof. D. N. Nwachuku
Prof. A. J. Isangedighi
Prof. (Mrs) H. M. Denga
PROF. E. A. Uwe
Prof. O. O. Lawal
Prof. R. A. E. Iheanacho
Prof. C. G. Asagwara
-
FACULTY OF AGRICULTURE
Dept of Agric Econs. & Ext.
Department of Soil Science
Department of Soil Science
Dept of Animal Science
Department of Soil Science
Dept of Crop Science
Dept of Animal Science
Dept of Animal Science
Ag. Head, Dept. of Agric. Econs & Ext.
Ag. Head, Dept. of Crop Science
Ag. Head, Dept. of Soil Science
Ag. Head, Dept of Animal Science
Head, Dept. of For. & Wildlife Res. Mgt
FACULTY OF EDUCATION
Dept. of Curriculum & Teaching
Dept. of Edu. Found. Guid & Couns.
-DO-DO-DO-DO-DO-DO-
39
Prof. D. I. Denga
Prof. (Mrs.) Arit E. Obot
Prof. Monday T. Joshua
Prof. L. O. Ogunjimi
Prof. C. A. Ajibola
Prof. Obinna T. Enukoha
Prof. (Mrs) Jane Omojuwa
Prof. I. M. Kalu
Prof. Louisa Uwatt
Prof. S. C. Uche
Prof. (Mrs.) S. J. Umoh
Prof. (Mrs) C. I. Oreh
Prof. R. B. Etor
Prof. Florence Obi
Prof. E. E. Anejo
Dr. M. U. Ojuah
Dr. Ajayi Omoogun
Dr. U. I. Udofia
Dr. (Mrs) Anthonia Inaja
Dr. C. Chukwurah
Dr. (Mrs) V. C. Emeribe
-
-DO-DO-DODept. of Human Kinetics & Health Educ.
-DODept. of Curr. & Teaching
-DO-DO-DO-DO-DODept. of Adult & Cont. Education
-DODept. of Voc. & Special Education
-DOAg. Head, Dept. of Adult & Cont. Edu.
Ag. Head, Dept. of Curr. & Teaching
Ag. Head, Dept. of Edu. Admin & Planning
Ag. Head. Dept of Edu. Found. Guid & Couns
Ag. Head, Dept. of Voc & Special Edu.
Ag. Head, Dept. of Human Kinetics & Health. Educ.
Prof. Kingsly I. Iqweike
Dr. E. E. Alobo
Dr. E. E. Udoaka
-
FACULTY OF LAW
Faculty of Law.
Ag. Head, Dept. of Pub. & Int. Law
Ag. Head, Dept. of Private Law
Prof. Itam H. Itam
Prof. P. E. Ebong
Prof. Obiora Onuba
Prof. O. O. Bassey
Prof. A. A. Otu
Prof. E. O. Nkposong
Prof. Ayi E. Archibong
Prof. Rowland Ndoma-Egba
Prof. Akanimo Essiet
Prof. E. N. U. Ezedinachi
Prof. C. O. Odigwe
Prof. Ima- Obong Ekanem
Prof. Owoidoho Udofia
Prof. A. D. Ekanem
Prof. Eric I. Archibong
Prof. E. E. J. Asuquo
Prof. A. A. Asindi
Prof. M. Meremikwu
Prof. A. M. Udosen
Prof. Emmanuel Ekanem
Prof. G. C. Ejezie
Prof. (Mrs) A. E. Asuquo
Prof. Maisie Etuk Udo
Prof. A. A. Alaribe
Prof. M. F. Useh
Prof. Lydia Abia-Bassey
Prof. E. K. Uko
Prof. C. A. Usoro
Prof. A. E. Udoh
COLLEGE OF MEDICAL SCIENCES
Dept of Obst. & Gynaecology
Dept of Biochemistry
Department of Surgery
Head, Dept. of Surgery
Department of Surgery
Department of Surgery
Department of Surgery
-DO-DODepartment of Medicine
-DODept. of Pathology
Dept. of Psychiatry
Dept. of Obst. & Gynaecology
-DODept. of Obst. & Gynaecology
Department of Paediatrics
-DO-DO-DODept. of Med. Lab. Sciences
-DO-DO-DO-DO-DO-DO-DO-DO-
40
Prof. V. Braide
Prof. E. E. Osim
Prof.A. E. Eno
Prof. A. O. Emeribe
Prof. E. U. Essien
Prof. Edisua Itam
Prof. Esua O. Udosen
Prof. (Mrs.) N. Eneobong
Prof. Atim I. Eshiet
Dr. O. E. Essien
Dr. A. U. Etiuma
Dr. John E. Ekabua
Dr. Michael E. Eyong
Dr. Paul .C . Inyang-Etoh
Dr. Pius Udia
Dr. F. E. Uboh
Dr. Idongesit I. U. Akpabio
Dr. (Mrs.) M. A. Eluwa
Dr. A. O. Obembe
Mr. Nneoyi Egbe
Dr. Grace B. Inah
Dr. N. C. Osuchukwu
Dr. Ubleni Emanghe
Dr. Wilfred O. Ndifon
Dr. Teresa Edentekhe
Dr. Uduak Asana
Dr. Ita B. Okokon
Prof. Owoidoho Udofia
Dr. Marcus Inyama
Dr. H. C. Okpara
-
Dept. of Pharmacology
Dept. of Physiology
-DODept. of Haematology
Dept. of Biochemistry
-DO-DO-DODept. of Anaesthesiology
Ag. Head, Dept. of Internal Medicine
Ag. Head, Dept. of Surgery
Ag. Head, Dept. of Obst. & Gynaecology
Ag. Head, Dept. of Paediatrics
Ag. Head, Dept. of Med. Lab. Scs.
Ag. Head, Dept. of Pharmacology
Ag. Head, Dept. of Biochemistry
Ag. Head, Dept. of Nursing Science
Ag. Head, Dept. of Human Anatomy
Ag. Head, Dept. of Physiology
Ag. Head, Dept. of Radiography
Ag. Head, Dept. of Radiology
Ag. Head, Dept. Public. Health Sciences
Ag. Head, Dept. of Med. Micro & Para.
Ag. Head, Dept. of Community Medicine
Ag. Head, Dept. of Anaethesiology
Ag. Head, Dept. of Ophthalmology
Ag. Head, Dept. of Family Medicine
Head, Dept. of Psychiatry
Ag. Head, Dept. of Haematology
Ag. Head, Dept. of Chem. Pathology
Prof. D. O. Mbat
Dr. Akambom I. Asuquo
Dr. (Mrs) A. I. Offiong
Dr. B. J. Inyang
Dr. E. B. Ebitu
FACULTY OF MANAGEMENT SCIENCES
Dept. of Banking & Finance
Ag. Head, Dept. of Accounting
Ag. Head, Dept. of Banking & Finance
Ag. Head, Dept. of Business Management
Ag. Head, Dept. of Marketing
Prof. O. D. Ekpa
Prof. M. I.Dosunmu
Prof. E. J. Ekpe
Prof. J. O. Ofem
Prof. Aniekan E. Edet
Prof. E. B. Akpan
Prof. C. S. Okereke
Prof. S. J. Ekwere
Prof. E. O. Esu
Prof. S. P. Antai
Prof. Bene Madunagu
Prof. Zsolt Lipcsey
Prof. E. E. Okwueze
Prof. F. W. Mbipom
Prof. A. I. Menkiti
Prof. M. U. Onuu
Prof. E. J. Uwah
Prof. F. N. I. Morah
FACULTY OF SCIENCE
Dept. of Pure & Applied Chemistry
-DO-DO-DODept. of Geology
Department of Geology
-DO-DO-DODepartment of Microbiology
Department of Botany
Dept. of Maths/Stat/Comp. Sc.
Dept. of Physics
-DO-DO-DO-DODept. of Pure & Applied Chemistry
41
Prof. E. J. Usua
Prof. Joe Asor
Prof. S. B. Ekanem
Prof. (Mrs) E. A. Uyoh
Dr. A. T. Owolabi
Prof. S. O. Udo
Dr. Victor Obianwu
Dr. C. A. Edem
Prof. B. I. Ita
Dr. E. E. Oku
Dr. Utip B. Ekaluo
Dr. I. O. Isaac
Dr. Josiah Lennox
Dr. T. N. Ngange
-
Dept. of Zoology & Env. Biology
-DO-DODept. of Genetics & Biotechnology
Ag. Head, Dept. of Botany
Dept. of Physics
Ag. Head, Dept. of Physics
Ag. Head, Dept. of Pure & Applied Chemistry
Dept. of Pure & Applied Chem.
Ag. Head, Dept. of Zoology & Env. Biology
Ag. Head, Dept. of Genetics & Biotechnology
Ag. Head, Dept. of Maths/Stats/Comp. Sc.
Ag. Head, Dept. of Microbiology
Ag. Head, Dept. of Geology
Prof. G. A. Ugal
Prof. J. O. Charles
Prof. J. U. Obot
Prof. R. O. Sule
Prof. M. O. Ebong
Prof. J. E. U. Ndebbio
Prof. J. G. Ottong
Prof. C. O. Bassey
Prof. S. P. Agi
Dr. Friday S. Ebong
Dr. James Okoro
Dr. Simon Odey Ering
Dr. D. D. Eni
-
FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCES
Dept. of Sociology
-DODept. of Geo. & Environ. Science
-DO-DODepartment of Economics
Department of Sociology
Dept. of Political Science
-DOAg. Head, Dept. of Economics
Ag. Head, Dept. of Political Science
Ag. Head, Dept. of Sociology
Ag. Head, Dept. of Geo. & Reg. Planning
Prof. S. Holzloehner
Prof. Ekom R. Akpan
-
INSTITUTE OF OCEANOGRAPHY
Institute of Oceanography
-DO-
Prof. E. E. Nkereuwem
LIBRARY
Library
Prof. B. O. Asuquo
Prof. A. I. Essien
Prof. C. A. Ajibola
Prof. C. S. Okereke
Prof. M. O. Nyong
Prof. Agwunobi
Prof. Francis E. Asuquo
-
SABBATICAL LEAVE
Dept. of Animal Science
Dept. of Animal Science
Dept. of Human Kinetics & Health Education
Dept. of Geology
Dept. of Economics
Dept. of Animal Science
IOC
Prof. Effiom E. Antia
Prof. O. E. Antia-obong
Prof. S. W. Petters
Prof. U. J. Ibok
Prof. Offiong E. Offiong
Prof. E. E. Enoobong
Prof. Zana Akpagu
Prof. Anthony Emeribe
Prof. Etete Peters
prof. Eka I. Braide
-
LEAVE OF ABSENCE
Institute of Oceanography
Dept. of Paediatrics
Department of Geology
Dept. of Pure & Applied Chemistry
Dept. of Pure & Applied Chemistry
Dept. of Genetics & Biotech.
Dept. of Modern Lang.& Trans. Studies
Dept. of Med. Lab. Science
Dept. of Medicine
Dept. of Zoology & Envirn. Biology
42
Prof. P. D. Ekwere
-
Dr. C. A. Eneji
Dr. Chinyere L. Ochulor
Dr. Bassey A. Okon
Dr. U. U. Bassey
Dr. I. N. E. Woruji
Dr. C. O. Ndifon
Dr. P. B. Udoh
Dr. A. B. Udoimuk
Dr. C. O. Nku
Dr. Theresa Ekanem
Dr. J. J. Udo
Dr. Anthonia Adindu
Dr. J. O. Akpotuzor
Dr. P. K. Bessong
Dr. E. I. Akpan
Dr. A. Afangideh
Dr. C. N. Odock
-
Mr. Obot M. Nseobot
Dr. (Mrs.) Julia D. Omang
Prof. P. N. Asuquo
Dr. (Mrs) Margaret Edem
-
-
Dept. of Surgery
FACULTY REPRESENTATIVES
Fac. of Agric. For & Wildlife Res. Mgt.
Faculty of Arts
-DOFaculty of Education
Faculty of Law
-DOFaculty of Science
-DOFaculty of Basic Med. Scs.
-DOFaculty of Clinical Scs.
Faculty of Allied Med. Scs.
-DOFaculty of Management Scs.
-DOFaculty of Social Sciences
-DOOTHER OFFICERS
Bursar
Registrar & Secretary to Senate
Director Academic Planning
University Librarian
SENATE EXAMINATIONS MISCONDUCT COMMITTEE
Prof. A. I. Menkiti
Prof. E. E. Osim
Prof. A. I. Obiekezie
Prof. D. O. Mbat
Prof. Zsolt Lipcsey
Dr. C. O. Ndifon
Mrs. Chukwuka Icha
-
Chairman
Member
Member
Member
Member
Member
Secretary
SENATE STUDENTS DISCIPLINARY COMMITTEE
Prof. F. E. Bisong
Prof. A. A. Asindi
Prof. B. N. Ekwueme
Barr. (Mrs.) Asari E. Young
Mrs. Chukwuka I. Icha
-
Chairman
Member
Member
Member
Member & Secretary
ANTI-CORRUPTION AND TRANSPARENCY MONITORING UNIT
Prof. C. O. Odigwe
Prof. E. E. Okwueze
Prof. Susanne Umoh
Mr. Dele Olowojoba
Dr. A. Agiang
Barr. Eno Abia
Mr. Okpo Usani
Mr. Godwin Mbeke
Ms Comfort Oko
Mr. Matthew Agbor
-
Chairman
Member
Member
Member
Member
Member
Member
Member
Member
Member
43
Mrs. Glory Egong
Prof. O. D. Ekpa
-
Member & Secretary
Member
DIRECTORATE OF RESEARCH
Prof. E. N. U. Ezedinachi
-
Director
One Co-ordinator from each Faculty or Institute
A representative from each of the ten faculties
A representative from each of the three institutes
Terms of Reference
1. To identify significant key research areas that seek to resolve existing problems that are relevant to
Nigeria in general and Cross River State in particular.
2. To identify sources of funding research from both local and international agencies and
communicate same to the University of Calabar Community and to guide them through workshops
and seminars to acquire relevant skills for research proposal preparation and application.
COMMITTEE OF THE UNIVERSITY
STATUTORY COUNCIL COMMITTEES/MEMBERSHIP
1.
FINANCE AND GENERAL PURPOSES COMMITTEE
(Constituted by Council in accordance with Section 5(2) of the University of Calabar Decree No. 8
of 1979)
MEMBERSHIP
Pro-Chancellor/Chairman of Council
Vice-Chancellor
Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic)
Barr. Henry Idahagbon
Dr. (Mrs) Ezinwa Uzuegbunam
Prof. (Mrs) Louisa Etebom Bassey Uwatt
Bursar
Mr. Kennedy Dike
Registrar
- Chairman
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member/Secretary
In Attendance
Director of Audit
University Librarian
Quorum
5 Members of the Committee
Terms of Reference
The Finance and General Purposes Committee shall, subject to the directives of the Council, exercise
control over the property and expenditure of the University and perform such other functions of the
Council as Council may from time to time delegate to it.
2.
UNIVERSITY TENDERS BOARD
MEMBERSHIP
Vice-Chancellor
- Chairman
44
Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Admin.)
Deputy Vice Chancellor (Acad.)
Librarian
Director, Interna Audit
Director, Health Services
Director, ICT
Director of Physical Planning
Bursar
Director, CES
Director of Works
Registrar
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member/Secretary
In Attendance
Director of Works
Director of Physical Planning
Quorum
A quorum shall consist of five members of the Board.
Terms of Reference
Subject to either Council’s or Finance and General Purposes Committee’s directive, the University
Tenders Board shall1. Determine the procedure for tendering and award of contract;
2. Arrange for the registration of contractors eligible to tender for contracts within the Committee’s
powers of award; and
3. Authorize the award of all contracts involving a sum not greater than N500,000.00.
3.
APPOINTMENTS AND PROMOTIONS COMMITTEE (ACADEMIC)
MEMBERSHIP
Vice Chancellor
DVC Academic
Deans of Faculties
Provost, College of Medical Sciences
Directors of Institutes
Dean, Graduate School
Librarian
Registrar
Deputy Registrar Estab .
In Attendance
Head of Department whose business is being discussed
- Chairman
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Secretary
Quorum
One-third of membership
Terms of Reference
1. To consider and make all appointments and promotions of academic staff, provided that the ViceChancellor, in collaboration with the appropriate Heads of Departments should have the power to
make temporary appointments to the academic staff for a period not exceeding one year; and
2. To decided the points in the appropriate salary scale at which members of the academic staff shall
be placed on appointment or on promotion in accordance with the regulations made from time to
time.
4.
APPOINTMENTS AND PROMOTIONS COMMITTEE
(ADMINISTRATIVE AND PROFESSIONAL STAFF)
45
MEMBERSHIP
Vice-Chancellor
DVC (Admin)
Registrar
Bursar
Librarian
Director Of Works
Dep. Registrar Estab
- Chairman
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Secretary
In Attendance
Head of Departments whose business is to be discussed by the Committee
Terms of Reference
1. To consider and make all appointments to and promotions within the Administrative and
Professional Grades provided that the Vice-Chancellor in consultation with the appropriate Head of
Department, shall have power to make temporary appointments to the Administrative and
Professional Grade for a period not exceeding one year;
2. To decide the point in the appropriate salary scale at which a member of the Administrative and
Professional Staff shall be placed on first appointment or on promotion, in accordance with the
regulations approved from time to time.
5.
LABOUR RELATIONS COMMITTEE
MEMBERSHIP
Pro-Chancellor/Chairman of Council
Vice-Chancellor
Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Administration)
Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic)
Mr. Kennedy Dike
Prof. Celestine Oyom Bassey
Prof. Alphonsus Ekpe Udoh
Bursar
Registrar
Bar, Henry Idahagbon
Dr. (Mrs) Ezinwa Uzuegbunam
Head of Legal Unit
Mr Dele Olowojoba
6.
- Chairman
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
DISCIPLINARY COMMITTEE
MEMBERSHIP
Barr. Henry Idahagbon
Prof. C. O. Bassey
Dr, (Mrs) Ezinwa Uzuegbunam
Prof. A. E. Udoh
Dr. Chike Augustine Ekeopara
Registrar
7.
- Chairman
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member/Secretary
COMMITTEE ON CONTISS 5 AND BELOW
MEMBERSHIP
Registrar
Chief D. Ulasi
Prof. Emeka E. Okwueze
Dr. (Mrs) Louisa Etebom Bassey Uwatt
Director, Health Services
Director, Physical Planning
- Chairman
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
46
University Librarian
One Representative from each Faculty
Director of Works
Head of Junior Establishment
8.
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
CENTRE FOR EDUCATIONAL SERVICES BOARD
MEMBERSHIP
Vice-Chancellor
Registrar
Director (CES)
Prof. Celestine Oyom Bassey
Administrative Officer
9.
- Chairman
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Secretary
COLLEGE OF MEDICAL SCIENCES BOARD
MEMBERSHIP
Pro-Chancellor/Chairman of Council
Vice-Chancellor
Provost, College of Medical Sciences
Registrar
Chief D. Ulasi
Prof./Alphonsus Ekpe Udoh
Chief Medical Director, UCTH
Chairman, Med. Advisory Committee, UCTH
CRS Commissioner for Health
Deputy Provost
The 3 Deans of Faculties in the College
College Accountant
Director of Physical Planning
College Secretary
- Chairman
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Secretary
OTHER COMMITTEES OF COUNCIL
1.
PROJECT MONITORING AND IMPLEMNTATION COMMITTEE
MEMBERSHIP
Chief Otazi, Moses Richard
Vice-Chancellor
Registrar
Barr. Henry Idahagbon
Dr. Chike Augustine Ekeopara
Director of Physical Planning
Director of works
Deputy Registrar (Development Division)
2.
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Secretary
UNICAL CONSULTANCY SERVICE BOARD
MEMBERSHIP
Pro-Chancellor/Chairman of Council
Vice-Chancellor
Registrar
Prof. Louisa Etebom Bassey Uwatt
Prof. Alphonsus Ekpe Udoh
Director (UCS)
Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Administration)
- Chairman
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
47
Administrative Officer
3.
- Secretary
UNICAL STAFF SCHOOL REPRESENTATIVE
MEMBERSHIP
Prof. Emeka E. Okuweze
4.
JOINT COUNCIL-SENATE ENDOWMENT COMMITTEE
MEMBERSHIP
Mr. Kennedy Dike
Chief Moses Otazi
Dr. (Mrs) Louisa Etebom Bassey Uwatt
Prof. Celestine Oyom Bassey
Four members from Senate
- Chairman
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Members
5.
INTERNATIONAL SECONDARY SCHOOL REPRESENTATIVE
Prof. (Mrs) Louisa Etebom Bassey Uwatt
6.
COUNCIL REPRESENTATIVE ON DUE PROCESS
Chief Moses Otasi
7.
Senate Research Grant Committee
Prof. E. E. Okwueze (Physics. Dept.)
Provost, CMS
Dean, Graduate School
Dean. Agric.
Dean, Arts
Dean, Allied Med. Science
Dean, Basic.Med. Science
Dean, Clinical Science
Dean, Education
Dean, Law
Dean, Mgt. Science
Dean, Sciences
Dean, Social Science
Director., IOE)
Director., IPPA)
Director., IOC)
Rep., Fac.of Agric.
- Chairman
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
Rep., Fac. of Arts
Rep., Fac. of Education.
Rep., Fac. of Science.
Rep., Fac. of Soc. Science
Rep., Fac. of Law
Rep., Fac. of Clin. Science.
PAR, Dev. Div.
AA, Dev. Div.
Conf. Sec., Dev. Div.
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- member
- Member
- Secretary
- Member
- Member
Central Admission Committee
Vice-Chancellor
DVC Academic
DVC (Admin.)
- Chairman
- Member
- Member
8.
48
Dean, Grad. School
Provost, CMS
Dean, Agric.
Dean, Arts
Dean, Education
Dean, Basic Med. Science
Dean, Clin. Science
Dean, Allied Med. Science
Dean, Law
Dean, Mgt. Science
Dean, Sciences
Dean, Social Science
Director, IOE
Director, IOC
Direcotr, IPPA
Director, Acad. Planning
(Sub-Dean, Agric.)
(Sub-Dean, Arts)
Sub-Dean, Educ.)
(Sub-Dean, Law)
(Sub-Dean, Bas. Med. Sc.)
(Sub-Dean, Ald. Med. Sc.)
(Sub-Dean of Clinical Sciences)
(Sub-Dean, Sciences)
(Sub-Dean, Soc. Sc.)
(Sub-Dean, Mgt. Sc.)
Registrar
All Heads of Departments
Dep. Registrar [Acad.]
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Memb
- Secretary
49
10.
Student’s Welfare Board
Dean, Student Affairs
Dr. (Mrs.) Eno P. Ebong
Dr. C. A. Ajibola
Mr. E. Archibong
Mr. Richard I. Ita
Mr. Okon Usani
Mr. Kingsley Odey
Bldr. Alderton Ewa
Mr. Iwuala Kelechi
Mr. Okoi Arikpo Ettah
Mr. Nsimene Ekpo
Mr. Cyprian Ntui
Mr. Dele Olowojoba (Dep. Reg.)
- Chairman
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Secretary
12.
Academic Planning Committee
There is no existing one; the University has never had any. Instead, the Academic
Unit has an Accreditation Committee which consists of the following
members:
DVC Academic
- Chairman
Director of Academic Planning
- Member
All Deans of Faculties/Directors of Institutes
- Members
Representatives from all Faculties
- Members
The Secretary of the Committee is provided by the Registrar
50
Planning
16 a) Unical Printing Press Board
Vice-Chancellor
Librarian
Prof. D. O. Mbat
Prof. C. S. Okereke
Director CES
Bursar
Barr. (Mrs.) Uba E. Eta
b)
Unical Bookshop
Leased to a private investor
c)
Motor Vehicle Loans
Barr. E. B. Iniama*
d)
Chairman
Member
Member
Member
Member
Member
Secretary
- Sole Administrator
Unical Sports Council
Dr. Eta Edim Eta
Dr. S. B. C. Iheanacho
Dir. of Works
Dir. of Hlth. Services
Director, CES
Dir. of Sports
Bursar
Dr. Charles B. O’Neil
DOS, SUG
Secretary to be nominated by Unical Director of Sports
- Chairman
- Vice-Chairman
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
e)
Library Committee
Vice-Chancellor/Representative
- Chairman
University Librarian
- Member
Representatives of various Faculties/Institutes
- Member
Representative of Graduate School Students
- Member
PAR (Development Division)
- Secretary
Terms of Reference
To advise the University Librarian on the formulation of library policy and on the development of
the library as a centre of learning and research.
To provide information and feed-back to and from the faculties on practical ways to enhance the
quality of library provision and service.
To advise in the preparation of estimates, the allocation of funds and the planning of major
additions to physical facilities and services.
To advise on the making of regulations governing the use of the library.
f)
Graduate School Board
Membership
Dean, Graduate School
Dean, Fac. of Agric.
Provost, Coll. of Med. Science
Dean, Fac. of Law
Dean, Fac. of Basic Med. Science
Dean, Faculty of Science
Dean, Faculty of Allied Med. Science
Dean, Faculty of Social Science
Dean, Faculty of Mgt. Science
Dean, Faculty of Education
Dean, Faculty of Arts
Dean, Fac. of Theology, CIWA)
- Chairman
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
51
Director, Institute of Education)
Director, Institute of Oceanography
Director, IPPA
University Librarian
Chair, Fac of Mgt Sc Grad Committee
Chair, Fac of Ald Med.Sc Grad Comt
Chair, Fac of Law Grad. Comt.
Chair, Fac of Sc. Grad. Comt.
Chair, Fac of Soc. Sc. Grad. Comt.
Chair, Fac of Arts Grad. Comt.
Chairman, Fac of Agric. Grad. Comt.
Rep. University Library
Director, Acad. Planning
Academic Sec., Graduate School
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Member
- Secretary
52
GENERAL INFORMATION
ACADEMIC ORGANISATION AND PROGRAMMES
The University of Calabar offers the following academic programmes and confers
degrees/diplomas/ certificates in the respective Faculties, Institutes and the College of Medical Sciences:
Faculty of Agriculture
Departments
Agric. Econs & Extension
Animal Science
Crop Science
Forestry & Wildlife Resource Management
Soil Science
-
B.Sc., PGD, M.Sc., Ph.D
B.Sc., PGD, M.Sc., Ph.D
B.Agric, PGD,M.Sc., Ph.D
B.Agric, PGD, M.Sc., Ph.D
B.Agric, PGD, M.Sc, Ph.D
Faculty of Allied Medical Sciences
Departments
Medical Lab. Science
Environmental/Public Health Science
Nursing
Radiography
-
B.M.L.S
B.Sc, MPH, Ph.D
B.N.Sc., M.Sc, Ph.D
B.Sc, M.Sc., Ph.D
Faculty of Arts
Departments
English & Literary Studies
History & International Studies
Modern Lang. & Trans. Studies
Linguistics
Religious & Cultural Studies
Philosophy
Theatre & Media Arts
-
B.A., PGD, M.A., Ph.D
B.A., PGD, M.A., Ph.D
B.A., PGD, M.A., Ph.D
B.A., PGD, M.A., Ph.D
B.A., PGD, M.A., Ph.D
B.A., PGD, M.A., Ph.D
B.A., PGD, M.A., Ph.D
Faculty of Basic Medical Sciences
Departments
Anatomy
Biochemistry
Physiology
Pharmacology
-
B.Sc., M.Sc., Ph.D
B.Sc., M.Sc., Ph.D
B.Sc., M.Sc., Ph.D
B.Sc., M.Sc., Ph.D
Faculty of Clinical Sciences
Departments
Pathology
-
MB,BCh., Fel. Nat. PostGrad.
Collge, Fel. West African College,
Ph.D
MB,BCh., Fel. Nat. PostGrad.
College, Fel. West African College,
Ph.D
MB,BCh., Fel. Nat. PostGrad.
College, Fel. West African College
D.A, MB,BCh., Fel. Nat.
PostGrad. College, Fel. West
African College
MB,BCh., Fel. Nat. PostGrad.
College, Fel. West African College
MB,BCh., Fel. Nat. PostGrad.
College, Fel. West African College
MB,BCh., Fel. Nat. PostGrad.
Chemical Pathology
-
Community Medicine
-
Anaesthesiology
-
Family Medicine
-
Paediatrics
-
Haematology
-
53
Ophthalmology
-
Internal Medicine
-
Surgery
-
Obst./Gynaecology
-
Psychiatry
-
Radiology
-
Med. Microbiology/Parasitology
-
Faculty of Education
Departments
Adult & Continuing Education
College, Fel. West African College,
Ph.D
MB,BCh., Fel. Nat. PostGrad.
College, Fel. West African College
MB,BCh., Fel. Nat. PostGrad.
College, Fel. West African College
MB,BCh., Fel. Nat. PostGrad.
College, Fel. West African College
MB,BCh., Fel. Nat. PostGrad.
College, Fel. West African College
MB,BCh., Fel. Nat. PostGrad.
College, Fel. West African College
MB,BCh., Fel. Nat. PostGrad.
College, Fel. West African College
MB,BCh., Fel. Nat. PostGrad.
College, Fel. West African College,
Ph.D
Curriculum and Teaching
-
Edu. Admin. and Planning
Edu. Foun., Guid & Counselling
Human kinetics & Health Education
Vocational and Special Education
-
Certificate, B.Ed., PGD, M.Ed.,
Ph.D
B.A., B.Sc.(Ed), PGD, M.Ed.,
Ph.D
B.Ed., PGD, M.Ed., Ph.D
B.Ed., PGDE., M.Ed., MLS, Ph.D
B.Ed., PGDE., M.Ed., Ph.D
B.Ed., PGD, M.Ed., Ph.D
Faculty of Law
Jurisprudence & Int’l Law
Private Law
-
LL.B, LL.M, Ph.D
LL.B, LL.M, Ph.D
Faculty of Management Sciences
Departments
Accounting
Banking and Finance
Business Management
Marketing
-
B.Sc., PGD, M.Sc., Ph.D
B.Sc., PGD, M.Sc., Ph.D
B.Sc., PGD, M.Sc., Ph.D
B.Sc., PGD, M.Sc., Ph.D
-
B.Sc., PGD, M.Sc., Ph.D
B.Sc., PGD, M.Sc., Ph.D
B.Sc., PGD, M.Sc., Ph.D
B.Sc., PGD, M.Sc., Ph.D
B.Sc., PGD, M.Sc., Ph.D
B.Sc., PGD, M.Sc., Ph.D
B.Sc., PGD, M.Sc., Ph.D
-
B.Sc., PGD, M.Sc., Ph.D
-
B.Sc., PGD, M.Sc., Ph.D
B.Sc., PGD, M.Sc., Ph.D
Faculty of Science
Departments
Botany
Chemistry
Genetics & Biotechnology
Geology
Maths Stat. & Computer Sc.
Microbiology
Physics
Applied Geophysics
(b)
Electronics & Computer Tech.
(c)
Pure Physics
Zoology & Env. Biology
Faculty of Social Sciences
Departments
Economics
Geography & Environmental Science
-
54
Political Science
Sociology
Institute of Education
Departments
Education Technology
Environmental Education
Extension/Distance Learning
-
B.Sc., PGD, M.Sc., Ph.D
B.Sc., PGD, M.Sc., Ph.D
-
Diploma
Diploma
Diploma
Institute of Oceanography
Departments
Fisheries and Aquaculture
Institute of Public Policy & Administration
Departments
Local Government and Rural Development
Personnel Mgt. & Labour Stud.
Policy and Admin Studies
-
PGD
-
DPA,
Dip.
Dip.
DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS
In addition to satisfying the minimum entry requirements of the University, prospective entrants are
expected to meet the following Departmental requirements:
A. FACULTY OF AGRICULTURE
Department of Agricultural Economics and Extension
i. The UME candidates are admitted into a five-year degree programme of the Department of
Agricultural Economics and Extension. The UME entry requirements are credit passes in
SSCE/GCE O-Level in five subjects (which should include, Chemistry, Mathematics, English
Language, Biology or Agricultural Science and any other subject) in not more than two sittings. At
least a pass in Physics is required. However, a candidate with a pass in English Language or
Mathematics may be allowed by to remedy the deficiency and must pass it during the first year of
study.
ii. The Second mode of admission is through the remedial programme. Candidates who have
successfully passed the University of Calabar Remedial Science Programme may also be admitted
into first year of the degree programme. Direct Entry Students with requisite qualification are also
admitted to do four years for the B.Agric. Programme.
iii. Apart from the UME and Remedial programme, students may be admitted from other Departments
in the Faculty in their final year. To be eligible for transfer into the Department of Agricultural
Economics and Extension, candidates must satisfy the following requirements, as applicable:
iv. Remedial candidates must have credit passes in Economics and mathematics;
v. Candidates on inter-departmental transfer must have a minimum CGPA of 2.50 in addition to an
average of a B-grade in Agricultural Economics and Extension courses;
vi. Candidates on inter-faculty transfer must have a minimum of CGPA of 3.00 plus B-grades in
Mathematics and Economics; and
vii. Candidates transferring from other Universities must have an equivalent of Second Class Upper
division at the time of the transfer.
POST GRADUATE:
i. Candidates who hold a First Degree either in Agriculture, Agricultural Economics, Economics or a
related discipline with a good Second Class Honours Degree from the University of Calabar or any
other University recognised by Senate may apply for admission
ii. Candidates will be required to register for and pass a total of 30 credit hours of course work at the
6000 level. Candidates will take a total of 18 credit units of compulsory courses and a total of 12
credit units of electives from two of the given option areas namely:
55





Agricultural Economic Development and Policy
Farm Management/Production Economics
Agricultural Marketing and Co-operatives
Agricultural Finance and Business Management
Resource Economics
Ph.D DEGREE
a) Candidates for admission into the Ph.D programmes must hold a Masters Degree in
Agricultural Economics or a related discipline.
b) In addition to completing the course work for the Masters Degree in Agricultural
Economics, the candidate shall complete 12 credit hours of course work at the 7000 level
and pass with a minimum grade of B.
c) Ph.D students in Agricultural Economics and Agricultural Extension must pass a
comprehensive examination in Economic Theory, Quantitative Methods and one chosen
option area.
Department of Animal Science
a) Admission of students into the Department is through the Joint Matriculation Examination and
Remedial Programme of the University of Calabar which is aimed at rectifying Student’s
deficiencies before embarking on the full programme.
b) To qualify for admission into degree course in Bachelor of Agriculture with specialization in
Animal Sciences, the candidate must satisfy general requirements as outlined in the JAMB
Brochure Guidelines for Admission for first degree courses in Nigerian Universities (obtainable
from the Joint Admission Matriculation Board). The candidate must as well fulfill the Faculty
and Departmental requirements prescribed below:
i. Obtaining a score in Joint Matriculation Examination of not less than the Minimum
Score required by the Department;
ii. Possessing one of the following qualifications:
 West African School Certificate or NECO with passes at Credit Level in at least five
subjects including English Language,
Mathematics, Agriculture Science or
Biology, Chemistry and Physics,
 General Certificate of Education with passes at Ordinary Level in at least five
subjects including English Language, Mathematics, Agricultural Science or
Biology, Chemistry and Physics.
c) The Department also admits candidates who have successfully remedied all their deficiencies.
Remedial students are not allowed to matriculate until they have completely remedied their
deficiencies. Candidates who fail to remedy such deficiencies after one session are required to
withdraw from the University.
d) Candidates seeking admission into the Post Graduate (PGD) or Master’s degree (M.Sc.)
Programme in Animal Science should hold a First Degree in Agriculture, Agricultural
Education, Biological Sciences, Biochemistry or any other related discipline with a minimum
of a good Second Class Honours Degree of the University of Calabar or any other University
recognised by Senate .
Department of Crop Science
(a) JME REQUIREMENT
The JME candidates are admitted into the five-year degree programme. The JME entry
requirements are credit passes in SSCE/GCE O/L/NECO in five subjects which should
include English Language, Mathematics, Chemistry, Agricultural Science or Biology and
Physics.
(b) JAMB DIRECT ENTRY REQUIREMENT
Two
‘A’
level
passes
in
chemistry
and
one
of
Agricultural
Science/Biology/Botany/Zoology, Mathematics, Physics, Geology, Geography and
Economics. Candidates admitted through direct entry are exempted from the year one
programme and thus their programme has a duration of four years starting from year two.
(c) REMEDIAL ADMISSION
56
Candidates who have successfully passed the University of Calabar Remedial Science
programme may also be admitted into the first year of the degree programme.
Department of Forestry and Wildlife Resources Management
a) JOINT ADMISSION MATRICULATION BOARD
A Candidate may qualify for admission into the Department of Forestry and Wildlife
Resources Management, by satisfying the following:
i. Obtaining a score in Joint Matriculation Examination
of
not
less
than
the
minimum score required by the Faculty;
ii. Possessing one of the following qualifications:
 West African School Certificate with passes at Credit level in at least five subjects
including English Language, Mathematics, Agricultural Science or Biology,
Chemistry and Physics;
 General Certificate of Education with passes at ordinary level in at least
five
subjects including English Language, Mathematics, Agricultural Science or Biology,
Chemistry and Physics;
 Senior Secondary School Certificate with credits in at least five subjects including
English language, Mathematics, Agricultural Science or Biology, Chemistry and
Physics.
b) REMEDIAL PROGRAMME
The Department of Forestry and Wildlife Resources Management runs a one-year Remedial
Programme to enable candidates make up for their deficiencies. There are two categories of
remedial admissions:
 Candidates who satisfy the requirements in Section (a) ii above i.e have five ‘O’ level
credits and at least a minimum acceptable score in the Joint Matriculation
Examination, but have a pass in English and Mathematics are allowed to remedy these
subjects preparatory to being admitted into the Department.
 Candidates who did not satisfy the Joint Admission Examination requirements but
have three credits at ‘O’ level GCE or Senior Secondary School Certificate, one of
which must be a science subject, are admitted to the one year remedial course. In
addition, the candidate would have attempted two other science subjects.
Department of Soil Science
1) Admission of students into the Department of Soil Science in the Faculty of Agriculture is
through the Joint Matriculation Examination, and the Remedial Programme of the
University of Calabar which is aimed at rectifying student deficiencies before embarking
on the full programme.
2) To qualify for admission into the degree programme, a candidate must satisfy the general
University requirements as outlined in the JAME Brochure Guidelines for admission to
First Degree Courses in Nigerian Universities (obtainable from the Joint Admissions
Matriculation Board). The candidate must also fulfill the Faculty and Departmental
requirements prescribed below:
a) DIRECT ENTRY: International students holding advanced ‘A’ Level GCE,
London/Cambridge GCE, with passes in the three basic Sciences plus English
Language can also be admitted into the Bachelor’s Degree Programme. Possession of a
National Diploma in Agriculture (Upper Credit) or three passes at ‘A’ Level GCE in
General Agriculture plus two basic science subjects including English Language
qualifies one for a Direct Entry (DE) admission.
b) JOINT ADMISSION MATRICULATION BOARD: A candidate may
i. Qualify for admission into the Faculty of Agriculture and Department of Soil
Science by satisfying the following:
 Obtain a score in the University Matriculation Examination (UME)
 of not less than minimum score required by the Faculty.
 Possessing one of the following qualifications:
57
a.
b.
c.
West African School Certificate with passes at Credit Level in at least five
subjects including English Language, Mathematics, Agricultural Science
or Biology, Chemistry and Physics.
General Certificate of Education (GCE) with passes at ordinary ‘O’ level
in at least five subjects including; English Language, Mathematics,
Agricultural Science or Biology, Chemistry and Physics.
Senior Secondary School Certificate with credits in at least five subjects
including English Language, Mathematics, Agricultural Science or
Biology, Chemistry and Physics.
c) GRADUATE ADMISSIONS:
Graduate (M.Sc and Ph.D) admissions are coordinated by the Graduate School of the
University of Calabar. But candidates must possess a good Bachelor’s degree or
Master’s Degree, as the case may be, in any of the Agric-based courses of the
University of Calabar or any other recognised University before being considered for
admission. At the time of considering the admission, suitable Supervisor(s) are given to
the candidate.
B.
FACULTY OF ALLIED MEDICAL SCIENCES
Department of Medical Laboratory Science
WAEC, GCE or Senior Secondary School Certificate with credit level passes in Physics,
Mathematics, Chemistry, Biology and English at not more than 2 sittings together with a relevant
pass in the Joint Matriculation Examination (JME). Pass in General Certificate of Education at
Advanced Level in Chemistry, Physics, Biology (or Zoology).
Department of Environmental Health Science
Admission to the programme is open to graduates of the University of Calabar or other universities
recognized by the Senate and applicants should hold at least a second class honours (upper
Division, 21) degree (or its equivalent ) in the health sciences (including health education);
adequate background in biomedical sciences, biological sciences; M.B..B.Ch and B.D.S. (Bachelor
of Dental Surgery) DVM or their equivalents or sociology with adequate background in
biomedical sciences. The department expects eligible applicants to attend a personal interview as
part of the selection process.
Department of Nursing
(a) UME ENTRY
Candidates must have an appropriate pass in the UME examination of the Joint Admission
and Matriculation Board (JAMB). In addition, the candidate must hold the
WASC/SSCE/GCE O/L or its equivalent with credits in at least 5 subjects (at not more than
2 sittings) including English Language, Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics and Physics.
(b)
DIRECT ENTRY
i. Candidates must possess the Advanced level GCE or Higher School Certificate in at least 2
science subjects, chosen from Biology/Zoology, Physics and Chemistry. In addition
candidates must have credits in 5 other subjects in O’Level GCE/SSCE including
Mathematics, Chemistry, Biology, Physics and English language.
ii. Already trained nurses must possess the Registered Nurse certificate (RN) of the Nursing &
Midwifery Council of Nigeria (N&MCN) and in addition hold the GCE/SSCE/WASC or
its equivalent; with credits in at least 5 subjects (at not more than 2 sittings) including
English Language and at least 2 science subjects chosen from Biology, Physics, Chemistry
and Mathematics.
iii. Direct entry candidates will be placed at the 200 level of study. The non-nursing qualified
direct candidates will be expected to sit for at least 2
professional examinations like
the UME candidates (that is, General Nursing and Midwifery or Psychiatric Nursing).
Duration:
UME - 5 years
Direct Entry
- 4 years
58
Department of Radiography
The minimum entry requirements for admission into the College of Medical Sciences are
applicable. This includes five ‘O’ level (SSCE of GCE/WASC or NECO) credits in Physics,
Chemistry, Biology, English Language and Mathematics, plus a pass in the Joint Admission
Matriculation Examination, provided the cut-off point is made.
C.
FACULTY OF ARTS
Department of English and Literary Studies
JME candidates need to fulfill the regular University requirement of five credits at O’Level
including English Language and English Literature. Direct Entry candidates must satisfy UME
requirements and:
 Two ‘A’ Level passes to include Literature in English and one other Arts subject
(excluding African Languages)
 NCE (merit) in English Literature and English Language
 Diploma in English Studies and Communication from the University of Calabar.
 Related Diploma from the Faculty of Arts.
Department of History and International Studies
Prospective degree candidates must satisfy both the general University entry requirements and the
specific Faculty and Departmental requirements.
(a)
Candidates for the four-year (8 semester) B.A. Programme, admitted through JAMB
University Matriculation Examination, must possess O/Level, NECO or other equivalent
Certificate with credit level passes in at least five subjects taken at not more than two
sittings. The five subjects must include English Language and History or Government.
(b)
Candidates for the Three-Year (6-semester) B.A. Programme, that is, Direct Entry (D.E)
candidates, must possess one of the following:
 Diploma in History or in any other related discipline obtained from the University of
Calabar or from any other institutions recognized by the University of Calabar with an
overall pass of at least merit level.
 GCE. A/Level Certificate with a minimum of two subjects, including History or
Government with at least a ‘D’ Grade pass in each subject.
 The National Certificate in Education (NCE) with merit level passes in at least two subjects
that should include History or Government.
 In all cases, D.E. candidates must posses the University minimum entry requirements and
the specific Faculty and Departmental entry requirement stated in (a) above.
Department of Modern Languages and Translation Studies
Admission requirements are in compliance prescribed by the Joint Admission & Matriculation
Board as well as those of the Faculty of Arts and the University at Large.
In Addition to the general entry requirements, a candidate for the 4-year programme (UME)
should possess five (5) ‘O’ level credits in 5 subjects including English Language and one other
Arts subject. Knowledge of French, Spanish or German is only an advantage, but not a
requirement.
For Direct Entry (3 year programme) a candidate is required to possess any of the following:
 5 ‘O’ Level credit passes in 5 subjects including English Language, plus 2 ‘A’ level passes
in two subjects, one of which must be in French.
 4 ‘O’ Level credit passes in 4 subjects including English Language plus 3 ‘A’ level passes
in 3 subjects one (1) of which must be in French.
 5 ‘O’ Level credit passes in 5 subjects including English language plus 2 merit or credit
passes in NCE, one of which must be in French.
 5 ‘O’ Level credit passes in 5 subjects including English Language, plus Diploma in
Language Studies at credit or merit level.
Department of Linguistics
59
Requirements for the four-year programme are in accordance with those of JAMB as well as
University and the Faculty of Arts– five credits including English Language and one other Arts
subject. For Direct Entry, the candidates must, in addition to general entry requirements, possess
any of the following:
i. Two NCE subjects with at least a merit in Linguistics, any Nigerian or Foreign Language
OR
ii. University/College Diploma or Certificate in TEFL (Teaching of English as a Foreign
Language).
iii. University/College Diploma in Studies in a Nigerian Language
Department of Religious Studies and Philosophy
a) Regulations for the M.A. Degree in Religious Studies:
 Admission to the programme is open to candidates with a B.A. (Second Class Lower or
above) in Religious Studies, Theology (or in related disciplines namely: Moral
Philosophy, Church History and Canon Law etc) from the University of Calabar or other
Universities recognized by .
 The duration of the M.A. programme is a minimum of two semester (one academic year)
or a maximum of four semesters (two academic years). Part-time students may not take
less than four semesters, and not more than six semesters to complete their degree.
b) Admission into the Ph.D programme in Religious Studies is in accordance with the general
university requirements for a higher degree in the University of Calabar. Candidates with
M.A. or M.Phil Degrees from the University of
Calabar and other recognised Universities
may be considered for admission.
Department of Theatre & Media Arts
a) To obtain a B.A. Honours in Theatre Arts and Media Studies, the student admitted by
University Matriculation Examination (U.M.E.) of the Joint Admissions and Matriculation
Board (JAMB) goes into the Four-year Programme.
b) To obtain a B.A. Honours in Theatre Arts and Media Studies, the student admitted by Direct
Entry through J.A.M.B. also, effectively joins at Year II of the Four-Year Programme, which
point is regarded as his Year-I. The background and entry qualifications of the D.E.
candidates differ according to their previous qualifications:
i. Any other two-year Diploma in Theatre or other related studies from an
approved/recognized post-secondary or equivalent institution within or outside Nigeria, at
least at Merit level.
ii. Other related (i.e cognate) studies equivalent to the D.T.A. may include Diploma in
Journalism, Radio and TV Studies, Textile and Design Studies, or Musical Studies.
iii. A GCE A/L Certificate with a minimum of three subjects, including English Literature
with at least a ‘D’ Grade pass.
iv. The National Certificate in Education (N.C.E.) in Three major subjects, including
Literature-in-English at least at Merit level pass.
v. The I.J.M.B. Certificate in Three relevant subjects including Literature in English with at
least ‘D’ grade pass.
vi. A Two-year OND in Mass Communication from an approved/recognized University or
Polytechnic with at least a
2.75GPA at Merit Level.
vii. In all cases above, candidate must possess five credit level passes in English Language and
Literature-in-English and any other three
relevant and approved subjects in the
G.C.E. O/L, NECO, (WA) SSCE or equivalent examination, but obtained at not more than
two sittings.
D.
FACULTY OF BASIC MEDICAL SCIENCES
Department of Anatomy
B.Sc. Programme: Entry qualification for the B.Sc. Course in Anatomy is WASC or its equivalent
with credits in: Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Mathematics and English Language. The
qualifications should be obtained in not more than two sittings.
M.Sc. Programme: The programme is open to candidates with Bachelors degree with first or
second class honours in Anatomy of the University of Calabar or any other degree deemed
60
equivalent by the University of Calabar, candidates with qualifications in medicine and
surgery (MBBCH), Dentistry (B.Ds) or Veterinary Medicine (DVM) are also eligible.
Ph.D Programme: Has been in place since the 2004/2005 Academic Session.
Department of Biochemistry
The UME entry requirements for the B.Sc. (Hons) degree programme in biochemistry are five
credits at ordinary level SSCE or School Certificate (SC)/GCE which should include credit passes
in the following subjects: Physics, Chemistry, Biology, Mathematics, English Language obtained
at not more than two sittings. The course shall last for four years.
Department of Physiology
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR MBBCh: Candidates for the six year MBBCh Programme
of the College of Medical Sciences must have credits in English Language, Physics, Chemistry,
Biology, Mathematics and any one other subject at WASC Examination or its equivalent. In
addition, the candidate must take and pass the competitive national J.M.E. for entry into Nigerian
Universities as well as the aptitude test conducted by the University.
Also, candidates may be admitted into the second year of the six-year programme who
hold GCE A/L Certificate or its equivalent in Physics, Chemistry, Biology, Zoology, Botany, or
holders of a minimum of Second Class (Hons) in one of the following subjects: Physics,
Chemistry, Biology, Zoology, Botany, Biochemistry, Physiology, Anatomy or Microbiology or
Holders of DVM.
ADMISSION REQUIREMENT FOR B.Sc. (HONS) PHYSIOLOGY: The entry qualifications for
the four-year B.Sc. degree programme are as follows:
West African School Certificate or an equivalent qualification with credits in the
following subjects: English Language, Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry, Biology and one other
subject. The candidate must also take and pass the competitive national J.M.E. for entry into
Nigerian Universities and the university aptitude test.
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR POSTGRADUATE DIPLOMA IN PHYSIOLOGY: In
addition to having ‘O’ Level requirement for admission into University of Calabar, the candidates
for admission into Post graduate-diploma in Physiology must have any of the following
qualifications:
(a)
NIST Final Certificate or equivalent in Physiology/Pharmacology (at credit level or above)
(b)
B.Sc. 2nd Class Hons. Degree in any related science discipline (e.g. Biology).
(c)
Pass degree, 3rd class Hons. Degree or Second Class Hons. Lower division in Physiology
with a low GPA.
ADMISSION REQUIREMENT FOR M.Sc. PROGRAMME IN PHYSIOLOGY: Admission into
the programme is open to graduates of the University of Calabar or other Universities recognised
by who hold at least a second class honours degree in physiology or related discipline. It is also
open to holders of M.B.B.Ch., DVM or BVM or a pass at credit level in Postgraduate Diploma in
Physiology.
ADMISSION REQUIREMENT FOR Ph.D PGROGRAMME IN PHYSIOLOGY:
The programme is open to any candidate who has the following qualifications:
i.
Master’s degree in Physiology with a minimum of 3.0 grade point average.
ii.
Outstanding performance during the M.Sc. Physiology programme. Such a candidate may
be allowed to advance from M.Sc. to Ph.D. on the recommendation of the Departmental
and Graduate Committees to the Graduate School Board and after approval by the of the
University.
Department of Pharmacology
Not avilable
E.
FACULTY OF CLINICAL SCIENCES
61
Department of Pathology
Not available
Department of Chemical Pathology
a) UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMME: The minimum entry requirements for the BMLS
degree programme are:
i) The West African School Certificate or its equivalent (GCE ‘O’ Level) with credit
passes in English Language, Mathematics, Chemistry, Physics, Biology and any one
other subject.
ii) A Candidate with the Part IV Professional IMLT diploma may be considered for
admission, provided such candidate in addition possesses and shows evidence of general
education by satisfying the pre-requisite for the 4-year Programme as in paragraph (1) or
any other qualifications acceptable to the University.
(b)
3 YEAR PROGRAMME: As in (a) (i) above
and in addition, Advanced level passes in Physics, Chemistry and Biology (or Zoology) or
equivalent qualification. Preference will be given to candidates with good grades and who
passes three subjects (‘A’ Level GCE) in one sitting.
(c)
POST GRADUATE: See post graduate handbook
Department of Community Medicine
Not available
Department of Anaesthesiology
Not available
Department of Family Medicine
Not available
Department of Paediatrics
Does not offer degree courses, but plays a major role in servicing and training of students
the Faculty of Clinical Sciences
within
Department of Haematology
Not available
Department of Ophthalmology
Not available
Department of Medicine
The Department accepts students who have successfully undergone the pre-clinical years and
passed Anatomy, Physiology and Biochemistry at the 2nd MB Examination. During their
remaining 3 years, they rotate through the Department 4 times (M1, M2, M3, M4) The first 2
postings, M1 and M2, last 15 weeks. During this period, emphasis is on history taking and physical
examination during clinical bedside teaching. There are also 2 hours per week structured
classroom lectures that go on simultaneously. This is the Clinical Year 1 of the 4 – year Medical
School Programme.
In the 2nd Clinical Year (5/6), Phase II, the third Medical posting exposes the students to
undergraduate psychiatry, and they rotate through the Infectious Diseases Hospital. They also get
more grounding in Clinical medicine by way of further bedside teaching and regular
seminars/tutorials.
In the final year (6/6),Phase III, students consolidate all they have acquired in the curriculum by
further tutorials, seminars and review lectures in Clinical Medicine and Therapeutics.
62
The curriculum has undergone a major revision with a view to increasing its relevance to national
and international needs. The average total number of students per class is 150
POSTGRADUATE TRAINING: The Department in collaboration offers this with National and
West African Postgraduate Medical Colleges. There are at present 30 resident doctors at various
stages of the postgraduate programme. Over the last five years, the Department has successfully
trained 7 Consultants, and most have joined the staff.
Department of Surgery
Students are admitted into a six-year programme of studies in Surgery and Medicine, leading to
the award of the MB, BCH degree. To qualify for admission, students must obtain a pass at Credit
Level in five subjects including Chemistry, Biology, English Language, Physics and Mathematics.
A good pass at the JAMB is also mandatory for admission. Students who are already graduates in
any of the Sciences or who hold A-Level passes in Biology, Chemistry and Physics are also
usually considered for direct admission into the degree course in medicine and Surgery. There is
no admission through the remedial programme in any Faculty of the College of Medical Sciences.
Department of Obstetrics/Gynaecology
Not available
Department of Psychiatry
Not available
Department of Radiology
Not available
Department of Medical Microbiology/Parasitology
Does not offer degree courses, but plays major role in servicing and training of
the Faculty of Clinical Sciences
F.
students
within
FACULTY OF EDUCATION
Department of Adult and Continuing Education
(a) ENTRY THROUGH UME: Candidates seeking admission through this route need 5 Credits
obtained from the Senior Secondary School Certificate Examination including English at not
more than two sittings or its equivalent in relevant subject areas in addition to an acceptable
pass in the University Matriculation Examination (UME).
(b) DIRECT ENTRY: Candidates holding the following qualifications are eligible to apply
through direct entry.
 Merit in relevant Diploma in Education
 Merit in two subjects taken at N.C.E. level.
 Terminal Examinations in International Baccalaureate from a recognized institution
 Higher Secondary School certificate credits or equivalent in three subjects.
(c) ENGLISH LANGUAGE REQUIREMENT: In all cases, whether by Direct Entry or UME, a
credit in English Language at the Senior Secondary School Certificate or General Certificate
Examination or its equivalent is required.
Department of Curriculum and Teaching
WASC/GCE(O/L) with passes at credit level in at least five subjects obtained at not more than two
sittings. Teachers Grade II certificate with passes at credit/merit levels in at least five subjects
including English Language and a subject in the relevant area and at least a pass in Mathematics (4
years programme).
N.C.E. holders must have passes in two relevant subjects at credit or merit level in addition to
‘O’Level passes at credit level in three other relevant subjects. At least a pass in Mathematics at
O’Level is also required (3-year post NCE)
Department of Educational Administration and Planning
63
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
NCE with an overall pass at Merit level or above provided the candidate also has at least
three credits in GCE or its equivalent and a pass in Mathematics.
Diploma in Education or in any other area provided the candidate also has at least three
credits at ‘O’Level including credit in English and pass in Mathematics at
GCE/WAEC/NECO.
Teachers Grade II certificate with a minimum of five passes at merit level including English
language and at least a pass in Mathematics.
General Certificate of Education or its equivalent with at least five credits in two sittings
including credit in English and at least a pass in Mathematics, holders of NCE/Diploma will
spend three academic years while all others will spend four academic years full time or four
and five years respectively if part-time.
Department of Educational Foundations, Guidance and Counselling
(a)
UME FOUR-YEAR DEGREE PROGRAMME: Candidate must satisfy the general
admission requirement for undergraduate studies. That is candidate must obtain at least
five O’ Level credits of Teachers’ Grade II certificate merits or better including English
Language credit A third sitting is allowed for the satisfaction of English Language credit.
A candidate is required to obtain an ‘O’Level credit pass or an approved equivalent in the
area he chooses to read as his/her teaching subject. A candidate who chooses any area of
science, Agriculture or Economics as a teaching subject must obtain O’ Level Credit or
Teachers’ Grade II Merit pass in Mathematics.
(b)
THREE YEAR DIRECT ENTRY PROGRAMME: Candidate must satisfy the general
admission requirement for undergraduate studies in addition obtaining one of the
following.
i.
At least two ‘A’ Level papers in addition to three other ‘O’ Level credits of Teacher
Grade II merit including credits in English Language obtained in not more than one
sitting. A second sitting is allowed for the satisfaction of the English Language
requirement. At least a pass in ‘O’ Level Mathematics is required for candidates with
Arts or Social Science teaching subjects, while those with Science teaching subjects
must have atleast an ‘O’ Level credit pass in Mathematics.
ii. A recognised Diploma with a minimum of Merit or better, including English
Language obtained in one sitting. A second sitting is allowed for the satisfaction of
the English Language requirement. At least a pass in ‘O’ Level Mathematics is
required for candidates with Arts or Social Science teaching subjects, while those
with Science teaching subjects must have at least an ‘O’ Level credit Pass in
Mathematics.
iii. NCE with at least an ‘O’ merit pass in one of the major subjects in addition to at least
four other ‘O’ Level credits or teachers’ Grade II merits obtained at not more than
one sitting. At least a pass in ‘O’ Level Mathematics is required for candidates with
Arts or Social Science teaching subjects, while those with Science teaching subjects
must have at least an ‘O’ Level Credit Pass in Mathematics.
iv. NCE with at least two merit passes in two major subjects in addition to at least three
other ‘O’ Level credits, or teachers’ Grade II merits obtained at more than one sitting.
At least a pass in ‘O’ Level Mathematics is required for candidates with Arts or
Social Science teaching subjects, while those with Science teaching subjects must
have at least ‘O’ Level Credit pass in Mathematics.
v. NCE with at least ‘O’ Level merit passes in three major subjects in addition to at
least two other ‘O’ Level credits or Teachers’ Grade II merits obtained at not more
than one sitting. At least a pass in ‘O’ Level Mathematics is required for candidates
with Arts or Social Science teaching subjects, while those with Science teaching
subjects must have at least an ‘O’ Level credit pass in Mathematics.
Department of Vocational & Special Education
(a)
A credit in English Language and a Pass in Mathematics at the SSCE (Secondary School
equivalent) are required for Special Education in addition to an acceptable pass in Joint
64
(b)
Matriculation Examination are qualifications for admission into the four (4) year degree
programme into any of the Universities.
DIRECT ENTRY – Any of the following qualifications for admission:
i.
A pass at merit (lower credit) level in a relevant Diploma programme. A credit in
English Language is required.
ii. Two (2) passes in relevant subject areas at Advanced Level with SC/GCE ‘O’Level
credit passes in three other subjects at not more than two (2) sitting OR
iii. Three (3) passes in relevant areas in the NCE with GCE ‘O’Level credit passes in
two other subjects in not more than two (2) sittings.
iv. Passes in two (2) major subjects in relevant areas in the NCE with GCE ‘O’Level
credit or its equivalent in three (3) other subjects for those taking courses in
Education. A pass in General English at the NCE level is acceptable in place of GCE
‘O’Level/SSCE.
v. Two passes at the IJMB (Interim Joint Matriculation Examination) or Cambridge
Moderated Schools Basic Studies Terminal Examinations in International
Baccalaureate from a recognised institution with school certificate credits or the
equivalent in three other subjects (subject to University requirements).
vi. Three passes in (v) above with a school certificate credit or its equivalent in two other
subjects. The qualification in (iv) above should apply to students in colleges of
Education to qualify for admission into the B.Ed. Degree programme.
vii. English Language and Mathematics required: In all cases, whether by Direct Entry or
JAMB, a credit in English Language and a pass in Mathematics at the senior or
school certificate/secondary equivalent are required for Vocational and Special
Education.
G.
FACULTY OF LAW
There are two modes of entry into the Faculty, i.e. the Joint Matriculation Entry mode and the
Direct Entry Mode.
(a) JOINT MATRICULATION ENTRY MODE: A candidate for admission into the Faculty of
law must posses at least S.S.S. Certificate or G.C.E. O/Level with credit passes in at least
five (5) subjects, including English Language and English Literature obtained at not more
than two sittings. Such a candidate must also have an acceptable pass in the JME.
(b) DIRECT ENTRY MODE: A candidate for admission into the Faculty of Law must possess:
i.
A first degree certificate from the Faculty of Arts or Social or Management Sciences, or
other acceptable first degree certificate or their equivalent.
ii. Three (3) papers at principal or advanced level in the Higher School Certificate or
G.C.E. together with credits in English Language and English Literature in the S.S.S.
Certificate Examination or G.C.E. O/Level or their equivalent; or
iii. Two (2) papers at Principal or Advanced Level Higher School Certificate or G.C.E.
plus credit in three (3) other papers, including English Language and English Literature
in the S.S.S. Certificate Examination or G.C.E. O/Level or other equivalent.
H.
FACULTY OF MANAGEMENT SCIENCES
Department of Accounting
a) The basic admission requirements for UME candidates are Five Credit Passes including
English Language, Mathematics and Economics in Senior Secondary School Certificate
Examination (SSCE) or its equivalent in not more than two sittings. The UME candidates
are admitted to pursue a four - year B.Sc. Programme in Accounting with a maximum of six
years in the consultancy degree programme students have minimum of five years and a
maximum of seven and a half years.
b)
The Direct Entry candidates should, in addition to meeting the basic admission requirements
stated above, possess an Upper credit in the Ordinary National Diploma
(OND)
in
Accounting, University of Calabar Diploma in Business Administration
(DBA),
with
3.50 or any other equivalent qualification that may be accepted by the Department. The
candidates will pursue a three year degree programme in Accounting. The Direct Entry
65
Consultancy students have a minimum of four years and a maximum of six years to spend
on the programme.
Department of Banking and Finance
(a)
The basic admission requirements for UME candidates are Five Credit Passes including
English Language, Mathematics and Economics in the Senior Secondary School
Certificate Examination (SSCE) or its equivalent in not more than two sittings. The UME
candidates shall pursue four year B.Sc. Programmes in Banking and Finance.
(b)
The Direct Entry candidates should, in addition to meeting the basic admission
requirements stated above, also possess an Ordinary National Diploma (OND) in Banking
and Finance, University of Calabar Diploma in Business Administration; IJMB; or any
other equivalent qualification that may be accepted by the Department. The candidates
will pursue a three-year degree Programme in Banking and Finance.
Department of Business Management
The Department offers a Bachelor of Science degree in Business Management to two sets of
students for both regular and evening degree programme(s);
(a) FOUR (4) YEAR UME OR FIVE (5)-YEAR EVENING PROGRAMME: Candidates for
either the four (4)-year UME regular or the five (5)-year evening programmes must have
obtained five (5) credit passes including English Language, Mathematics and Economics in
the Senior Secondary Certificate Examination (SSCE) or its equivalent obtained at not more
than two (2) sittings. The Four (4)-year regular candidates are admitted through the Joint
Matriculation Examination (UME) while those for five-year evening programmes come
through the Internal Competitive Examination.
(b) THREE (3) YEAR REGULAR OR FOUR (4)-YEAR EVENING DIRECT ENTRY
PROGRAMME: Candidates for the three (3)-year regular or four (4)-year evening Direct
Entry Programmes must in addition to meeting the requirements stated above also posses the
University of Calabar Diploma in Business Administration at merit level and above; OR
National or Ordinary Diploma (ND or OND) in the relevant field at upper credit level and
above from a recognised institution. Candidates with the Higher National Diploma (HND)
and a lower credit in the relevant field, and equally those holding a University degree may
also apply. Academic transcripts are required in all cases for the Direct Entry Admission.
N/B:The Department does not accept IJMB or ‘A’ Level Papers or NCE for Direct Entry
Admission.
Department of Marketing
(a) The Bachelor of Science Degree in Marketing either as a four (4)-year UME or a Five (5)year UME Evening Programme is available.
Candidates for the 4-year regular or the
five (5)-year evening programme must obtain five (5) credit passes including English
Language, Mathematics and Economics in Senior Secondary Certificate Examination
(SSCE) or its equivalent obtained at not more than two (2) sittings.
(b) THREE (3) REGULAR OR FOUR (4) YEAR EVENING DIRECT ENTRY
PROGRAMME: Candidates for the three (3)-year Regular or four (4)-year evening
Programme must in addition to meeting the requirements stated above possess the
University of Calabar Diploma in Business Administration at merit level or above, or the
National Ordinary Diploma (ND or OND) in the relevant field at Upper Credit Level or
above, from recognised institutions. Candidates with the Higher National Diploma (HND)
and a Lower Credit in the relevant field, and equally those holding a University Degree may
also apply. Academic Transcripts must be produced in all cases for the Direct Entry
Admission.
N/B: The Department does not accept IJMB or ‘A’ Level papers or NCE forDirect Entry
Admission.
I.
FACULTY OF SCIENCE
Department of Botany
66
The department offers a 4-year B.Sc. Degree Programme to students admitted through the
University Matriculation Examination (UME) or through Post-Remedial Science placement, and a
3-year B.Sc. Programme to Direct Entry students.
(a) THE 4-YEAR PROGRAMME: The basic requirements for the 4-year degree programme
are a pass at credit level in the following subjects: English Language, Mathematics, Biology,
Chemistry and Physics.
(b) THE 3-YEAR PROGRAMME: The Direct Entry candidates must in addition to meeting the
basic entry requirements stated, also possess A-levels in three subjects Biology, Physics and
Chemistry. For the Post Pre-Degree placement, the candidates must have successfully
remedied (passed with the acceptable grade) the deficiencies through the Pre-Degree
Programme of the University to qualify for enrolment in the Department.
Department of Chemistry
(a) There are three modes of admission into the undergraduate degree programme of the
department. A candidate can enter into the three-year degree programme by Direct Entry.
The minimum direct entry requirements are passes in at least two of the following subjects
at advanced level or the equivalent: Chemistry, Physics and Mathematics plus SSCE/GCE
O/L pass at credit level in Chemistry, English Language, Mathematics and any other two
Science Subjects.
(b) The JME candidates are admitted into the four-year degree programme. The JME entry
requirements are passes in SSCE/GCE O/L in five subjects at credit level which should
include Chemistry, English Language, Mathematics, Physics and Biology. However, a
candidate with a pass in English Language or Mathematics (but not in both of them) may be
admitted and allowed to remedy the deficiency during the first year of study.
(c) The third mode of admission is through the Remedial Programme. Candidates who have
successfully gone through the University of Calabar Pre-Degree Programme may also be
admitted into the Department.
Department of Genetics and Biotechnology
(a) For the Four-year Degree Programme in Genetics and Biotechnology, candidates must past
at credit level in the School Certificate Examination or its approved equivalent in 5 subjects
namely English, Biology, Chemistry, Elementary Mathematics and Physics, or six credits
with one pass which must be remedied internally in the first year.
(b) For the three-year degree programme, passes at ‘A’ level MME/GCE in Botany/Zoology,
Biology and Chemistry are required (for NCE merit and above). A credit level pass in
Physics or Mathematics is also required at ‘O’ level.
(c) Students from other departments in the University wishing to transfer to the Department of
Genetics and Biotechnology must have a CGPA of at least 2.70
Department of Geology
(a) DIRECT ENTRY REQURIEMENTS: Direct Entry, Advanced Level GCE passes or
equivalent in any two of the following: Geography, Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry and
Geology, Botany or Zoology, Ordinary level credits in Mathematics and any other two
science subjects.
(b) THE JME ENTRY REQUIREMENTS: Are five credits at ordinary level SSS3/GCE which
should include: Biology, Chemistry, Physics and Mathematics. Candidates with a pass in
English Language but with six credits may be considered for admission. University of
Calabar Post Pre-Degree Candidates who satisfy the JME entry requirements are also
eligible.
The Department runs a 4-year degree programme for admissions through JME and a 3-year degree
programme for Direct Entry admissions.
Department of Mathematics/Statistics and Computer Science
(a) UME CANDIDATES: In addition to the general entry requirements approved for admission
to Nigerian Universities, candidates must have passed SSCE/GCE ‘O’ Level or its equivalent
at Credit level in Mathematics, Physics and Chemistry or Biology in addition to an acceptable
pass in UME. A credit in Further Mathematics will be an advantage.
67
(b) POST PRE-DEGREE CANDIDATES: Students who have successfully completed the
University’s one year Pre-Degree Science Programme are qualified to be admitted into the
B.Sc. degree programme in Mathematics/Statistics or Computer Science. In particular,
qualified Post Pre-Degree Candidates must have:
i. Passed all the five (5) subjects: Mathematics, English Language, Biology, Chemistry
and Physics, which they registered for in the Pre-Degree Year.
ii. Obtained a minimum grade of ‘C’ in the ‘O’ Level course(s) not passed at credit level
in the SSCE/GCE O/L.
iii. Scored a minimum of 15 points
(c) DIRECT ENTRY CANDIDATES: Direct Entry candidates must have:
i. Two A/Level papers in science subjects including Mathematics.
ii. NCE with at least a merit in Mathematics and one other science subject.
iii. Diploma in Computer Science or Diploma in Statistics with Computer Application
from University of Calabar or any other recognised University.
iv. OND/HND with a merit pass in any of the following: Computer Science, Engineering,
Mathematics/Statistics. All Direct Entry candidates must satisfy the requirement in (a)
above.
Department of Microbiology
(a) The basic entry requirements are SSCE/GCE passes at credit level in the following: English
Language, Mathematics, Biology, Chemistry, Physics, and any other subject
(b) Direct Entry students should in addition to meeting the basic admission requirements stated
above, also possess ‘A’ level passes in 3 of the above listed science courses.
Department of Physics
(a) Applied Geophysics
There are three modes of admission into the undergraduate programme in Applied
Geophysics.

A Three Year-Programme by Direct Entry: The minimum entry requirements for
Direct Entry are passes in A-Level or the equivalent in Physics and either Chemistry
or Mathematics, plus WASCE/SSCE/GCE ‘O’ Level/NECO passes at Credit level
in Physics, English Language, Mathematics and any other two science subjects.

JME candidates are admitted into a four-year degree programme. The minimum
entry requirements for JME candidates include Credit Level passes in
WASCE/SSCE/GCE ‘O’ Level/NECO in five subjects which should include
Physics, English Language, Mathematics, Biology/Chemistry. Candidates with a
pass (P7) in English Language may be allowed to remedy the deficiency during the
first year of study by taking and passing it in the UNICAL Pre-Degree English
examination. However, such candidates must have six credits in at most two sittings.

The third mode of admission is through successful completion of the University of
Calabar Pre-Degree Programme, with at least a ‘C’ grade in Physics and
Mathematics.
(b)
Electronics & Computer Technology
There are three modes of admission into the Undergraduate Degree Programme of
Electronic and Computer Technology.
i. A four-year programme by Direct Entry. The minimum entry requirements for Direct
Entry are passes in the A-Level or its equivalent in Physics or either Chemisry or
Mathematics, plus SSCE/GCE O/L passes at Credit level in Physics, English
Language, Mathematics and two science subjects.
ii. JME candidates are admitted into a five-year Degree programme. Admission
requirements include Credit level passes in SSCE/GCE O/L in five subjects which
include Physics, English Language, Mathematics, Biology/Chemistry. Candidates
with pass in English Language may be allowed to remedy the deficiency during the
first year of study by taking and passing the Pre-Degree English examination. Such
candidates must have six Credits in at most two sittings.
68
iii. The third mode of admission is through successful completion of the Pre-Degree
Programme of the University of Calabar.
(c)
Pure Physics
There are three modes of admission into the three undergraduate degree programme of
Pure Physics.
i.
A three-year programme for Direct Entry. The minimum entry requirements are
passes in A level or its equivalent in Physics and either Chemistry or Maths plus
WASCE/GCE ‘O’ Level/NECO passes at credit level in Physics, English Language,
Maths and two science subjects.
ii. A four-year programme in which students are admitted into a four-year Degree
programme. Admission requirements include Credit level passes in Maths,
Biology/Chemistry. Candidates with pass (P.7) in English Language, may be allowed
to Remedy the deficiency during the first year of study by taking the UNICAL PreDegree English examination. Such candidates must have six credits in at least two
sittings.
iii. A four-year programme by UNICAL Pre-Degree science programme. This mode of
admission is through successful completion of the Unical Pre-Degree Science
programme with at least a C grade in Physics and Maths.
Department of Zoology and Environmental Biology
(a)
For a 4-year degree programme, candidates for the degree of B.Sc. (Zoology and
Environmental Biology) must pass, at credit level, the School Certificate Examination or
its equivalent in 5 subjects including Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics and English.
Admission is also based on an acceptable pass in the University Matriculation
Examination (UME) and the University of Calabar Aptitute Test.
(b)
For the 3-year degree programme, passes at ‘A’ Level UME/CGS/NCE in Botany or
Zoology or Biology and Chemistry (for NCE, merit and above) are required. ‘O’ Level
credits/NCE (or equivalent) in Physics or Mathematics (see also JAMB Brochure). From
1999/2000 session, entry requirement became credit passes in Science and Mathematics
plus English in SSS Final Examination or at the School Certificate (SC), General
Certificate of Education, Ordinary level and any other subject as may be required by the
Faculty.
Marine Biology Programme
(a)
FOUR YEAR PROGRAMME: To qualify for admission into the 4-year programme, all
candidates must posses at least 5 credits in SSCE/GCE (O/L) at not more than two
sittings. Credit passes are required in English and Mathematics and in the core science
subjects: Chemistry, Physics, Biology depending on eventual area of specialization.
Candidates with P7 in English Language, but who have a total of six credits including the
above science subjects will be considered for admission. Final selection for admission
into Year One of the 4-year programme shall be through a competitive qualifying
examination administered by the University.
(b)
DIRECT ENTRY (3-YEAR PROGRAMME): Candidates for direct entry shall be
required to satisfy the minimum University requirements for admission into degree
programmes in addition to the following conditions:
i. Hold Bachelors degree in relevant science (Biology, Chemistry, Physics,
Mathematics and Environmental Protection and Resource Management [EPM])
from the University of Calabar or from any other recognised institution.
ii. Hold a Diploma of the Institute of Oceanography or of any other recognized
institutions in the relevant disciplines. Minimum GPA for admission shall be 2.75
on a 4-point scale or 3.30 on a 5-point scale.
iii. Possess the HSC/GCE (A/L) with passes in three science subjects at the required
grades.
iv. Posses HND in the relevant science disciplines.
J.
FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCES
69
Department of Economics
A candidate may enter the NUC degree programme either through the University Matriculation
Examinations (UME) or by Direct Entry. While the UME candidates spend four (4) years on the
programme, the Direct Entry candidates spend three (3) years.
a. To be admitted into the four (4)-year UME programme, an applicant would have satisfied
the following conditions in addition to the general entry requirements approved for
admission into Nigerian Universities: Credit passes in five (5) subjects including English
Language, Mathematics, Economics and a pass in a science subject in SSCE or
WAEC/GCE Ordinary Level or its equivalent obtained at not more than two (2) sittings.
b. Applicants who seek admission to pursue a degree under the three (3)-year
i. Direct Entry programme must in addition to meeting the requirements stated
above also possess the University of Calabar Diploma in Applied Economics at
credit level or above, or must have passed the GCE or the Higher School
Certificate Examination or its equivalent at the Advanced Level. Candidates with
a Higher National Diploma (HND) in the relevant field, and those with a
University degree may also apply.
ii. N/B: The Department does not accept IJMB for Direct Entry admissions
Department of Geography and Regional Planning
1) 4 – YEAR PROGRAMME: Candidates must have a credit in Geography and at least a
pass in Mathematics at the senior secondary certificate level in addition to the university
entry requirements of five credits, including a credit in English Language.
2) DIRECT ENTRY: 3 – YEAR PROGRAMME: In addition to the general university entry
requirements for candidates, direct entry applicants who seek admission to pursue a degree
in geography and environmental science under the 3 – year programme must have passed
the general certificate of education or the higher school certificate examination or its
equivalent subject at the advanced level.
Department of Political Science
B.Sc Political Science
(a) DIRECT ENTRY:
 Two GCE Advanced Level papers in Government and any one of the following:
Economics, Geography and Mathematics.
 At least a pass in Mathematics (‘O’ Level)
 Three GCE (O’Level) or SSCE Credits including English Language.
(b)
ENTRY THROUGH UME:
 Must have taken Government and at least one other Social Science subject
(Economics, Geography, Psychology and Sociology)
 Five credits including English Language, Government and one other social science
subject, i.e Economics, Geography, Psychology and Sociology.
 At least a pass in Mathematics
Bachelor in Public Administration
a) THE FIVE-YEAR PROGRAMME: 5 credit passes in SSCE/GCE O Level, NECO
including English Language with at least, a pass (P7) in Mathematics
in not more than
two sittings.
b) THE FOUR-YEAR PROGRAMME: 5 credit passes in SSCE/GCE ‘O’
Level, NECO including English Language with at least, a pass in Mathematics in not more
than two sittings. Posses a Diploma from a recognised institution in any of these relevant
fields: Public Administration, Personnel Management, Applied Economics, Political
Science, Social Works, Business Administration, Law, Mass Communication, Philosophy,
etc. OR Hold ND, HND, NCE or equivalent qualifications from other institutions
recognised by the University in relevant course.
Department of Sociology
70
(a)
Entry into the degree programme could be obtained either through the University
Matriculation Examination (UME) or Direct
entry (DE). Students with acceptable
score points (above 200) as determined by the (central Admissions Board) in the joint
Matriculation Examination are expected to have Five ‘O’ Level credits in relevant arts or
Social Science subjects: English Language, Government, History, Economics, Geography,
Christian Religious Knowledge and at least a (P7 or P8) in Mathematics.
(b)
For the Direct Entry (3 years), the department accepts a Diploma essentially in Social
Work, GCE (A/L), and OND with good grades of credit and above from recognized
institutions in relevant fields apart from social work, such as community development,
criminology, political science/public administration, public/local government
administration. In addition, the Department accepts at least a pass (P7 or P8) in
Mathematics, and credits in five other relevant Social Sciences/Arts ‘O’ Level subjects.
The department runs a full time degree programme in Sociology with no consideration for
part time students.
Bachelor in Social Works (BSW)
(a)
4-YEAR PROGRAMME
i. Diploma in Social Work of the University with a pass at the credit or high merit level, or
an equivalent qualification from a recognized University. In addition to the above, the
candidate must also possess the basic qualification of at least five (5) credits at the
GCE/WASC/SSE level in one sitting, or in two sittings, one of which must be English
Language, with at least a Pass in Mathematics.
OR
ii. Five (5) papers in GCE/WASC/SSCE including at least 2 papers at the Advanced Level
(A-Level): the ‘O’Level papers must include a credit in English and at least a Pass in
Mathematics.
OR
iii. Practicing professionals with Diploma in Social Work, or its equivalent (e.g. Social
Welfare, Social Development, Youth Development, Rural Development, Community
Development), Theatre Arts Certificate in Nursing, H.Sc., OND, Public Admin.,
Philosophy, English, DBA with at least five (5) years post qualification experience.
(b)
K.
FIVE (5)-YEAR PROGRAMME
At least (5) credits at the GCE/WASC/SSCE Level in one sitting or in 2 sittings, one of
which must be English, and at least a pass in Mathematics.
Duration of Course:
4 YEARS:
Four years (Educational Consultancy)
5 YEARS:
Five Years (Educational Consultancy)
INSTITUTE OF EDUCATION
Department of Education Technology
a) THE FOUR-YEAR PROGRAMME (NOW HOSTED IN DEPARTMENT OF
CURRICULUM & TEACHING) JAMB REQUIREMENTS: 5 Credit passes in SSCE/GCE
O’Level, NECO in not more than two sittings with at least a pass in Mathematics. OR
Teacher Grade II certificate with a minimum of five passes at merit level or above including
English Language and at least a pass in Mathematics, in not more than two sittings. AND a
Pass in the UME at the appropriate level in relevant subjects. Candidates for specialization in
the sciences must have a credit level pass in Mathematics.
b) THE THREE-YEAR PROGRAMME DIRECT ENTRY REQUIREMENTS: NCE with
overall pass at Merit level or above, provided the candidate also has at least three other
credits at GCE or its equivalent, including English Language and a pass in Mathematics. OR
Diploma in Education or in any other area approved by the University of Calabar, provided
the candidate also has at least three O’ level credits including a credits in English and a pass
in Mathematics at GCE/WASC/NECO or its equivalent.
OR
71
c)
Advanced equivalent level GCE or IJMB in at least two principal papers or ACE at Merit
level provided the candidate also has at least three other credits at ordinary level GCE or its
equivalent including credit in English Language and at least a pass in Mathematics. Pass the
UME at the appropriate level in relevant subjects. Candidates for specialization in the
sciences must have a credit level pass in Mathematics.
Department of Environmental Education (Moved to Department of Curriculum & Teaching)
a) Admission is opened to two categories of candidates, depending on their entry qualifications.
i) THE THREE (3)-YEAR PROGRAMME: For admission into the three (3)year
degree programme, candidates must:
 Satisfy the minimum University requirements for entry into degree programmes, that
is they must possess at least 5 credits in SSCE/GCE O/L, NECO or TC II, including
English language in not more than two sittings, AND
 Possess a Diploma from a recognised institution in any one of these relevant fields:
Environmental Education, Public Administration, Personnel Management, Applied
Economics, Political Science, Social Works, Business Administration, Law, History,
Theatre Arts, Mass Communication, Philosophy, Religion, English and Literary
Studies, Languages and Linguistics, Computer Science and RN/RM Nursing and
Midwifery, Accountancy, Education, Adult Education, Health Statistics and Health
Administration, as well as other related discipline. OR
 Hold the advance Level GCE
ii) THE FOUR (4)-YEAR PROGRAMME: For admission into the (4) four-year degree
programme, candidates must:
a. Satisfy the minimum qualifications specified in a(i). That is, they must possess at least
5 credits in SSCE/GCE O’Level, NECO or TC II merit in two relevant subjects
including English Language in not more than two sittings.
b. Pass the UME at the appropriate level.
Department of Extension/Distance Learning
Not available
13.
INSTITUTE OF PUBLIC POLICY & ADMINISTRATION
a) The following Diploma programmes which are of two-year duration on full-time
offered in the Institute:
 Diploma in Public Administration (DPA)
 Diploma in Personnel Management (DPM)
 Diploma in Local Government Administration (DLG)
b)
basis are
B.Sc. degree programme in Policy and Administrative Studies is also offered For admission
into the above diploma programmes, candidates must possess a minimum of four (4) credits
in the GCE O/L, SSCE, NECO, TC II examinations and a pass in English Language in not
more than two
sittings. Candidates who desire to proceed to the B.Sc., Policy and
Administrative Studies programme at the completion of their diploma must, however, possess
Credit in English Language and at least a Pass in Mathematics while in the diploma
programme.
72
ACADEMIC REGULATIONS GOVERNING FIRST DEGREE PROGRAMMES
SECTION I
DEFINITIONS
In these regulations the following terms shall have the meanings assigned to them below:
1.1
Course: An aggregate of teaching, evaluation and examination offered by a particular Department
under an approved title, e.g THA 1011 Introduction to Theatre.
1.2
Course work: Comprises the total of teaching/practicals, tests and examinations that is taken into
account when assessing a student’s performance towards the award of a degree or diploma.
1.3
Core Course: A course which is designated by the appropriate Departmet/Faculty as a
compulsory requirement for graduation.
1.4
Elective Course: A course chosen under advice, from outside the Department or the Faculty in
cognate area.
1.5
Optional Course: A compolimentary course chosen under advice or as prescribed within the
students’ discipline to enable the student to complete the total number of credit hours required for
graduation.
1.6
Credit Hours: Each one-hour lecture or tutorial period that a class meets during a week. Thus a
class that meets three times a week will normally be assigned three credit hours per semesters. A
three-hour Laboratory, studio, classroom or theatre practical class shall normally be the equivalent
of one credit hour.
1.7
Calendar Year: Combination of a standard session and a long vacation normally extending from
September 30th to October 1.
1.8
Long Vacation: The period between the beginning of July and end of September.
1.9
A Standard Session/Academic Year: Is normally a 9 month or 36 weeks period beginning in
October and ending in June.
1.10
Semester: Is normally one half of a session or academic year.
1.11
Academic Discipline: Special area of study normally housed in a Department e.g Botany in the
Department of Biological Sciences.
1.12
Programme: Series of courses taken over a prescribed period of study leading to recognised
qualification (Certificate/Diploma/Degree, etc.).
1.13
Year of Study: That point within a programme, at which a student’s standing may be identified
within the prescribed period of study.
1.14
Subject: In the MBB.Ch. Programme, a subject may include more than one course and a subject
mark is the average of the course marks.
1.15
A Resit Examination: An examination which the student is required to take having previously
been adjudged to have failed. This applied to MBB.Ch. and non-degree programmes.
1.16
A Repeat Examination: An examination which the student is required to take again after
repeating the source as a result of failing a previous examination.
1.17
Supplementary Examination: An examination given to a student who has been excused by
Senate on grounds acceptable to it from the normally scheduled one.
1.18
Board of Examiners: All members of a Department or Faculty holding academic appointments
above the rank of Graduate Assistant.
1.19
A Pass Grade: A pass grade is a grade of E or above.
1.20
A Fail Grade: A fail grade is a grade of F.
1.21
Probation: A status granted to a student whose Cmulative Grade Point Average (CGPA) at the
end of the session falls below 1.00. Such a student shall be required to repeat only the failed
courses of the previous year and will be credited with the grades earned during the first attempt
and during Probation Year. At the end of the probation year, the student’s CGPA will be
calculated based on the two sets of results.
1.22
Withdrawal: When a student’s CGPA falls below 1.0 after probation, he will be required to leave
the University.
1.23
Concurrent: A cross-listed course between two or more Departments.
1.24
Audited Course: An enrichment course which carries no grade.
Note: In the regulations which follow the masculine gender is used for both masculine and feminine.
73
SECTION II
ORGANISATION OF PROGRAMMES
2.1. A programme of studies shall be provided leading to a Bachelor’s Degree to be denoted by the
letters B.A, B.N.Sc., B.M.L.S. which may be awarded with Honours or as Pass degree. The
MBB.Ch., may be awarded only as an unclassified Pass degree.
2.2. Instruction shall, for all programmes, except the MBB.Ch., be organised in courses and students
shall be required to take an approved combination of courses by Senate on the recommendation of
the Board of the appropriate Faculty, as may from time to time, be determined. Regulations
governing the MBB.Ch. degree are separately detailed in this publication. Each course shall
normally be assigned 3 credit hours. There shall be four levels of courses organisation numbered
1000-1999, 2000-2999, 3000-3999, and 4000-4999 in four year programmes. Departments where
programmes last five will have an additional level. The first digit indicates year of study. The two
middle digits indicates area of study. The last digit indicates the semester in which the course is
offered.
 for First Semester Courses
 for Second Semester Courses
 for First or Second Semester Course and
 for whole Year Courses
Course number shall be prefixed by a three character discipline code e.g. BIO, CHM, GEO, HIS,
THA, POS.
2.3. Appropriate prerequisites may be prescribed. Such prerequisites courses may be carried for suitably
qualified students by Senate in the recommendation of the appropriate Faculty Board.
2.4. A student may also be deemed to have fulfilled a pre-requisite if he audits and obtains the minimum
grade of pass in the course. The grade shall be used in computing his CGPA.
2.5. A concurrent requirement will be satisfied if the student has taken the course from a cross listed
Department and passed. Otherwise he must register for the course within the same session and pass
it.
2.6. A student who on admission is required to remedy a deficient subject shall be expected to pass the
subject at the end of the session, failing which he must withdraw from the University. No
opportunity for a Resit examination shall be allowed.
2.7. Students shall normally be required to register for a minimum of 10, and a maximum of 16 or such
prescribed number of courses in each academic session or prescribed period of study for the degree.
2.8. The total minimum number of courses required for the award of a degree shall be approved by
Senate on the recommendation of the appropriate Faculty. A student is dully registered if he submits
the registration cards to the Faculty and Department within the period stipulated for registration.
SECTION III
CHECKING OF CREDENTIALS (SCREENING)
3.1. Soon after registration of freshmen and before final year examinations, students will be required to
present the originals of their credentials to the Academic Division for verification. Final year students
will be expected to present the substantive certificates (not statements of results). Any student found
to have made false claims shall be expelled.
3.2. The maximum period for a degree in any one programme shall be 50% above the number of years
stipulated above. A student who spends one year in excess of the approved minimum period of study
for a degree course the names in each class arranged alphabetically.
74
3.3. Each student registered for any degree programme of the University, except Nigeria Certificate of
Education and degree holders, must register for the following General Studies Courses:





*
GSS 1101/1102
GSS 1111/1112
GSS 1121/1122
GSS 2111/2112
GSS 3111/3112
Entrepreneural
Use of English
Nigerian People and Culture
Philosophy and Logic
History and Philosophy of Science
Application of Computers
Studies.
3.4. The minimum credit hours required for graduation shall be 120 and the maximum 144, except for
Law, Medical Laboratory Science and Agriculture where the minimum shall be 150 and the
maximum 180. More credit hours may be offered subject to approval by Senate.
3.5. At least 9 credit hours shall be left open as electives for each students during a programme of study.
SECTION IV
ORGANIZATION AND CONDUCT OF EXAMINATIONS
Examination Malpractice
4.1. Types of Malpractice by Students
i. Copying with co-operation
ii. Copying without co-operation (Giraffing)
iii. Preparation and use of extraneous materials
iv. Impersonation
v. Courier (smuggling of question papers out of examination halls)
vi. Reading of notes/textbooks in toilet during the relevant examination.
vii. Writing on lap, dresses or other materials
viii. Plagiarism, act of using somebody else’s work without acknowledgement
ix. Evidence of pre-knowledge of examination questions
x. Smuggling in or out answer scripts after examinations.
4.2. Types of Malpractice by Lecturers/Staff
i. Leaking of questions to students
ii. Helping students to answer questions during examination
iii. Allowing students to substitute freshly written answer scripts for the ones
used
during
examination.
iv. Inflation or change of marks by course lecturer in order to pass a particular
candidate/candidates.
v. Requesting Senate to correct already approved grades based on false claims.
vi. Conscious alteration of grades/raw scores by compilers of results or typist/lecturers/head of
department, etc.
vii. Non-submission or destruction of answer scripts in order to enable a student to qualify for a
special resit or supplementary examination if a grade is
certain in the examination.
viii. Writing of thesis/projects for students by lecturers.
ix. Superisors/Lecturers aiding and abetting plagiarism.
General
4.3
Any other acts considered by Senate and Vice-Chancellor to be classified as
malpractice.
examination
Pre-Examination Stage
4.4
It shall be the responsibility of each Faculty to organize and conduct examinations for courses
taught by the Department in the Faculty in accordance with directives laid down from time to time
by the Faculty Board and Senate. Each Department shall nominate an Examinations Officer (not
75
below) Lecture 1 status for the time tabling, invigilation and the physical arrangements for all
examination in the Department. The academic supervision shall rest with the Head of Department
and Chief Examiner in a particular course during the session. There shall be a Faculty Examination
Committee which shall consist of each Departmental Examinations Officer plus the Sub Dean (as
Chairman) and the Dean (Ex-Officio): It shall be responsible for the coordination of timetables,
physical arrangements, invigilation and discipline for all examinations in the Faculty, the results of
which shall be reported back to the Board of Examiners.
4.5
In order to be admitted to an examination in a course unit, a student must have been registered for
that course. He must have satisfied any University and Faculty requirements regarding the
performance of all assignments connected with the subject taught, the payment of fees, and the
75% mandatory attendance at lectures/practicals. It shall be the responsibility of each student to
ensure that he is registered for the appropriate examinations and to ascertain the dates, times and
places of the examinations for which he is registered. A student shall be at examination venue at
least 30 minutes before the advertised time for the examination. A student required to supply his
own pen, pencils, rulers and such other items.
4.6
The Time-Table Committee which should comprise the Academic Planning Unit and the SubDeans should start its work of making the Time-Table/Allocation of rooms for examinations early.
This would help reduce the clashing of lectures and examinations. The registry shall be solely
responsible for the issuing of answer booklets/sheet during examinations. Departments, through
the invigilator will collect all used and unused materials. The Chief Examiner will ensure that such
materials are returned to the registry at the end of each examination session. No staff or student
shall take away or keep any unused answer booklet or sheet for whatever reason. The duration of
every examination should normally be 3 weeks to allow for judicious use of available space. The
following shall be bodly inscribed on every answer booklets: “THE PENALTY FOR
EXAMINATION MALPRACTICE IS EXPULSION”.
Examination Invigilation Stage
4.7
A candidate shall be admitted up to 30 minutes after the start of the examination but he shall not
be allowed extra time. If a candidate arrives later than 30 minutes after the start of examination,
the invigilator may at his discretion admit him if he is satisfied that the candidate had good reason
for his lateness. The invigilator shall present a written report of the circumstance to the Chief
examiner who shall inform the Departmental board of Examiners which shall decide whether to
accept the candidate’s paper or not. Similarly, the invigilator should present a written report if he
uses his discretion to disallow the student from the examination.
4.8
The candidates must produce their identity cards and fee clearance cards on entry of every
examination and leave them prominently displayed on the desk for inspection by the invigilator
throughout the examination. This is mandatory. The invigilator shall see that each student signs the
attendance sheep provided by the Department in duplicates. Each Faculty Finance Officer shall
ensure that students writing examinations have their fee clearance card.
4.9
The Chief Invigilator shall draw the attention of the candidates to the examination regulations
especially the PENALTY inscription written on the answer booklet. A candidate may be permitted
by the invigilator to leave the examination provided that:
a) He/She does not do so within the first one hour except in cases of emergency. In the event of
a candidate being taken ill. The invigilator must send the sick
candidate along with an
examination attendant and a written note to the Medical Centre and send a copy of such a
note to the Department.
b) A student who leaves the examination room shall not be readmitted unless throughout the
period of his absence he has been continually under the supervision of an invigilator or a
person duly appointed by him.
4.10
No student shall communicate with any other person during examination except with the
invigilator, and only when absolutely necessary. In addition, no student shall make noise or cause
disturbance during an examination.
76
4.11
No book, paper, printed or written document or any other aid may be taken into an examination
room by any candidate except as may be stated in the rubric of an examination paper. Any
candidate found in possession of such items shall be reported in writing to the Chief Examiner
who shall inform the Departmental Board which shall determine whether or not to accept the
student’s script or make any other recommendations to the Faculty Board of examiner. Each
candidates shall be required to deposit at his own risk any handbag, briefcase or similar articles at
a space provided for such purpose before the start of an examination.
4.12
No student shall, directly or indirectly, give assistance to any other student or permit any other
student to copy from or otherwise use his papers. Similarly, a student shall not directly or
indirectly accept assistance from any student or any other unathorised person.
4.13
If any candidate is found to infringe or is suspected of infringing sub-sections above or indeed
suspected to have engaged in any of the acts listed as examination malpractice, the invigilator shall
apprehend the candidate concerned. Within the period of the examination, such a student shall be
made to submit a written report on the incident to the Chief Invigilator before his script is
collected. The Invigilator shall submit a written report to the Chief Examiner immediately after the
examination. The Chief Examiner shall cause the circumstance to be investigated by the
Departmental Examination Malpractice Committee and shall report to the Departmental Board of
Examiners which may subsequently recommend to the Faculty Board of Examiners what action
should be taken in the case. The Faculty, after establishing a prima facie case shall immediately
report the matter to the Senate Committee on Examination Malpractice, attaching all exhibits and
making recommendations based on its findings. The Senate Committee shall immediately look
into the case, inviting the parties concerned for interview, giving opportunities for crossexamination, and finally sending a recommendation to Senate or Chairman of Senate.
4.14
Each student shall write his registration number; not his name, distinctly at the appropriate place
on the cover of every answer booklet or separate sheet attached to the answer booklet.
4.15
A student shall not mutilate or remove from the examination room any paper or other materials
supplied except the question paper.
4.16
At the end of the time allotted, the Invigilator shall instruct all students to stop writing. They must
comply. Non-compliance shall be treated as examination malpractice.
4.17
The Invigilator shall put the answer sheets serialy in sealed envelopes. Each envelope must be
signed by each Invigilator and the seal must go over the signatures. The Chief Invigilator shall
return the sealed envelopes to the Chief Examiner or any one appointed by the latter. It shall be the
responsibility of the Chief Examiner in each Department to collect and sign the examination
scripts.
Notes:
a) The Registry shall lock up rooms reserved for examination prior to the actual examination,after having
duly completed all necessary arrangements. No student shall be permitted to do “their last minute
reading” in those rooms.
b) During the examinations, any lecturer whose course is being written shall be in the examination hall to
answer questions raised by students.
c) The Invigilator shall take charge of the attendance sheets which shall be signed by each student at the
beginning of the examination and after submission of answer scripts. The sheet shall be signed in
duplicate copies one of which shall be enclosed with the answer scripts submitted to the heads of
Department/Chief Examiners.
Post Examination Stage
4.18
Marks/grades for all courses shall be approved in the first instance in meetings of the
Examinations Board of the Department of Primary registration. The recommendations of the
Departmental Examinations Board shall be considered at a duly convened meeting of the Faculty
77
Board of Examiners. The Faculty Board shall make its recommendations to Senate through the
Dean of Faculty.
Appointment and Duties of the Examination Officer
4.19
There shall be an Examination Officer appointed for each Department/programme. The
Examination Officer shall not be below the rank of Lecturer 1 status.
4.20
The appointment shall be for 2 academic sessions subject to reappointment for a period of another
2 years.
4.21
The Head of Department, through the Dean of Faculty applies to the Vice-Chancellor of approval
after which the Registrar issues the letter of appointment.
4.22
It shall be the responsibility of the Examination Officer in each Department to prepare a summary
result sheet for all students registered in his Department for each year of study on a separate sheet,
showing for each candidate the following:
a. Registration number or any other identification approved by Senate;
b. Courses taken and grades obtained;
c. Weighted average and class of degree in the case of Final Year students.
4.23
These sheets shall be prepared under strict confidentiality and signed by the Chief Examiner and
deposited with the Dean not later than 24 hours before the date fixed for the Faculty Board of
examiners meeting.
4.24
The Dean shall be Chairman of the Faculty Board of Examiners. At least three days’ notice (or the
meeting including any meeting called to consider resit results), must be sent by the Faculty
Officer to each member.
4.25
No student shall be informed of the result of any examination by any individual until has been
approved by Senate.
4.26
Once the examination results are approved by Senate, they shall be published on the Notice Board
by the Deans of Faculties. It shall be the responsibility of the Registrar to issue individual
statements of results to students.
4.27
Official transcript of results be signed by the registrar. Transcripts may only be issued on the
request of students to institutions of higher learning and to institutional sponsors under
confidential cover. Students currently enrolled in programes will apply for their transcript through
their Heads of Departments.
Absence from Examinations
4.28
No student shall be excused from taking the whole or any part of any examinations except on the
strength of a Medical Certificate supplied, or endorsed by the Director of Health Services. In such
cases, the facts, supported by the evidence, shallbe submitted to the Board of Examiners by the
Head of Department which Board shall make recommendations to Senate for appropriate action.
4.29
An application by a student, or, if he is incapacitated, by a person acting on his behalf, for
exemption from any examination on medical grounds shall be submitted to the Faculty
Examinations Board, through the Head of Department as soon as possible and normally not later
than seven (7) days after the date of the examination, providing relevant evidence. The Faculty
Board of Examiners shall there-upon consider all the evidence submitted to it including oral
evidence, where appropriate and make recommendations through the Faculty Board to Senate. The
decision of Senate on such recommendations shall be final.
SECTION V
OPERATIONAL GUIDELINES ON MEDICAL REPORT
78
FROM OUTSIDE THE UNIVERSITY
5.1
Any student whose illness has started before he travels out of Calabar must obtain a referral note
from the Director of Health Services (or his representative), University of Calabar, to the Medical
Centre or Private Doctor of his choice.
5.2
Any student wishing to receive treatment within Calabar but not in the University of Calabar
Medical Centre shall also collect a referral note from the Direcotr of Health Services (or his
representative), University of Calabar Medical Centre.
5.3
Whether or not a student falls under rules 1 and 2, the Medical Certificate submitted after
treatment must indicate date of admission, discharge and probable period of convalescence.
5.4
If the student had any operation, the Surgeon must state clearly the exact surgery performed and
this must be attached to the Medical Certificate.
5.5
When submitting items 3 and 4, a photocopy of the referral note issued in section 1 and 2 should
be attached.
5.6
If any doubt or difficulty arises in respect of the interpretation of the aforesaid clauses or
implementation, the Director of Health Services shall refer to the Chairman of Senate for final
determination.
5.7
Any student who fails to satisfy the above conditions shall not be entitled to claim the benefits of
Medical Certificate.
5.8
For effective health surveillance, all new students shall undergo a medical examination on
admission, supervised by the director of Health Services of the University or his representative.
All new students shall be registered with the Health Services department (Medical Centre), be
certified medically fit and obtain clearance to that effect before Matriculation.
SECTION VI
EXAMINATIONS AND EXAMINERS
6.1
The setting and marking of all examinations shall be the responsibility of the Head of Department
as the Chief Examiner and every lecturer who has taught the course.
6.2
Categories of examinations shall include practical, teaching, laboratory and theatre practice, orals
and written papers.
SECTION VII
DUTIES OF INTERNAL EXAMINERS
a)
b)
c)
d)
e)
Set and participate in the moderation of examination questions.
Invigilate all examinations
Grade all examinations and keep copies of both the percentage score and the letter grade.
Consider and approve examination results for submission to the Faculty SERVC.
In the case of final year examinations, internal examiners along with external examiners shall
consider and forward examination results to the Faculty ERVC and SERVC before Faculty Board
approves them.
 Every course shall have no fewer than two examination namely: the lecturer who taught the course
and the internal moderator.
79
 Where there is a conflict, the Departmental Board of Examiners shall resolve it.
 Moderation schedules shall be prepared and distributed by the Head of Department (Chief
Examiner) before marking begins.
 They shall prepare marking schemes for the course which shall, in the case of final year courses,
be sent to the External Examiner.
SECTION VIII
APPEALS
8.1
A student may appeal to the Registrar for the re-marking of his Examination scripts
payment of N400.00 (four hundred naira) no person can appeal for the reassessment
scripts of some other student.
on
of
8.2
A group appeal by all candidates involved in a particular course examination cannot
entertained.
be
8.3
For an appeal to be valid, notice in writing of such an appeal must be lodged with the registrar
within four weeks after Senate has approved the relevant results.
8.4
Applications for reassessment when submitted shall be sent by the Registrar to the Dean of the
Faculty concerned who should try to find an internal assessor. Only when there is a problem would
an External Assessor be used.
8.5
Effort shall be made to minimize reassessment cases. Students shall not be made to know who the
assessors are. When sending script to assessors for reassessment the
composition shall be as
follows:
i. Some scripts from the highest scoring students and some scripts from the lowest scoring
candidates in the course.
ii. A couple of scripts whose scores are round the petitioner’s scores
iii. The petitioner’s scripts
iv. Marking scheme used to assess the scripts by the lecturer.
8.6
There shall be no indication to the assessor which scripts belong to the petitioner.
8.7
After the reassessment, only the petitioner’s script would be affected by any change
the other sample scripts would retain their original grades.
8.8
The external assessor shall be paid a fee of N100.00.
8.9
Final year students’ scripts shall not be reassessed; it is for this purpose that External Examiners
are appointed.
8.10
The result of the reassessment shall carry the comments and signature(s) of the assessor(s) when
a reassessment exercise results in favour of students, i.e change in
later grades.
i. such results shall be presented to Senate for approval and change of earlier record
ii. the appeal fee shall be refunded to the student(s)
8.11
If a reassessment exercise does not result in favour of the student, the result shall be
the Registrar for communication to the student concerned.
8.12
If a major change in grade occurs following a reassessment, the lecturer who taught
the
courses and graded the scripts shall be asked to explain to Senate why the major change occurred.
Senate shall not encourage frivolous changes in grades already approved by it.
80
the
the
in grade;
sent
to
SECTION IX
GRADING SYSTEM FOR ALL EXAMINATIONS EXCEPT FOR M.B.B.Ch
9.1
In weighing the work done for the award of degrees the following computations will
adopted:
Percentage
Mark
70% & above
60 – 69
50 – 59
45 – 49
40 – 45
0 – 39
Letter Grade
Grade Point
Description
A
B
C
D
E
F
5
4
3
2
1
0
Excellent
Very Good
Good
Fair
Pass
Fail
be
Classification of Degrees
All degrees except for M.B.B.Ch shall be classified as follows:
9.2
Grade Point Average
4.50 – 5.00
3.50 – 4.49
2.40 – 3.49
1.50 – 2.39
1.00 – 1.49
0.99 and less
Class of Degree
First Class (Hons)
Second Class (Hons) Upper Division
Second Class (Hons) Lower Division
Third Class (Hons)
Pass
Fail
i
Credit Units
ii
Percentage
Scores
iii
Letter
Grades
iv
Grade
Point
(GP)
Vary according to
contact hours.
Hours assigned to
each course per
week per semester
And according to
work load carried
by students
70 – 100
60 – 69
A
B
5
4
50 – 59
C
3
45 – 49
40 – 44
0 – 39
D
E
F
2
1
0
9.3
v
Grade
Point
Average
(GPA)
Derived by
multiplying
i and iv.
and
dividing by
total credit
unit
vi
Cumulative
Grade Point
Average
(CGPA)
4.50 – 5.00
3.50 – 4.49
2.40 – 3.49
1.50 – 2.39
1.00 – 2.39
0.99
and
below
vii
Class of
Degree
First Class
2nd Class
Upper
2nd Class
Lower
3rd Class
Pass
Fail
The yearly cumulative system shall supersede the weighted system as a basis for determining the
Class of Degree. The CGPA in the Fourth (or Final) year now determines the class of degree as
seen in the above table.
SECTION X
LATE SUBMISSION OF RESEARCH PROJECT
10.1
A student who fails to submit his final year research project/term paper in time for it to get to the
External Examiner shall be deemed as not having fulfilled the requirement of the course and so
shall earn mandatory grade of “F”.
10.2
The course shall be regarded as a repeat course and the student shall then submit the project at the
next available opportunity.
SECTION XI
81
DETERMINATION OF PASS, PROBATION, WITHDRAWAL AND REPEAT COURSE
PERFORMANCES
11.1
Pass
A student shall have passed the examination if he obtains a pass grade of E (1.00 point) or above
in the 5 (five) courses or the number of courses as required by the
appropriate Faculty.
Resit
11.2
Resit as contained in the University Examination regulations of 1985 Governing First
Programmes is hereby abolished for students admitted from 1990/91 session.
11.3
11.4
11.5
11.6
11.7
Degree
Probation
A status granted to a student whose Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA) at the end of the
session falls below 1.00. Such a student shall be required to repeat only the failed courses of the
previous year and will not take on any new course. The student shall be credited with the grades
earned during the first attempt and during the probation year. At the end of the probation year, the
student’s CGPA will be calculated based on the two sets of results.
Withdrawal
At the end of the probation year, a student whose CGPA is below 1.00 shall be required to
withdraw from the programme.
Repeating Failed course(s)
Subject to the conditions for withdrawal and probation, a student may be allowed to repeat the
failed course at the next available opportunity, provided that the total number of credit hours
carried during that semester does not exceed 24. A student repeating any course shall retain the
grades earned. The grade points earned at all attempts shall count towards the CGPA.
Final Year of Study
There shall be examination in not fewere than 10 courses given during the final year of study one
of which would be general paper of project, or both.
A candidate who fails to obtain the necessary minimum requirement of a degree may be permitted
by Senate to re-enroll in the University for a further period of studies not exceeding 50% of the
total approved duration of his programme including any probation and/or suspension of study year
including a sickness period covered by medical report approved by Senate.
SECTION XII
REVISED REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE AWARD OF M.B.B.Ch DEGREE
12.1
The M.B.B.Ch degree shall be earned after successful completion of Parts I-IV examinations as
detailed below.
The normal duration of this programme is 6 academic years for candidates admitted with GCE
O/L WASC/SSSC Or 5 academic years for those admitted with GCE A/L HSC or degrees.
12.2
Students and staff shall be made aware of existing examination regulations from the beginning.
12.3
Students shall be exposed to Pre-medical (if they are admitted with GCE A/L HSC or degree) and
finally clinical programmes.
12.4
Pre-Medical
The pass mark in each course in the pre-medical year is 40%. A student shall repeat all failed
courses. No student shall be allowed to carry more than two-failed courses to the pre-medical year.
Those with more than 2 failed courses shall change programmes. Students who do not pass the
failed course within one year of the pre-clinical year shall change programmes.
Part I
82
12.5
No student shall be allowed into Part I MBB.Ch Examination who has not passed all the preclinical courses. The subjects of the Part I Examination shall be:
 Anatomy
 Biochemistry
 Physiology
 Neurosciences
12.6
All pre-clincal candidates shall take the Part I examination at the end of their third Semester after
admission to the course, in April.
12.7
Candidates who fail in one or two subjects in the first attempt shall resit these in July. Candidates
who fail the resit examination shall repeat one semester and resit all subjects in April. Candidates
who fail in any subject(s) a third time shall be asked to withdraw.
12.8
Candidates who fail in three or four subjects at the first examination shall repeat two semesters and
resit all subjects in April.
12.9
Candidates who score an aggregate of less than 120 marks in the 4 subjects following the repeat of
semesters as above shall be asked to withdraw.
12.10
Candidates who fail in any of the subjects following repeat of 2 semesters as above and whose
aggregate score in the 4 subjects is less than 120 marks who resit the failed subject(s) for the third
time shall be asked to withdraw.
12.11
Assessments
The final assessment of candidates shall be composed of results obtained during the course from
continuous assessment, the form of which is the departmental responsibility, as approved by
College Academic Board and College Assembly, and final examination composed of two written
papers and a practical oral examination in each subject.
12.12
The relative weighing of continuous assessment to the final examination shall be 40% continuous
assessment to 60% final examination.
12.13
No final examination marks shall be divulged to candidates. Transcripts shall only show pass (P)
fail (F) or distinction (D) grades.
12.14
12.15
Schedule of Examinations
Final Pre-Clinical examination (Part I) shall normally be held at the end of the third semester in
April. Resit examinations shall normally be held in July.
Part II
No candidate will be allowed to proceed to the clinical course (Phase I clinical) and Part II
examination until he has completed requirements of the Part I. Candidates for Part II examination
shall be examined in two subjects namely: Laboratory Medicine (including Pathology, Chemical
Pathology, Haematology and Medical Microbiology and Parasitology) Pharmacology
The examination shall take place in June of the year following the Part I examination. Candidates
shall submit themselves for examination in the two subjects on the first occasion.
i. Candidates who fail to satisfy the examiners in one subject will be allowed to proceed to
the Phase II clinical course and resit the referred subject in
August/September of the
same year.
ii. Candidates who fail to satisfy the examiners in the resit examination shall be required to
repeat the year and retake the two subjects the following June for
the last time.
iii. Candidates who fail to satisfy the examiners in the two subjects shall be required
to
repeat the year and resit the examination in the two subjects in June of the following
year.
83
iv. Candidates who fail to satisfy the examiners in one subject of the repeat will
be
allowed to proceed to the Phase II clinical course and resit the referred subject
in
August/September of the same year for the last time. Candidates who fail the examination
for the third would be required to transfer to a B.Sc. Programme in Medical Sciences, or
withdraw.
v. Candidates who fail to satisfy the examiners in the two subjects after
repeating
the
course shall be required to transfer to B.Sc Programme in Medical Science or withdraw.
12.16
Part III
No candidates will be allowed to take Part III examination until he/she has passed in both subjects
of the Part II examination.
2.17
Candidates for Part III shall be examined in two subjects namely:
 Paediatrics, and
 Obstetrics and Gynaecology
The examination shall take place 12 months after the 1st Part II Examination of the appropriate
class. Candidates must submit themselves for examination in both subjects in the first occasion.
12.18
Candidates who fail to satisfy the examiners in either or both subjects shall be allowed to proceed
to the Phase III clinical course and resit the referred subject(s) 3 months later. Candidates who fail
the resit shall not be allowed to take the examination until they have done a mandatory two months
posting in the failed subjects.
12.19
They will not be allowed to proceed to the final stage of M4S4 Community Health and General
Practice postings until they have completely cleare O & G and Paediatric (Part III).
12.20
Part IV
Candidates for Part IV shall be examined in three subjects namely:
 Medicine (including sub-specialty subjects)
 Public Health, and
 General Practice
12.21
Candidates who fail any subject(s) shall be required to resit those subjects in August/September of
the year.
12.22
Candidates who fail again shall repeat those subject(s) once more in May/June of the following
year after undergoing a mandatory 2 month ‘Clinical Posting’ in each of the failed subjects. Any
subsequent attempt shall be with the approval of the Senate on the recommendation of Academic
Staff Assembly.
12.23
Part II, III and IV Assessments
Continuous Assessment will form 40% of the total marks obtainable. In Medicine, Surgery and
General Practice the continuous assessment shall include marks scored from “clinical skills”
examination at the end of the M2/S2/GP posting, and this examination shall constitute 50% of the
continuous assessment marks in these subjects.
12.24
The Final Examination will form 60% of the total marks obtainable. The examination in each
subject shall be held in 3 part, namely; two written papers, practical/clinical and oral examinations,
except in medicine and surgery, which shall have three written papers (including a paper each, in
medical and surgery specialties).
12.25
In continuous assessment, at least one-half (1/2) of the marks available shall be from
practical/clinical tests.
12.26
One written paper shall be on objective (MCQ) of an agreed pattern.
84
12.27
The other written paper(s) shall be of essay-type. The 60 marks available at the exams shall be
distributed as follows:
Paper I (MCQ)
10 marks
Paper II
5 marks
Clinical/Practical
25 marks
Orals
10 marks
In Medicine/Surgery only
Paper I
Paper II
Paper III
Clinical/Practicals
Orals
-
10 marks
10 marks
5 marks
25 marks
10 marks
12.28
Candidates shall have obtained a minimum of 50% of the marks available in practical/clinical
examination, to be considered as having passed in the subject in the Part III and IV examinations.
Candidates shall also have obtained a minimum of 50% of the total marks available in the subject,
to be considered as having passed in the subject in Parts II, III and IV.
12.29
Candidates shall be required to have completed to the satisfaction of the Departments concerned
such period of approved practical/clinical course work as defined in the syllabuses.
12.30
Paper III of Part IV examination comprises sub-specialties in Medicine and in Surgery.
12.31
Part III Examinations
The Part III Examinations shall take place in August at the end of clinical phases II course and
consists of Paediatrics and Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
12.32
12.33
12.34
Part IV Examinations
The Part IV Examinations shall take place in May/June following 2 weeks revision in which all
subjects at the Part IV Examinations shall be taught. The Part IV Examination shall consist of
Medicine, Surgery, Community Health and general practice.
Project and Dissertation
Every student shall participate in group projects of not more than five people and write a report on
the research done as part of continuous assessment for the MBB.Ch degree. The Department of
Community Health shall arrange supervision and determine the format of the presentation of the
dissertation, which shall be bound in hard cover. The research materials shall be evaluated in the
Community Health Departent.
General
Candidates who fail to present themselves for examination in any subject without prior permission
shall be deemed to have failed the examination in that subject.
12.35
A student shall have a minimum of 75% attendance in practical/clinical classes to be allowed to
appear for examinations. Failure to attain 75% attendance in practical/clinical classes in any
subject shall be regarded as a failure at the examination in that subject.
12.36
In cases of ill-health certified by the Director of University Health Services, a decision on
individual basis will be taken by Senate on the recommendation of the Academic Staff Assembly.
12.37
Candidates shall normally be allowed three attempts in any of the four professional examinations.
12.38
Resit/Repeat candidates shall not be credited with distinctions.
12.39
The continuous evaluation score at the first sitting of an examination shall apply to the second
attempt at the examination.
85
12.40
Further evaluation tests shall be given to determine evaluation scores in subsequent attempts at the
examination. Absence from examination: General University Regulations shall apply.
12.41
Transcripts shall only show pass (P), fail (F) or distinction (D) grades. No final examination marks
shall be divulged to candidates.
12.42
Any section of these regulations may, from time to time, be altered by Senate on recommendation
of the Academic Staff Assembly.
SECTION XIII
MISCELLANEOUS
13.1
13.2
Readmission after Withdrawal
The provision that a student who has been asked to withdraw may seek re-admission after one year
to repeat the year is no longer in operation.
Aegrotat
Before can approve the award of an aegrotat degree on the recommendation of a Faculty Board of
Examiners, the candidate must have:
(a)
Produced satisfactory medical evidence of his inability to take the appropriate
examination.
(b)
Secured not less than 2.25 grade point average throughout his period of study.
(c)
Completed not less than 65% of the course unit credit hours required by the
particular Faculty.
Suspended Studies
The maximum period of suspended studies shall NOT be more than two academic years.
SECTION XIV
INTERPRETATION
14.1
These regulations do not exclude special request from Departments in respect of exceptional cases,
and the Faculty Board of Examiners need not explain to candidates the reasons for the exercise of
its discretion in applying these regulations.
In the event of any disagreement arising from the interpretation of these regulations or any matter
concerning examinations, the decision of the Dean/Provost shall be operative, but they shall
submit a report of any such decision to the next meeting of the Faculty Board which shall have the
power to confirm, or alter the Dean’s/Provost’s decision. Such decision by the Faculty Board may
be made the subject of an appeal to Senate, the decision of which shall be final.
86
SCHEDULE OF CHARGES
Where charges are indicated per semester, students may opt to pay the whole session's charges and
obtain clearance at the beginning of the session. Charges payable are determined from time to time by the
Governing Council of the University. Examples of charges paid in the 2011/2012 Academic session are
reproduced in following Tables .
2011/2012 SUMMARY OF CHARGES – REGULAR STUDENTS (UNDERGRADUATES)
Fresh Students
Category
Science
Non-Science
Medical
Full Charges
40,800.00
40,300.00
44,800.00
60 %
71,560.00
27,260.00
29,960.00
40%
13,240.00
13,040.00
14,840.00
Portal Charge
2,250.00
2,250.00
2,250.00
Returning Students
Science
Non-Science
Medical
28,600.00
28,100.00
32,600.00
17,940.00
17,640.00
20,340.00
10,660.00
10,460.00
12,260.00
1,750.00
1,750.00
1,750.00
Returning Students
Science
Non-Science
Medical
31,100.00
30,600.00
35,100.00
19,440,.00
19,140.00
21,840.00
11,660.00
11,460.00
13,260.00
1,750.00
1,750.00
1,750.00
2010/2011 SCHOOL CHARGES FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS
(FRESH STUDENTS)
500.00
800.00
1,500.00
1,000.00
1ST
SEMESTER
Free
300.00
480.00
900.00
600.00
2ND
SEMESTER
Free
200.00
320.00
600.00
400.00
5,000.00
2,000.00
1,500.00
3,000.00
1,200.00
1,000.00
2,000.00
800.00
500.00
1,500.00
1,000.00
2,500.00
500.00
1,250.00
300.00
750.00
500.00
500.00
1,000.0
300.00
300.00
1,200.00
2,000.00
2,500.00
1,000.00
2,000.00
200.00
900.00
600.00
1,500.00
300.00
800.00
180.00
500.00
300.00
300.00
600.00
200.00
180.00
800.00
1,200.00
1,500.00
600.00
1,200.00
100.00
600.00
400.00
1,000.00
200.00
450.00
120.00
250.00
200.00
200.00
400.00
100.00
120.00
400.00
800.00
1,000.00
400.00
800.00
100.00
S/N
DESCRIPTION
SESSION
1.
2.
Tuition
Medical Referral
Medical Charges
Medical Exams (including X-Ray)
Library Charges
Examinations:
i. MB BCh STudents
ii. Other Students
Games
Lab/Studio
Science Studnets
Non-Science Students
Medical Students
Sanitation
Result Verification
I.D Card
Screening – 1st Year Students
Caution
Students’ Union Dues
Students’ Welfare Insurance Scheme
Students’ Affairs Record’s dues
Students’ Handbook
Security Charges
General Rehabilitation/Hostel Maintenance
Non-Refundable Acceptance
Endowment
Utility
Nigeria Youth Aids Programme
Free
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
87
22.
ICT Training & IT Facilities (payable once)
Database Fund
Development Levy
23.
24.
Total
Science
Non-Science
Medical
5000.00
5000.00
-
2000.00
10,000.00
40,800.00
40,300.00
44,800.00
2000.00
6000.00
27,560.00
27,260.00
29,960.00
4,000.00
13,240.00
13,040.00
14,840.00
2011/2012 SCHOOL CHARGES FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS
(RETURNING STUDENTS – EXCLUDING FINAL YEAR)
S/N DESCRIPTION
- - - -.- - - - SESSION
1. Tuition
2. Medical Referral
Medical Charges
3. Library Charges
4. Examinations:
i. MB Bch Students
..
ii. Other Students
5. Games
6. lab/Studio
Science Students
Non-Science Students
Medical Students
7. Sanitation
8. Result Verification
9. I.D Card
10. Screening
11. Caution
12. Students' Union Dues
13. Students' Welfare Insurance Scheme
14. Students' Affairs Record's Charges
15. Students' Handbook
16. Security Charges
17. General Rehabilitation Hostel Maintenance
1ST ND
2 SEMESTER
SEMESTER
Free
500.00
800.00
500.00
Free
300.00
480.00
300.00
Free
200.00
320.00
200.00
5,000.00
3,000.00
2,000.00
2,000.00
1,000.00
1,200.00
600.00
800.00
400.00
1,500.00
1,000.00
2,500.00
1000.00
1,000.00
500.00
900.00
600.00
1,500.00
600.00
600.00
300.00
600.00
400.00
1,000.00
400.00
400.00
200.00
500.00
1,000.00
100.00
300.00
600.00
60.00
200.00
400.00
40.00
1,000.00
600.00
400.00
2,000.00
1,200.00
800.00
1,000.00
12,000.00
2,200.00
28,6000.00
28,100.00
32,600.00
600.00
7,200.00
2,100.00
17,940.00
17,640.00
20,340.00
400.00
1200.00
100.00
10,660.00
10,460.00
12,260.00
18. Non-Refundable Acceptance
19.
20.
21
Total.
Endowment
Utility/Development Levy
Nigeria Youth Aids Programme/ Database
Fund
Science
Non-Science
Medical
e-transact/portal Charges N1,750.00
2011/2012 SCHOOL CHARGES FOR UNDERGADUATE STUDENTS
(FINAL YEAR STUDENTS)
88
500.00
800.00
500.00
1ST
SEMESTER
Free
300.00
480.00
300.00
2ND
SEMESTER
Free
200.00
320.00
200.00
5,000.00
2,000.00
1,000.00
3,000.00
1,200.00
600.00
2,000.00
800.00
400.00
1,500.00
1,000.00
2,500.00
1000.00
1,000.00
500.00
500.00
2,000.00
500.00
1,000.0
100.00
900.00
600.00
1,500.00
600.00
600.00
300.00
300.00
1,200.00
300.00
600.00
60.00
600.00
400.00
1,000.00
400.00
400.00
200.00
200.00
800.00
200.00
400.00
40.00
1,000.00
2,000.00
600.00
1,200.00
400.00
800.00
1,000.00
2,000.00
200.00
2,000.00
10,000.00
31,100.00
30,600.00
35,100.00
600.00
1,200.00
100.00
2,000.00
6,000.00
19,440.00
19,140.00
21,840.00
400.00
800.00
100.00
4,000.00
11,660.00
11,460.00
13,260.00
S/N
DESCRIPTION
SESSION
1.
2.
Tuition
Medical Referal
Medical Charges
Library Charges
Examinations:
i. MB BCh STudents
ii. Other Students
Games
Lab/Studio
Science Studnets
Non-Science Students
Medical Students
Sanitation
Result Verification
I.D Card
Screening
Project Supervision
Students’ Union Dues
Students’ Welfare Insurance Scheme
Students’ Affairs Record’s Charges
Students’ Handbook
Security Charges
General Rehabilitation/Hostel Maintenance
Non-Refundable Acceptance
Endowment
Utility
Nigeria Youth Aids Programme
Database Fund
Development Levy
Science
Non-Science
Medical
Free
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
Total
e-transact/Portal Charges N1,750.00
2011/2021 SUMMARY OF CHARGES – POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL
CATEGORY – ARTS, EDUCATION ARTS, SOCIAL SCIENCES
New Students
M.A/M.Ed
(With Studio)
M.A/M.Ed
(Without
Studio)
Returning Students
M.A/M.Ed
(With Studio)
M.A/M.Ed
(Without
Studio)
Nigerian
Part Time
Full-Time
71,300.00 81,300.00
PORTAL
CHARGE
Foreign
African
Non-African
171,300.00
301,300.00
2,250.00
69,300.00
79,300.00
169,300.00
299,300.00
2,250.00
67,800.00
77,800.00
167,800.00
297,800.00
2,250.00
65,800.00
75,800.00
175,800.00
293,300.00
2,250.00
89
CATEGORY- AGRICULTURE, BASIC MEDICAL SCIENCES & SCIENCE
New Students
M.Sc &
74,300.00
84,300.00
174,300.00
304,300.00
Ph.D
Returning Students
M.Sc &
Ph.D
71,800.00
81,800.00
171,800.00
2,250.00
349,300.00
2,250.00
CATEGORY- LAW AND MASTERS IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION (MBA)
New Students
M.Sc/LLM,
69,300.00
84,300.00
169,300.00
332,800.00
Ph.D
Returning Students
LLM,M.Sc,&
Ph.D
66,800.00
MBA
New Students
Returning Students
109,300.00
106,800.00
MPA/MPAS
New Students
Returning Students
94,300.00
91,800.00
81,800.00
166,800.00
259,300.00
256,800.00
229,300.00
226,800.00
2,250.00
346,800.00
409,300.00
406,800.00
2,250.00
2,250.00
2,250.00
474,300.00
471,800.00
2,250.00
2,250.00
POST GRADUATE DIPLOMAS
PGDM,PGDE,PGDEE,
PGDPA,PGD ECONS,
PGD AGRIC.ECONS,
PGD CROP SCIENCE.
81,300.00
PGD COASTAL ZONE MGT, 81,800.00
PGD FISHERIES/AQ, PGD
GEOLOGY,PGD MED.
MICRO/PARA.,PGD
MICROBIOLOGY, PGD
BIOCHEMISTRY, PGD
HAEMATOLOGY, PGD
PHYSICS, PGD CHEMISTRY.
ITEMS
Tuition
231,300.00
476,300.00
2,250.00
139,080.00
286,080.00
2,250.00
CES SCHOOL CHARGES SCHEDULE FOR 2011/2012
NEW STUDENTS
UNDERUNDERFIRST
GRADUATE
GRADUATE SEMESTER
Non-Science
Science Students
60%
Students
N
N
N
25,000.00
25,000.00
15,000.00
SECOND
SEMESTER
40%
N
10,000.00
Medical Referral
500.00
500.00
300.00
200.00
Medical Fee
800.00
800.00
480.00
320.00
Medical Exam (X-Ray)
1,500.00
1,500.00
900.00
600.00
Library Fee
1,000.00
1,000.00
600.00
400.00
Examination Fee
2,000.00
2,000.00
1,200.00
800.00
90
Games Fee
Laboratory/Studio:
Science Students
1,000.00
1,000.00
600.00
400.00
900.00
600.00
1,000. 00
600.00
400.00
1,500.00
Non-Science Students
Sanitation
1,000.00
1,000.00
600.00
400.00
Result Verification (Payable once)
1,000.00
1,000.00
600.00
400.00
I.D. Card (Yearly)
500.00
500.00
300.00
200.00
I.D. Card (Replacement)
400.00
400.00
240.00
160.00
Screening Fee
S.U.G.
Caution Deposit (Refundable)
Students’ Handbook
500.00
500.00
500.00
300.00
500.00
500.00
500.00
300.00
300.00
300.00
300.00
180.00
200.00
200.00
200.00
120.00
Student Affairs Record
100.00
100.00
60.00
40.00
Security Fee
1,000.00
1,000.00
600.00
400.00
General Rehabilitation
2,000.00
2,000.00
1,200.00
800.00
Acceptance Fee
2,000.00
2,000.00
300.00
200.00
Endowment Fee
1,000.00
1,000.00
600.00
400.00
Utility Fee
2,000.00
2,000.00
1,200.00
800.00
1,000.00
200.00
500.00
2,000.00
5,000.00
1,000.00
200.00
500.00
2,000.00
5,000.00
600.00
120.00
300.00
300.00
3,000.00
400.00
80.00
200.00
200.00
2,000.00
10,000.00
10,000.00
6,000.00
4,000.00
38,880.00
25,920.00
64,300.00
38,580.00
25,720.00
2,250.00
2,250.00
Students’ Welfare Insurance Scheme
NYAP
Result Computerization
Data Base Fund
ICT Training
Prospectus
Administrative Charge
Development Levy
TOTAL
Science Students
64,800.00
Non-Science Students
Portal/e-transact Charges
2,250.00
CES SCHOOL CHARGES SCHEDULE FOR 2011/2012
RETURNING STUDENTS
ITEMS
UNDERGRADUATE
N
25,000.00
500.00
UNDERGRADUATE
Non-Science
Students
N
25,000.00
500.00
Science Students
Tuition
Medical Referral
FIRST
SEMESTER
SECOND
SEMESTER
60%
40%
N
15,000.00
300.00
N
10,000.00
200.00
480.00
320.00
Medical Fee
Medical Exam (X-Ray)
Library Fee
800.00
800.00
1,000.00
1,000.00
600.00
400.00
Examination Fee
2,000.00
2,000.00
1,200.00
800.00
Games Fee
Laboratory/Studio:
1,000.00
1,000.00
600.00
400.00
91
-
Science Students
Non-Science Students
Sanitation
Result Verification (Payable once)
1,500.00
900.00
600.00
600.00
600.00
400.00
400.00
1,000.00
-
1,000. 00
1,000.00
-
I.D. Card (Yearly)
500.00
500.00
300.00
200.00
I.D. Card (Replacement)
400.00
400.00
240.00
160.00
Screening Fee
500.00
500.00
300.00
200.00
S.U.G.
Caution Deposit (Refundable)
Students’ Handbook
Student Affairs Record
500.00
-
500.00
-
-
-
300.00
-
200.00
-
100.00
100.00
60.00
40.00
Security Fee
1,000.00
1,000.00
600.00
400.00
General Rehabilitation
2,000.00
2,000.00
1,200.00
800.00
Acceptance Fee
2,000.00
2,000.00
300.00
200.00
Endowment Fee
1,000.00
1,000.00
600.00
400.00
Utility Fee
2,000.00
2,000.00
1,200.00
800.00
1,000.00
1,000.00
600.00
400.00
200.00
500.00
2,000.00
500.00
2,000.00
10,000.00
200.00
500.00
2,000.00
500.00
2,000.00
10,000.00
120.00
300.00
300.00
80.00
200.00
200.00
Students’ Welfare Insurance Scheme
NYAP
Result Computerization
Data Base Fund
ICT Training
Teaching Practice/Industrial Attachment
Project Supervision (Final Year Only)**
Development Levy
TOTAL
Science Students
-
300.00
1,200.00
6,000.00
200.00
800.00
4,000.00
34,200.00
22,800.00
56,500.00
33,900.00
22,600.00
58,500.00
1,750.00
35,400.00
35,100.00
1,750.00
23,600.00
23,400.00
57,000.00
Non-Science Students
Final year Only** (Science)
Final Year Only** (Non-Science)
Portal/e-transact Charges
-
59,000.00
1,750.00
CES CHARGES SCHEDULE FOR 2011/2012 SESSION (NEW STUDENTS)
PROGRAMMES
NIGERIANS
Remedial Science
(Tuition)
(Other Charges)
DIPLOMA
Science Lab. Tech. (SLTP)
(Tuition)
(Other Charges)
Science Lab Tech
Proficiency Others
(Tuition)
(Other Charges)
Public Administration (DPA)
(Tuition)
FOREIGN STUDENTS
African
Non-African
10,000.00
21,350.00
31,350.00
75,000.00
21,350.00
96,350.00
127,500.00
21,350.00
148,850.00
10,000.00
21,350.00
31,350.00
10,000.00
21,350.00
31,350.00
75,000.00
21,350.00
96,350.00
75,000.00
21,350.00
96,350.00
127,500.00
21,350.00
148,850.00
127,500.00
21,350.00
148,850.00
10,000.00
75,000.00
127,500.00
92
(Other Charges)
Local Government Admn. (DLG)
(Tuition)
(Other Charges)
Personnel Management (DPM)
(Tuition)
(Other Charges)
Environmental Education (DEE)
(Tuition)
(Other Charges)
UNDERGRADUATE
B.Sc Env. Prot. & Res. Mgt. (EMP)
(Tuition)
(Other Charges)
B.Sc Management
(Tuition)
(Other Charges)
B.Sc Accounting
(Tuition)
(Other Charges)
B.Sc Banking & Finance
(Tuition)
(Other Charges)
B.Sc Marketing
(Tuition)
(Other Charges)
B.Sc Marine Science
(Tuition)
(Other Charges)
B.Ed Env. Education
(Tuition)
(Other Charges)
ITEMS
Tuition
Medical Referal
Medical Fee
Medical Exam (x-Ray)
Library Fee
Examination Fee
Games Fee
Laboratory Studio
Science Students
20,850.00
30,850.00
20,850.00
95,850.00
20,850.00
148,350.00
10,000.00
20,850.00
75,000.00
20,850.00
127,500.00
20,850.00
10,000.00
20,850.00
30,850.00
75,000.00
20,850.00
95,850.00
127,500.00
20,850.00
148,350.00
10,000.00
20,850.00
30,850.00
75,000.00
20,850.00
95,850.00
127,500.00
20,850.00
148,350.00
25,000.00
20,850.00
45,850.00
150,000.00
20,850.00
170,850.00
255,000.00
20,850.00
275,850.00
25,000.00
20,850.00
45,850.00
150,000.00
20,850.00
170,850.00
255,000.00
20,850.00
275,850.00
25,000.00
20,850.00
45,850.00
150,000.00
20,850.00
170,850.00
255,000.00
20,850.00
275,850.00
25,000.00
20,850.00
45,850.00
150,000.00
20,850.00
170,850.00
255,000.00
20,850.00
275,850.00
25,000.00
20,850.00
45,850.00
150,000.00
20,850.00
170,850.00
255,000.00
20,850.00
275,850.00
25,000.00
21,350.00
46,850.00
150,000.00
21,350.00
171,350.00
255,000.00
20,850.00
275,850.00
15,000.00
20,850.00
35,850.00
150,000.00
20,850.00
170,850.00
255,000.00
20,850.00
275,850.00
CES SCHOOL CHARGES SCHEDULE FOR 2011/2012
NEW STUDENTS (DIPLOMA)
SCIENCE
NONFIRST
STUDENTS
SCIENCE
SEMESTER
STUDENTS
60%
15,000.00
15,000.00
9,000.00
500.00
500.00
300.00
800.00
800.00
480.00
1,500.00
1,500.00
9,000.00
1,000.00
1,000.00
600.00
2,000.00
2,000.00
1,200.00
1,000.00
1,000.00
600.00
1,500.00
900.00
93
SECOND
SEMESTER
40%
6,000.00
200.00
320.00
6,000.00
400.00
800.00
400.00
600.00
Non-Science Students
Sanitation
Result Verification
ID Card (Yearly)
ID Card (Replacement)
Screening Fee
S.U.G.
Caution Deposit
(Refundable)
Students Handbook
Students Affairs Record
Security Fee
General Rehabilitation
Endowment Fee
Acceptance Fee
Utility Fee
Students Welfare Insurance
Scheme
NYAP
Result Computerizaation
Data Base Fund
ICT Training
Prospectus
Admission Charge
Development Levy
TOTAL
Science Students
Non-Science Students
Portal /e-transact Charges
S/N
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
1,000.00
1000.00
500.00
400.00
500.00
500.00
500.00
1,000.00
1,000.00
1000.00
500.00
400.00
500.00
500.00
500.00
600.00
600.00
600.00
300.00
240.00
300.00
300.00
300.00
400.00
400.00
400.00
200.00
160.00
200.00
200.00
200.00
300.00
100.00
1000.00
2000.00
1000.00
2000.00
2000.00
1000.00
300.00
100.00
1000.00
2000.00
1000.00
2000.00
2000.00
1000.00
180.00
60.00
600.00
1200.00
600.00
120.00
40.00
400.00
800.00
400.00
1200.00
600.00
800.00
400.00
200.00
500.00
2OOO.OO
200.00
500.00
2000.00
120.00
300,00
1200.00
80.00
200.00
800.00
10,000.00
10,000.00
6,000.00
4,000.00
49,300.00
2250.00
29,880.00
29,580.00
2250.00
19,920.00
19,720.20
49,800.00
2250.00
CES SCHOOL CHARGES SCHEDULE FOR 2011/2012
RETURNING STUDENTS (DIPLOMA)
ITEMS
SCIENCE
NONFIRST
STUDENTS
SCIENCE
SEMESTER
STUDENTS
60%
Tuition
15,000.00
15,000.00
9,000.00
Medical Referal
500.00
500.00
300.00
Medical Fee
800.00
800.00
480.00
Medical Exam (x-Ray)
Library Fee
1,000.00
1,000.00
600.00
Examination Fee
2,000.00
2,000.00
1,200.00
Games Fee
1,000.00
1,000.00
600.00
Laboratory Studio
Science Students
1,500.00
900.00
Non-Science Students
1,000.00
600.00
Sanitation
1,000.00
1,000.00
600.00
Result Verification
ID Card (Yearly)
500.00
500.00
300.00
ID Card (Replacement)
400.00
400.00
240.00
Screening Fee
500.00
500.00
300.00
S.U.G.
500.00
500.00
300.00
Caution Deposit (Refundable) 500.00
500.00
300.00
Students Handbook
Students Affairs Record
100.00
100.00
60.00
Security Fee
1000.00
1000.00
600.00
General Rehabilitation
2000.00
2000.00
1200.00
Endowment Fee
1000.00
1000.00
600.00
Acceptance Fee
2000.00
2000.00
Utility Fee
2000.00
2000.00
1200.00
Students Welfare Insurance
1000.00
1000.00
600.00
Scheme
NYAP
200.00
200.00
120.00
Result Computerizaation
500.00
500.00
300,00
94
SECOND
SEMESTER
40%
6,000.00
200.00
320.00
400.00
800.00
400.00
600.00
400.00
400.00
200.00
160.00
200.00
200.00
200.00
40.00
400.00
800.00
400.00
800.00
400.00
80.00
200.00
26
27
28
29
30
31
S/N
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
Data Base Fund
ICT Training
Prospectus
Admission Charge
Development Levy
TOTAL
Science Students
Non-Science Students
Portal /e-transact Charges
2OOO.OO
2000.00
1200.00
800.00
10,000.00
10,000.00
6,000.00
4,000.00
46,500.00
1,750.00
28,200.00
27,900.00
1,750.00
18,800.00
18,600.20
47,000.00
1,750.00
CES SCHOOL CHARGES SCHEDULE FOR 2011/2012
PRE-DEGREE PROGRAMME
ITEMS
NON-SCIENCE
FIRST SEMESTER
STUDENTS
60%
Tuition
15,000.00
9,000.00
Medical Referal
500.00
300.00
Medical Fee
800.00
480.00
Medical Exam (x-Ray)
1,500.00
900.00
Library Fee
1,000.00
600.00
Examination Fee
2,000.00
1,200.00
Games Fee
1,000.00
600.00
Laboratory Studio
Science Students
1,500.00
900.00
Non-Science Students
Sanitation
1,000.00
600.00
Result Verification
1000.00
600.00
ID Card (Yearly)
500.00
300.00
ID Card (Replacement)
400.00
240.00
Screening Fee
500.00
300.00
S.U.G.
500.00
300.00
Caution Deposit (Refundable)
500.00
300.00
Students Handbook
300.00
180.00
Students Affairs Record
100.00
60.00
Security Fee
1000.00
600.00
General Rehabilitation
2000.00
1200.00
Endowment Fee
1000.00
600.00
Acceptance Fee
2000.00
2000.00
Utility Fee
2000.00
1200.00
Students Welfare Insurance Scheme
1000.00
600.00
NYAP
200.00
120.00
Result Computerizaation
500.00
300,00
Data Base Fund
2000.00
1200.00
ICT Training
Prospectus
Admission Charge
Development Levy
10,000.00
6,000.00
TOTAL
Science Students
49,300.00
29,580.00
Non-Science Students
Portal /e-transact Charges
2,250.00
2,250.00
CENTRE FOR GENERAL STUDIES (CGS)
SUMMARY OF CGS CHARGES 2011/2012
A.
Designated Bank: ZENITH BANK, Calabar
95
SECOND
SEMESTER 40%
6,000.00
200.00
320.00
600.00
400.00
800.00
400.00
600.00
400.00
400.00
200.00
160.00
200.00
200.00
200.00
120.00
40.00
400.00
800.00
400.00
800.00
400.00
80.00
200.00
800.00
4,000.00
19,720.00
B.
Charges:
1.
1st Year – (5 courses) @ N200.00 per course = N1,000.00
2.
Direct Entry – (7 courses) @ N200.00 per course = N1,400.00
3.
Returning students – N200.00 per course.
This payment includes N50.00 Departmental charges per course otherwise:
1.
1st Year – (5 courses) @ N150 per course = N750.00
2.
Direct Entry – (7 courses) @ N150.00 per course = N1,050.00
3.
Returning students (N150.00) per course
PAYMENT OF SCHOOL CHARGES
Both new and returning students are to note that school charges must be paid in any of the
designated banks and then proceed to the Database with the print out for online registration.
A.
Students on Regular University Programmes
Faculty
Banks
Basic/ Clinical Medical Sciences
ECOBANK
Allied Medical Sciences
FINBANK
Social Sciences/Sciences
FINBANK
Arts
ECOBANK
Agriculture and Science
UBA
Law
STERLING BANK
Management Sciences
WEMA BANK
Education
ZENITH BANK
Sciences
ACCESS
Postgraduate School Programmes
Spring Bank (Enterprise Bank)
B.
Students on CES Consultancy Programme
Faculties
Banks
Social Sciences
FINBANK
B.Sc Marine Sciences
Access Bank
Pre- degree
Sterling Bank
Institutes (IOC & IPPA)
WEMA Bank
Management Sciences
WEMA Bank
Education/IOE
ZENITH Bank
SANDWICH
ECOBANK
The bank draft, which must be drawn on any of the Banks listed above, should be made payable to
UNIVERSITY OF CALABAR. Students MUST write their names, Departments and Registration
Numbers on the reverse side of the bank draft. They must, in addition, make photocopies of both sides of
the draft and attach same to the original bank draft for payment on arrival.
MODE OF PAYMENT
Students are required to present the bank draft to National Universities Commission Data Base (NUCDB)
which will issue them with University receipts/PIN with which they will be allowed to register.
Registration for all programmes in the University is done on-line, powered by NUC data base/Zellence
Communications. Parents and guardians as well as sponsors are encouraged to pay the charges all at once
where possible.The University often makes adequate arrangements to receive the charges even before the
commencement of the session to reduce the congestion usually experienced at the beginning of session.
Persons who are willing to take advantage of this arrangement are encouraged to do so. Please note that
any student who fails to pay his/her school charges will normally not be allowed to register and will be
prevented from benefiting from lectures.
New students are often required to bring along the following:
 Letter of admission from JAMB and / or UME Notification of Result Slip;
 Six recent passport photographs
96




Birth Certificate or Sworn Declaration of Age
Certificate of State/Local Government of Origin
Certificate (s) on which the admission was based e.g '0' level, IJMB, 'A’ level, etc.
Three file jackets.
CHARGES MUST BE PAID IN FULL FOR EACH SEMESTER OR YEAR AS THE CASE MAY BE. NO
PERMISSION SHALL BE GRANTED FOR NON-PAYMENT OF APPROPRIATE CHARGES. ALL CHARGES
SHALL BE PAID AT DESIGNATED BANKS.
GENERAL STUDIES PROGRAMME
Background
The Centre for General Studies and Communication Skills at the University of Calabar came into existence
in 1979 following the Federal Government’s call for all Nigerian universities to establish “a compulsory
course on national awareness in university curriculum”.
Section five (5) of the revised National Policy on Education titled “Higher Education including
Professional Education” succinctly states that, as part of a general progrmme of all-round improvement in
university education, students would be made to take a course in history of ideas and the philosophy of
knowledge or some other such suitable course as may be determined. Also of historical importance is the
University of Nigeria Law of 1961 (E. N. L. Number 21 of 1961), status six (6). By this law the College of
General Studies was among the thirty-six (36) colleges listed for establishment. When the University of
Calabar was a campus of the University of Nigeria it had to adhere to this prescription and General Studies
was one of the programmes which it ran.
From whatever angle one views the roots of General Studies programmes in Nigerian institutions of higher
learning, the objectives point to a direction which is virtually similar to them: to do away with the
parochial-type mode of education where emphasis is placed on a one-track specialization in a single field.
In other words, the inception of the General Studies programme is in line with the quest for a broad
spectrum of knowledge.
The emergence of the National Universities Commission (NUC) has added further impetus to, and
emphasis on, the relevance of General Studies in the scheme of university education in Nigeria. Currently,
there is an attempt to merge benchmarks and minimum academic standards on General Studies in Nigerian
universities with a proposal to increase the number of courses and make the General Studies programme
run throughout the duration of the degree programme.
Objectives
The objectives of the General Studies programme in the University of Calabar include:
a) Assistance to individuals to understand and promote the cultural heritage of Nigeria, in particular,
and African traditions in general.
b) Encouragement of breadth and depth of learning on a continuous basis.
c) Strengthening of a sense of national awareness, spirit of patriotism, loyalty and understanding.
d) Differentiation between patriotism and ethnicity; shun of clannishness when national unity and
patriotism are threatened.
e) Encouragement of integration of scientific, technological and humanistic outlooks in the lives and
attitudes of the individual.
f) Equipment of the individual with the basic tools of communication and critical thinking.
g) Provision of a broad-based inter-disciplinary education which no single discipline within the
university system can solely afford to provide.
h) Production of university graduates with analytical and critical minds in a dynamic world.
i) Development of the intellectual capacities of individuals to understand, appreciate and promote
peaceful co-existence.
97
Overall, the goal of the General Studies programme in the University of Calabar is to produce “wellgrounded, morally and intellectually capable graduates with vision in an environment of peace and social
cohesion”.
Introduction
The Centre for General Studies and Communication Skills offers a programme of study which is aimed at
stimulating and broadening the student’s awareness and knowledge in relevant fields outside his
immediate area of specialization. In this way, the student is brought to understand more closely the
significance of the linguistic, cultural, social, historical, physical, scientific and technological environment
in which he exists.
The courses offered are made to span a vast area and varieties of knowledge: from the Nigerian historical,
political and sociological situation, information on the pure sciences to critical, analytical and logical
reasoning.
Furthermore, there is an indepth focus on the use of the English language – its role as a second language
used for study in Nigerian higher institutions of learning, and a concrete approach towards the
development of effective communication skills in the language. There is also provision for training in
computer awareness.
With this rich academic background, a graduate of the University of Calabar is made to achieve the wider
educational objectives of the Nigerian university system.
Regulations
To obtain a first degree in any of the disciplines in the University of Calabar, a student must take and pass
all the General Studies courses offered by the Centre for General Studies and Communication Skills.
Currently, there are seven (7) such courses: Use of English and Communication Skills I, Use of English
and Communication Skills II, Citizenship Education, Philosophy and Logic, History and Philosophy of
Science, Introduction to Coputers and Computer Applications. The first five courses are offered to students
in their first year of study (that is to say, their year of admission) while the last two are offered in the
second year of study.
Each course carries two (2) credit hours. To graduate, therefore, a student is required to successfully
complete fourteen credit hourse of General Studies courses.
For Direct Entry students, the requirement for first and second year students equally apply, for although
they gain admission into the second year class, their year of admission remains their first in the system.
Whenever there is a doubt, students are strongly advised to seek the counsel of their Academic Advisers,
who are appointed by department to guide them.
In addition to Academic Advisers, the Centre has a Co-ordinator for each General Studies course. Students
are equally advised to seek clarification from the appropriate Co-ordinator on, or solutions to any problem
which they might encounter with any of the courses. Any problem which a Co-ordinator cannot handle is
normally brought to the attention of the Director, Gentre for General Studies and Communication Skills.
The Codes, titles and credit hours of the seven courses currently offered by the Centre are as follows:
FIRST YEAR (UME AND DIRECT ENTRY)
1) GSS 1101: Use of English and Communication Skills I
2) GSS 1102: Use of English and Communication Skills II
3) GSS 1111 and GSS 1112: Citizenship Education
4) GSS 1121 and GSS 1122: Philosophy and Logic
5) GSS 1131 and GSS 1132: History and Philosophy of Science
2 Credit hrs.
2 Credit hrs.
2 Credit hrs.
2 Credit hrs.
2 Credit hrs.
SECOND YEAR/DIRECT ENTRY
1) GSS 2111: Introduction to Computers
2 Credit hrs.
98
2) GSS 2112: Computer Applications
3) Entrepeuneural Studies
2 Credit hrs.
2 Credit hrs.
Each course is taught by teams of lecturers assigned to groups of students, usually based on the students’
departments or programmes. Each team of lecturers is made up of experts drawn from the relevant
disciplines. All lecturers are appointed upon strong recommendations from the relevant academic
departments.
The second year courses are basically designed to ensure that every student of the University of Calabar
becomes properly aware of the computer and acquires competence in its usage. The first semester course,
Introduction to Computer, is basically a computer awareness course, while the second semester
component, Computer Applications, offers students sustained practical demonstration on the use of
computers. All teaching in the second semester course is done in the computer laboratory, where students
have access to, and can practice with, computers.
Schedule of General Studies Courses
In recognition of the peculiarities of departments in terms of the number of courses which their students
must offer each semester of their first year, and taking into account certain obvious logistic constraints,
three of the first year GSS courses have been made available both in the first and second semesters. Their
descriptions, objectives and contents remain, however, the same, irrespective of when they are offered
(whether in the first or second semester).
In the same way, departments and programmes have been grouped based on when their students are
required to offer the courses – whether in the first or second semesters. Details of available General
Studies courses, semesters in which they are offered, and departments whose students must offer them, are
given in the Table below:
FIRST YEAR (UME AND DIRECT ENTRY)
FIRST SEMESTER
Courses
Departments/Programmes
GSS 1101: Use of English and All departments and programmes
Communication Skills I
GSS 1111: Citizenship
All departments and programmes in:
Education
Faculties of Arts, Education, Law, Management
Sciences, Social Sciences and Institutes
of
Education, Oceanography, and Public Policy and
Administration.
GSS 1121: Philosophy and
As in GSS 1111: Citizenship Education above,
Logic
plus Faculty of Agriculture.
GSS 1131: History and
All departments and programmes in: Faculties of
Philosophy of Science
Basic Medical Sciences, Allied Medical Sciences,
Clinical Sciences, Sciences, Institutes of
Education,
Oceanography, Public Policy and
Adminitration and Adult Education (CES).
SECOND SEMESTER
Courses
Departments/Programmes
GSS 1102: Use of English and All departments and programmes
Communication Skills I I
GSS 1112: Citizenship
All departments and programmes in: Faculties of
Education
Basic Medical Sciences, Allied Medical Sciences,
Clinical Sciences, and Adult Education (CES)
GSS 1122: Philosophy and
As in GSS 1112: Citizenship Education above,
Logic
except departments and programmes in Faculty
of Agriculture
GSS 1132: History and
All departments and programmes in:Faculties of
Philosophy of Science
Agriculture, Arts, Law, Science, Management
99
GSS
Entrepeuneural
Studies
Sciences, Social Sciences and Education.
All Departments.
Note carefully that with the exception of GSS 1101 and 1102, which must be done by every first year
student in the first and second semesters (as indicated), all the other courses are done only once – either in
the first semester or in the second semester.
Those with codes ending in “1” are taught in the first semester and are available to students from some
departments who can only do the courses in the first semester because of the peculiar circumstances of
those departments. The courses with codes ending in “2” are taught in the second semester to students
from those departments for whom it is convenient to do so. Departments are not allowed to unilaterally opt
out of or into any semester with respect to the existing schedule of General Studies courses for their
students. Departments are required to dsicuss their problems with the Centre which would then find ways
to remedy the situation without upsetting the system.
In the scond year, students from all the departments and programmes are required to do the two available
GSS courses at the same time. Thus GSS 2111: Introduction to Computers is taken by all second year
(including Direct Entry) students in the first semester, while in the second semester, they take GSS 2112:
Computer Applications, irrespective of their departments or programmes.
At the moment, Faculty of Agriculture students, however, do the computer courses in their third year.
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS AND CONTENTS
GSS 1101:
USE OF ENGLISH AND COMMUNICATION SKILLS I
FIRST SEMESTER
Course Description:
The course is designed to assist students by inculcating in them appropriate work habits and high level
skills required to cope with university work, especially in a milieu where the English language is used as
the medium for instruction and communication. Put differently, the course is designed to improve reading,
listening, speaking, writing – including note-taking, studying and examination skills as well as the use of
the library. The desire is to effectively teach English for academic purposes.
Course Objectives
Following from the above, therefore, we can summarize the objectives of English for Academic Purpose
(EAP) as follows:
a) Arousal in students the awareness of the language, such as will enable them to decipher fact from
opinion, identify the truth and be able to make sound judgement whenever any material, written or
oral, is presented before them.
b) Improvement of the students’ ability to organize their thoughts in sentences and paragraphs and
thereby becoming efficient in both written and oral communication.
c) Enhancement of the reading and listening skills of the students.
d) Enhancement of students’ ability in the use of the mechanics of writing such
as punctuation,
spellings, etc.
The objectives stated above can be achieved through:
a) A deliberate effort on the part of the student to improve his/her English language ability in the
areas of speaking, listening, reading and writing, through adequate exposure to various settings.
b) Programmed instructions by the lectures and students’ own systematic
practice, particularly a
prompt response to assignments and practicals.
c) The following are English for Academic Purposes (EAP) tasks:

Describing

Defining

Comparing and Contrasting

Classifying
100






d)
Reporting
Explaining
Arguing a poing of view
Interpreting
Giving directions
Group discussion
The following are the basic language activities

Reading

Listening

Speaking

Writing

Study skills and use of the library
Course Outline
a) Introduction:
General instruction regarding EAP and study skills
b) Reading: Speed and Techniques

Speed reading

Scanning

Skimming

Reading impediments
c) Reading:



Comprehension
Preparation
For required information
Locating specific written information
d) Reading:
for Evaluation

Constructively

Critically

Creatively
 Text analysis for language, functions, description, definition, exemplification, comparison,
cause and
effect, etc.
e) Reading: Vocabulary Development

Using the dictionary

Understanding word meaning

Understanding collocation

Word analysis and relations

Intensive and extensive reading
Listening
7.
8.
-
for note-taking
for vocabulary development and structural patterns
-
Vowels
Consonants
Intonations
Stress
Making a presentation
Principles and techniques of public presentation
Speaking process
-
Forms: description, exposition, narration, argument
Speaking
Writing
101
-
Essay: types, structure
Letters: Types, corrections and distinguishing
features
9.
10.
11.
12.
Introduction to academic writing (detailed treatment
in the second semester)
Study skills
Note-taking
Note-making
Techniques for note-taking/making
Study reading
Study time and methods
Grammar and Communication
Phrases and content
Clauses and content
The sentence: elements, types, structure
Spelling and punctuation
Overview
Sound spelling
Using the dictionary
Punctuation
Library skills
i.
The library: meaning, purposes, functions and types
ii.
Finding materials in the library
iii.
Reference materials in the library
iv.
The catalogue
v.
Classification
vi.
Library rules and regulations
vii.
Functional arrangement of the library
Note:
1.
The library skills component carries twenty (20) marks. Lectures for
this component will take one hour each week in the last five weeks
examination.
2.
Assignments and tests carry 30 marks while the semester
examination carries 50 marks.
3.
Each student should endeavour to acquire the core texts and at least
two novels.
before
GSS 1111 & GSS 1112: CITIZENSHIP EDUCATION
The Course
Citizenship Education was designed by the National Universities Commission (NUC) to
replace the Nigerian Heritage which was taught to all undergraduates in Nigerian Universities. The
course is designed to introduce all fresh undergraduates in the university to the socio-cultural,
economic and political complexities of the Nigerian nation.
Major emphasis is placed on the peoples of Nigeria and the problems and challenges of
cultural diversity; patterns of social, economic, political and religious organisations, as well as
constitutional development and the problems of nation- building in Nigeria.
Recently, efforts have been made to focus on such areas as rights and obligations, arms of
government and sustainable development. The approach is thematic rather than chronological,
with the overall aim to awaken national integration.
The following topics are currently treated in the course:
1.
The Nigerian Constitution
2.
Ethics and Discipline in National Life
3.
Rights and Obligations
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4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
Nation-Building in Nigeria
Arms of Government
Citizenship
Ethnic Pluralism and National Identity in Nigeria
Psychology and Human Behaviour
Culture and Peoples of Nigeria
Women and Development in Nigeria
Sustainable Development
Federalism and Revenue Allocation
Nigeria and Constitutional Development
GSS 1121 & GSS 1122: PHILOSOPHY AND LOGIC
A.
PHILOSOPHY SECTION
A historical survey approach to the scope, notions, branches and problems of Philosophy
The main aim of this section is to introduce the beginner to the historical origins of
philosophic thought, specifically, to present to the learner the problems that have been the focus of
philosophers at various periods of its development.
Outline
1.
What is Philosophy?
a.
Traditional and latest branches of philosophy
b.
Philosophical systems
c.
Philosophy and the good life
2.
History of Philosophy
A general run down of the problem that was central to each period is given.
Philosophers specific are used to illustrate attempts to address the problem.
A.
Ancient Period
i.
Thales
ii.
Anaximander
iii.
Anaximenes
iv.
Heraclitus
v.
Parmenides
a.
Shift in Focus
The Sophists and what they stand for in the history of
Philosophy will be articulated. Individual Sophists will be
mentioned without much details. However, Protagoras will
attention as representative.
b.
Socrates
c.
Plato – theory of forms and briefly his political history
d.
Aritotle – in relation to Plato’s theory of forms
B.
Medieval Period
a.
Existence of God
i.
Thomas Aquinas
ii.
Anselm
iii.
Augustine
C.
Modern Period
a.
Rationalism – the instructors will explain the claims and
mention the representatives of the rationalist school – Rene
Decartes, Baruch Spinoza and Leibniz. A discussion of
Descartes’ approach suffices.
103
be given
b.
Immanuel Kant will be discussed as this pertains to his
attempt to reconcile empiricism and rationalism. Attempts
made to expose his theory of categorical imperative.
B.
3.
Existentialism The instructors will discuss the general features of
existentialism as well as mention the representatives.
A discussion of Satre and Camus suffices.
4.
African Philosophy
5.
African Political Philosophy
6.
Violence
will
be
LOGIC SECTION
This section aims to expose students to the basic concerns of logic. Discussion in this respect will
centre on the theoretical content of logic, the nature of arguments, the history and development of
logic, Laws of thought – in order to equip students to deal with inductive-deductive or any other
reasoning. The instructors are expected to expose students to the following:
1.
What is Logic?
2.
History and Development of Logic
3.
Laws of Thought
4.
5.
What is an Argument?
a.
Componenets of Arguments
i.
Inferences
ii.
Propositions
iii.
Premises
iv.
Conclusion
b.
Types of Arguments
i.
Deductive and Inductive
c.
Evaluation of Arguments
i.
Validity and Invalidity
ii.
Soundness and Unsoundness
iii.
Correct and incorrect inductive arguments
Fallacies – Formal and informal – Give examples
6.
Definitions
7.
Categorical propositions
i.
Types of Categorical propositions
ii.
Quality and quantity
iii.
Square of opposition
8.
Elementary Logical Operators
i.
Negation
ii.
Conjunction
iii.
Disconjunction
iv.
Conditional statement
v.
Biconditional
vi.
Constants of punctuation
9.
Truth Tables
i.
Truth Table Construction
ii.
Truth Table test of validity
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10.
Formal proof Rules of Influence
(Only the nine and ten rules)
11.
Elementary introduction to quantification theory.
GSS 1131/1132:
HISTORY AND PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE
Course Description
The course is designed to introduce students to the basic historical and philosophical facts about
science. Focus should expand to include the elements of the environment, technology, health,
nutrition and diseases.
Course Objectives
During and on completion of the course students should be able to:
a.
Exhibit elementary knowledge of the origin, growth and development of the
sciences;
b.
Examine the contributions of philosophy to the growth and development of
the
sciences, including mathematics;
c.
Justify the concept and need for environmental sustainability;
d.
Establish the interrelationship among the sciences, arts, technology,
environment,
health and society;
e.
Develop an interest in scientific and technological approach to daily
problems.
Course Context
A.
History of Science
The Universe, man (origin and nature, the cosmic environment;
galaxies, planets, solar systems, etc.)
History of science including medicine and Mathematics in the
ancient world (Africa, Greece, Arab, Inca, Aztec).
History of Science 16th century to the present.
B.
Philosophy of Science
Positivism, rationalism, Anarchic philosophy, etc and their
relationship with science, mathematics, medicine, politics,
technology, etc.
C.
Relevance to Nigeria
Science and technology in Nigeria
Technology transfer
Science technology-society interaction
D.
Environment
Sustainability and renewability
Pollution
Energy
E.
Health, Nutrition and Diseases including
Awareness
Preventive health practices
Newer and common diseases, etc.
GSS 1102:
USE OF ENGLISH AND COMMUNICATION SKILLS II
Introduction
The focus of the Second Semester work shall be on writing, with reading as required for
academic writing, as well as the application of the library skills learnt during the First Semester.
Students will be guided to select topics from their areas of specialization, structure and
present research information in accordance with the specifications of their disciplines.
105
Course Objectives
The objectives are to consolidate and advance on the work of the previous Semester by:
1.
Enabling students to develop appropriate skills in producing mini-research
reports
based on requirements of their disciplines.
2.
Training in using appropriate language and process of composition
3.
Training students on the application of other language skills in information
retrieval,
evaluation and presentation for effective writing.
4.
Exposing students to various other forms of writing which they are bound to
encounter after graduation.
Course Outline
1.
The process of research writing I
Guide students in selecting topics either individually or in groups
Discuss the thesis statements, including qualities of a good thesis
statement
Discuss and guide students in compiling a working bibliography
2.
Advanced Reading
Discuss registers, with particular emphasis on the students’
disciplines
Select appropriate materials for reading.
3.
Advanced Reading for Research
Information
Scanning
Skimming
For required information
Locating specific information
4.
Reading for Note-making for Research
Techniques of note-making
Types of notes
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
Proceed to stage II of the mini-research writing
Guide students as they make oral presentation in class of what has
been read on their selected topics.
Students make and present note-slips
Writing: Structuring paragraphs of the following thought patterns:
Description
Definitions
Exemplification
Classification
Comparison and contrast
Cause and effect
Generalisation and quantification
Interpretation of data
Writing: Structuring paragraphs of the following types:
Introduction
Transition
Conclusion
Proced to stage III of the mini-research project
Write the first draft
Revise it if necessary
Advanced writing
Writing of Abstracts
Writing of Reports: layout, structure, tenses.
Proceed to stage IV of the mini-research
Write the final draft
Type and submit
106
11.
Writing: Official letters and memos
Notes: 1.Lecturers should liaise with departments to have a clear idea of academic writing required.
2.The mini-research will account for twenty (20%) percent and the centrally conducted assessment will
account for the remaining twenty (20%) percent allocated to continuous assessment.
GSS 2111:
INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTERS
DEFINITION, BRIEF HISTORY, GENERATIONS
The modern day computers classification; digital, analog and hybrid computers. The microcomputers,
hardware, input, processing and output units. Software and peripherals. Storage devices: ROM, RAM,
Hard disk, diskettes. Binary numbers, Memory ratings bits, nibbles and bytes. Programming Languages
machine, language, high level and low level languages, characteristics and examples.
Fundamentals of BASIC programming: Definitions, constants, variables and strings; data types, coding of
data, programme algorithm and flowcharting; rules for coding.
Programme statements: Input, processing and output statements; controls in output statements. Other
programme statements assignment, declarative repetitive loop and transfer of control statements. Examples
of simple programmes. Computer networking definition, advantages and network topologies. E-mails,
websites, browsing.
GSS 2112:
COMPUTER APPLICATIONS
Safety precautions in computer laboratories. Identification of Hardware components – Keyboard, mouse,
CPU, monitor and printers. Support electronic peripherals – UPS, voltage stabilizers, etc. Booting up the
system – cold boot and warm boot. Windows start up environment-start button, the pull-down menu.
Loading the DOS and characteristics of the DOS screen. Keyboard – identification of the keys. How to use
the keyboard (in DOS mode) – typing in small and capital letters, use of backspace, space bar and arrow
keys. Editing by use of insert and delete keys. DOS commands and function of ENTER key. Diskettes –
handling and formatting, copying of files from hard disk on to diskettes. The BASIC editor – loading on to
the RAM, characteristics of the editor screen. Running some small scale programs – saving programmes
on hard disc and diskettes. Loading of programs from diskettes on to RAM. Use of software packages and
work processing – Microsoft word, etc. Printing and saving of documents. Sending and receiving E-mails;
browsing the Internet. Shutting down the computer.
THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARY
The University of Calabar Library was established in October 1973, as a Library of the Calabar Campus of
the University of Nigeria, Nsukka. Since its inception, it has been shifted from one site to another in search
of adequate accommodation.
By August 1978, the University of Calabar Library had acquired over 40,000 volumes of books and 11,000
volumes of bound journals. The volumes of books and journals acquired were greatly influenced by the
increase in the number of disciplines being taught in the University. There was a problem coping with
growth in the collection because, like other units of the University, the Library had for a long time been
faced with acute shortage of space. However, the situation was slightly ameliorated by September 1978
when the Library was transferred to the former students’ refectory. As would be expected, the refectory
building, designed for an entirely different purpose, was far from being a satisfactory library. But in terms
of space, it marked an improvement on the facilities, which were available before.
Undoubtedly, by this severe limitation, it took the vision and exemplary dedication of a group of scholars
who ensured that a definitive library was built to take care of problems of space and exponential growth in
collection development. These scholars most especially interested and involved in the planning and
implementation of the University of Calabar Library complex included late Professor Donald Ekong, the
Vice-Chancellor and very effective instrument for Library development; Professor Ulo K. Enyenihi;
Ambassador (Professor) Okon Edet Uya, the then Deputy Vice-Chancellor, and Chief N. O. Ita, the
University Librarian at the time who ensured that a suitable architectural edifice was put in place and
107
located at the epicenter of Faculty buildings, most of which have now been rehabilitated, completed and
commissioned.
The central location of the Library places it at the vortex of library and information services to the entire
University community. The definitive library complex has since 1985 been existing at its permanent site
in the University. It is to be noted that the uncompleted state of the University of Calabar Library building
can partly be attributed to eventual lack of funds. This is because when the Library was conceptualized,
the economy of the country as a whole was buoyant and building materials were relatively cheap; hence
the permanence inherent in its gigantic structure designed and implemented to house at least a million
volume stock. The new Library complex has, therefore, provided the much-needed space required for
professional services and study facilities. The Library has been steadily developing over the years and it is
expected to continue with its rapid growth.
Library holdings to date include over 136,000 volumes of books, 9,166 volumes of bound journals, 300
current titles of journals, 37,000 pamphlets/magazines and newspapers. In terms of physical facilities, the
total space available for reading is 23,000 sq. metres. The total seating capacity for now is 2,046 readers.
This is likely to increase in response to the continued growth of student population and the eventual
completion of the building. When in 1975 the University of Calabar started operating as an autonomous
University, the student population was nowhere compared to what it is now. The University Library is now
expected to provide services for over 30,000 staff and students of the University.
The Library Building
As stated earlier, the University of Calabar Library is a building which was put into use without being
completed. For instance, large portions of it were requisitioned and used for non-library purposes such as
lecture halls, classrooms and departmental offices. The influx into the building of a large student
population has resulted in over-use and misuse of facilities, thereby causing stress to the structure of the
building itself. At the 49th meeting of the Library Committee, it was decided that the rather heavy student
population be relocated to lecture pavilions. It was hoped that at the end of the 2003/2004 session, there
would be full compliance so that there could be meaningful reduction in the population of non-users of the
Library.
The University’s Master Plan (1977) proposes that the University Library should be a major building
complex on campus and that, apart from its conventional function, would house an Audio-visual Centre,
viewing rooms, and University Press located at the basement of the building. The National Universities
Commission (NUC) Standards Guide to Universities (1978) and its twin document Procedural Guide for
the Unviersities (1978) existed in the same year, the University Librarian at the time, Chief N. O. Ita,
wrote his brief, and it is most probable he used those two cited documents. His professional expertise was
therefore greatly harnessed to write the brief in 1978 for the building. His brief to the Architect was
comprehensive. Chief Ita’s numerous suggestions and subsequent corrections of the architectural drawing
led to the final imposing structure. Chief Ita’s effort did not go unnoticed in the literature as an expatriate
staff of the Library, Kwasitsu (1987) published a comprehensive history of future development of the
University of Calabar Library. Indeed, in the International Library Review Journal (LIBRI) where
Kwasitsu’s article appeared, the University of Calabar Library is described as “a purpose-built Library
that heralded a new era of Library architecture not only in Nigeria but Africa as a whole.” It is highly
significant that the building occupies an important place in the history of the University of Calabar
Library, because the need for such a building had become imperative to cope with teaching and learning
activities as well as increased student population. Chief Ita’s brief for the building was based on the
philosophy of open-access librarianship.
The chosen architect for the building was Femi Popoola of Lagos. However, the actual construction
contract was awarded to Reynolds Construction Company (RCC). The building has an “H” shape
structure, is 5-floor high with each of the two wings measuring 120m by 17.525m. The two wings are
separated by a space of 30m and are linked in the middle by a central service court 20m wide. They are
also linked at each end of each floor by a covered walk way. The conveniences which were located on all
floors, worked for a while when students were not many. However, in the 1995/96 academic session, when
the population of students grew out of proportion with the facilities available, the conveniences were
misused and sometimes subjected to outright abuse. During the Petroleum Trust Fund (PTF)
rehabilitilation programme in the Library, the opportunity was seized to get rid of the old conveniences
108
within the Library and transfer them to a nearby location tucked out of sight outside the building with a
complement of supervisory staff for janitorial services. At the basement of the library, there are allocated
spaces for a Printing Press, Microfilming area, a large store, rare book collection, stack rooms, a small
museum, photo-copying service and a canteen which could accommodate up to eighty persons.
Facilities
As the University Library could not be completed at once, all the necessary facilities were not installed
before its occupation. For instance, the lift, standby electricity generator, audio-visual and bindery
equipment for the basement, air-conditioning and other electrical fittings were not installed and are still
awaiting activation.
The 23,000-square-metre floor space makes the University of Calabar Library one of the largest library
building in Africa. Its capacity to hold more than one million books actually doubles the standard set by
NUC for such buildings. It is expected that equipments would be made available to enhance proper
services.
The following problem area still require solutions:
a.
Air-conditioning: The building is centrally air-conditioned but this is yet to be switched on for
logistic reasons; hence the provision of about 70 ceiling fans, which, it was hoped, would
reasonably make air circulate inside. The Faculty of Law and its students association (LAWSAN)
have significantly contributed electric ceiling fans and some standing fans to further improve the
learning environment in the Law Library. The University Authorities have constantly ensured
proper lighting in the entire Library Building by replacing bad tubes at fairly regular intervals. The
number of existing fans in the Library is grossly inadequate, at only 30% of provision for them.
b.
Power Supply: The building certainly requires a stand-by generator of its own as there is irregular
supply of electricity from the Power Holding Company of Nigeria (PHCN) and the augmented
service from the University generating plant. The Audio-visual and Bindery equipment for the
basement was not installed and is still awaiting activation and more chairs and reading tables have
also been provided for students largely due to the Education Tax Fund Intervention Scheme.
c.
Automation: In the early part of the 1990s, the Library acquired a computer donated by NUC for
its Tin-Lib Software. For a long period, the one computer constituted what the Library had by way
of automation, having thus recorded bibliographic details of its acquisitions and converted this
from the usual card catalogue. The pace of development in Information Communication
Technology (ICT) has been poor. For instance, since 1985 the Library Complex has had no
telephone, fax or intercom facilities. This has made contact with staff and users difficult. Indeed,
there has been a lot of frustration for staff and users. However, with the advent of the ETF Library
Intervention Scheme, the Library has been able to acquire 12 more computers to enhance
information services.
In addition, the Library received a boost when in 2004 a distinguished alumnus of the University of
Calabar, Dr. A. B. C. Ojiako, donated an Information Technology Centre to the University Library. This
ensured that the Library was now connected to the Internet. Recently, the University of Calabar Library
was selected as one of the 3 regional pilot centres for e-learning, usually referred to as the Virtual Library
Project (VLP) by the National University Commission (NUC). With the Internet facility now in place, it is
possible for staff and students to access the well over 980 journal titles that have been digitalized for the
project. Efforts are continuing to ensure that NUC provides the necessary infrastructure for effective
implementation of the Scheme in the University of Calabar.
Staffing
The University of Calabar Library is undoubtedly one of the most well-staffed university libraries in
Nigeria. It has a total staff strength of 162, of which 21 are academic librarians (9 Ph.D holders, 4 on staff
development pursuing doctorate degrees and others with Masters degree). It was a worthy legacy of the
founding University Librarian that staff who were recruited were of the most qualitative status to serve the
academic community.
At the early stages of the functioning of the University Library, specifically in the 1970s and 1980s, it was
renowned for having a sizeable number of expatriate staff. But gradually, this dwindled and by 1996, no
109
expatriate staff existed again in the Library having been replaced by Nigerians who are properly qualified
to work in the University Library. The Library also had other complement of staff, such as those on
sabbatical placement from other university libraries and fresh graduates participating in the NYSC scheme,
as well as recently absorbed staff from the Okuku campus of the University of Calabar.
Significant progress has been recorded in staff motivation, such as the granting of staff development to
deserving staff; promotions on regular basis for academic and non-academic Library staff; establishment
of staff welfare shceme for Library staff; constitution of sports men and women who are athletes and
footballers for University staff games. In this respect, the University of Calabar Library won the NUSSA
games trophy as overall winner and since 1998 the Library is yet to be displaced as Champion of the Staff
Games. The trophy is still held in the Library since no other department has surpassed Library staff
performance.
Funding
The 1980s through 1993 were years of financial drought for Library acquisitions due to poor funding. The
downturn in the economy implied less money being voted for Library services and this in turn led to
dependence on donated materials. However, in view of the Federal Government/ASUU agreement (1993)
that 10% of each University’s subvention should be allocated to Library Development Fund (LDF), library
acquisitions improved tremendously. In the University of Calabar, the Library had been lucky to have
Vice-Chancellors who were always mindful of the critical importance of the Library in the academic
activities of the institution. Even though since 1998 funding had been inadequate, the Library had held its
ground with regular acquisitions of books and journals with the exception that only one copy of each book
could be afforded.
Generally, the outlook is good in that the books and journals the Library holds are up-to-date in the
2002/2003 range of publications and this position has helped considerably in the various accreditation
exercises that the University had between 1999-2003.
In order to augment inadequate funding, the Management of the University Library succeeded in attracting
donations from external agencies as follows:
 Gained World Bank Publications depository status. The Collection is current with 2000, 2001 and
2003 publications, although mainly in the Social Sciences;
 Education Tax Fund: The Library has successfully retired the 2001 grant and has executed the
2002 projects, a delay occasioned by the six-month industrial action in Nigerian Universities. The
2003 project proposal was geared towards library computerization;
 Book donations are being received from various sources including the Brothers Aid International
(BAI), The Rotary International, World Bank and Indigenous Nigerian Authors;
 The University Library is a participant in the UNESCO Federal Ministry of Education Virtual
Library Project.
Professional Challenges
In the past 25 years, a number of professional challenges have emerged:
a) The University Library has gained membership of an international consortium for information
resource sharing. This emanated from the Standing Conference of African University Librarians
West Africa (SCAULWA), held in Legon, Ghana, in November 2003. The idea was to share
information resources from learned journals and books not held by each institution. Other
members are Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, UNAAB, Abeokuta, and the University of Ilorin,
Ilorin;
b) To facilitate greater access to the collection during the accreditation exercises, the professional
staff of the Library have embarked upon listing of books and journals held in the various subject
libraries. For instance, the Law Library Holdings up to November 2003 have been bound as a
volume in order to facilitate access to the Law collections. In December 2003, the Medical Library
Holdings, including her specialties of Paediatric Nursing and Surgery, were also prepared as
bound volumes. The latent objective is to eventually produce Library holdings in most subject
areas that are usual targets for accreditation exercises.
Research and Development
110
In 1986, Librarians in the University of Calabar gained academic status at par with academic (Teaching)
colleagues. Assessment for promotion has been based mainly on academic publications, research and
professional practice. The emphasis on publications became pronounced as Librarians were actively
engaged in teaching Use of Library Skills, Bachelors and Masters degrees in Library Science. Librarians
had access to and were awarded Senate Research Grants, Staff Development/Study Fellowships. They
were also active in all Faculty Boards of the University gaining effectively from interaction with lecturers
in respect of their various information needs.
The University of Calabar Library staff have published widely in books and refereed journals as well as
attended numerous conferences in Nigeria and abroad. Particularly note-worthy in this regard have been
the publications of Mr. N. O. Ita, Profs. Olu Lawal, and. E. E. Nkereuwem, Dr. U. S. Edem, Dr. (Mrs.) J. I.
Iwe, Mr. U. U. Ekpe, Dr. Udofia I. Udofia, Dr. (Mrs) Mfon E. Etuk, Mr. Okon Edet Ani, Mrs. Aniebet I.
Ntui, Mr. Eric T. Ofre, Mr. B. A. Bassey, Mr. Emmanuel U. Atseye, Mr. Jacob E. Esin, and Mrs. Eucharia
U. Okwueze. Taken together, these represent significant academic contributions in the different areas of
Library Sciences and Library Management.
Conclusion
With hindsight, the past 25 years have truly been eventful years for the University of Calabar Library. The
alignment of Library acquisitions policy with changes in the curricula of the institution has greatly aided
research and provided an added impetus to the learning environment. The pronouncement of the Visitor to
the University at its 21st convocation in 2004 that the University Library building would be completed with
Federal Government grant is quite heart-warming and capable of placing the University in the highest rank
of academic excellence. The Internet connectivity and enhancement of the Library Information
Technology Centre would add greatly to more qualitifative research output.
The opening hours of the Library are as follows:
Opening Hours:
During Semester:
Monday – Saturday
Sunday
During Vacation:
Monday – Friday
Saturday
8.00am – 10.00pm
1.30pm – 6.00pm
8.00am – 6.00pm
8.00am – 1.00pm
THE UNIVERSITY BOOKSHOP
The University of Calabar Bookshop first existed as a part of the University of Nigeria, Nsukka, and later
as part of the University of Ibadan Bookshop. It was only in June 1980 that the University of Calabar
bookshop became autonomous with books worth over N70,000.00.
However, it was only in July 1980 that the Unical bookshop started to operate in earnest, as a selfaccounting service unit of the University.
The University bookshop was one of the four subsidiaries of a proposed holding company. The others
were University of Calabar Farm Limited, Unical Laundries Limited and the University Hotels Limited.
The bookshop sells text-books, professional books, stationery, t-shirts, handbags, etc. It serves the
university community, the general public, including educational institutions. The bookshop is open for
business from 7.30am to 4.30pm on Mondays to Fridays.
THE UNIVERSITY OF CALABAR FARM LIMITED
Initially conceived to be one of the subsidiaries of a holding company, the University of Calabar Farm
Limited was floated with N50,000.00 on March 21, 1983. The total assets of the farm, which in 1984
amounted to some N130,000.00 rose to N2 million after two years of operation. The assets include stocks,
buildings, equipment and machinery.
111
The farm produces day-old chicks for sale to farmers in the state and beyond. Sales at the first year of
operation amounted to N83,000.00 and increased to N465,000 during the second year of operation, that is,
as at June 30, 1986.
The farm at present has a hatchery unit producing 21,000 day-old chicks per month. The layer unit
produces 7,750 kilogrammes of broiler per month while the broiler unit produces 7,500 kilogrammes of
broiler meat per month. And the feedmill produces 450 tonnes of poultry feeds per month.
The University of Calabar Farm Limited is a deliberate effort by the university to go into a giant profitable
poultry venture, the success of which would mean a significant contribution to the protein needs, not only
of the university community, but of the general public.
THE UNIVERSITY HEALTH SERVICES DEPARTMENT
At the planning stage of the University of Calabar, the technocrats took cognizance of the inadequate
health facilities in Calabar in the mid seventies. A Health Services Department was therefore envisioned
as one of the service departments in the new university. The immediate objectives were to provide prompt
medical attention to sick students and staff and thereby, minimize malingering, loss of man hours if staff
were to go out for treatment and to save cost as treatment was to be free. Staff and students initially
patronized a private clinic in town while construction work in the medical centre was going on . Late in
1976, the centre opened for business. It was then an 8– bed facility which boasted an operating theatre, a
laboratory, a pharmacy, medical records, consulting rooms and ancillary administrative units. Qualified
personnel were recruited in the respective areas. An environmental sanitation unit was created in the
department to attend to the physical sanitation of the campus. The department has continued to render both
primary and secondary health care to the university community as envisaged while extending such services
to the host community as part of the university’s corporate social responsibility.
The core staff of the department are doctors, nurses, laboratory scientists, pharmacy personnel, medical
records staff and a compliment of auxiliary staff (drivers, administrative staff, etc). The staff disposition
is attached as ‘Annex I’. The medical center offers a 24 – hour service which includes out-patient
consultation on week days up to 4.00 pm each day. Thereafter, there is a doctor, pharmacist and laboratory
scientist on call. Very ill patients are admitted for closer attention while illnesses which are beyond the
level of care provided in the center are promptly referred to the University of Calabar Teaching Hospital
or similar institutions for the required specialized level of care. In its thirty years of existence, the center
has acquitted itself creditably. Judging by statistics, thousands of patients have been successfully treated.
These include staff, students, and others who are fee-paying patients. The Community health unit renders
maternal and child welfare as well as school health services. Immunization against yellow fever,
meningitis and Hepatitis B is offered whenever the vaccines are available. No doubt, mortalities have been
recorded in the center. At all events, every effort is put in to ensure that none dies who would have lived.
In order to step up awareness in the community, the department carries out enlightenment programmes
from time to time. In response to the high prevalence of hypertension and its sequel in the university
community, the department in 2004 embarked upon an office to office blood pressure check. Those with a
raised blood pressure were referred to the Medical Centre for treatment and follow up.
In addition to routine clinical duties, the centre runs a genetic counseling service on sickle cell disease.
This service is accessible to sickle cell patients and carriers and is of particular importance to partners in
courtship as the knowledge of their genotype would avert the harrowing experience of raising sicklers.
Another special service is voluntary counseling and testing for HIV/AIDS. The American government
through her agencies Family Health International (FHI) and Global HIV/AIDS Initiative in Nigeria
(GHAIN) has established a Voluntary Counseling and Testing (VCT) centre in the medical centre. Rebranded “Heart to Heart Center”, people are encouraged to voluntarily come forward and know their HIV
status. More and more clients are accessing the service in a friendly environment where confidentiality is
assured. As a measure of confidence of her personnel and laboratory the medical centre has been listed for
a World Health Organization sponsored clinical trial of a new anti-malarial drug, which would soon
commence. We are open to such collaboration as it exposes the staff, and opens new vistas for the centre.
112
DIRECTORATE
AUDIT UNIT
Establishment
This unit was set up in 1981 in the Vice Chancellor’s office to carry out internal audit functions for the
university.
Internal Auditing
This is the independent appraisal activity carried out by specially assigned staff of the organisation to
review the operations of the subsystems as a service to management. This function is performed by
measuring and evaluating the effectiveness of the other controls within the system. The controls operate in
the areas internal control and internal check.
Internal control is the whole system of control, financial and otherwise instituted by the management to
ensure that work is carried out in an orderly manner and that the books of accounts are well kept and that
the assets are safeguarded. Inetrnal check operates in such a way that the function of one person is
independently proved by the function of another or is complementary to the function of another.
Educational/Professional Qualification of Staff
To be appointed an Internal Auditor II (the starting point of the employment of the auditor) one must
possess either a B.Sc. (Hons) degree or an HND both in Accounting. One so appointed can further develop
oneself professionally as either a Chartered Accountant, ACA or a Certified Accountant, CAN.
In addition to this qualification, the internal auditor should possess “auditor-like” qualities, such as
firmness, ability to handle facts and figures and courage to withstand pressure of those who may hate
controls and transparency.
Special Projects Previously Undertaken
This unit initiated and produced the Unical staff list (for the first time) that contains the names of all staff
of the university. Now it is possible to know how many staff there are, where to find each of them, where
they come from and their academic qualifications from this publication. A similar publication has also
been made for the pensioners.
Staff Strength
Presently, the unit has 12 technical staff (trained in Accounting) ranging from the rank of Internal Auditor
II to the rank of Director of Audit. In addition, the unit has 10 support staff who are pool staff sent from
the Central Registry and who can be easily transferred from the unit to some other departments.
Functions of the Unit
The functions of the unit are performed in six sections and these are:
a) The Administration Section which is headed by the Director of Audit who coordinates the
activities of all the other sections of the unit.
b) The Prepayments Audit Section has the duty of processing claims and vouchers before they are
paid.
c) The Post Audit Section verifies and confirms claims and vouchers after they have
been
paid.
d) Assets Verification Section confirms the existence a nd continued existence of assets brought into
the university.
e) Systems/Salaries and Pension Audit Section appraises the effectiveness of the
university’s
subsystems. It also checks and confirms staff salary figures before they are paid.
f) Faculty and Computer Audit section audits students’ payment of school charges in order to
discover which student has not paid his/her fees.
Reporting
The Financial Rules and Regulations approved by the Governing Council require the Director of Audit to
report to the Vice-Chancellor and copies sent to the Pro-Chancellor, Registrar and Bursar. These Rules and
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Regulations also require that the Director of Audit shall have access to all books and records of the
University to enable him report appropriately.
To be able to report properly, input reports are received from the subordinate officers of the unit, example;
Deputy Director of Audit, Chief Internal Auditor, Principal Internal Auditors, Senior Internal Auditors,
Internal Auditors I and II.
GRADUATE SCHOOL.
Pursuant to the University of Calabar Decree of 1979, in which is enshrined the desire to “encourage and
promote scholarship and conduct research in all fields of learning and human endeavour, and to relate its
activities to the social, cultural, and economic needs of the people of Nigeria”, graduate education began
quite early at the University of Calabar. It became the pattern in all faculties that once an undergraduate
programme had taken roots, a graduate programme soon followed.
Graduate studies began in the 1978/79 session when the Board of Postgraduate Studies was set up to
organize graduate-level courses and research and admit students. The History department blazed the trail
that session by enrolling 7 students. Between 1979 and 1981/82, a total of 66 students had enrolled in
various graduate programmes in all the existing faculties, except law and agriculture. The first group of
graduands, totaling 8, took their Masters degree in November 1982 from the departments of Biochemistry,
Chemistry, and Geography and Regional Planning. Students’ enrolment in 1991/92 stood at about 1,000
distributed in all faculties and institutes and by 2001/2002 was at about 2000. The Catholic Institute of
West Africa in Port Harcourt became affiliated to the University of Calabar in 1988, under the directive of
the National Universities Commission, thereby awarding University of Calabar higher degrees in various
theological disciplines.
Graduate education at the University of Calabar aims primarily at fostering original, creative, and scholarly
research ability. This is through course work, and problem-focused research, which is designed to buttress
a sound knowledge and the application of fundamental principles towards an improved understanding and
development of the nation’s rich natural, social and cultural endowments. To date, a total of 3381 Masters
degrees and 338 Ph.D’s have been awarded to deserving students.
DEGREE AND DIPLOMA PROGRAMMES OFFERED
1. Faculty of Agriculture
 Agricultural Economics and Extension: PGD, M.Sc., M.Phil, Ph.D
 Animal Science: M.Sc., M.Phil, Ph.D
 Crop Science: PGD, M.Sc., M.Phil, Ph.D
 Soil Science: M.Sc., M.Phil, Ph.D
 Forestry and Wild Life Res. Mgt. PGD, M.Sc, Ph.D
2. Faculty of Arts
 English and Literary Studies: M.A., M.Phil, Ph.D
 History & International Studies: M.A., M.Phil, Ph.D
 Linguistics: M.A., M.Phil, Ph.D
 Religious Studies and Philosophy: M.A., M.Phil, Ph.D
 Theatre Arts: PGD, M.A., M.Phil, Ph.D
 Modern Languages and Translation Studies: MA, M.Phil, Ph.D
3. Faculty of Education
 Adult and Continuing Education: M.Ed., M.Phil, Ph.D
 Educational Administration and Planning: M.Ed., M.Phil, Ph.D
 Curriculum and Teaching: PGDEE, M.Ed., M.Phil, Ph.D
 Educational Foundations, Guidance and Counselling: PGDE, M.Ed., M.Phil, Ph.D
 Vocational and Special Education: M.Ed., M.Phil, Ph.D
 Human Kinetics and Health Education: M. Ed., Ph.D
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4. Faculty of Law: LL.M, M.Phil, Ph.D
5. Faculty of Management Science
 Accounting: M.Sc., M.Phil, Ph.D
 Banking and Finance: M.Sc and M.Phil, Ph.D
 Business Management: PGD, MBA, M.Phil, Ph.D
 Marketing: M.Sc., M.Phil, Ph.D.
6. Faculty of Science
 Botany: M.Sc., M.Phil, Ph.D
 Genetics/Biotechnology: M.Sc., M.Phil, Ph.D
 Geology: M.Sc., M.Phil, Ph.D, PGD in Applied Geology
 Mathematics/Statistics & Computer Science: PGD, M.Sc., M.Phil, Ph.D
 Microbiology: M.Sc., M.Phil, Ph.D, PGD
 Physics; M.Sc., M.Phil, Ph.D., PGD.
 Pure and Applied Chemistry: M.Sc., M.Phil, Ph.D, PGD in Applied Chemistry
 Zoology: M.Sc., M.Phil, Ph.D, PGDFAQ
7. Faculty of Social Sciences:
 Economics: PGD, M.Phil, M.Sc., Ph.D.
 Geography and Regional Planning: PGD, M.Sc., M.Phil, Ph.D.
 Political Science: PGDPA, MPAS, M.Sc., MPA, M.Phil, Ph.D.
 Sociology: M.Sc., M.Phil, Ph.D.
COLLEGE OF MEDICAL SCIENCES
8. Faculty of Allied Medical Science
 Anaesthesiology: PGD
 Chemical Pathology: PGD, M.Sc., M.Phil, Ph.D
 Environmenal Health Sciences: M.Sc., M.Phil, Ph.D
 Haematology:
 Medical Microbiology/Parasitology: PGD, M.Sc., M.Phil, Ph.D
9. Faculty of Basic Medical Sciences
 Anatomy: PGD, M.Sc., M.Phil, Ph.D
 Biochemistry: M.Sc., M.Phil, Ph.D, PGD
 Food Science and Nutrition: PGD, M.Sc., M.Phil, Ph.D
 Physiology: PGD, M.Sc., M.Phil, Ph.D
10. Catholic Institute of West Africa:
 M.A., M.TH., Ph.D.
Regulations Governing The Graduate School:
Article 1:
The Graduate School
(a) The academic unit responsible for the co-ordination and quality control of graduate studies at
the University of Calabar shall be known as The Graduate School.
(b) Graduate Studies shall include all academic and professional curricula which require student
achievement beyond the undergraduate level in any field, generally leading to a postgraduate
Diploma or Certificate, a Masters, or Doctorate degree (M.A., M.Ed., M.Sc., or Ph.D).
Article 2:
The Graduate School Board:
The Graduate School Board shall be the governing body of the Graduate School.
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(a)
Membership of The Graduate School Board shall consist of the following members:
(i)
Dean of the Graduate School – Chairman
(ii)
Deans of Faculties and the Provost of the College of Medical Sciences
(iii) Director of Academic Planning (ex officio member).
(iv) The Chairman of each Faculty Graduate Committee
(v)
Directors of Institutes/Divisions offering graduate programmes.
(vi) The University Librarian (ex officio member)
(vii) Academic Secretary of the Graduate School (Secretary)
(b)
Terms of Reference:
The Graduate School Board shall make recommendations to Senate on the following:
(i)
The establishment of graduate programmes, fields and subjects of studies.
(ii)
Regulation of priorities and co-ordination of graduate studies.
(iii)
Regulations relating to graduate Studies.
(iv)
The award of University Graduate Scholarships.
(v)
Fostering the development of co-operative and multi-disciplinary graduate work
between the different sections of the university.
(vi)
Admission of Graduate Faculty Members.
(vii)
Establishment of criteria for graduate supervisors in the university
(c)
The Functions:
The functions of the Graduate School Board shall be:i. To co-ordinate graduate programmes of the university including planning administration
and admissions to programmes of study.
ii. To recommend on the provision of appropriate facilities for Graduate work,
and to
regulate disbursement of funds allocated for graduate work.
iii. To regulate and enhance the quality of graduate instruction and research in the university.
This will include educational exchange and contact within
Nigeria and outside,
where necessary.
iv. To monitor and evaluate the progress of graduate work in all academic departments.
v. To prepare and submit estimates for the recurrent and capital requirements of the school
on an annual and quinquinnial basis.
vi. To encourage the publication of the outcomes of graduate studies in form of journals,
monographs and books.
vii. To publicise the graduate activities of the university extensively, with a view to attracting
enrolment and financial support from government, industrial and other bodies.
viii. To execute other functions as the Vice-Chancellor/ may from time to time direct.
ix. To submit a report to Senate once a year.
(d)
The Meeting of the Graduate School Board:
i. The Graduate School Board shall meet once a month as stipulated in the
University Calendar.
ii. The regular meeting of the Board shall be after at least seven days advanced
notice with published agenda which shall include the introduction of business
from the
floor.
iii. A special meeting of the Board may be called at short notice by the Dean but
the purpose of such a meeting shall be specified and such business shall be the business of
the day.
iv. A special meeting of the Board may be called on a written request to the
Dean by at least five members of the Board drawn from at least three
faculties, including the College of Medical Sciences, provided that the other
terms specified in Article 2(d) (iii) are met.
v. One third or the largest whole number less than 331/3% of the total
membership of the Graduate School Board shall constitute a quorum for the
transaction of business.
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Article 3:
The Graduate Faculty:
(a) Membership: Membership of the Graduate Faculty shall be open to the following categories
of
full-time academic staff.:
(i)
Professors and Readers at the University of Calabar.
(ii) Senior Lecturers with relevant teaching experience and academic distinction, as
ascertained from their published works.
(iii) Other academic staff who meet at least two of the following requirements:
 Doctorate degree or its equivalent
 Rank of Lecturer I or higher
 Significant publications/or experience in their fields of specialty
 Responsibilities of the Graduate Faculty: The responsibilities of the Graduate Faculty
shall include:
i) Teaching on a regular and continuing basis in the graduate programme of their
departments;
ii) Supervising theses and dissertations;
iii) Serving as advisors to graduate students;
iv) Serving on examination panels for graduate students;
v) Serving on the Joint Committee on Graduate Instruction
(JCGI)
in
crossdisciplinary programmes requiring joint faculty action.
Article 4:
Officers of the Graduate School:
The Officers of the Graduate School shall include the Dean, Deputy Dean and the Academic
Secretary.
(A) The Dean of the Graduate School:
(i) Tenure of Office:
(a) Without prejudice to the right of the Vice-Chancellor to appoint the first
Dean, the Office
of the Dean of the Graduate School be an elective one, open to all Professors in the
University except those on visiting status.
(b) The tenure of office for the Dean shall be two years in the first instance.
(c) A serving Dean may seek re-election but no Dean may serve more than two consecutive
terms.
(d) The Dean shall be elected by members of Senate from among the eligible Professors.
(ii) Duties:
(a) The Dean shall preside at meetings of the Graduate School.
(b) Supervise the day-to-day administration of the Graduate School
(B)
(i)
The Deputy Dean of the Graduate School:
Qualification and Tenure
(a) The rank of a Deputy Dean shall be the same as that of the Dean.
(ii) Duties
(a) In the absence of the Dean, the Deputy Dean shall oversee the day-to-day
Graduate School.
(b) He/She shall deputise for the Dean in his absence.
(c) He/She shall undertake any other activities assigned by the Dean.
(C)
running of the
The Academic Secretary of the Graduate School:
The Secretary shall hold at least the rank of Senior Assistant Registrar. He/She shall work under
the direction of the Dean.
Article 5:
Other Boards
Any Faculty organizing graduate programmes shall have constituted a Faculty Board and a
Departmental Board for graduate studies unless where the meeting for the Departmental Board has
been specifically varied by .
A).
Faculty Graduate Committee:
(a) Membership of the Faculty Graduate Committee shall include all the academic staff who meet
the qualifications specified in Article 3
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(b)
(c)
(d)
(e)
B.
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
(e)
(f)
(g)
C.
There shall be a Chairman, elected by the membership, and his tenure of
office shall be
two years.
The Chairman may be re-elected for a second term.
The Deans of Faculties or Provost of the College of Medical Sciences shall not serve as
Chairman.
The Dean’s Office or the office of the Provost as applicable, shall provide the Faculty Graduate
Committee a Secretary and other facilities required for
carrying out its responsibilities.
Duties of the Faculty Graduate Committee:
To co-ordinate graduate work in the faculty, including examinations.
To communicate the problems facing graduate studies at the faculty level to
the
Graduate
School.
To recommend candidates to Graduate School for admission.
To make recommendation of candidates for the award of grants and
fellowships and the
award of higher degrees and graduate diploma to the Graduate School or Board.
To recommend to the Graduate School Board students for extension of graduate
scholarships
and those who need to undertake part of their work in other institutions in Nigeria and abroad.
To recommend external examiners to the Graduate School Board.
To carry out any other functions assigned to it by the Graduate School Board
Departmental Graduate Committee:
(a) Membership and Governance:
i) The membership shall consist of all staff with responsibilities in the departmental graduate
programme
ii) There shall be a Chairman elected by the membership.
iii) The Office of the Head of Department shall provide the Departmental Graduate
Committee with secretarial services and other needed materials required for carrying out
its responsibilities.
(b) Duties of the Departmental Graduate Committee:
i) To co-ordinate graduate programmes in the department.
ii) To collaborate with other disciplines and sub-disciplines in the faculty in running interdisciplinary degree programmes.
iii) To review applications for graduate admission and make appropriate recommendation to
the Faculty Graduate Committee.
iv) To constitute internal examiners and the Supervisor(s) as required by the Graduate School
Regulations.
v) To recommend external examiners to the Faculty Graduate Committee.
vi) In addition to already existing roles, the Faculty Chairman shall communicate matters
emanating from Graduate School Board/ Vetting Committee to the Chairperson of the
Departmental Graduate Committee within one week.
REGULATIONS GOVERNING GRADUATE STUDIES
1.01
Section I:
General:
Each Graduate Faculty/College/Institute may, consistent with these regulations, make further
regulations for the detailed organization of graduate work and research within the
Faculty/College/Institute, subject to the approval of Senate.
Matters requiring the approval of Senate shall first be considered by the Departmental and Faculty
Graduate Committees and recommended to the Graduate School Board which may, if approved,
recommend to Senate.
1.02
Programme of Studies
A programme of studies shall be provided leading to the award of certificates, diplomas and postgraduate degrees as may be approved by Senate. The Masters degree may be denoted by the
letters: M.A.; M.Ed.; M.P.A.;MPAS; M.B.A.; M.P.H.; M.Sc.; LL.M., the Master of Philosophy
by M.Phil, and the doctorate degree by Ph.D.
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Section II:
APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION INTO GRADUATE PROGRAMMES.
GENERALREGULATIONS
Courses may be offered full-time or part-time. All programmes begin with coursework and end with a
project for Graduate Diploma or thesis for Masters and Ph.D degrees. For full-time studies in most
programmes, the postgraduate diploma lasts for one calendar year, the Masters degrees last for 2 years and
the Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D) programmes extend over a minimum of 3 years. Part-time programmes
take a much longer time. Candidates with Masters degree from recognized universities may credit the
relevant courses towards the Ph.D programme, provided the quality of the grade is acceptable to the
Graduate School. Candidates are required to have a minimum CGPA of 3.0 on a 5-point scale and 2.75 on
4-point scale for Masters programmes and 4.00 on a 5-point scale and 3.00 on a 4-point scale for Ph.D
programmes.
B. SPECIAL INFORMATION FOR MPhil/Ph.D CANDIDATES
The MPhil/Ph.D option is available for all programmes. Candidates may be admitted into the MPhil/PhD
programme in exceptional circumstances where the CGPA in the Masters degree is lower than the
minimum required B (60%) average or 4.00 on a 5-point scale. The MPhil/Ph.D option will also be
available to candidates interested in pursuing PhD programmes in fields different from but relevant to that
in which they obtained their Masters degree. A terminal MPhil degree will be awarded if the candidate
fails to make the minimum required to transit to the Ph.D programme.
C. MODE OF APPLICATION
Interested candidates are to first log on to our website http://www.unicalonline.edu.ng to access the
prospectus for the complete description of available courses.
Thereafter, candidates are required to pay a non-refundable fee of N10,000 application form (subject to
review) by E-tranzact at any bank as will be provided by the Graduate School. A printout will be issued at
the bank with a Confirmation Order number. Candidates would then enter their Confirmation Order
number and their email or mobile phone numbers on the website to access the form. Follow the steps by
providing your data as prompted and ensure that your form is submitted. YOU ARE TO PRINT OUT A
COPY OF YOUR FORM BY CLICKING ON PRINT button after submission. Please bring a copy of the
printed form and photocopies of your credentials to the screening.
The current designated banks include: Enterprise Bank (former Spring Bank), First Bank Plc, UBA Plc,
Sterling Bank Plc, Syke Bank, Zenith Bank, First City Monument Bank, Ecobank Plc. These may however
change with time on the directives of the Graduate school Board. Candidates are required to contact the
Graduate school for updates.
D. CONCEPTNOTE
As part of the admission requirements, candidates for Masters, MPhil/Ph.D and Ph.D degrees are expected
to submit a CONCEPT NOTE outlining the candidate’s research proposal or statement of research interest.
The concept note which provides a synopsis of the candidate’s research intent must not be longer than one
and a half pages for Masters and three pages for Doctoral candidates. Candidates for all PGD programmes
as well as MBA, MPAS and MPA degrees are excluded from submission of concept note.The concept
note will be useful in determining candidate’s preparedness and suitability for the programme as well as
identifying supervisors for the prospective candidates.
E. TRANSCRIPTS
Candidates are to ensure that their academic transcripts are forwarded by their previous institutions to the
Secretary, Graduate School, University of Calabar, P.M.B. 1115, Calabar, Cross River State, on or before
deadline as may be announced by the Graduate school Board.
119
F. ADMISSION SCREENING EXERCISE
All candidates shall be required to take part in the Admission screening exercise which will be announced
by the Graduate School as follows: Part A – Written (Use of English Language and General Knowledge);
Part B – Oral interview in the respective Departments (based on subject area).
The Graduate School in collaboration with Departmental Graduate Committee shall screen and
recommend candidates for admission
The candidates’ forms accompanied by validated transcripts shall be sent to the Head of Departments into
which the candidate seeks admission for processing and recommendation using Graduate School
predetermined criteria for eligibility.
The Head of Department in consultation with the Departmental Graduate Committee shall determine the
eligibility of candidates based on laid down Graduate School criteria.
3.01
Section III:
Provisional Admission of Graduate Students
The following will be qualified to seek admission as graduate students:
(a) Those who hold a first degree with first or second class honours of the University of Calabar,
with CGPA not lower than 3.00/5.00 or 2.75/4.00 for Masters Degree and 4.00/5.00 or
3.00/4.00 for Doctorate degree.
(b) Those who hold an equivalent degree from another university or any other equivalent
qualifications, provided that in any case where there is doubt about equivalence,
the
Graduate School may seek the guidance of the Registrar of the University.
(c) Those who hold any other qualification which, together with relevant experience, is deemed
by Senate to be equivalent to(a) or (b) above.
3.02
Candidates with degrees from non-English speaking universities who seek registration as graduate
students at the University of Calabar shall either fulfill the general university requirements in
English Language or produce a certificate from a recognized University certifying that the
candidate’s knowledge of English, if necessary, is satisfactory.
4.01
Registration
The provisional admission offered to a student may be confirmed when he produces evidence of
the following documents required for registration:
 Original evidence of qualification
 Academic transcript from previous institution(s)
 NYSC discharge certificate (where applicable)
 Evidence of sponsorship for institutionally sponsored candidates.
 Written permission of employers for part-time studies.
4.02
Registration Status:
Registration may be part-time or full-time
(a)
Part-time Registration:
Students on part-time studies shall not normally register for more than 3 (three) course
units or less than 2 (two) course units per semester.
(b)
Full-time Registration:
Students on full-time studies shall not normally register for more than 5 (five) course units
or less than 4 (four) course units per semester, Full-time workers must not register
for full-time studies.
(d)
Change of Registration Status:
A student may change his registration status from full-time to part-time or from part-time
to full-time by obtaining the permission of his/her Head of
Department
and
completing the required forms for change of registration status
within
the
normal
registration period.
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4.03
Late Registration:
a. Students shall register within a prescribed period.
b. Students are allowed two weeks beyond the prescribed period for late registration on payment
of late fee of N15,000.00.
c. A student who fails to complete registration requirements prescribed in (b) shall be required
to apply to Senate for permission to register. He shall in
addition pay a late registration
fee of (N15,000.00).
4.04
Withdrawal of Registration:
a. A fully registered student may withdraw his/her registration, without any
penalty, within
the first three weeks of the Semester.
b. A student who withdraws his/her registration after three weeks of the beginning of the
semester shall lose 50% of his/her tuition fee for the semester.
c. A student who withdraws his/her registration after 6 weeks of the beginning of the semester
shall lose his/her tuition fee for the semester.
d. The provisions of (a) and (c) above do not affect the non-refundable deposit required of all
candidates applying for admission into the University of
Calabar.
4.05
Full Registrations status:
(a)
Registered graduate students shall pay such fees as shall be prescribed from
time to time.
(b)
At the end of the semester of provisional registration, a registered graduate
will be deemed to have achieved a full registration status.
(c)
All graduate students are required to renew their registration each semester in
Graduate School until they finally graduate.
student
the
5.0
Section V:
Masters Degree Regulations
5.01
Eligibility and Procedures:
Course of advanced studies and/or research which may be full-time or part-time, leading to the
Masters degree may be organized by Faculty Graduate Committees.
The following will be eligible to take courses and/or undertake research as candidates for the
Masters degree under the appropriate Faculty/ :
(a) First degree: first or second class honours degree;
(b) Candidates for the Masters programme must present and defend a concept note to the
Department
(c) They must write and pass a qualifying examination and must attend an interview.
(d) The candidates must have achieved CGPA not lower that 3.0 on a 5 point scale; 2.75 on 4
point scale on their Bachelors programme.
(e) A holder of Postgraduate diploma in relevant field may be admitted into a Masters
programme.
(f) Holders of HND with a minimum of upper credit or an equivalent professional qualification
may be admitted to a Masters degree programme provided the candidate has a Post Graduate
Diploma relevant to the degree in view, with at least one (1) reference letter from a former
Head of Department or a lecturer of the senior cadre
5.02
a)
The Academic Secretary of the Graduate School shall submit each application to the Head of
the relevant Department who shall, after consultation with the Departmental Graduate
Committee, make recommendation to the appropriate Faculty/College Committee concerning
the admissibility of each candidate and shall advise the Faculty Graduate Committees as to
whether the applicant’s suggested field of study or research is such that the department is in a
position to provide facilities and continuous supervision.
121
(b)
c)
d)
e)
The department shall recommend the appointment of one supervisor for each student.
However, in exceptional cases arising from the multi-disciplinary nature of the subject, or
for some other reason, two supervisors may be
appointed.
Sufficient reason must also be given for the recommendation or otherwise of each of the
candidates.
A candidate for the Masters degree shall pay, apart from the registration fee, such additional
fees as may be determined from time to time by Senate through the Graduate School Board.
Graduate students who reside in the University shall be charged for accommodation at a rate
to be determined from time to time.
5.03
Programme Duration
5.04
Full-Time students:
After registration, every full-time candidate for the Masters degree shall pursue his studies and/or
research for not less than three semesters, and not more than five semesters to complete the degree
programme; provided that Senate may in exceptional circumstances, on the recommendation of a
Faculty Graduate Committee duly endorsed by the Committee of Supervisor(s), extend a student’s
course by not more than one semester.
5.07
Part-Time Students:
(a) After registration, every part-time candidate for the Masters degree shall pursue his studies
and/or research for not less than four semesters and not more than six semesters to complete
the degree programme; provided that Senate may, on the recommendation of the Faculty
Graduate Committee duly endorsed by the Committee of Supervisor(s), extend the maximum
period by not more than two semesters.
(b) For the purpose of this Regulation, a member of the staff of the University of Calabar, other
than a Graduate Assistant, who wishes to read for a Masters degree shall be regarded as a
part-time candidate, unless he/she is on leave for research.
(c) A part-time candidate for the Masters degree shall satisfy his Department that he/she can
meet the following additional conditions:
i. Where the study will be undertaken at least partly during normal working hours, or
where laboratory or other facilities will be used, or
where the study forms part of
his/her normal duties, the applicant shall present his employer’s written permission to
undertake that course.
ii. Ready access to satisfactory library facilities should be available to
the
applicant;
and
iii. Arrangements shall be made for regular consultation which shall normally take place at
least every semester.
Course Load:
Candidates for the Masters degree programme shall normally be required to register for and pass a
minimum of 30 (inclusive of 6 credits for thesis) and maximum of 36 credit hours (inclusive of 6
credits for thesis).
5.08
5.09
Termination of Studentship
(a) Senate shall, upon the request of the Graduate School Board, authorize the Secretary of the
Graduate School to remove a student’s name from the
Graduate School Register if
he/she fails to satisfy the Graduate School that he/she is making satisfactory progress.
(b) A student’s name may also be removed from the register for non-payment of
fees, or
for failure to observe regulation in force.
(c) A student’s name once removed from the register may be restored only with the consent of
Senate.
5.10
Graduate Examination
(a) A candidate for the Masters degree shall be examined by written, oral
and/or practical
examination.
(b) Each Faculty Graduate Committee shall make recommendations to Senate through the
Graduate School concerning the appointment of examiners provided that each candidate
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shall be examined by not less than three examiners, one of whom shall be a person of high
academic and/or professional standing from outside the university.
6.0
6.01
Section VI:
Doctorate Degree Regulations
Courses of study and research, which may be full-time or
part-time,
Doctorate Degree may be organized by Faculty Graduate Committees.
6.02
The following will be eligible to seek registration as candidates for the Doctorate Degree:
(a)
Candidates with a first degree; First or second class honours and a Masters degree in the
relevant area of proposed study.
(b)
An overall GPA of 4.0 on a 5-point grading system and 3.0 on a 4-point grading system
or better and adjudged to have demonstrated good research ability in their
dissertation/thesis as determined by the external examiners’ report on the performance of
candidate in the oral defence and content of thesis. Candidate must have recorded at least a
B grade (60%) or “Very Good” in the assessment of the external examiner.
leading
to
the
(c)
Candidates for Ph.D admission must present a written statement of research interest on the
proposed area of research and pass an interview to be conducted by the Departmental/
Faculty Graduate Committee. The interview will largely be drawn from the concept notes
presented by the candidates in the process of application. An interview may be conducted
by telephone or by teleconferencing if candidates are not within the country.
(d)
Doctoral candidates who did not take part in the qualifying examination required for
admission at the Masters degree level will be required to undertake this examination to
determine their suitability for doctoral admission.
The qualifying exam will comprise the use of English Language, subject matter
proficiency in area of specialization and basic ICT competence.
Candidates may be admitted into the MPhil/ PhD programme in exceptional circumstances
where the CGPA in the Masters degree is lower than the minimum required B (60%)
average or 4.00 points.
The MPhil/Ph.D option will also be available to candidates interested in pursuing PhD
programmes in fields different from but relevant to that in which they obtained their
Masters degree.
The eligible field of study appropriate for admission into the MPhil/PhD programme will
be as determined by the Departmental Graduate Committee.
The Graduate School shall be officially notified of programmes deemed eligible by
Departments for admission into their respective MPhil/PhD programmes.
A 60% (B grade) average shall be the minimum required to transit from MPhil to PhD.
An MPhil degree will be awarded if the candidate fails to make the minimum required.
(e)
(f)
(g)
(h)
(i)
(j)
(k)
(l)
Two reference letters - one of which must be from a former Head of Department and/or
Supervisor.
6.03
Candidates who obtained their last qualifying degree more than seven years before
the date
of application may not be considered for admission without the express permission of Senate.
6.04
All applications for registration shall be made to the Secretary of the Graduate School and
accompanied by the appropriate registration fee.
6.5 (a) The Secretary of the Graduate School shall submit each application to the relevant Head of
Department who shall make recommendations to the appropriate Faculty Graduate Committee
concerning the admissibility of each applicant and shall advise the Faculty Graduate Committee
as to whether an applicant’s suggested field of study or research is such that the department is in
a position to provide facilities and continuous supervision. The department shall recommend the
appointment of supervisor(s) for each student admitted.
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(b) When the approvals of the Graduate School and Senate have been obtained,
the applicant’s
name and field of study shall be added to the register of students for the doctorate degree.
(c) Neither the Faculty Graduate Committee nor the Graduate School, nor the Senate shall be
obliged to give reasons for accepting or rejecting an application for admission.
(d) A registered candidate for the doctorate degree shall pay, apart from his registration fee, such fee
or fees as may be prescribed from time to time by Senate through the Graduate School Board.
Where a candidate for the doctorate degree has transferred from the status of a candidate for the
degree of Masters his date of registration may be backdated to the date he registered as a
candidate for the Masters degree, provided he pays for that period, any difference in fees and
establishment charges between those payable by candidates for the Masters degree and those
payable by candidates for the doctorate degree.
6.06
Credit for Work Done at Masters Level:
Candidates who earned the degree of Masters from the University of Calabar, may on the
recommendation of their Faculty Graduate Committee, validated by the transcripts of their Masters
course work, obtain credit waiver of up to 24 credit hours, provided that they remain in the same
specialised field of study and score a grade of (B) or better.
6.07
Candidates who earned the degree of Master from other universities, may on the basis of the
recommendation from their Faculty Graduate Committee, validated by the transcripts of their
Masters course work, obtain credit waiver of up to 18 credit hours, provided they remain in the
same specialised field of study and score a grade of 3.0 or better in each course for which credit is
granted. All students in this category asking for waivers should accompany the application with a
handbook from their universities.
6.08
Candidates who hold the degree of Masters from other universities but whose transcripts either do
not show the quality of grades acceptable to the University of Calabar or their university policy
does not permit the release of performance in each course unit, shall not qualify for credit. It is the
responsibility of candidates who seek credit for Masters work done in this or other universities to
apply for such credit during the first semester of registration. No such application may be
entertained after the first year of registration at the University of Calabar.
6.09
Full-Time Students: After registration, every full-time candidate for the doctorate degree shall
pursue his studies and research for not less than six semesters, and not more than ten semesters to
complete the degree programme; provided that Senate may on the recommendation of a Faculty
Graduate Committee duly endorsed by the Supervisor(s), extend a student’s course by not more
than four semesters, provided:
(a) That a candidate already holding an approved higher degree may present his thesis for
examination before the completion of four semesters;
(b) (that where a candidate for the doctorate degree transferred from the status of
a
candidate for the Masters degree, any period of registration for the Masters degree shall
count toward his period of registration for the doctorate degree;
6.10
Part-time Students
After registration, every part-time student for the Doctorate degree shall pursue his studies and
research for not less than 10 semesters and not more than 14 semesters to complete the degree
programme; provided:
(a)
That a candidate already holding an approved higher degree may not present
his
thesis for examination before the completion of four semesters.
(b)
That where a candidate for the Doctorate degree transferred from the status of
a candidate for the Masters degree, any period of registration for the Masters degree shall
count toward his period of registration for the Doctorate degree. Members of staff of the
University of Calabar who wish to read for the Doctorate degree shall be regarded as parttime students for the purpose of these regulations.
124
6.11
Course Load
(a) Candidates for the Doctorate degree are normally required to take and attain the required
level of performance in the prescribed course(s) for which they
received credits, if any.
(b) Candidates possessing the Masters degree may
be granted credit for not more than 24
credits of course work.
(c) Applicants for registration for part-time study leading to the Doctorate
degree,
shall
comply with the conditions laid down for part-time study for the Masters degree.
(d) Unless a Faculty Graduate Committee permits otherwise, candidates shall reside and study
for at least four semesters in the university, provided that in no case may permission be given
for less than
three semesters of residence.
(e) A committee of not less than two (2) supervisors shall be appointed by the department
through the Faculty Graduate Committee to guide and direct the study of each student
registered for the Doctorate degree. One of these shall be Chief Supervisor.
(f) The Faculty Graduate Committee shall, on the recommendation of the candidate’s
supervisors prescribe a course of study and research which may include course work. The
student’s subject area for thesis shall be approved by the Graduate School Board.
6.12
(a) Senate shall, upon the request of the Graduate School Board, authorise the Secretary of the
Graduate School, to remove a student’s name from the Graduate Register if the student fails
to satisfy the Graduate School Board that he/she is making satisfactory progress.
(b) A student’s name may also be removed from the register for non-payment of fees, or for
failure to observe regulations in force.
(c) A student’s name once removed from the register may be restored only with the consent of
Senate.
6.13
Doctoral Candidacy: Candidates registered for the doctoral programme may be admitted to the
status of candidacy after satisfactorily meeting the following
requirements:
(a) Completing the prescribed course units for 36 credit hours, including credits
earned
through the degree of Masters.
(b) Passing the comprehensive examinations.
(c) A candidate for the Doctorate degree shall be examined by a thesis, and by a written or
practical examination provided always that an oral examination both on the material of the
thesis and general knowledge of the field in which the subject for research has been chosen,
shall form part of the overall examination. Each Faculty Graduate Committee shall
recommend the length and manner of examination which must be approved by Senate on the
recommendation of the Graduate School.
7.0
Section VII: Diploma Programme Regulations
Course of study and/or research which may be Full-Time or Part-Time leading to the award of
Diploma may be organized by Faculty/College/Institute. The following are the general
requirements:
7.01
(i)
Candidates for admission into the Postgraduate diploma programmes must write and pass
a qualifying examination.
(ii)
The third class degree shall be the minimum requirement for admission into any Post
Graduate Diploma in the University.
(iii)
Lower credit shall be the minimum required for admission into Postgraduate Diploma
programmes for candidates with HND qualification.
(iv)
The Departmental Graduate Committee will determine programmes (Bachelors degree,
HND and Professional Certificates) considered eligible for admission into their respective
postgraduate diploma programmes. The list of eligible programmes must be submitted to
the Graduate School and updated whenever necessary.
Post Graduate Diploma in Education:
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The following will be eligible to register as candidates for the Postgraduate Diploma in Education
(PGDE):
Registered graduate students who:
(a) Possess degree awarded by the University of Calabar, or
(b) Possess an equivalent degree from other recognised universities, and
(c) Present evidence of specialization in secondary school teaching subject in the arts, sciences,
or social sciences.
Residency Requirements: Graduate students who reside in the university halls shall be charged for
accommodation at a rate to be determined from time to time by the university.
Graduate Diploma in Management (GDM):
The following will be eligible to register as candidates for the GDM:
(a)
Candidates with university degree who have at least 3 years Post-graduate
industrial/administrative experience and have been recommended/sponsored
by their
employers;
(b)
Applicants who hold HND or equivalent professional qualification and have at least 5
years administrative/managerial experience and have the recommendation/sponsorship of
their employers/sponsors.
7.04
Post-graduate Diploma in Public Administration:
The following will be eligible to register as candidates for the Post-graduate Diploma in Public
Administration (PGDPA).
(a) Holders of approved university degree or equivalent, and
(b) Candidates who, though not possessing university degree, have served at
least 5 years in
an executive position in the public or private sector. Such candidates should be sponsored
by their employers.
7.05
Post-Graduate Diploma in Applied Microbiology (PGDAM)
The following will be eligible to register as candidates for the PGDAM:
(a) Holders of B.Sc. (Hons) degree with at least a second class lower in Biology,
Botany,
Biochemistry or Zoology; and
(b) Candidates with Higher National Diploma (HND) with at least an upper
credit pass.
7.06
Post-Graduate Diploma in Applied Chemistry (PGDAC)
The following will be eligible to register as candidates for the PGDAC:
(a) Holders of B.Sc. (Hons) degree with at least a
second class lower division in Chemistry,
Biochemistry and Chemical Engineering, or
(b) Holders of HND in Chemical Technology with
at least an upper credit pass.
7.07
Post-Graduate Diploma in Physics (PGDP)
Holders of the following qualifications will be eligible to register as candidates for the PGDP:
(a) A minimum of credit at HND final examination or its equivalent
(b) Third class or pass degree in Physics
(c) At least second class lower degree in Educational Physics.
7.08
Post-Graduate Diploma in Aquaculture (PGDA)
The following will be eligible to register as candidates for the PGDA:
(a) Holders of a first degree in Zoology, Biology, Fisheries or Aquaculture;
(b) Holders of HND upper credit at least in Fisheries and Aquaculture with two
post-qualification experience.
REGULATIONS GOVERNING GRADUATE EXAMINATIONS
Section I:
Definitions
In these regulations the following terms shall have the meaning assigned to them below:
126
years
Course Unit: An aggregate of teaching, evaluation and examination offered by a particular department
under a published title. Each course unit shall normally be assigned 3 credit hours.
Course Work: Items in addition to the end of semester or resit examination(s) that are taken into account
when assessing candidate’s performance in a course unit.
Subject: An academic discipline studied in one department. A subject may include more than course unit
and a subject mark is the average of the course unit marks.
Year of Studies: The combination of course units taken by a student in a particular session.
Course: A series of course units leading to a recognised qualification.
Core Course Unit: A course unit which is designated by the appropriate departments as the basic
requirement for a particular degree.
Credit Hours: A credit hour is defined as a series of at least ten one-hour lectures, tutorials or a series of
at least ten three-hour laboratory practical classes, or an equivalent amount of other assigned study or
practical experience, or any combination of these.
A Resit Examination: An examination which the student is required to take having previously been
adjudged to have failed it.
Supplementary Examination: An examination given to a student who has been excused by Senate, on
grounds acceptable to it, from the normally scheduled one.
Board of Examiners: All members of a department of faculty, holding academic appointment in the rank
of Graduate Faculty.
Section II: Organisation and Conduct of Semester Examinations
2.01
Organisation of Examination
It shall be the responsibility of the Graduate Faculty to organize and produce examinations for course units
taught by the departments in the Faculty/College/Institute, in accordance with these regulations and other
directive laid down from time to time by Senate.
The Academic supervision of examinations shall rest with the Head of Departments, Chief Examiner, in
consultation with members of staff teaching a particular course unit during the session.
2.02
Conduct of Examinations
(a)
In order to be admitted to an examination a student must have been registered for the course and
for each and every course unit. He must have satisfied any University and Faculty requirement(s)
regarding attendance, the performance of all assignments connected with the subject taught, and the
payment of fees.
(b)
All courses shall be examined at the termination of the course unit and candidates
will
be
credited with the number of credit hours assigned to the course unit for which they have passed the
examination.
(c)
Each student shall obtain from the Graduate School an examination card which shall show
only his/her registration number and/or any other
identification approved by Senate
(d)
All examinations including Seminar papers shall be moderated by external examiners duly
appointed by Senate.
(e)
It shall be the responsibility of each student to ensure that he is registered for
the
appropriate examinations, to ascertain the dates, times and places of the examinations for
which he/she is registered.
(f)
A student shall be in the examination room at least 30 minutes before the scheduled time
for the examination. A student is required to supply his/her own pens, pencils, rulers, and
such other items as may be specified in the
Examination instructions.
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(g)
The student shall be admitted up to 30 minutes after the start of the examination but he/she
shall not be allowed extra time. If a student arrives later than 30 minutes after the start of
the examination, an invigilator may by his discretion admit him if he is satisfied that the
student had good reason for his lateness. The invigilator shall present a written report of
the circumstances to the department’s Examinations Officer who shall inform the
Departmental Graduate Committee of Examiners which shall decide whether to accept the
student’s paper or not.
(h)
The student must produce the registration and identity cards on entry to every examination
and leave them prominently displayed on the desk for the
inspection
of
the
invigilator throughout the examination. It shall be the duty
of the invigilator to enter
in the register, an accurate record of the registration number, (not the name) of every
candidate attending the examination.
(i)
A student may be permitted by the invigilator to leave the examination room
during the course of an examination provided that:
i. No student shall be allowed to leave the examination room during the
first
hour of the examination except in cases of emergency. In the
event
of
a
candidate taking ill the invigilator must complete the appropriate form and send
the sick candidate along with an
examination attendant to the Medical
Centre. The student must hand his script to the invigilator before leaving.
ii. A student who leaves the examination room shall not be readmitted unless
throughout the period of his/her absence he/she has been continually under the
supervision of an invigilator or person duly appointed as an invigilator.
(j)
No student shall communicate with any other student or with other person(s),
except with the invigilator when essential. In addition, no student shall make
any noise or cause any disturbance during an examination.
(k)
No book, paper, printed or written document, or other aid may be taken into an
examination rook by any student, except as may be stated in the rubric of any examination
paper. Any candidate found in possession of such items shall be reported in writing to the
Departmental Board which shall determine whether or not to accept the student’s script or
make any other recommendations to the Faculty Board of Examiners.
(l)
Each student is required to deposit, at his own risk, any handbag, briefcase or
similar article at a location provided for the purpose before the start of an
examination.
(m)
No student shall directly or indirectly, give assistance to any other student, or permit any
other student to copy from his/her papers. Similarly a student must not directly or
indirectly accept assistance from any student or anyother unauthorized person.
(n)
If any student is found to infringe on, or is suspected of infringing on (j) and/or (k) above,
or in anyway cheats or disturbs the conduct of examination, the invigilator shall warn the
student forthwith. The student concerned shall, however, be allowed to continue with the
examination provided he causes no disturbance. The invigilator shall submit a written
report to the Departmental Chief Examiner who will cause the circumstances to be
investigated and will report to the Departmental Board of Examiners which may
subsequently recommend to the Faculty Board of Examiners what action should be taken
in the case.
(o)
Each student shall write his registration number, not his name, distinctly at the appropriate
place on the cover of every answer booklet or separate sheet
attached to the answer
booklet.
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(p)
Except for the printed question paper, a student shall not remove from the
examination room, or mutilate, any paper or other material supplied.
(q)
At the end of the time allotted, the invigilator shall instruct all students to stop writing, and
they must comply.
(r)
The invigilator shall put the answer sheets serially in sealed envelopes. Each
envelope must be signed by each invigilator. The Chief Invigilator shall return the sealed
envelopes to the Chief Examiner and obtain a receipt for same. It shall be the
responsibility of the Chief Examiner in each department to collect and sign for the
examination scripts.
2.03
Consideration and Communication of Examination Results
(a) Marks/grades for all course units shall be considered in the first instance by the
Departmental Graduate Committee under the Chairmanship of the Chief Examiner.The
recommendations of the Departmental Graduate Examination Committee shall be
considered at a duly convened meeting of the Faculty Graduate Examination Committee
which shall make its recommendations to the Graduate School Board.
(b) The Chairman, Faculty Graduate Committee shall submit examination results
on
approved format, considered appropriate for each examination.
(c) No student shall be informed of the result of any examination by any
individual until it
has been approved by Senate.
(d) Official transcript of results shall be signed by the Dean of Graduate School and
countersigned by the Secretary of the Graduate School. Transcripts may only be issued to
institutions of higher learning and to institutional sponsors under confidential cover.
2.04
Absence from Examinations
(a) No student shall be excused from taking the whole or any part of any examinations except
on the strength of a medical certificate supplied, or recognised by the Director of University
Medical Services that he is unfit to take the examination. In such cases, the facts, supported
by the evidence, shall be submitted to the Graduate School Board by the faculty which board
shall make recommendations to Senate for appropriate action.
(b)
An application by a student, or if he is incapacitated, by a person acting on his behalf, for
exemption from any examination on medical grounds shall be submitted to the Graduate
School through the Head of Department as soon as possible and normally not later than
seven days after the date of the examination providing full relevant evidence. The Graduate
School Board shall, thereupon consider all the evidence submitted to it including oral
evidence, where appropriate, and make recommendations to. The decision of on such
recommendations shall be final.
2.05
Examiners and marking Scripts
The setting, and marking of examination papers shall be the duty of the Chief Examiner, the
internal examiners, as well as the external examiners.
2.06
Appointment and Duties of Internal Examiners
(a) Appointment of Internal Examiners:
The Internal Examiners shall have the qualification of Graduate Faculty. The Chief
Examiner shall be the Head of Department.
(b) Duties of Internal Examiners
(i) They shall participate in the setting and moderation of examination questions and in
the invigilation and grading of all examinations.
(ii) Internal examiners, along with external examiners, shall consider and approve
examination results for submission through the Graduate School Board to Senate.
(iii) There shall be no fewer than two internal examiners for each course unit.
2.07
Appointment and Duties of External Examiners
129
(a)
Appointment: External Examiners shall be nominated by departments and their names,
qualifications, addresses, along with their rank and area of specialization, sent for approval
by Senate through the Graduate School Board. The External Examiner is normally a senior
academic member of an outside university or equivalent institution, and the appointment is
normally for a maximum period of three (3) consecutive years on a yearly basis.
External examiners may be appointed for dissertation/project examination only.
(b)
2.08
Duties of External Examiners:
(i) To moderate all examination question papers. They shall satisfy
themselves as to
the appropriateness of the examination questions as having regard to the approved
syllabus for the course and the level of examination.
(ii) To mark, or to revise the marking of the scripts, and projects, or such portions of the
scripts of candidates.
(iii) To participate in practical and oral examination, where such examinations are given,
after consultation with the relevant Internal Examiners in the subject.
(iv) To attend Departmental Board of Examiners and participate in the determination of
results.
(v) To submit a written report on each candidate’s project/thesis on a format approved by
Senate.
(vi) To submit to the Vice-Chancellor a written report on each course work examination
moderated by them.
(vii) In case of any disagreement between an internal examiner and an external examiner
over marks or other related matter, the views of the external examiners shall prevail.
Appeals
(a)
A student may appeal through his/her Head of Department to the Dean of the Graduate
School for a reassessment of his/her Examination script on payment
of a fee of
N1000.00 per course unit.
(b)
If the appeal results in a significant improvement (i.e. a change in letter grade) on the
student’s original grade, the appeal fee shall be refunded to the appellant.
(c)
No person can appeal for the reassessment of the scripts of some other student.
(d)
A group appeal by all candidates involved in a particular course examination
shall not
be entertained.
(e)
For an appeal to be valid, notice in writing of such an appeal must be lodged
with the
Graduate School within four weeks of the publication of the relevant
result.
Section III:
3.01
Grading System for all Examinations
Grading System for Higher Degrees
Examination grades shall be reported with the following designations:
(i)
Score
70 – 100
60 – 69
50– 59
45 – 49
40 – 44
Below 40
No marks assigned
letter grade
A
B
C
D
E
F
I
Point
Verbal equivalent
5.00
4.00
3.00
2.00
1.00
0.00
Nil
Excellent
Very Good
Good
Pass
Fail
Bad fail
Incomplete
(ii)
The minimum pass grade for each course unit in the Graduate Progamme shall be “C”.
(iii)
Failure to satisfy all the requirements for a course unit and remove all
incomplete
grades by the end of the fourth week of the succeeding semester will earn a candidate an
F grade.
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(iv)
A candidate who does not sit for an examination because of ill-health or any other reason
that is not covered by a certificate/document acceptable to Senate
shall be awarded
an F grade.
(v)
M.Sc.: The minimum cumulative grade point average for graduation in the Masters
programme shall normally be 3.00/5.00, provided no fail grade is recorded.
(vi)
The minimum cumulative grade point average for graduation in the Doctorate degree
programme shall normally be 4.00/5.00. Superior grades (A) may be applied to offset (C)
grades, provided that the required minimum cumulative grade point average is attained by
the candidate.
3.02
Classification of Degrees and Diplomas
(i)
All graduate degrees shall be awarded without classification.
3.03
Change of Registration
In assessing a candidate’s work for a change of registration from a Masters programme to a Ph.D
programme, superior grades (A, B) may be applied to offset pass grades (C, provided that the
required minimum cumulative grade point average is attained by the candidate.
Section IV:
Determination of Pass, Credit, Resit, Repeats and Withdrawal Performances
4.01
Pass
A student shall have passed the examination if he obtains a pass grade of (C) or above in each
course unit prescribed for the graduate programme.
4.02
Resit
(i)
(ii)
(iii)
4.03
4.04
A student shall have failed the examination if he obtains a grade below C in one or more
course units. Such a student shall resit the failed course unit(s).
A student has one chance to resit and pass the failed course unit(s).
The highest grade which a student shall have registered for a resit examination is ‘B’ for
Ph.D candidates and ‘C’ for Masters degree
candidates.
Repeat
A student who resits a failed course unit(s) and fails to pass, may be allowed to repeat
course.
Supplementary
The actual grade obtained for each course unit shall be
the
registered.
4.05
Withdrawal from University
A student shall have failed the examination and shall be required to withdraw from the University
if:
(a)
he/she fails all the prescribed course units for full-time or part-time students,
as
the
case may be, at the end of the first semester;
(b)
a full time student obtains 3 or more failing grades at the end of the second
semester
whether or not the failing grades are the aggregate of all failures obtained during one academic
year, and fails to obtain an overall Grade Point Average of 3.00;
(c)
a part-time student obtains 2 or more failing grades at the end of the second
semester
whether or not the failing grades are the aggregate of all failures obtained during one academic
year and fails to obtain an overall Grade Point Average of 3.00.
4.06
Repeating the year with Special Permission of Senate
Senate may allow a student to repeat the year if he/she is unable to follow the full programme and
examinations provided this inability is supported by appropriate medical certificates acceptable to
Senate. The grades obtained for each course unit during that year shall be registered as such.
131
Section V:
Other Examinations
5.01
Comprehensive Examinations
There shall be a Comprehensive Examination at the end of the coursework for the Ph.D, to be
conducted in a manner prescribed by the department and approved by Senate.
5.02
Doctoral Theses
(a) Two External Examiners shall be appointed per doctoral thesis based on the area of
specialization and expertise in relation to the thesis to be examined. They shall be expected to
send in a written report on the thesis to be examined before the date of examination. The report
shall be submitted to the Graduate School within one month from the date of receipt of the
theses. The two examiners must confirm the suitability of the thesis for examination. One of
the examiners will be required to come down to conduct the oral examination. He shall be
expected to submit a written report after the examination.
(b) An Internal Examiner shall be expected to be knowledgeable in the field where the thesis has
been written He shall submit an independent report to the Dean of Graduate School after
the oral examination. He/ She shall complete and sign a joint report with the external
examiner after the oral examination. He/she shall serve as the Graduate School Representative.
The report on reaching the Dean of Graduate School shall be further transmitted to the head of
the unit concerned in the Graduate School for vetting purposes.
Masters Theses
a) An external examiner shall be appointed per masters thesis. He/ She shall be required to make
a written report on the suitability of the thesis for the award of the degree before the date of the
examination. The report shall be submitted within one month from the date of receipt of the
thesis. Where the thesis is deemed unsuitable for the degree in view the candidate shall rewrite
the thesis to an acceptable standard before an oral examination is conducted.
b) The requirement governing the nomination of an internal examiner for the Ph.D shall also hold
for the Masters thesis.
The Head of Department shall be the Chief Examiner provided he/she is not the candidate’s
Supervisor, spouse or parent.
Procedure for External Examination
(i) At least eight weeks before an oral examination, the candidate in consultation with Supervisor(s) shall
submit through the Head of Department an application for examination to the Departmental Graduate
Committee (the Committee shall verify and ascertain the readiness of candidate) for external
examination.
(ii) Application shall be sent to the Faculty Graduate Committee for consideration and recommendation
to the Graduate School.
(iii) On approval, the candidate shall submit 4 typed soft-bound copies of the thesis to the Head of
Department at least 6 weeks to the examination.
(iv) The Head of Department shall send copies of the thesis (3 copies for Ph.D and 2 copies for Masters
thesis) to the Graduate School for onward forwarding to the External Examiner(s) and Graduate
School Representative respectively.
(v) A candidate whose work has been referred back for improvement shall present himself for reexamination within two semesters and may not present himself for re-examination more than once.
(vi) Copies of a successful thesis/dissertation, bound in a prescribed manner, shall be deposited as follows
through the Graduate School:
 One copy with the Secretary of the Graduate School
 Two copies with the University Library; and
 One copy with the Department in which the candidate has worked.
(vii) The effective date for award of degrees and postgraduate diploma shall be the date of Senate and
Board approval, respectively.
132
GRADUATE PROGRAMMES
A.
General Programme Regulations
Courses may be offered full-time or part-time. All programmes begin with course work and end
with a project (for Diploma) or thesis (for Masters and Ph.D degrees). For Full-time studies in
most programmes, the post-graduate Diplomas and Masters programmes last at least one calendar
year, (the Masters programme in Management Studies lasts at least two years).
The Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D) programme extends over a period of at least three years. The
part-time programmes in Education last for at least three vacations. Candidates with disciplinary
deficiencies may be allowed to remedy them by taking and passing appropriate undergraduate
courses with a grade approved by the relevant department within one additional year or semester
of preliminary studies. Such grades will not count as graduate credit. Candidates with Masters
degree from a recognised university may credit the relevant courses towards the Ph.D Programme
provided the quality of the grades is acceptable to the Graduate School. The course work for all
programmes ends with comprehensive examination.
B.
Programmes Available
I.
Higher Degree Programmes
1.
Faculty of Agric
PGDA, M.Agric, Ph.D
2.
Faculty of Arts
M.A., MPhil, and Ph.D. programmes are available in the following areas:
(i)
English and Literary Studies: African Literature (African Oral Literature, Modern African
Literature, Literature of the African Diaspora).
(ii)
History: West African History (Social, Economic and Political); East and Central African
History, African Diaspora History, Imperialism, Historical Methods (Oral Tradition).
(iii)
Languages and Linguistics
(a)
Languages: French Language and Language Teaching, Translation, French
Literature and Culture, African Francophone Literature.
(b)
Linguistics: M.A. Programme is available in the following areas: Descriptive
Linguistics, Comparative Linguistics, Applied Linguistics.
(iv)
Theatre Arts: The Department offers Master of Fine Arts (M.F.A.) programmes in the
following fields: Theatre Directing and Theatre/Studio Administration Programmes are
run on full time basis only.
3.
Faculty of Social Sciences:
M.B.A. is offered in the Department of Management Studies; M.Sc. and Ph.D programmes are
available in all other Departments of the Faculty of Social Sciences.
(i)
Economics: Development Economics: Mathematics Economics: Economic and Social
History of Nigeria; Public Finance and Monetary Economics Programmes are on full-time
basis only.
(ii)
Geography and Regional Planning:
Specializations are in Climatology, Urban Geography, Geomorphology, Transport/
Industrial Geography.
(iii)
Management Studies: The Programme offered is Master of Business Administration
(MBA). The Preliminary year Programme is on full-time basis only.
(iv)
Political Science: Comparative Politics, Political Behaviour, Political Economy,
International Relations; Political Theory/Philosophy. The following programmes are also
offered: Master of Public Administation (MPA); M.Sc. in Policy Studies, and M.Sc. in
Public Planning and Management.
(v)
Sociology: The following programmes are offered: Development Sociology, Industrial
Sociology, Demography and Social Anthropology. The Programmes are on full-time basis
only.
133
4.
Faculty of Education
Regular Programmes: M.Ed. and Ph.D Programmes are available in the following areas during the
session:
 Curriculum Studies
 Educational Administration and Planning
 Educational Foundations
 Guidance and Counselling
5.
Faculty of Science
(a) M.Sc. and Ph.D Programmes are available in the following areas:
(i)
Biological Sciences: Parasitology, Genetics, Microbiology and Entomology.
(ii)
Chemistry: Analytical Chemistry, Organic Chemistry, Inorganic Chemistry,
Physical Chemistry and Process Metallogy.
(iii)
Geology: Mineralogy and Petrology: Petroleum Geology/Sedimentology,
Micropaleontology: Marine Geology; Applied Geochemistry; Engineering
Geology; Hydrogeology; Exploration Geophysics.
(iv)
Physics: Geo-environmental physics (General and Applied Geophysics,
Atmospheric Physics, Meteorology; Applied Engineering Physics (Applied
Acoustics, Communications Vacuum Physics and Material Science); Theoretical
Physics (Solid State, Nuclear and Plasma Physics).
(b) M.Sc. Programme in Applied Mathematics is available in the Department of
Mathematics/Statistics:
6.
College of Medical Sciences:
M.Sc. and Ph.D programmes are offered in the Department of Biochemistry; M.Sc. in the
Departments of Anatomy, and Biochemistry; M.Sc. in the Departments of Anatomy, Medical
Microbiology and Parasitology; and Master of Community Health (MCH) in the Department of
Community Health.
(i)
Anatomy: Field of Research interest include Congenital Malformations (Teratology),
Histology, Physical Anthropology (Sexing of Bones), Advanced
Cell
Biology,
Embryology and Comparative Anatomy. Programmes are only on full-time basis.
(ii)
Biochemistry: The following areas of specialization are offered: Clinical Biochemistry,
Nutritional Biochemistry, Biochemical Toxicology, Metabolism, Biochemical
Endocrinology, Lipid Biochemistry.
(iii)
Community Health:
The programme offered is Master of Community Health
(M.C.H.) with specialization in:
 Community Health Education
 Primary Health Care
 Epidemiology
(iv)
Medical Microbiology/Parasitology areas of research include: Clinical
Medical Mycology and Medical Parasitology.
Bacteriology,
The College of Medical Sciences also organizes Inter-Departmental M.Sc. Programme in Nutrition
and Food Science, co-ordinated by the Department of Biochemistry. Areas of Specialization are:
 Nutrition
 Food Science
II.
Postgraduate Diploma Programmes:
These are offered by the Faculties of Education and Management Sciences.
1.
Postgraduate Diploma in Education (PGDE)
This programme prepares graduate teachers without teaching qualifications for effective service in
the Secondary Schools and Colleges in Nigeria. Postgraduate Diploma in Education (PGDE)
courses are organized in the regular session.
134
2.
Postgraduate Diploma in Public Administration (DPA): The Department of Political Sciences
offers courses leading to the award of the Diploma in Public Administration (DPA). The Diploma
in Public Administration (DPA) programme is designed for persons with at least 5 years
executive/managerial positions in the public and private sector and others who wish to increase
their theoretical and practical knowledge of the complexities of modern public administration.
SCHEDULE OF COURSES
FOR A COMPLETE DESCRIPTION OF COURSES UNDER GRADUATE SCHOOL, CONTACT
THE GRADUATE SCHOOL PROSPECTUS OR VISIT THE GRADUATE SCHOOL WEBSITE
AT www.unicalonline.edu.ng.
Adjust all the graduate school aspect
135
CATHOLIC INSTITUTE OF WEST AFRICA (CIWA)
PORT HARCOURT
This great institute established in 1981 in Port Harcourt is affiliated to the University of Calabar through
the Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies.
The Catholic Institute of West Africa (CIWA) Port Harcourt is a higher ecclesiastical Institute founded in
1981 for the study of Theology and other related disciplines within the socio-cultural context of West
Africa. The institute was established and is owned by the Association of Episcopal Association of
Anglophone West Africa (AECAWA). It is open to all citizens of West Africa and beyond, irrespective of
religion, gender, ethnic origin and social class. CIWA graduate programmes is applicable for admission
into the graduate programmes of other related disciplines.
Objective
The institute is a special Theology mainly for holders of First degree in Theology from recognized
institutes of research and related disciplines as well as in other human sciences.
It is responsible for the training of academic personnel in theological and related disciplines for seminaries,
other ecclesiastical institutions of learning, pastoral institutions ministry and catechetical centres. The
institute is expected to promote fruitful dialogue, faith and reason, between Gospel and culture and
between Christian thought and modern sciences. Courses and programmes are organized with these
objectives in view.
Institute’s Research Thrust
Aware of the importance of theological education in the formation and integral development of human
person, the institute endeavours to inculturate the timeless and placeless Word of God and the Wisdom of
the past ages (including African worldview) into the present African way of life thereby serving as the
midwives of the African culture and modernity, hence, the expected birth of an authentic African religious
culture and way of life. This process of inculturation is both a methodology and a theological thrust which
the institute uses to drive home the divine message to its adverse audience in the sub-region and beyond.
In the same way, the Institute endeavours to contextualize the divine message to address itself specifically
to every context, be it political, economic, legal, warfare, etc in fulfillment of the Biblical injunction on
Christians, to be the salt of the earth (Mt. 5:13). The other related disciplines are expected to carry out their
researches with the same thrust.
Programme Organization
Admission: Admission to the programme is open to candidates who hold at least a Second Class Lower
Division Bachelor’s degree with B or 2.75 grade point average in the envisaged discipline.
Departments: The Institute has, meanwhile, for its theological faculty two main departments – Department
of Biblical Theology/Dogmatic Theology and Liturgy and the Department of Pastoral Theology, Moral
Theology and Canon Law. Philosophy is a unit on its own. It is envisaged that these units within the
departments will in the near future become departments on their own to promote independent research and
specialization.
Semester Courses: Each unit offers a minimum of six courses per semester for Masters and Doctorate
candidates.
INSTITUTE OF EDUCATION
Course No.
PGE 5011
PGE 5112
PGE 5021
PGE 5022
PDE 5611
Course Title
Educational Tests and Measurements
Teaching Practice
Research Methods and Case Study
Special Research Project
School and Society
136
Credit Hours
3
3
3
3
3
Course No.
PDE 5312
PDE 5212
PDE 5111
PDE 5121
PDE 5141
PDE 5131
PDE 5151
PDE 5412
PDE 5022
Course Title
Philosophical Foundations of Education
History of Nigerian Education
Curriculum and Instruction
Special Teaching Methods in Science
Special Teaching Methods in Mathematics
Special Teaching Methods in Social Science
Special Teaching Methods in Language Arts
Educational Administration and Supervision
Special Research Project
Credit Hours
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
POST-GRADUATE DIPLOMA IN ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION (PGDEE)
Course No.
PGDEE 5111
PGDEE 5211
PGDEE 5311
PGDEE 5411
PGDEE 5511
PGDEE 5612
PGDEE 5712
PGDEE 5812
PGDEE 5912
PGDEE 5922
Course Title
Environmental Education I
Planning and Process
Curriculum and Instruction
Community Education
Research Methods in Education
Environmental Education II
Nigerian Environment
Community Health
Environmental Perceptions and Human Behaviour
Project
Credit Hours
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
INSTITUTE OF OCEANOGRAPHY
Course No.
FAQ 5021
FAQ 5031
FAQ 5041
FAQ 5051
AMD 6001
FAQ 5002
Course Title
Fish Breeding and Fingerling Production
Pond and Cage Construction and Maintenance
Advanced Fish Nutrition
Aquaculture Economics and Extension
Fish Pathogens and Diseases
Aquaculture (Field) Practical Project
M.Sc./Ph.D Degree Courses
Course No.
Course Title
FAQ 5021 Structure and Functions of the Marine Ecosystem I
FAQ 5011
Anatomy Physiology of Fishes
FAQ 5001
Physical and Chemical Oceanography
FAQ 5031
Fish Population Dynamics and Stock Assessment
FAQ 5001
Current Topics in Fisheries and Aquaculture
FAQ 5000
Research Project
FAQ 5012
Fish Reproductive Biology and Early Stages
FAQ 5002
Advanced Aquaculture
FAQ 5032
Statistics and Sampling Techniques for Fisheries Biology
FAQ 5022
Structure and Functions of the Marine Ecosystem II
FAQ 5042
Fish Pathogens and Diseases
FAQ 6000
Research Project
FAQ 6002
Advanced Fish Nutrition
FAQ 6003
Fish Processing and Gear Technology
Credit Hours
3
3
3
3
3
3
Credit Hours
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
INSTITUTE OF PUBLIC POLICY AND ADMINISTRATION (IPPA)
Course No.
IPA 5001
IPA 5001
Course Title
Public Policy Analysis and Decision-Making I
Public Policy Analysis and Decision-Making II
137
Credit Hours
3
3
Course No.
IPA 5011
IPA 5012
IPA 5021
IPA 5022
IPA 5031
IPA 5032
IPA 5041
IPA 5042
IPA 5051
IPA 5052
IPA 5062
IPA 5072
IPA 5082
IPA 5061
IPA 5022
Course Title
Local Government and Intergovernmental Relations
Public Financial Management
Public Administration in Nigeria
Advanced Rural Development
Advanced Public Personal Administration
Public Corporations
Organisation Theory
Comparative Public Administration
Advanced Local Government Accounting and Auditing
Nigerian Foreign Policy
Health and Welfare Administration
Nigerian Public Finance
Project Report
Quantitative Analysis and Research Methods
Rural Development
Credit Hours
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
INSTITUTE OF EDUCATION
BACKGROUND INFORMATION
The Institute of Education is an academic unit of the University of Calabar established by statute in 1987.
The statute was revised in 2002. By statute the main functions of the Institute now include the following:
i.
Acting in advisory and consultative capacity to the Ministries charged with responsibility for
Education in matters pertaining to education, and collaborating with the Ministries both in the
planning and extension of educational facilities and in the provision, either by itself or in
conjunction with other bodies, of suitable courses of study and instruction.
ii.
Provision of teaching, research and training, leading to the award of Diplomas and Certificates in
Environmental Education and Extension Services.
iii.
Conducting and promoting research and acting as a coordinating agency for research in all matters
pertaining to education and the development of education.
iv.
Providing education centres for the promotion of educational interest of persons concerned with or
interested in education.
v.
Recommending to senate the award of degrees, diplomas and certificates.
vi.
Promoting the training of teachers and other persons engaged in educational vocational work.
vii.
Undertaking Consultancy Services for Governments, International Organizations, Local,
Authorities and Private.
vii.
Providing and coordinating courses, conferences and lectures for persons concerned with or
interested in education.
ix.
Advising on the establishment and maintenance of professional Library services in the Institute
and in affiliated institutions.
x.
Serving on State and National bodies responsible for educational policy such as the Joint
consultative Committee on Education (JCC), National Education Council (NEC), HERDC, NCCE
etc.
138
1.
GOVERNING BOARD
The Institute of Education shall have a Governing Board which shall consist of the following:
a) The Vice-Chancellor
b) The Director of the Institute
c) The Dean, Faculty of Education
d) One External Member of Council
e) Dean of Graduate School
f) A representation from the Cross River State Ministry of Education
g) One member of the Senior staff of the Institute elected by the Academic Board of the
Institute
h) The University Librarian
i) The Director of Academic Planning
j) Secretary of the Institute shall be the Secretary of the Board.
2.
TENURE
Tenure of the Board is three years.
3.
THE MEETING OF THE BOARD
The Board shall meet at least twice in a year and at any other time at the request of the Vice
Chancellor, the Director of the Institute or any six other members.
4.
FUNCTIONS OF THE BOARD
Subject to the control and direction of the Council and any regulation made by the Senate, the
functions of the Governing Board shall be as follows:
i)
ii)
iii)
iv)
v)
vi)
vii)
5.
To give policy directives necessary for the functioning of the Institute
To present to the University Council through the Vice Chancellor all proposals involving
finance and administration
To receive annual reports on the Institute
To approve on the recommendation of the Professional and Academic Board the budget
and prgrammes of the Institute.
To submit to Council and where necessary the Senate minutes of the meting of the
Governing Board.
To approve on the recommendations of Instituted Professional and Academic Board, the
granting of the status of Associated Institution to any Institution.
To carry out any other functions conferred upon the Institute by the University Law or
Statute or by the Council and Senate.
ACADEMIC AND PROFESSIONAL BOARD
There shall be an Academic and Professional Board for the Institute of Education which shall
comprise:
a)
The Director of the Institute as Chairman
b)
The Unit Co-ordinators in the Institute
c)
All Research and teaching staff of the Institute from the rank of Asst Research Fellows.
d)
Heads of Departments within the Faculty of Education or their representatives
e)
A representative of the Librarian
f)
Representative of the Faculty of Arts, Social Sciences, Sciences and Agriculture.
g)
Representative Graduate School
h)
One representative each of the affiliated bodies with the Instituted.
i)
The Senior Administrative Officer in the Institute shall serve as the Secretary.
The Academic and Professional Board shall meet at least once a month in each semester and at any
time at the request of the Director or any here members in writing to the Director. The quorum for
the meeting of the Academic and Professional Board shall be he Director of the Institute and one
third of the membership.
139
6.
FUNCTIONS OF THE ACADEMIC AND PROFESSIONAL BOARD
Subject to the control and direction of the Governing Board and any regulations made be the
Senate, the Academic and Professional Board shall have the following functions:
a)
b)
c)
d)
e)
f)
g)
h)
i)
j)
To supervise the training of candidates for the examination of the Institute or of other
professional bodies
To recommend to Senate for approval, courses and syllabus of study with the Institute
To recommend to Senate the award of Diplomas and Certificate
To arrange for student's practical field experience with Schools, Industries, Government
parastatals, International Organizations and other accredited Institutions.
To regulate the conduct of Institute's Examinations
To recommend to Senate the appointment of External Examiners.
To organize and execute the extension programmes of the Institute.
To appoint committees as may be deemed expedient
To deal with any matter referred to it by the Governing Board or Senate
To report its proceedings to the Governing Board where necessary.
ADMINISTRATION
The Institute of Education is administered by the Director who is responsible to the Vice-Chancellor. The
Director is the Chairman of the Academic and Professional Board of the Institute, the Secretary of the
Institute's Governing Board and also the Ex-officio member of all Boards and Committees appointed by
the Governing Board or the Academic and Professional Board.
The academic staff of the institute are research staff and are designated as Research Assistants, Assistant
Research Fellows, Research Fellows II, Research Fellows I, Senior Research Fellows, Readers and
Professors. All academic staff from the rank of Assistant Research Fellows are as of right, members of the
Academic and Professional Board.
The Academic and Professional Board is the general policy making body subject to the authority of the
Governing Board and Senate. It handles all matters of general interest to students and staff. There are
unit coordinators that handled specified functions and are responsible to the Director. There are also
Academic Advisers who handle students' academic and personal problems. The Institute Officer oversees
all administrative matters involving staff and students and such other functions as assigned by the Director
or directed by the Registry.
All staff and students have unrestricted access to the Director, however, students are urged to first discuss
their problems with officials designated to handle such problems. Academic Advisers, Examinations
officer and Coordinators as well as the Institute officer are always ready to help students solve their
problems.
UNITS IN THE INSTITUTE
The Institute has for now three units as follows:
(a)
Research and Publications Unit
(b)
Conferences, Seminars /workshop Unit
(c)
Diploma Programmes Coordinating Unit
Institute Programmes
A.
Certificate Programmes
i.
Certificate in Science Education (CSE)
ii.
Certificate in Mathematics Education (CME)
iii.
Certificate in Educational Technology (CET)
iv.
Certificate in English Language Education (CEL)
v.
Theatre and Performing Art Education (TPE)
140
B.
Diploma Programmes
i.
Ordinary Diploma in Education (DED)
ii.
Diploma in Library Science (LSD)
iii.
Diploma in Environmental Education (DEE)
iv.
Diploma in Educational Technology (DET)
Duration of Diploma Programmes
The duration for each Diploma Programme is two academic Calendars/years, made up of four semesters.
Admission Requirements for Diploma Programmes
For a candidate to be qualified for any of the Institute's Diploma Programmes he/she must posses any of
the following:
i.
Senior Secondary School Certificate or equivalent with at least four credits in relevant subjects
including at least a pass in English Language and Mathematics in at most two sittings.
ii. Teachers Grade Two Certificate (TCC II) with at least four credits or merits including at least a pass in
English language, Mathematics in only one sitting.
iii. Any other qualification acceptable to the University of Calabar for a Diploma Programme admission.
Requirements for Graduation
Students must have done all courses as required and completed and submitted their projects. They must
also have completed a six-week intemship/Industrial Training (IT) programme in a relevant establishment.
Maximum credit units per semester is 18 units.
CODE
DED = Diploma in Education
LSD = Library and Information Science Diploma
DPB = Diploma in Primary and Basic Education
DET = Diploma in Educational Technology
DEE = Diploma in Environmental Education
Diploma Programmes:
Diploma in Library Science
Programme Objective:
The objective of the Diploma in Library and information Science (Dip.Lib) programme is to train serving
Library Assistants and Attendants and other qualified candidates who wish to rise to middle management
positions in different libraries, in the country. The programme is also available to holders to Teacher Grade
II and NCE Certificate. The need for well equipped and effectively managed libraries in our schools and
colleges has long been recognized. What have been lacking are suitably trained and qualified personnel to
organized and run these libraries. The programme will provide teachers with the basic professional
knowledge and practical skills needed to develop, equip and run libraries and media centers in our schools
and colleges.
141
COURSE STRUCTURE AND DESCRIPTION
YEAR ONE
1ST SEMESTER
Course
Code
DED1001
DED1021
DED1031
DED1041
LSD1101
LSD1151
Course title
2ND SEMESTER
Credit Hr
Communication
Skills
2
Course
Code
DED1002
Child Psychology I:
Growth &
Development
Introduction to
Computer
2
DED1012
2
DED1022
Introduction to
Philosophy and
Logic
Introduction to
Library &
Information Science
2
DED1012
2
LSD
Introduction to
Physical
Bibliography, Book
Selection and
Acquisition
Two courses from
Area of
Specialization
2
1
Courses title
Credit Hr
Basic concepts and
process in Test &
Measurement
Instructional
Methodologies and
Microteaching
Child Psychology II:
Behaviour and
Learning
Introduction to
Projectual
2
The role of Libraries in
the Educational process
2
Circulation of Library
Materials & Reference
Service
2
Two course from areas
of Specialization
6
2
2
2
142
LSD
1
152
6
18
18
YEAR TWO
1ST SEMESTER
Course
Code
DED2001
DED2031
DET2001
LSD2101
LSD2111
LSD2121
2ND SEMESTER
Course title
Credit Hr
Introduction to
Research and
Statistics
Computer
Application
Non-projectuals and
Low Cost
Technology
Elements of Library
Administration
Classification I
2
Course
Code
DED2002
2
LSD2102
2
LSD2112
2
LSD2122
Cataloguing and
Indexing I
Two courses from
Area of
Specialization
2
2
Courses title
Credit Hr
Teaching
Practice/Internship
2
Cataloguing and
Indexing II
Classification II
2
Project in Library
Science
Two Courses from Area
of Specialization
2
2
6
18
6
18
142
DIPLOMA IN EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY
a) Rationale
Diploma in Educational Technology (DET) is designed to provide opportunities for school leavers
who desire to make a career in the education industry or in education courses capable of
generating self employment. The programme also serves as a feeder for the Bachelor's degree in
Educational technology.
b). Programme Objectives
The programme is designed to:
i)
Produce young generation of skilled educators for Nigerian educational system.
ii)
train middle class but skilled manpower for primary and junior secondary schools in
Nigeria; and serve as feeder for the Bachelor's degree in Educational Technology
COURSE STRUCTURE AND DISTRIBUTION
Year
Semester
Core
Required
Courses
Courses
ONE (1)
1st.
8
4
2nd
4
8
ST
nd
1 and 2
12
12
TWO (2)
1st.
2nd
ST
1 and 2nd
2
8
22
6
18
143
Teaching
Subjects
6
6
12
Elective
Total
-
18
18
36
6
6
24
4
8
18
18
72
The following course structure will apply:
YEAR ONE
1ST SEMESTER
Course
Code
DED1001
DED1011
Course title
2ND SEMESTER
Credit Hr
Course Code
Courses title
Credit Hr
Basic concepts and process in Test & Measurement
Instructional Methodologies and Microteaching
2
2
Communication Skills
Use of Library
2
2
DED1002
DED1012
Introduction to Computer
2
Required Courses
DED1041 Introduction to Philosophy
and Logic
Required Courses
2
DED1022
Child Psychology II: Behaviour and Learning
2
DED1012
Introduction to Ware
2
DED1021
2
DET 1022
Print Technologies and Library Studies
2
2
DET
1032
Introduction to Projectuals
6
DED1031
DED1001
Child psychology I: Growth
and Development
Introduction to Educational
Technology
Two course from areas of
Specialization
6
Two courses in a Teaching Subject
18
18
YEAR TWO
1ST SEMESTER
Course
Code
DED2001
2ND SEMESTER
Course title
Credit Hr
Course Code
Courses title
Credit Hr
Introduction to Research and
Statistics
Computer Application
2
DED2012
Teaching Practice/Internship
2
2
DET 2002
Project in Educational Technology
2
Two courses from Area of Specialization
6
DED2031
Required Courses
Non-projectuals and Low
Required Courses
2
144
DET2001
DED 2011
DED 2031
Elective
Cost Technologies
Photography and
Broadcasting Technologies
Adult Basic and Literacy
Education
Two courses from Area of
Specialization
One course in Restrcted
Elective
2
Elective
Two Restrcted Elective
2
2
6
2
18
18
Restricted Elective Courses
DED 2011
DED 2021
Introductory Guidance and
Counselling
School Librarianship
2
DET 2112
Technologies for Distance Learning
2
2
DPB 2032
DPB 2042
Introduction to Special Needs Learners
Administration of Pre-primary and Basic
Education
2
2
145
DIPLOMA IN ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION (DEE)
INTRODUCTION
Diploma in Environmental Education (DEE) was introduced as an academic programme in the Institute of
Education by NCF/WWF and the University of calabar to meet the yearning of the people toward
environmental conservation and awareness, in order to subvert the increasing impacts of environmental
deterioration in our societies. The Ordinary Diploma in Environmental Education is a two-year (FourSemesters) programme designed for secondary school leavers or holders of the school certificate or
equivalent qualifications.
OBJECTIVES
The Ordinary Diploma in Environmental is designed to:
i) Produce a crop of middle manpower that will assist in policy formulation and implementation of
environmental conservation matters and sustainable development;
ii) Develop low level professionals that will take curriculum initiatives and assist in the teaching and
learning of Environmental Education in Nigerian Educational system;
iii) Provide expertise that will educate urban and rural dwellers on the
subject of Environmental
Conservation, Management and Sustainable Development;
iv) Fill manpower requirement in Environmental Protection Agencies, Nature Conservation
Organizations and National Parks;
v) Ensure the availability or resource persons that will develop materials for the Advancement of
Environmental Conservation and Protection.
ENVIORNMENTAL EDUCAION
COURSE STRUCTUE AND DISTRIBUTION
YEAR ONE
1ST SEMESTER
Course
Code
DED1001
DED1011
DED1021
DED1031
DED1041
DPP 1101
Course title
2ND SEMESTER
Credit Hr
Communication
Skills
2
Course
Code
DED1002
Use of Library
2
DED1012
Child psychology I:
Growth and
Development
Introduction to
Computer
Introduction to
Philosophy and
Logic
Introduction to
Environmental
Education
Two course for areas
of Specialization
2
DED1022
2
DET 1032
2
DED1012
2
DEE 1302
6
18
Courses title
Credit Hr
Basic concepts and
process in Test &
Measurement
Instructional
Methodologies and
Microteaching
Child Psychology II:
Behaviour and
Learning
Introduction to
Projectuals
Planning and Process in
Environmental
Education
Man and Environmental
Behaviour
2
Two courses in a
Teaching Subject
6
2
2
2
2
2
18
YEAR TWO
146
1ST SEMESTER
Course
Course title
Code
CORE COURSES
DED2001 Introduction to
Research and
Statistics
Computer
DED2031 Application
DET2001
DEE 2301
DEE 2311
Non-projectuals and
Low Cost
Technology
Practicum in
Environmental
Education
Education for
Sustainable
Development
Two courses from
Area of
Specialization
2ND SEMESTER
Credit Hr
Course
Code
2
DED2002
Teaching
Practice/Internship
2
2
DEE 2302
2
2
DEE 2402
Introduction to
Environmental Impact
Assessment
Project in
Environmental
Education
Two Courses from Area
of Specialization
2
Courses title
2
6
2
6
18
RESTRICTED ELECTIVES
DED 2011 Introductory
2
Guidance and
Counselling
DED 2021 School Librarianship
2
18
DET 2112
Technologies for
Distance Learning
2
DPB 2032
Introduction to Special
Needs Learners
Administration of Preprimary and Basic
Education
2
DPB 2042
AREAS OF SPECIALIZATION:
1.
ENGLISH LANGUAGE (ENG) COURSES
i)
ENG 1001 Introduction to English Structure
ii)
ENG 1101 Introduction to Literature
iii)
ENG 1002 Basic Grammar
iv)
ENG 1102 Literacy Criticism
v)
ENG 2101 English Studies Method
vi)
ENG 2001 Introduction to Oracy Skills
vii)
ENG 2002 English Composition, Stylistic Semantics
viii)
ENG 2102 English Comprehension and Language Evaluation
2.
Credit Hr
CHRISTIAN RELIGIOUS KNOWLEDGE (CRK) COURSES
i)
CRS 1101 History and Religion of Israel
ii)
CRS 1111 Introduction to the Study of Religion
iii)
CRS 1222 History of Christianity in West Africa up to 18th Century
iv)
CRS 1232 Introduction to Comparative Study of Religion
v)
CRS 2111 Early Church History
vi)
CRS 2121 General Christian Ethics of Religion
vii)
CRS 2212 New Testament
viii)
CRS 2222 Methodology of Religions Studies
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2
3.
AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE (AGS) COURSES
i)
AGS 1101 Introduction to Agricultural Sciences
ii)
AGS 1111 Agricultural Economics and Extension
iii)
AGS 1102 Principles of Soil Science
iv)
AGS 1112 Introduction to Animal Science
v)
AGS 2101 Crop Production
vi)
AGS 2111 Livestock Production and Management
vii)
AGS 2102 Agricultural Science and Environment
viii)
AGS 2112 Practical
4.
PHYSICAL AND HEALTH EDUCATION (PHE) COURSES
i)
PHE 1101 Foundation of Health Education
ii)
PHE 1201 Theory and Techniques of Games and Sports
iii)
PHE 1302 Organization and Administration of Games and Sport
iv)
PHE 1402 Introduction to Nutrition Science and Safety Education
v)
PHE 2101 Introduction to Exercise Physiology and Sociology of Sports
vi)
PHE 2201 School Health Education
Vii)
PHE 2301 Psychology of Coaching, Officiating and Management
viii)
PHE 2401 Communicable and Non-Communicable Diseases
5.
INTEGRATED SCIENCE (ISC) COURSES
i)
ISC
1101 Fundamental of Living Things
ii)
ISC
1011 Man and Energy
iii)
ISC
1012 Environment and Population
iv)
ISC
1112 Management of Natural Resources
v)
ISC
2011 Process of Life
vi)
ISC
2111 Man and Environmental Resources
vii)
ISC
2112 Man and Machine
viii)
ISC
2212 Introductory Ecology
6.
MATHEMATICS (MTH) COURSE
i)
MTH 1001 Basic Concept of Mathematics
ii)
MTH 1001 Mathematics Methods
iii)
MTH 1011 Algebra and Trigonometry I
iv)
MTH 1012 Algebra and Trigonometry II
v)
MTH 2010 Statistics and Probability
vi)
MTH 2002 Co-ordinate Geometry
vii)
MTH 2011 Mathematics Methods II
viii)
MTH 2011 Vector Algebra
7.
ECONOMICS (ECS) COURSES
i)
ECS 1101 Introduction to Monetary and Financial Institutions
ii)
ECS 1111 Principles of Economics
iii)
ECS 1102 Methods of Teaching Economics
iv)
ECS 1112 Principles of Economics II
v)
ECS 2101 Mathematics for Economics
vi)
ECS 2111 Macro Economics I
vii)
ECS 2102 Introductory Micro Economics
viii)
ECS 2112 Macro Economics II
8.
GEOGRAPHY (GEO) COURSES
i)
GEO 1001 Introduction to Physical Geography
ii)
GEO 1011 Introduction to Human Geography
iii)
GEO 1022 Introduction to Regional Geography 1
iv)
GEO 1032 Introduction to Map Work 1
v)
GEO 2001 Physical Geography 2
vi)
GEO 2011 Human Geography of Tropical Africa
148
vii)
viii)
GEO
GEO
2022
2032
West Africa (Nigeria)
Map Work II
9.
POLITICAL SCIENCE (POS) COURSES
i)
POS 1101 Introduction to Political Science
ii)
POS 1111 Introduction to Political Economy
iii)
POS 1012 Introduction to Political Science
iv)
POS 1112 Nigerian Government and Polities
v)
POS 2011 The Politics of Pollution
vi)
POS 1111 Public Policy Analysis
vii)
POS 2112 The Military in Politics
viii)
POS 2212 Organizational Theory
10.
SOCIAL STUDIES (SOS) COURSES
i)
SOS 1061 Foundations of Social Studies
ii)
SOS 1011 Culture and the Environment
iii)
SOS 1062 Economy and the Environment
iv)
SOS 1072 Development and its Impact on Environment
v)
SOS 2061 Man and Social Change
vi)
SOS 2071 Impact of Social Problems on Environment
vii)
SOS 2062 Science Technology and the Environment
viii)
SOS 2072 Political Influence on the Environment
COURSE DESCRIPTION
LIBRARY SCIENCE (LSD) COURSES
LSD 1101 INTRODUCTION TO LIBRARY SCIENCE
Introduction to the basic principles of library science, types Libraries and the Library in the Society.
Definition of the library;
i. as an educational agency;
ii. as an information agency;
iii. as a recreational agency
Types of Libraries:
Types and characteristics of library resources. Outline view of major functions: collection, processing,
organization, storage and retrieval of resources.
The Library in the Society
The social, political and cultural setting within which libraries operate. The impact of the public library on
the spread of literacy and knowledge intellectual freedom and the issue of censorship. Outline history of
libraries from the earliest times to the present.
LSD 1051 INTRODUCTION TO PHYSICAL BIBLIOGRAPHY, BOOK SELECTION AND
ACQUISITION
Description of the book as a physical object. Overview of paper and paper making. Outline history of
printing from the earliest times to the present. Problems of book preservation with special reference to the
tropics.
It also examines theory and practice of book selection. Factors affecting book selection in
different libraries. Processes of book acquisition. Problems of serials
acquisition. Acquisition of nonprint materials. Criteria for weeding. The publishing industry and the book trade with special reference to
Nigeria. Copyright and the problems of book piracy.
LSD 2111 CLASSIFICATION I
Outline view of the universe of knowledge and the structural inter-relationships of the different branches
of that universe. The nature of classification. The function of classification in the ordering of knowledge.
Brief history of classification. Introduction to Library classification. History and development of the major
classification schemes. Evaluation of each of the schemes and their appropriateness in different libraries.
149
LSD 2121 CATALOGUING AND INDEXING 1
This course introduces students to descriptive cataloguing of library materials, the structure and forms of
the library catalogue, and the use of cataloguing tools. It considers the relevance of cataloguing codes and
introduces students to AACR II. Further descriptive cataloguing. Application of A.A. C.R. II Content
analysis and subject indexing.
LSD 1152 CIRCULATION OF LIBRARY MATERIALS AND REFERENCE SERVICES
Strategies for the control and protection of library resources. Different charging systems. Reservations and
other counter processes. It also surveys general reference sources such as: encyclopedias, dictionaries,
handbooks, concordances, abstracts, indexes, and bibliographies, their organization and use. The art of
handling reference enquires. Literature search technique.
LSD 1142 THE ROLE OF LIBRARIES IN THE EDUCATIONAL PROCESS.
Library is a storehouse of information and a reservoir of cultural achievements of a given society and the
world at large from one period of time to the next. This course will examine the custodial and initiation
role of the library in Nigeria society to enhance the education of individual youths and adults into selfdirected learning processes such as cultural, sociological philosophical, psychological, economic and
literacy.
LSD 2101 ELEMENTS OF LIBRARY ADMINISTRATION
Practical aspects of the organization and administration of libraries. Budgeting and budget control.
Personnel selection, recruitment and management. Problems in the administration of different types of
libraries public national academic, school and special libraries.
LSD 2112 CLASSIFICATION 11
Practical classification of library materials using Dewey, Library of Congress and U.D.C. Subject analysis.
Alphabetization. Evaluation of the major schemes: L.C.D.C and U.D.C. Practical classification of library
materials using a chosen scheme. Classification of non print materials.
LSD 2132 MEDIA LIBRARIANSHIP
Other media as complimentary to the book medium in the transmission information. Type of media, their
selection, acquisition, organization and use in libraries and media centers.
LSD 2141 SCHOOL LIBRARIANSHIP
The school library within the school setting. Relationship of the school librarian or teacher/librarian with
the school administration. School library accommodation. School library resources and equipment. The
role of the school library in the teaching process. Practical administration of the school library.
LSD 1251 SOCIOLOGY OF LIBRARIANSHIP
An examination of social structure and social institutions. Problems of
dynamics. Libraries and social development.
social organization; group
LSD 1171 CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT
This course aims at providing teacher librarians with a practical and functional approach to curriculum
planning, its organization, instruction, principles of learning and teaching as is related to Nigerian
education, with consideration of the needs of students in the Nigerian secondary school, in addition to the
methods of evaluating the curriculum.
LSD 2102 CATALOGUING AND INDEXING II
More descriptive and subject cataloguing. Cataloguing of non-print materials. Catalogue maintenance.
Further content analysis and subject indexing. Types of indexes.
LSD 2122 PROJECT
Individual study by the student of an approved topic chosen from any area of library science and
conducted under a project supervisor.
150
LSD 2152 SPECIAL LIBRARIES
The position of special libraries within the parent organizations. Types of special libraries. Special library
resources. Organization and administration of special libraries.
LSD 2131 RESEARCH TECHNIQUES
Procedure and techniques of project writing are taught to learners. They are also exposed to simple and
relevant methods of analyzing data and reporting research.
EDC 2142 GUIDANCE AND COUNSELLING
The principles and philosophy that underlie the practice of guidance and counseling are studied.
Fundamentals of guidance are also examined with a bias in the educational and vocational uses of the
library in Nigeria.
EDC 1162 GENERAL TEACHING METHODS
An experience-based approach to methods of teaching, in which students develop lesson plans, units of
study objectives and evaluative techniques in instruction; the use of materials and the construction of
visual aids by the prospective teacher librarian.
ENG 1101 ENGLISH ORACY SKILLS
Oral communication skills, which are basic to language development are studied. The relevance of
listening and speaking skills is emphasized. Students are also exposed to the techniques of making
effective use of these skills as well as imparting them to others.
ENG 1102 ENGLISH LITERACY SKILLS
This course inculcates the reading and writing aspects of communication skills in English. Components
and types of reading are taught as well as reading comprehension strategies. Students are also introduced
to various aspects of the writing skill such as summary, essays, letters, reports, minutes of meetings etc.
PRE-PRIMARY AND BASIC EDUCATION (DPB) COURSES
DED 1001 Communication Skills
The Course is designed to equip the students with effective verbal, written and non-verbal communication
skills, using English as the lingua franca and the official communication medium. Interest in literary
works. Comprehension and competence in both oral and written English shall be emphasized.
DEB 1011 Use of Library
Focus shall be on the development and use of relevant library skills including the location and
identification of library materials. The use of the internet for sourcing of materials shall also be
emphasized.
DED 1021 CHILD PSYCHOLOGY I: GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT
Child growth and development from conception to childhood period. Pre-natal and Post-natal
developmental processes, Early environmental needs and needs satisfaction. Attachment social
development, and early environmental experiences.
DED 1031 Introduction to Computers:
Types, functions, programmes, operations and possibilities of computers, their historical development,
internet utility for different purposes including education, business, politics, government and industries
shall be exposed in order to create computer awareness, appreciation and utilization skills.
DED 1041 Introductory Philosophy and Logic
The rudiments of oriental and western philosophies, reasoning and logic as applied to daily life and living
and to technologies shall be emphasized.
DPB 1001 Introduction to Pre-Primary and Basic Education
This course is designed to acquaint students with the background, meaning and differences between preprimary and basic education. Forms of basic education, planning and execution of community based
151
education. Curriculum and techniques in pre-primary education including adult literacy and basic
education shall form the focus.
YEAR ONE
SECOND SEMESTER COURSES
DED 1002 Introductory Tests and Measurement
Basic Concepts of Tests and Measurement in Education. Elementary test construction and administration.
Elements of descriptive statistics used in reporting learners progress and performance.
DED 1012 Instructional Methodologies and Microteaching
The rudiments of instructional methods, class management and teaching skills shall form the focus of this
course. The microteaching mode with focus on introduction, test of entry behaviour, use of instructional
materials, questioning, repetition and relevant pedagogic skills shall also be emphasized as rudimentary
requirements for effectiveness in teaching behaviour. Students should carry out microteaching practices.
DED 1022 Child Psychology II: Behaviour and Learning
Concept of learning, learning readiness conditioning and learning processes. Critical periods in learning,
learning activities and problems children encounter.
DPB 1002 Infant Teaching Modes (Music, Dance, Drama, Arts) and Sensory Organs.
This course involves the use of music, recitation, dance and other arts e.g aids in teaching and learning at
pre-primary schools. Selection of some local/cultural dance and equipment in school and learning
situation.
DPB 1012 Foundations of Pre-Primary and Basic Education
The historical, philosophical, psychological, sociological and cultural background of pre-primary and basic
education shall form the focus of this course. The elements of western and oriental philosophies shall be
introduced as sustainable foundations for pre-primary and basic education.
DED 2001 Introductory Research Methods and Statistics
The rudiments of research and elementary statistics, research designs, methods, instruments, population,
sampling techniques, long essay reports format leading to choice of acceptable topics shall be the focus,
especially as related to Educational Technology.
DPB 2001 Mathematics Curriculum and Methods
This course is designed for students to remedy their deficiencies in mathematics and to lay a foundation for
further work in mathematical computation and problems solving especially at pre-primary and primary
level. Emphasis is on the processes which would facilitate pupils understanding of basic mathematical
concept taught.
DPB 2011 English Language and Reading Curriculum and Methods
Language and reading, methodology of teaching language, reading and writing at pre-primary level.
Problems associated with these activities at this level and various approaches to the situation. The issue of
literacy in the local language. The methodology of the local language, and the selection of the suitable
texts for reading in both English and the local language.
DPB 2021 Science Curriculum and Methods
This course is designed to equip students with the basic concepts in pre-primary/primary science. Theories
in science. Scientific experiment for the pre-primary and primary children with emphasis on science
process skills-the meaning and value of science to the society. Components of science, rationale of science
education for children. Science learning centres and how to make them. Living and non-living things,
states of matter, air and its constituents, water and solvent.
EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY (DET) COURSES
DED 1001 Communication Skills
152
The course if designed to equip the students with effective verbal, written and non-verbal communication
skills, using English as the lingua franca and the official communication medium. Interest in literary
works, comprehension and competence in both oral and written English shall be emphasized.
DED 1011 Use of Library
Focus shall be on the development and use of relevant library skills including the location and
identification of library materials. The use of the internet for sourcing of materials shall also be
emphasized.
DED 1031 Introduction to computers
Types, functions, programmes, operations and possibilities of computers, their historical development,
internet utility for different purposes including education business, politics, government and industries
shall be exposed in order to create computer awareness, appreciation and utilization skills.
DED 1041 Introductory Philosophy and Logic
The rudiments of oriental and western philosophies, reasoning and logic as applied to daily life and living.
Technologies pre-primary and basic education shall be emphasized.
DET 1001 Introductory to Education and Technology
The general background to education and technology, their history and interrelationships shall be
examined to bring out their salient features, purposes, values and influences. Specific areas and problems
of education and technology as related to the state and the country shall be closely examined.
DED 1002 Basic Concepts and Processes in tests and Measurement
Basic concepts of tests and measurement in education and elementary test construction and administration
shall be the focus of this course. Elements of descriptive statistics used in reporting learner's progress and
performance, shall also be emphasized.
DED 1012 Instructional Methodologies and Microteaching
The rudiments of instructional methods, class management and teaching skills shall form the focus of this
course. The microteaching mode with focus on introduction test of entry behaviour, use of instructional
materials, questioning, repetition and relevant pedagogic skills shall also be emphasized as rudimentary
requirements for effectiveness in teaching behaviour. Students should carry out microteaching.
DET 1012 Instructional Wares
The categories, functions, structures, strategies, values and problems associated with instructional wares
especially as related to primary and junior secondary schools shall be examined closely. Comparative
effectiveness of each category of instructional wares shall be studied.
DET 1022 Print Technologies and Library Studies
The historical and practical background of prints and book production, storage, classification, care, repairs
and their technologies shall be studied. The implications of books, writing and library to modern
developments and information technologies shall also be emphasized along with the rudiments of
intellectual property rights and copyright laws.
DET 1032 Introduction to Projectuals
Emphasis shall be on the nature, types, uses, functioning and utilization strategies of projectuals. Relevant
hardware's and software, their manipulation, production, care and storage, classroom use an sitting
arrangements for maximum effectiveness shall be examined.
DET 2001 Non-Projectuals and Low-Cost Technologies
Basic design tools and principles necessary for improvisation of non-projectuals, their utilization and
evaluation strategies, the Circle of Improvisation and the Cone of Experience are important. Practice
application of the design tools and principles for production of non-projectuals and low-cost is mandatory.
Students should produce instructional packages to reflect their teaching subject.
DED 2001 Introductory Research and Statistics
153
The rudiments of research and elementary statistics, research designs, methods, instruments, population,
sampling techniques, long essay reports and report format leading to choice of acceptable topics shall be
the focus, especially as related to educational technology.
DED 2011 Introductory Guidance and Counseling
Focus on individual, group, family, school, industrial, career and non-school counseling settings, basic
principles, occupational choice, psychological testing and applications within the face-to-face situations
shall be emphasized.
DED 2021 School Librarianship
Examines the school library with the school setup. Relationship of he school librarian or teacher/librarian
with the school administration. School library accommodation, resources and equipments. The role of the
school library in the teaching process. Practical administration of the school library.
DED 2031 Introduction to Special Needs Learners
The categories, problems, concepts and prospects of aspects in the regular class shall be examined. Basic
concepts of special education, characteristics, causes and learning processes of each category of the
exceptional child and the role of the educational technologist are also important.
DED 2002 Teaching Practice/Internship
Teaching practice including internship for practical field, experience in school setting, under close
supervision of both the departmental and co-operating staff for a minimum of six weeks.
DET 2002 Projects in Educational Technology
Mini and major instructional packages, long essays and individual written project reports as an amalgam of
the course will be mandatory. Bound project reports or long essays on approved topic under close
supervision will also be a mandatory requirement.
DET 2012 Photography and Broadcasting Technologies
The theory, practice and technologies involving simple photographic and broadcasting processes and
products, dark room processes, skills and ethics, types of photography, scripting for the radio, television
and production of short albums and video/CD will be encouraged.
DET 2412 Technologies for Distance Education
The distance learning models and technologies in different African and non-African countries shall be
studied using the comparative approaches to emphasize the historical background, philosophies, the
problem and merits. NOUN structure, problems advantages, technologies and possibilities in the light of
the current socio-political problems in Nigeria shall be examined in detail.
ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION (DEE) COURSES
DEE 1101 INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION
The course introduces students to the concept of Environmental Education as a new discipline in the
school curriculum as well as its relevance to the society. It examines some global environmental problems
and their implications for human survival.
DEE 1201 FOUNDATIONS OF ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION
The course aims at introducing students to the genesis of Environmental education from the Industrial
Revolution to date. It covers the Historical Philosophical Psychological as well as the sociological
foundations of Environmental Education.
DEE 1301 COMMUNITY AND RURAL DEVELOPMENT
This course will expose students to, the concepts of community and rural development, social and political
organization of communities, problems and solutions associated with their communities, and the
approaches to environmental conservation and sustainable development in communities.
DEE 1401 EDUCATION FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT
154
The course is designed to expose the learners to the basic elements of sustainable development. In essence,
the course is aimed at development in individuals the tenets of sustainability of resources in our
environment for human existence. Issues such as the concept of sustainable development objectives, basic
principles, benefits, and problems are examined.
In addition the course exposes the learner to the different environmental resources and how they can be
sustainable managed. Solution to some major environmental problems are also emphasized.
DEE 1102 PLANNING AND PROCESS IN ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION
Planning and process is a course designed to equip students with skills in understanding group dynamics
and various strategies for effective environmental management. Essentially the course will focus on
different ways and means of solving the multifarious human and environmental problems that plaque the
world today. It is hoped that at the end the student will have a change of attitude, a large vision, creative
imagination and empathy for the environment.
DEE 1202 CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT AND EVALUATION IN ENVIRONMENTAL
EDUCATION
The course is designed to:
1. introduce the prospective environmental education to the basic concepts and principles involves in
environmental education curriculum development, implementation and evaluation;
2. examine the various instructional theories and their to environmental education (EE) curriculum at the
formal and non-formal settings:
3. justify the role of individual differences in EE curriculum and sustainability practices, and
4. expose the prospective environmental education to the strategies of environmental education
programme proposals using the curriculum development and evaluation strategies.
DEE 1302 MAN AND ENVIRONMENT BEHAVIOUR
The course examines how human-being perceive the physical environment and how such perception
affects their behaviour towards it. The attitude of man towards the use of resources in the community
environment is also ascertained.
DEE 1402 PEDAGOGY OF ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION
Pedagogy of Environment Education is a scientific and systematic approach of imparting knowledge,
values and skills to learners. The course provides learners with requisite broad-based knowledge of other
social problems, skills and tools to learning and teaching in environmental education. The course is
conceived as an intervention and ongoing process meant to help institutions and individuals to become
more responsive to human conditions, individual integrity, cultural and biographical conditions that
influence their lives in complex environment.
DEE 2101 INDUSTRIAL ATTACHMENT/TEACHING
The course is designed to expose students to practical problems of Environmental Education and
sustainable development for six weeks so that the knowledge acquired in this direction can be fully applied
within the referent situation.
DEE 2201 COMMUNICATION AND MASS MEDIA ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION
The course introduces one to the techniques, characteristics and problems of communication, with
emphasis on forms processes and styles of human symbolic communication. It would focus on the
functions, purpose and strategies of effective communication in environmental education.
DEE 2301 PRACTICUM IN ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION
Practicum in environmental education is designed to practically expose students to the functioning of the
physical environment with its attendant socio-cultural influences by human activities. Basically, the course
is intended to arose a strong feeling of concern for practical environment problems and solutions. The
ultimate aim is to protect the biosphere for the benefit of man.
DEE 2401 RESEARCH METHODS IN ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION
The main goal of this course is to introduce environmental educators to the various methods of conducting
valid researches in the field of environment education and to adequately evaluate scientific and unscientific
155
evidences. Upon completion of the course, each student is expected to demonstrate understanding of the
techniques used in identifying environmental education research problems, formulating hypotheses,
constructing and using data gathering instruments, and employing appropriate statistical procedures to
analyze and interpret environmental research data.
DEE 2102 SEMINAR IN ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION
The course focuses on seminar and workshop skills based on environmental education and sustainable
development processes. Emphasis is also on independent exploration of local environmental problems
ways of creating awareness among the people.
DEE 2202 MANAGEMENT OF NATURAL ECOSYSTEMS
Promotion of environmental management strategies and their operational guidelines form the focus of the
course. The features purposes and management strategies of ecosystem should emphasize diversity,
aesthetics, compromise, team work principles of wildlife management and control including the
application of some related theories.
DEE 2302 INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT (EIA)
The course is designed to introduce students to the concept of Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA). It
presents an overview of development and the environment as well as the impact of Human Activities on
the environment. The framework for environmental management and the objectives, principles, basic
concepts methods and application of environmental impact assessment are adequately emphasized.
DEE 2402 PROJECT IN ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION
This course requires students to write their projects on any aspect of the environment and it is akin to an
independent study project. The theme of the project shall bear relevance to environmental conservation
and sustainable development, which may be either local or global concern. But more importantly, it shall
emphasize the awareness and educational components.
AREA OF SPECIALIZATION
1. ENGLISH LANGUAGE COURSES
ENG 1001 Introduction to English Structure:
The course focuses on competent knowledge of communication skills in English, learning of English and
interest in literacy work thus preparing them for further studies in English Language.
ENG 1002 Basic English Grammar, Phonology and Morphology:
The course is designed to help students develop a confident and competent know ledged of communication
skills in English, develop interest in literary work while preparing them for further studies in the subject.
ENG 1011 Introduction to Literature:
The course shall expose students to the nature of literature and equip them with the techniques necessary
for literary appreciation.
ENG 1012 Introduction to Literary Criticism:
The course shall nurture in students interest for literary works, expose them to different genres of
literature, both African and European, show the relationship between literature and the society, equip them
with skills necessary for appraisal of literary texts.
ENG 2001 English Studies Method:
The course is designed to give students general background information on the nature of language and how
it is acquired. It also includes units of language like grammatical structures and lexis. The teaching of
literature to children is also incorporated. The course outlines techniques for assessing and evaluating
achievement in language as well as error remediation, teaching strategies and suitable materials for basic
level of education.
ENG 2002 English Composition, Stylistic and Semantics:
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This course covers three areas. English composition, which exposes students to various facets of
composition writing processes and formats, stylistics which exposes students to the study of style in
different genres, through the oral or written medium; and semantics which exposes students to the study of
language in relation to meaning.
ENG 2001 Introduction to Oracy Skills:
The course is designed to further help students develop confidence and competence in communication
skills in English Oracy, equip them on various strategies for evaluating materials for teaching English
Language, develop interest in literary works and be prepared for further studies in English.
ENG 2012 English Comprehension, Language Evaluation and Testing:
The course inculcates in students effective comprehension strategies and summary skills. It also enhances
their language performance, evaluation and equips them with language testing skills.
2. RELIGIOUS STUDIES (CRS) COURSES
CRS 1101 HISTORY AND RELIGION OF ISRAEL
The course makes a critical study of the Book of Genesis in particular and the Pentateuch in general with
the exception of Leviticus and Deuteronomy. religious emphasis. The course also studies in addition
historical accounts contained in the Books of Joshua. Judges and 1 Samuel. The origin of David to the fall
of Samaria in 587 B. C should also be studies along with the book of II Samuel and I and II Kings, Amos
and Hosea.
3. AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE (AGS) COURSES
AGS 1101 INTRODUCTION TO AGRIC SCIENCE
This course aims at introducing the students to the general concepts of Agriculture. Besides crop
production, animal science and soil science, other areas exists which will not only enhance the study of the
aforementioned areas but deals with general and specific matters relating to agriculture.
AGS 1111 INTRODUCTION TO AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS
This course looks at the basic economics principles and how they apply to Agriculture. It also takes a look
at marketing-an important segment of modern agriculture and extension services
AGS 1102 INTRODUCTION TO SOIL SCIENCES
This course entails a detailed study of the soil in relation to its origin, formation, characteristics,
components among others.
AGS 1112 INTRODUCTION TO ANIMAL SCIENCES
This course is an introduction to animal science. It will look at the importance and ecological distribution
of animals as well as other aspects of animal anatomy and physiology.
AGS 2101 CROP PRODUCTION
This course deals with detailed study of such selected crops as cereal, legumes, tubers and roots, oils and
fibers, edible fruits, beverages and vegetables. It explains factors affecting crop production, classification
of Agricultural produce
AGS 2101 LIVESTOCK PRODUCTION AND MANAGEMENT
This course deals with the production and management of monogastric and polygastric animals.
AGS 2102 AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE & ENVIRONMENT
This course introduces students basically to agricultural production and ecology. It will assess critically the
relationship of various agricultural practices and ecological systems and their relatedness.
AGS 2112 PRACTICAL AGRICULTURE
In this course, students are expected to own and manage a plot of land planting crops they have studied. It
should also look at animal maintenance among other.
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4. PHYSICAL AND HEALTH EDUCATION (PHE) COURSES
5. INTEGRATED SCIENCE (ISC) COURSES
ISC 1101 FUNDAMENTALS OF LIVING THINGS
The course intends to acquaint students with the basic fundamentals of living organisms. The structure of
the cells, nucleus, chromosomes and genes, important cell processes and elementary genetics.
ISC 1011 MAN AND ENERGY
The course aims at introducing the students into some basic principles regarding man and energy, the
understanding of the meaning, sources, uses and the importance of energy in our everyday life. Alternative
sources of energy such as fossil fuels synthetic solar etc would also be treated.
The course also introduces students to the basic concepts of work and energy force, it also examines
conductors, insulators measurement of energy using simple calculations.
ISC 1012 POPULATION AND ENVIRONMENT
This course is intended to acquaint the students with the knowledge of how population impacts on the
environment and vice versa as well as developing strategies on sustainable use of the environment by the
populace.
ISC 1112 MANAGEMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES
This course is designed to promote natural resource management strategies. It also highlights various
techniques of managing the entire ecosystem with a view to ensuring sustainable development. Some
emphasis is also placed on biodiversity; aesthetics and wildlife conservation as this promote tourism.
ISC 2011 PROCESSES OF LIFE
The basic concepts about life processes would be treated during this course with emphasis on practical
examples and observation.
ISC 2111 MAN AND ENVIRONMENTAL RESOURCES
Students are expected to:
i.
Explain the concept of resources
ii.
Identify the various resources used by man
iii.
Understand the sustainable use of the resources of the environment.
ISC 2112 MAN AND MACHINE
This course intends to treat the various meanings, types and uses of simple machines, and compound
machines; as classes of levers, pulleys, axles and wheels machine planes and wedges, ie the various forms
of machines including their applications would be treated in the discussion of the general principles and
mode of operation, certain terms generally employed alongside effects of machines on human capacity,
like mechanical advantage, efficiency and simple calculation.
6. MATHEMATICS (MTH) COURSES
MTH 1001 BASIC CONCEPTS IN MATHEMATICS:
Sets and set operation; laws of algebra of sets; one-one correspondence, countable and uncountable sets;
cardinality of sets; binary relations, binary operations; menstruation; geometry; elementary statistics;
matrices; determinants and its application; number bases other than 10 shall be focused upon.
MTH 1002 MATHEMATICS METHODS
The shall focus on elements of philosophy of mathematics teaching and learning, works of Bruner, Gagne,
Piaget, Ausubel; Taxonomy of objectives and lesson presentation, introduction to questioning techniques,
teaching of concepts, principles., skills and proofs; laboratory approaches to teaching mathematics; lesson
assessment; diagnosis and remediation of difficulty in mathematics learning; problems of teaching/learning
mathematics.
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MTH 1011 ALGEBRA AND TRIGONOMETRY I
Real numbers; laws of indices; surds; logarithms; linear and quadratic polynomials (definitions and
operations); reducible and irreducible polynomials, division algorithm; remainder and factor theorem;
cyclic polynomials; properties of angles and triangles; polygons (types, properties and area of regular
polygon), congruent triangles, definition of tagonometric ratios and inter-relationship between them, the
general angle, negative and small angles shall be emphasized in the course.
MTH 1012 ALGEBRA AND TRIGONOMETRY II
The course intends to examine the theory of quadratic equations; algebraic and graphic solutions to
simultaneous equations; exponential equation; linear and quadratic in-equalities; partial fractions, curve
sketching and polynomial functions; permutation and combination; Binomials theorem; arithmetic and
geometric progression; compound, half and multiple angles; identities involving single angles and inverse
trigonometric functions; graphs of simple trigonometric functions; and general solution of trigonometric
equations.
MTH 2001 STATISTICS AND PROBABILITY
The course is designed to cover the nature and purpose of mathematical statistics, tabular and graphical
presentation of data, measures of central tendency, measures of dispersion; z-score; correlation rank order
and Pearson product moment; random experiment; probability laws; random variables- discrete and
continuous distributions; estimation of parameters; confidence internal; hypotheses testing and decision; ttest; analysis of variance; goodness of fit (X2) test; non-parametric tests.
MTH 2002 CO-ORDINATE GEOMETRY
The course shall focus on points and lines; equation of a straight line, intersection of lines, internal division
of a line segment; distance from a point to a line between two parallel lines, pairs of straight lines, angle
bisector, area of triangle and quadrilaterals; equation of circle and parabola in Cartesian form; scale
drawing and loci.
MTH 2011 MATHEMATIC METHODS II
The course shall focus on evaluating the adequacy of a mathematics textbook, progressive nature of
mathematics and its implication for teaching; individual differences in the classroom causes and care;
ways of motivating students to learn mathematics; classroom management in mathematics lesson; learning
aids definitions and types; criteria for selecting and uses; learning aids from local materials; teaching
triangles; geometrical constructions; signed numbers, percentages, profit and loss, linear equations and
solutions to quadratic equations.
.MTH 2012 VECTOR ALGEBRA
The following topics shall be examined in vectors; localized vector, free vector, equality of vectors, like
and unlike vectors; triangle, parallelogram, polygon laws, resultant vectors; parallel vectors, scalar
multiple of a vector, commutative and distributive laws, component of a vector; rectangular component
vectors, unit vectors, magnitude or modulus of a vector, position vectors, collinear point, direction cosines,
angle between two vectors; scalar product, application to geometry, the sine of the angle between two
vectors; area of a parallelogram; parallel vectors; non-commutative law of gross product and copular
vectors; vectors; volume of tetrahedron; triple vector product; application of vectors to geometry and line
matrices.
7.
ECONOMICS (ECS) COURSES
8.
GEOGRAPHY (GEO) COURSES
GEO 1011 INTRODUCTION TO HUMAN GEOGRAPHY
The students at the end of this course should understand the definition and the basic components of human
geography: describe resources in their region and explain the settlement and economic activities of
mankind.
GEO 1022 INTRODUCTION TO REGIONAL GEOGRAPHY
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The course will exposed students to the components of their regions and the outside world. It will expose
students to Scope of Regional Geography, Theory of the Earth, Human and physical setting, Africa, North
and South America, Europe, Asia and Australia.
GEO 1032 INTRODUCTION TO MAP WORK
This course will expose students to how to read, interpret and prepare maps of their local environment.
GEO 2001 PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY 2
Students are expected to:
a)
identify and explain the rock types in their environment;
b)
identify the landforms and explain their processes of formation;
c)
discuss the effect of climate on the environment;
d)
identify the types soil within their locality;
GEO 2011 GEOGRAPHY OF TROPICAL AFRICA
The course will examine the physical setting of Africa and the socio-economic activities.
GEO 2022 WEST AFRICA (NIGERIA)
The students are expected to:

Understand the physical setting of West Africa and Nigeria in Particular.

Know and explain the resources and the Socio-economic development of the region.
GEO 2032 MAP WORK 2
Students are expected to know the basic principles of producing map of their villages. It will cover
reasons for mapping, Principles of mapping, Principles of mapping, Type of map or classification of maps,
Photographs and their use in Geography, Interpretation of relief, Qualitative analysis, Quantitative analysis
and Interpretation of drainage
9.
POLITICAL SCIENCE (POS) COURSES
POS 1101 INTRODUCTION TO POLITICAL SCIENCE 1
This course is to provide and introduce participants towards having an initial knowledge of the political
process and science as a field of study. It provides the framework for understanding government,
governance, the societal structure as the context of operation and human interactions to ensure a steady
polity.
POS 1111 INTRODUCTION TO POLITICAL ECONOMY
This course is to examine the societal economic structure as its being influenced by political decisions
making process. The political and economic institutions constitute the super-structures. It is to provide the
elementary basic for a more advance study of the economic and political institutional arrangement and
their relationship.
POS 1102 INTRODUCTION TO POLITICAL SCIENCE II
Introduction to political science II is designed to offer participants more advanced information and
knowledge of the political process and institutional arrangements that facilitate governance.
POS 1112 NIGERIAN GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS
1.
The mode of production and characteristic of the Nigerian state.
2.
Colonial policies in Nigerian system and concept of political development.
3.
The economic endowment of Nigeria political system.
4.
Pre-independent and independent political activities in Nigeria.
5.
Contradictions in Nigeria political system from 1964 to 1970.
6.
Coalition government and consequences for Nigerian Political System.
7.
Political instability and political order in Nigeria.
8.
Nigeria and the wider world.
9.
Nigeria political culture, the military and Nigeria political system.
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POS 2101 THE POLITICS OF POLLUTION
The course introduces students to politics of pollution. It discusses the nature of the state and the role of
power in environmental management of pollution. Attempts are made to identify different approaches to
analyzing pollution policy issues, critical evaluation of control strategies, and problem associated with
control in the face of capitalist accumulation, production processes and the radical demand for structural
transformation of national-and international economic relations in the face of increasing pollution.
POS 2201 PUBLIC POLICY ANALYSIS
This is an introductory survey into basic concepts, tools, and the problems of public policy analysis. The
course is to expose students to a body of knowledge called policy studies. Public policy will be introduced
as both a process and as an end result designed to resolved some problems in the society.
POS 2102 THE MILITARY IN POLITICS
The military in politics is to expose students to the political culture and military intervention in politics, the
sociology of the armed forces, why the military have got themselves mixed up with politics, their
objectives and the general characteristics of the military.
POS 2202 ORGANIZATION THEORY
The course will introduce students to organization theory, concept of bureaucracy, Classical organization
approach; Neo-classical organization approach, Administration and administrative behaviour in a political
institution and Decision making in an organization
10.
SOCIAL STUDIES (SOS) COURSE
SOS 1011 CULTURE AND ENVIRONMENT
The course is preoccupied with the study of the relationship between culture and the environment,
highlighting the impacts of various cultural patterns on the entire environment. It then proceeds to examine
certain human cultural practices that are environmentally friendly and those that are environmentally
unfriendly and the resultant effect of this on the ecological balance.
SOS 1061 FOUNDATION OF SOCIAL STUDIES

To equip students with the rudiments of social studies

To expose students towards knowing the trend of social studies education.

Make students appreciate the dependable role of social studies as instrument for national
development.
SOS 1062 ECONOMY AND THE ENVIRONMENT
This essence of the course is to expose the students to the judicious use of natural resources in order to
conserve the environment. It examines the meaning and purpose of economy, the use of natural resources
of the biophysical environment to sustain economy, the constituent elements of economy and the effects of
economic activities on environment.
SOS 2061 MAN AND SOCIAL CHANGE 3 CREDIT HOURS
This course examine how man influences man. The concept of social change, theories of social change and
variables that produce change are explored. The implications of social change in Nigeria, and especially in
the emerging social institutions are studied.
SOS 2072 SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY AND THE ENVIRONMENT
i. Proper understanding of the meanings of science and technology
ii Practical approach to the study, (teaching and learning) of science; especially, natural science.
iii. Importance of sciences in society.
iv. Procedure of practical application of scientific knowledge to resolve social and material problems of
life-development of technology.
v. Practical approach to the study of social studies.
iv. For the purpose of realizing the above objective of the course, the content that follows is here
proposed.
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SOS 1072 DEVELOPMENT AND ITS IMPACT ON ENVIRONMENT
The students are to be introduced to the various concepts of development. The emphasis is laid on the
physical or infrastructural development as well as material development. The impact of such developments
on environment will be examined.
REGULATIONS GOVERNING EXAMINATIONS
1. The general University regulations governing the conduct of examinations and the tone of examination
environment should apply.
2. Resit Exam:
Students who fail to reach prescribed standards may resit. However, students may be given the
opportunity to revisit and master the subject matter that was failed before the resit is conducted.
Therefore:
a. First Semester Resit Examination take place during the secondary semester examinations period in
normal circumstances.
b. Second semester Resit Examinations shall take place three months after the second semester or
preferably one week before the opening date for the next academic session.
3. Failing Resit Courses.
There shall be no repeat of courses “repeat of year” students who fail resit courses shall carry the “fail”
grade, i.e have the “ Fail grades recorded for them.
4. Withdrawal from Programme:
Students may be allowed to complete their courses unless they withdraw voluntarily. Given the short
duration of the programme and the emphasis on skills acquisition and development, withdrawal is not
recommended.
The grading system for Diploma Programmes.
Distinction
4.50 - 5.00
Credit
3.50 - 4.49
Merit
2.40 - 3.49
Pass
1.00 - 2.39
INSTITUTE OF OCEANOGRAPHY
PART ONE
GENERAL INFORMATION
ESTABLISHMENT
The Institute of Oceanography (IOC), University of Calabar, is charged with the responsibility of carrying
out research in its mandate areas as well as providing instruction and training for future managers of the
marine/aquatic ecosystem. It was the first institute to be established in the University of Calabar in the
1982/83 academic session.
Vision
The vision of the institute is to become a leading aquatic sciences institution in Africa and in the world,
fully equipped with the best personnel and infrastructure to promote development and management of
aquatic resources including all facets of aquaculture.
162
Mission
The institute has the mandate for research into various facets of the aquatic sciences including sustainable
management and exploitation of aquatic resources. The focus of our research programmes is the Nigerian
coastline, nearshore and coastal areas while recognizing the inter-linkages and inter-dependencies of the
various aquatic systems. Through cooperation with other national and international institutions involved in
similar work, we seek to continually update our capabilities. Our training programmes are geared towards
production of medium and high-level manpower equipped to address aquatic environmental issues in the
country and sub-region.
Aims and Objectives
The objective of the institute is to provide education and carry out research in oceanography. Its aims
include teaching and research in marine sciences and production of the much required medium and high
level marine scientists, functions which most other universities in the country are not currently performing.
Functions
The functions of the institute include but not limited to the following:
i.
Provision of undergraduate and postgraduate teaching, research and training in aquatic science
leading to the award of diplomas, certificates, Masters and Doctorate degrees in the different areas
of marine sciences;
ii.
Training for the award of postgraduate diplomas in Fisheries and Aquaculture, Coastal
Zone
Management, Marine Meteorology and Fish Diseases;
iii.
Provision of certificate courses in Water Pollution and Coastal Zone Management;
iv.
Provision of specialist courses whether leading to university distinction or not for
persons
from the industry or government;
v.
Carrying out research with particular reference to the Aquatic/Marine sciences and
undertaking of consultancy services for government, international organizations, local authorities
and the private sector;
vi.
Undertaking of extension services in Fisheries and Aquaculture, Marine Sciences and in this
respect provision of short term courses, workshops, conferences, symposia and seminars for
practicing Fisheries and Aquaculture practitioners, marine policy officers and managers of coastal
environments, etc;
vii.
Undertaking the publication of a journal of Aquatic Sciences and policy; and
viii.
Assistance to the relevant departments in the university in the teaching and research at the
postgraduate and undergraduate levels.
Scope of Activities
The activities of the institute include basic and applied research in the following areas:
 Biological Oceanography
 Marine Chemistry
 Marine Geology
 Fisheries and Aquaculture
 Physical Oceanography
 Aquatic Microbiology and Fish Diseases.
Researches in fresh- and brackish-waters quality, nypa palm management and utilization, and fisheries, are
also carried out.
Academic Programmes
Diploma in Marine Science
The Institute also offers a Diploma Programme in Marine Science. The course is designed to prepare
candidates for science based academic programmes and to produce qualified middle-level manpower for
the marine and fisheries industry. The practical nature of the programme will equip the graduands for
active participation in the fisheries and aquaculture business, and employment in the marine sector.
The duration of the programme is normally two sessions (four semesters) for full time students.
163
It is open to candidates with the following qualifications:
a. Credit passes in four subjects in WASC/GCE/SSC/NECO including Physics,
b. Chemistry, Mathematics and Biology or Agricultural Science at not more than two sittings;
c. At least a pass in English Language.
Post-Graduate Diploma (PGD) Programmes
PGD in Fisheries and Aquaculture
The postgraduate diploma in fisheries and aquaculture is designed to equip students with the necessary
tools for aquaculture practice. The course is also beneficial for fisheries extension officers and other field
personnel in aquaculture related enterprises. The duration of the programme is twelve months.
Admission is open to holders of first degrees in zoology, biology, fisheries or aquaculture. Holders of
HND in fisheries and aquaculture and relevant science subjects with at least two years post-qualification
experience are also eligible.
PGD in Coastal Zone Management
The postgraduate diploma in Coastal Zone Management (CZM) Programme is an international twelve
month programme. It is designed to provide students with a wide range of theoretical and practical skills
on coastal issues with emphasis on coastal ecosystems, fisheries, ecology, law and social sciences relevant
for coastal planning and management.
The course is beneficial for universities and institutes involved in research and nature conservation,
governmental and non-governmental organizations dedicated to coastal systems and resource management,
consultancy outfits and agencies involved in environmental impact assessment/monitoring and
organizations providing aids for environmental management and conservation.
Admission Requirements
(i)
B.Sc. degree in natural sciences, environmental science and engineering
(ii)
HND in natural sciences, environmental science and engineering with at least two
years
post-qualification
cognate experience.
INSTITUTE OF PUBLIC POLICY AND ADMINISTRATION (IPPA)
Introduction
The Institute of Public Policy and Administration is a group of scholars and students pursuing the broad
objectives of improving public policies through research and the training of public service personnel.
Public policy questions, the focus of IPPA research and training, often require knowledge of many
academic disciplines for their solution. The institute thus has an interdisciplinary staff of political
scientists, economists, anthropologists, sociologists, geographers, historians, lawyers, educators, health
administrators and management experts who are building up and making available an accurate body of
knowledge about the determinants, processes and consequences of public choices made in our country.
Functions of the Institute
a. The Institute was established by statute during the 1983/84 academic year. The statute was revised
and updated in 2001 and mandates the institute to carry out the following functions:
b. To provide undergraduate and postgraduate teaching and research on Public Policy Studies and
Administration leading to undergraduate and graduate diplomas and degrees in Public
Administration, Policy Studies, Public Planning and Management;
c. To provide specialist courses whether leading to university distinction or not for government and
local government employees and persons in the private sector under such conditions as may be
prescribed by the appropriate authorities;
d. To recommend to Senate the award of Fellowships and other distinctions;
e. To conduct research with particular reference to administration and policy studies and to undertake
consultancy service for government, local government authorities and the private sector;
f. To undertake extension services and in this respect to provide short term courses, workshops,
conferences, symposia and seminars for practicing public officers;
164
g.
h.
i.
To undertake the publication of a Journal of Public Policy and Administration Studies and other
academic publications;
To assist other departments and faculties in teaching functions of the university at the postgraduate and undergraduate levels;
To perform any other functions that the Senate may from time to time deem fit to assign the
institute.
Mission of the Institute
The mission of IPPA is statutorily determined. The statute directs the university, through the institute, to
establish a leading centre of Policy and Administrative Studies, capable of creating and communicating
policy relevant knowledge to a diversified public and provide policy and administration skills to the
Nigerian public service as well as the private sector. In pursuance of these goals:
i. An interdisciplinary group of policy analysts, both at professional and training levels, has been
assembled;
ii. A methodology capable of establishing a system of standards, rules and procedures for policy
inquiry is in place and is subjected to analysis, criticism and revalidation;
iii. Policy-relevant knowledge is emerging and it is being communicated by a variety of means,
including seminars and publications, to a wide range of the public; and
iv. Interdisciplinary co-operation in the policy and administration enterprise is actively pursued.
Programmes Offered in the Institute
Currently, IPPA offers the under-listed programmes:
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
Diploma in Public Administration (DPA)
Diploma in Personnel Management (DPM)
Diploma in Local Government Administration (DLG)
Diploma in Tourism Management (DTM)
Diploma in Law (Dip Law)
f.
Diploma in Business Administration (DBA)
g.
Bachelor of Science in Policy and Administrative Studies (Transfered to the Department of
Political Science)
h.
Post-Graduate Diploma in Public Administration (PGDPA)
i.
Post-Graduate Diploma in Local Government Administration (PGDLGA)
j.
Master in Policy and Admin. Studies (MPAS) (Transfered to the Department of Political Science)
Purpose of the Programmes
The programmes which are available on full-time bases are designed for persons in executive managerial
positions in the public and private sectors, who wish to increase or improve their theoretical knowledge
and practical skills. They are also designed for those who may wish to equip themselves for entry into such
positions. Graduates of the programmes reaching acceptable academic standards may be admitted into
Bachelor of Science, Policy M Administrative Studies (B.Sc. – PAS) of the institute and other degree
programmes in the University.
Admission Requirements
For admission into the above Diploma programmes, candidates must possess a minimum of four (4) credits
in the GCE O/L, SSCE, NECO, TC II examinations and a pass in English Language in not more than two
sittings. Candidates who desire to proceed to the B.Sc., Policy and Administrative Studies programme at
the completion of their Diploma must, however, possess Credit in English Language and at least a Pass in
Mathematics while in Diploma programme.
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Programme Structure/Course Outline
DPA Programme
YEAR ONE
1ST SEMESTER
Course title
Course
Code
DPA1001
DPA1021
Introduction to Public Policy
Introduction to Public Administration
3
3
Course
Code
DPA1002
DPA1021
DED1031
Constitutional Development in Nigeria
3
DED1041
The Machinery of Govt. and Govt.
Regulations
Introduction to Nigerian Political
Economy
Communication for Middle Level
Management
DPA1051
DPA1071
Credit Hr
2ND SEMESTER
Courses title
Credit Hr
3
3
DED1022
Budget and Budgeting Process
Introduction to Personnel
Administration
The Nigerian Rural Society
3
ED1042
Government and Politics in Nigeria
3
3
DPA1052
Industrial Relations and Management
3
3
DPA1062
Field Data Collection: Organisation and
Analysis
Local Government in Nigeria
3
DPA 1072
3
3
YEAR TWO
1ST SEMESTER
Course
Code
DPA2001
2ND SEMESTER
Course title
Credit Hr
3
DPA2021
DPA1031
DPA1041
Public Policy Analysis & Decisionmaking
Public Administration in Nigeria
Theories of Public Administration
Constitutional and Administrative Law
Course
Code
DPA2002
Courses title
Credit Hr
3
DPA2022
DED2032
ED2042
Public Finance & Public Financial
Management
Rural Development
Public Corporations
Development Administration
3
3
3
DPA1051
Theories of Organisation
3
DPA2052
Nigerian Foreign Policy
3
DPA1061
Development Economics and Planning
3
DPA2062
Health and Welfare Administration
3
DPA 2082
Human Resources Management
3
DPA 2072
Project
3
166
3
3
3
YEAR ONE
Course
Code
DPA1001
DPA1021
DED1031
DED1041
DPA1051
DPA1071
1ST SEMESTER
Course title
Credit Hr
Introduction to Public Policy
Introduction to Public Administration
3
3
Course
Code
DPA1002
DPA1021
Constitutional Development in Nigeria
The Machinery of Govt. and Govt.
Regulations
Introduction to Nigerian Political
Economy
Communication for Middle Level
Management
3
3
2ND SEMESTER
Courses title
Credit Hr
3
3
DED1022
ED1042
Budget and Budgeting Process
Introduction to Personnel
Administration
The Nigerian Rural Society
Government and Politics in Nigeria
3
DPA1052
Industrial Relations and Management
3
3
DPA1062
Field Data Collection: Organisation and
Analysis
Local Government in Nigeria
3
DPA 1072
3
3
3
YEAR TWO
Course
Code
DPA2001
DPA2021
DPA1031
DPA1041
DPA1051
DPA1061
1ST SEMESTER
Course title
Public Policy Analysis & Decisionmaking
Public Administration in Nigeria
Theories of Public Administration
Constitutional and Administrative Law
Theories of Organisation
Development Economics and Planning
Credit Hr
3
3
3
3
3
3
Course
Code
DPA2002
DPA2022
DED2032
ED2042
DPA2052
DPA2062
DPA 2082
DPA 2072
2ND SEMESTER
Courses title
Public Finance & Public Financial
Management
Rural Development
Public Corporations
Development Administration
Nigerian Foreign Policy
Health and Welfare Administration
Human Resources Management
Project
167
Credit Hr
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
DLG PROGRAMME
YEAR ONE
Course
Code
DLG1001
DLG1021
DLG1031
DLG1041
DLG1051
DLG1071
1ST SEMESTER
Course title
Credit Hr
Introduction to Public Policy
Introduction to Public Administration
3
3
Course
Code
DLG1002
DLG1021
Constitutional Development in Nigeria
The Machinery of Govt. and Govt.
Regulations
Introduction
to
Nigerian
Political
Economy
Communication for Middle Level
Management
3
3
2ND SEMESTER
Courses title
Credit Hr
DLG1022
DLG042
Budget and Budgeting Process
Introduction to Personnel
Administration
The Nigerian Rural Society
Government and Politics in Nigeria
3
3
3
DLG1052
Industrial Relations and Management
3
3
DLG1062
Field Data Collection: Organisation and
Analysis
Local Government in Nigeria
3
DLG1072
3
3
3
YEAR TWO
Course
Code
DLG2001
DLG2021
DLG1031
DLG1041
DLG1051
DLG1061
DLG 2081
1ST SEMESTER
Course title
Public Policy Analysis & Decisionmaking
Public Administration in Nigeria
Theories of Public Administration
Constitutional and Administrative Law
Theories of Organisation
Development Economics and Planning
Local Government Accounting and
Auditing
Credit Hr
3
3
3
3
3
3
Course
Code
DLG2002
2ND SEMESTER
Courses title
Credit Hr
DLG2022
DLG2032
DLG2042
DLG2052
DLG2062
DLG2082
Public Finance & Public Financial
Management
Rural Development
Public Corporations
Development Administration
Nigerian Foreign Policy
Health and Welfare Administration
Human Resources Management
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
DLG2072
Project
3
DTM PROGRAMME
YEAR ONE
1ST SEMESTER
Course
Code
DTM1001
Course title
Introduction to Tourism
2ND SEMESTER
Credit Hr
3
Course
Code
DTM1112
Courses title
Tourism & Community Development
168
Credit Hr
3
DTM1021
DTM1031
DTM1041
DTM1051
DTM 1061
DTM1071
Introduction to Economics of Tourism
Introduction to French
Communication in English Language I
Introduction to Econ-Tourism
Public Relation and Tour Guide
Techniques for Library Use
3
3
3
3
3
3
DTM1122
DTM1132
DTM1142
DTM1152
DTM1162
DTM1172
Tourism & Environmental Aesthetics
Communication in English II
Introduction to French
Introduction to Recreation & Leisure
History of Tourism in Nigeria
Tourism Politics & Transportation
3
3
3
3
3
3
DTM 1081
Computer Application Course
3
DTM1062
Field Data Collection,, Organization &
Analysis
3
DTM PROGRAMME
YEAR TWO
1ST SEMESTER
Course
Code
DTM2001
DTM2111
DTM2121
2ND SEMESTER
Course title
Credit Hr
DTM2141
Tourism & Psychology
Tourism & World View
Tourism Administration & Support
Service
Sustainable Development & Tourism
Industry
Cultural Heritage & Tourism
DTM 2151
DTM2161
Comparative Tourism System
Recreation Resource Development
DTM2131
3
3
3
Course
Code
DTM2112
DTM2122
DTM2132
Courses title
Marketing Special Events Tourism
NGOs & Tourism Development
Tourism & Modernization
3
3
3
DTM2142
Tourism & International Relations
3
3
DTM2152
3
3
DTM1162
DTM2072
Tourism,
Politics
&
Development
Field Experience Report
Project
169
Credit Hr
National
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
DPA/DPM/DLG 1001: INTRODUCTION TO PUBLIC POLICY
Introductory overview of the several frameworks, models and approaches to policy. Significance of public
policy. Nigeria’s public policy and decision-making processes and environment. Focus on specific policy
issues in the social, economic and political sphere of the Nigerian community, especially some of the
topics on policy initiatives in the country. Conflicts and influences in policy processes, choices and
implementation.
DPA/DPM/DLG 1021: INTRODUCTION TO PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION
Indigenous systems of social administration, control and justice in Nigeria prior to 1900. British colonial
administration from 1900 to 1960. Administrative/judiciary connections up to the end of Native
Administration at the federal, state and local levels and from 1960 to present.
DPA/DPM/DLG 1031: CONSTITUTIONAL DEVELOPMENT OF NIGERIA
The major constitutional landmarks that have determined the evolution of the Nigerian state especially
since the mid-nineteenth century, features of each constitution and how it facilitated or impeded the
growth of governance in Nigeria.
DPA/DPM/DLG 1041: THE MACHINERY OF GOVERNMENT AND GOVERNMENT
REGULATIONS
A theory of government rules and regulations. Rules and regulations in historical perspective – precolonial, colonial and post-colonial systems of rules and regulations. General orders; financial regulations;
civil service regulations; bureaucracy and its formal rules; the civil service rule and regulations.
Substantive rules governing appointments, severance and discipline in Nigerian Civil Service. Rules and
regulations governing entitlements – medical, maternity, leave, pensions, etc. Establishment circulars, the
open reporting systems and their problems.
DPA/DPM/DLG 1051: INTRODUCTION TO NIGERIAN POLITICAL ECONOMY
This course is designed to enable students to have basic insights into Nigeria’s contemporary political
economy. In part I, the pre-colonial mode of production and social formations and sources of change, trade
and state formation are examined.
In part 2, the evolution of the Nigerian state through British imperialism and colonialism together with the
impact of the incorporation on Nigerian societies are examined. Also examined are the political and
economic structures that promote and sustain imperialist control with a view to understanding the nature of
development and under-development in Nigeria. The concluding part calls for critical assessments of the
relationship of neo-colonialism, economic dependence and class formation to choice of development
strategies, policy outputs and patterns of political change in Nigeria in the period from 1960 to the present.
DPA/DPM/DLG 1071: COMMUNICATION FOR MIDDLE LEVEL MANAGEMENT
Theoretical and institutional aspects of governmental expenditures. Analysis of the effects of fiscal,
monetary and debt management policies on the level of employment, prices and rate of economic growth
and development. Sources of public revenue. Principles and methods of taxation. Nigerian taxation law
and regulations. Principles and types of budgeting and financial control. The role of audit, financial
relationships of federal, state and local governments; independent sources of local government finance.
DPA/DPM/DLG 1012: INTRODUCTION TO PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT
Bureaucracy in the public and private sectors. Principles and theories of managerial organization with
particular reference to the public service, administration and reform, discipline, motivation and incentives
of staff training and development and manpower planning. Personnel relations, role models and
responsibilities of a “professionalized” civil service.
DPA/DPM/DLG 1022: NIGERIAN RURAL SOCIETY
Nigeria is largely a rural society, proper understanding of the people of Nigeria’s various communities,
their political, social economic and cultural organizations is required for effective programmes of rural
development and national integration. Students are introduced to the Nigerian rural society to enable them
170
appreciate the similarities and differences among Nigerian peoples for better understanding and productive
interactions.
DPA/DPM/DLG 1042: GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS IN NIGERIA
Emergence, character and implications of the political economy of the Nigerian state (with particular
reference to political structures and processes). A critical survey and analysis of federalism, leadership,
fellowship, interest groups, minority, communal and ruling class politics in Nigeria. Parties and elections,
constitutionalism, systemic change and development. Crisis, conflict and the civil war; military rule and
political instability. Continuity and change in the first, second, third and fourth republics (some enduring
issues of the fiscal crisis, inter-governmental relations, public policy, etc).
DPA/DPM/DLG 1052: INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS & MANAGEMENT
Students are here introduced to the classical theories of administration and structures of organization,
leading to a consideration of the different schools. Max Webber and modern theorists are considered. The
course also deals with the problems of political office holders and career civil servants, and of political
parties and public administration. Nigeria, Britain, USA and France provides the principal focus of study.
DPA/DPM/DLG 1062: FIELD DATA COLLECTION: ORGANIZATION AND
ANALYSIS
The techniques of data gathering in social sciences; field entry and administration; note-taking; field
summaries. The use of secondary resources-library, newspaper and government documents analysis:
structure of field report.
DPA/DPM/DLG 2001: PUBLIC POLICY ANALYSIS & DECISION-MAKING
Introductory over-view of the several framework, models, and approaches to policy analysis. Significance
of public policy analysis. Nigeria’s public policy and decision-making process and environment. Focus on
specific policy is in the social, economic and political sphere: the Nigerian community, especially some of
the topical policy initiatives in the country. Conflicts and influences on the policy processes, choices and
implementation.
DPA/DPM/DLG 2031: THEORIES OF PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION
Intellectual development of public administration. The classical, scientific, human relations, systems and
structural-functional theories; forms or managerial and administrative organizations; decision-making in
public bureaucracy, ethics of public administration; public interest.
DPA/DPM/DLG 2041: CONSTITUTIONAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE LAW
Meaning of, and distinction between constitutional law, parliamentary acts and administrative laws and
regulations. Relations between the executive, legislature and judiciary; their operations and mutual
influence. “Judicial” powers and functions of public administrators. Administrative accountability to the
executive and legislative arms of government. Doctrine of ultra vires: government liability of public
servants for acts committed in the course of official duties. The role and powers of ombudsman.
DPA/DPM/DLG 2051: THEORIES OF ORGANIZATION
Students are here introduced to the classical theories of administration and structures of organization
leading to a consideration of the criticisms of them in the light of modern theories and their different
schools. Max Weber and modern theorists are considered. The course also deals with the problems of
“politics and administration”, including the constitutional and organizational relationships of political
officials and career civil servants, and of political parties and public administration. Nigeria, Britain,
United States of America and France provides the principal focus of study.
DPA/DPM/DLG 2061: DEVELOPMENT ECONOMICS AND PLANNING
Examines the economic issues of poverty, inequality and unemployment in the Third World. Emphasizes
the effect of the external environment viz; trade, technology and technology transfer, international division
of labour; strategic and structural dependence; industrialization and planning; transnational corporations;
international capital flows; Third World debt; north – south dialogue; south-south cooperation; prospects
for a new international economic order; and other relevant changes that have implications for developing
economics such as perestroika and glaspost; and the role of women in development.
171
DPA/DPM/DLG 2002: PUBLIC FINANCE AND PUBLIC FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT
Institutional bases of government revenue and expenditure. Sources of public revenue. Principles and
methods of taxation. Nigerian taxation laws. Budgeting: principles and types of financial control. Audit-its
role in financial management. Fiscal and monetary management and their effects on wages, prices and
level of employment. Federal systems and the financial relationships. State and local governments: their
independent sources of revenue.
DLG 2081:
LOCAL GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTING AND AUDITING
Structure of local government accounts in Nigeria; purposes and methods of keeping accounts; rules of
accounting; materials, wages and overhead costs of local governments. Principles and practice of auditing;
auditing procedures and techniques; audit report, queries and surcharges. A case of selected audit reports
in Akwa Ibom and Cross River States.
DPA/DPM/DLG 2022: RURAL DEVELOPMENT
Theories, concepts and approaches to the study of rural development: fundamental features of rural
societies in Africa; their ecological systems, patterns of development, structure and functions; a
comparative analysis of policies, strategies for functions; a comparative analysis of policies as strategies
for rural development in Nigeria; implications of national development policies and programmes for rural
development.
DPA/DPM/DLG 2032: PUBLIC CORPORATIONS
A review of the types and nature of public corporations and state-owned companies in Nigeria: rationale
for their establishment: organizations’ finances and management: relations with governments: their
suitability as instruments of socio-economic development in the new African states.
DPA/DPM/DLG 2042: DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION
Development administration: its meaning, rationale and theories. Development paths (socialist and
capitalist), their principles, concepts and practices. Modernization and underdevelopment. Dependency
and development theories, their utilities and limitation. Development administration in Nigeria: tools,
pattern, methods, processes and machinery. The National Development plans (1945-1985). Effect of
chosen path: A critique towards new frontiers in development administration.
DPA/DPM/DLG 2052: HEALTH AND WELFARE ADMINISTRATION
An overview of health care delivery system in Nigeria. The development of organized health care services
within the changing conditions of Nigeria. Traditinal medicine and the role of traditional healers in
contemporary modern medicine. Social, economic and political factors of health care administration.
Approaches to health care policy decisions such as Primary Health Care and National Health Insurance,
etc. Politics of health care delivery system at the local, state and federal government levels.
DPA/DPM/DLG 2082: HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT
Theory of motivation. Motivation maintenance theory. Preference/expectancy theory. Reinforcement
theory. Theories X and Y. Analysis of job satisfaction, motivation and performance. Career planning and
development. Employee benefits and managerial decision-making.
DPA/DPM/DLG 2072: PROJECT
Each student is required to write a project. The project shall be supervised by a lecturer assigned to the
student, and will count for 6 semester hours of credit. Three copies of the approved project must be
submitted to the supervisor for grading. No student can get a Diploma in IPPA without a completed and
grade project.
172
FACULTY OF AGRICULTURE
History
Greater reliance on agriculture as the basis for Nigeria's sustainable development in the 1990's and
decades ahead is sine qua non. This is because of the unique role agriculture plays in national
development. Agriculture supplies raw materials to many industries. It acts as foreign exchange earner as
well as feeding the teaming population. On this basis, agricultural research and education, which are
designed to equip the sector and to provide the needed skilled manpower, have to be encouraged, financed
and research findings/information disseminated in order to meet the expected goal. It is in realization of
the above that the Faculty of Agriculture, University of Calabar, was established with the first batch of
students in the 1981/82 academic year.
At inception, seven departments were proposed, however, five are fully operational as at 2002.
These are:
1)
The Department of Animal Science
2)
The Department of Crop Science
3)
The Department of Agricultural Economics & Extension
4)
The Department of Soil Science
5)
The Department of Forestry and Wild1ife Resources Management
The Department of Food Technology and Nutrition is proposed and may take off in the near
future .
The faculty runs a five-year programme of studies, which prepares students for the degree of
Bachelor of Science in Agriculture. In the 1986/87 academic session, the faculty evolved a new
curriculum leading to the award of Bachelorof Agriculture (B. Agric.) with a lot of emphasis on practical
training. This was in consonance with the need to professionalise Agriculture. The first three years are
devoted to academic training which consists largely of courses required by all students in Agriculture.
The fourth year is used solely for practical training. The final (fifth) year is devoted to specialized
training in various options in Agriculture. Projects are also carried out in the respective disciplines.
In 1990, the Faculty had to re-align its courses in order to meet the stipulated NUC minimum
academic standards. This has led to the inclusion of new courses, like Forestry and Home Economics. A
new syllabus has been prepared along this line. The minimum number of credit hours required for
graduation is 199 comprising complete course work, i.e. a minimum of 163 credit hours 36 credit hours
of practical work.
Admission Regulation and Entrance Requirements
Admission of students into all the departments in the faculty is through the University
Matriculation Examination and the Remedial Programme of the University of Calabar which is aimed at
rectifying student deficiencies before embarking on the full programme.
To qualify for admission into any degree course in the Faculty of Agriculture, a candidate must
satisfy the general University requirements as outlined in the JAMB Brochure Guidelines for admission to
First Degree Courses in Nigerian Universities (obtainable from the Joint Admission Matriculation Board).
The candidate must as well fulfill the faculty and departmental requirements prescribed below:
1.
DIRECT ENTRY through direct: The Faculty of Agriculture does not admit students
entry:
However, proposals, to do so are in the pipeline:
2.
JOINT ADMISSION MATRICULATIOPN BOARD A
candidate
may
qualify
for
admission into the Faculty of Agriculture by satisfying the following:
a)
Obtaining a score in University Matriculation Examination of not less than
the minimum score required by the faculty.
b)
Possessing one of the following qualifications:
i.
West African School Certificate with passes at Credit level in at least
five subjects including: English Language, Mathematics, Agricultural
Science
or Biology, Chemistry and Physics.
ii.
General Certificate of Education with passes at ordinary level in at
least five subjects, including: English Language, Mathematics,
Agricultural Science, Biology, Chemistry and Physics.
173
iii.
Senior Secondary School Certificate with credits in at least five
including: English Language, Mathematics, Agricultural
Chemistry and Physics.
Science
or
subjects
Biology,
DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS AND EXTENSION
History of the Department
The Agricultural Economics and Extension programme was one of the B.Sc Degree Prorammes, which
took off during the 1981/82 session. The approved curriculum of the programme continued to be operative
until the 1988/89 session when it was replaced by a revised version. The approved revised prospectus
includes courses on Introduction to Quantitative Agricultural Economics, Research Methods, and
Introduction to Econometrics, which were not available in the earlier prospectus.
ACADEMIC PROGRAMMES
Undergraduate
The department operates a bifurcate undergraduate programme. Students in the department are exposed to
both Agricultural Economics and Agricultural Extension courses. The aim is to give the students a strong
foundation in these two very important sub-disciplines of Agriculture. Students in the department are
expected to choose one of the options (Agricultural Economics or Agricultural Extension) after their Year
IV programme.
Objectives
1 To develop students’ skills in analyzing and solving agricultural problems using economics &
Extension rationale/principles.
2 To equip students with necessary skills to take up jobs both in the private and public sectors of the
Nigerian economy.
3 To train students to be able to conduct advanced research in the dual area of Agricultural
Economics and Extension.
4 To train and equip students with skills in technology transfer.
5 To train and equip students with skills to become job creators and self-employed.
Postgraduate
The Postgraduate programmes in the department are in the areas of Agricultural Economics and
Agricultural Extension. The department runs a post-graduate Diploma, Masters and Ph.D in the two
options.
Objectives
The major objectives of the graduate programme in the Department of Agricultural Economics and
Extension are to:
1. train Agricultural Economists/Extensionists and equip them with analytical tools for finding
solutions to economic problems of agriculture.
2. produce individuals capable of undertaking research and teaching in the field of agricultural
economics and extension for employment in research organisations and higher institutions of
learning.
3. equip, train graduates of Agricultural Economics to become self-employable as agricultural
management consultants, agricultural marketing specialists, publishers of agricultural business
bulletins and journals, etc.
Admission Requirements
Undergraduate (UME, Remedial, Transfer & Direct Entry)
The UME candidates are admitted into a five-year degree programme of he Department of Agricultural
Economics and Extension. The UME entry requirements are credit passes in SSCE/GCE O-Level in five
subjects (which should include: Chemistry, Mathematics or Physics, English Language, Biology or
Agricultural Science and any other subject) in not more than two sittings. At least a pass in Physics is
174
required. However, a candidate with a pass in English Language or Mathematics may be allowed by
Senate to remedy the deficiency and is required to pass it during the first year of study.
The second mode of admission is through the remedial programme. Candidates who have successfully
passed through the University of Calabar remedial Science programme may also be admitted into first year
of the degree programme. Direct entry students with requisite qualification are also admitted to do four
years for the B. Agric. programme.
Transfer
Apart from the UME and remedial programme, students may be admitted from other departments in the
faculty in their final year. To be eligible for transfer into the Department of Agricultural Economics and
Extension, candidates must satisfy the following requirements, as applicable:
a. Remedial candidates must have credit passes in Economics and Mathematics;
b. Candidates on inter-departmental transfer must have a minimum CGPA of 2.50 in addition to an
average of a B-grade in Agricultural Economics and Extension courses.
a)
Post Graduate (PGDE)
Entry Requirement:
i.
Candidates must have a Bachelor’s degree (at least a third class) in Agriculture and related disciplines.
ii.
Higher National Diploma (HND) (Lower Credit) in Agriculture and related disciplines.
b)
M.Sc. Degree
Candidates who hold a first degree either in Agriculture, Agricultural Economics, Economics or a related
discipline with a good Second Class Honours degree from the University of Calabar or any other
university recognized by the Senate may apply for admission. Candidates will be required to register for
and pass a total of 30 credit hours of course work at the 600 level. Candidates will take a total of 18 credit
units of compulsory courses and a total of 12 credit units of electives from two of the given option areas,
namely:
 Agricultural Economic Development and Policy
 Farm Management/Production Economics
 Agricultural Marketing and Co-operatives
 Resource Economics
c)
i)
Ph.D. Degree
Candidates for admission into the Ph.D. programmes must hold a masters degree in Agricultural
Economics or a related discipline.
ii) In addition to completing the course work for the masters degree in Agricultural Economics, the
candidate shall complete 12 credit hours of course work at the 700 level and pass with a minimum
grade of B.
iii) Ph.D students in Agricultural Economics and Agricultural Extension must pass a comprehensive
examination in Economic Theory, Quantitative Methods and one chosen option.
COURSE OUTLINE
Undergraduate - Year One
YEAR ONE
1ST SEMESTER
Course
Code
Course title
2ND SEMESTER
Credit Hr
175
Course
Code
Courses title
Credit
Hr
BIO1101
CHM1011
MTH 1011
3
3
3
BIO1102
CHM1022
MTH 1352
3
PHY1102
GSS 1101
Introductory Biology I
Introductory Chemistry
Elementary Mathematics &
Statistics
Introduction
to
Microeconomics
Use of English I
2
ECS1102
PHY1101
GSS1011
Introductory Physics
Philosophy and Logic
3
2
GSS1102
GSS 1112
ECS1101
Introduction to Biology II
Organic Chemistry I
Co-ordinate Geometry &
Calculus
Introduction Physics II
3
3
3
Introduction to MacroEconomics
Use of English
Citizenship Education
3
3
2
2
COURSE DESCRIPTION
BIO 1101:
INTRODUCTORY BIOLOGY
Cellular basis of live, General structure and functions of plant cells and cellular organelles, plant cell
division, heredity, diversity in plant cells and habitats, morphology, general characteristics. Life cycles
and range of forms of Bacteria, Viruses, Fungi, Bryophytes, Lichens and Pteridophytes.
General structure of animal cell, Functions of animal cells and cellular organelles, animal cells types and
division. Forms, functions and life history of invertebrates using selected examples from classes of
invertebrates such as Protozoa, Coelenterates, Arthropods, Platy helminthes, Ashelminthes, Annelids and
Molluses.
CHM1 1011: INTRODUCTORY CHEMISTRY
Atoms, sub-atomic particles, inscapes, Avogadros’ number, the mole concept, chemical formulae, the
laws of chemical combinations, equations and calculations, state of matter, gases, liquids and solids,
chemical thermodynamics, energetics and thermo chemistry, buffers, chemical equilibrium and
equilibrium constants solubility, products, chemical kinetics, electrochemistry, nuclear binding energy
fission and fusion.
MTH 1111:
ALGEBRA AND TRIGONOMETRY
Algebra and trigonometry, real number system, real sequence and series, sets and subsets, unit intersection,
complements, empty and universal sets, venn diagram, one way correspondence between sets, quadratic
functions and equations, solution of linear equations, simple properties of determinants, inches and
binomial d theorem, transformation equations of the straight line and application to simple regression
equations, permutations and combinations circular measure, trigonometric functions of angles, addition
and factor formulae, complex numbers, moments and couples, relative velocity, calculus, elementary
functions of simple real variable graphs of simple functions, the differentiations of simple algebraic
exponential and log functions, differentiations of a sum, product of a quotient function of rules, implicit
differentiation, definite and indefinite integral to areas and volumes.
PHY 1101:
INTRODUCTORY PHYSICS I
Mechanics, units, dimensions, the S.I. Kinetics. Motion with constant acceleration, force, work, energy,
momentum, centre of mass, elastic and inelastic collusions, impulsive force, equilibrium. Heat: atoms and
molecules, temperature and thermal capacity, properties of gases, kinetic theory, specific heats, first law of
thermo-dynamics.
Waves: The electromagnetic spectrum, velocity and characteristics of light, sound elementary acoustics.
The Bel Haygen’s principle, reflection, refraction, morrows, prisms, lenses, the eye polarization.
ECS 1101: INTRODUCTION TO MICROECONOMICS
The nature of Economic Science: The methodology of Economics Elementary principle of
microeconomics, demand, supply, price determination. Types of Markets: Competitions, Oligopoly,
monopoly.
GSS 1101: USE OF ENGLISH
Writing English and effective communication study skills. Language skills. Writing of essay answers.
Instructions of Lexis, sentence construction, outlines and paragraphs. Collection and organization of
materials and logical presentation. Punctuation and logical presentation of papers, use of the wrong
phonetics, art of public speaking and oral communication.
176
GSS 1121:
PHILOSOPHY AND LOGIC
Nature of logic, aims of logic, why do logic – the usefulness of logic, law of thought. Premise and
conclusion indicators. Informal fallacies, kinds sand uses of definitions in logic, inductive and deductive
logic, elementary logical iterators. The concept of philosophy and its latest dimensions, the question of the
origin of philosophy. The fundamental problems of philosophy. Lonians, Plato and Aristotle, Thomas
Aquinas, and St. Augustine. Modern period: Bene: Descartes, John Locke. Contemporary positivism,
existentialism.
CHM 1022: ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II
Historical survey of the development and importance of organic chemistry, Nomenclature and classes of
organic compounds, Homologous series, Functional groups, isolation and purification of organic
compounds, Qualitative and quantitative organic chemistry, stereochemistry: Determination of structure of
organic compounds, Electronic theory in organic chemistry, Saturated hydrocarbons. Unsaturated
hydrocarbons. Periodic table and periodic properties, alency forces, structure of solid. The chemistry of
selected metals and non-metals
Qualitative analysis, chemical equations and storchiometry.
COURSE OUTLINE
YEAR TWO
1ST SEMESTER
Course
Code
AGR2101
AGA2101
AGC2101
AGS2101
AGX2101
AGC2201
2ND SEMESTER
Course title
Credit Hr
3
Course
Code
AGC2302
Intro. To Agric. BioChemistry
Principles of Animal
Production
Principles
of
Crop
Production
Principles of Soil Science
Intro. To Agric. Ext. &
Rural Sociology
Botany
and
Crop
Physiology
Cytology and Genetics
Credit
Hr
3
3
CHM2422
Analytical Chemistry
3
3
AGA2202
3
3
AGE2202
2
AGR2202
3
AGS2202
Anatomy and Physiology of
farm Animals
Introduction to Agric.
Economics
Introduction to Agric.
Engineering
Intro. To Pedology & Soil
Physics
Introduction to Forestry
Principles of Food Science
and
Technology
AGR2302
AGR2402
Courses title
3
3
2
3
3
COURSE DESCRIPTION
AGR 2001:
INTRODUCTION TO AGRICULTURE
Definition of Agriculture: The origin, scope and importance of Agriculture to man, Food supply situation
in the world, trend distribution, Characteristic features of Tropical Agriculture and how production is
affected. Farming system practices, land tenure, Land use, Types, forestry, Fish farming and wild life
Agriculture.
AGR 2101:
INTRODUCTION TO AGRICULTURAL BIO-CHEMISTRY
Structure, properties and Biological pigments, Vitamins, amino acids, Peptides, Proteins enzyme,
Coenzymes. Hormones. Plant growth factors, Purines, Pyrimidines, Nucleotides and Nucleic acid and
porphyrins. Enzyme, nature, classification, inhibition, activation, control of activity, specificity, active
sites and mechanisms of action. Intermediary metabolism, biological oxidations and bioenergetics.
AGR 2101: PRINCIPLES OF ANIMAL PRODUCTION
History of Animal Agriculture, classification and distribution to important world breeds of cattle, sheep,
goats, pigs, poultry and rabbits, climate and other factors affecting the livestock industry in Nigeria
management practices and systems and effects on behaviour and handling of animals.
177
AGC 2101: PRINCIPLES OF CROP PRODUCTION
Development of crop production: Cultural practices from major crops, importance of crop rotation, water
and soil conservation. Irrigation, drainage, fertility maintenance and pest control. Weeds and their impact
on crop production. Basic mendelian genetics. Harvesting, processing and storage of Agricultural
products.
AGC 2101: PRINCIPLES OF SOIL SCIENCE
Physical, chemical and biological properties and processes of soils. Soil moisture, air and temperature,
soil classification and survey. Role and use of lime, fertilizer, organic matter and manure. Soil-plant
relationship with emphasis of functions of essential elements in plants, their availability, requirements and
deficiency symptoms.
AEX 2101: INTRODUCTION TO AGRIC. EXTENSION AND RURAL SOCIOLOGY
Definition, objective and philosophy of Agricultural Extension. The institutional setting of Agricultural
Extension Basic concepts and principles of Rural Sociology to the understanding of rural situation.
Importance of rural communities and institutions, social stratification, social processes and social
stratification, social processes and social changes in rural areas. The rural revolution and social
transformation, changing rural-urban problems. Elimination of rural-urban distribution and the future of
rural communities.
AGC 2201: BOTANY AND CROP PHYSIOLOGY
Botanical and other methods of classification of cultivated crops with particular reference to tropical crops.
External and internal structure of plants. Reproduction in plants, pollination, fertilization and fruit
formation. Physical and chemical phenomena in the living functions of plants. Environmental influences
on crop growth. Variation in photosynthetic capacities and factors affecting them, yield maximization.
Storage and mobilization of reserves.
AGA 2202: ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY OF FARM ANIMALS
Anatomy and physiology of domestic animals such as cattle, sheep, goats, pigs, rabbits and poultry.
Anatomy and physiology of the cell, cell types, animal tissues, nervous system, skeletal system. Muscle
bone, circulatory system, reproductive, digestive, special senses and other systems of farm animals
Elements of environmental physiology and animal behaviour. Growth and bio-energetics.
AGE 2202: INTRODUCTION TO AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS
The nature of economics and economic problems, scope and method, price theory and functions of the
market with particular reference to Agriculture. Concepts of demand, supply, price determination and
elasticity are handled. Emphasis is also placed on the structure and changes in the Nigerian Agriculture as
well as agriculture problems, the National Income and Income Employment Theories. Types of Market
structures investment, interest rate, inflation, international trade commodity agreements and balance of
payments, money and banking.
AGR 2202: INTRODUCTION TO AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING
Definition, areas of specialization and roles of Agricultural Engineering in national economy. Prospects
and job opportunities. Work, power energy heat and basic electricity, Machines of efficiency. Weather,
rainfall, soil and water conservation. Drying and storage moisture content. Introduction to tools and
workshop practice.
AGS 2202: INTRODUCTION TO PEDOLOGY AND SOIL PHYSICS
The soil, its origin and formation, soil morphological characteristics, soil components, soil forming rocks
and minerals, weathering of rocks and minerals. Profile description, soil survey, soil mapping. Soil
classification. Properties and management of Nigerian soils. Classification of soil separates, soil texture,
surface area of particles, aggregation, soil structure, and stability, porosity, soil water relations, soil and the
hydrologic cycle. Soil temperature and conduction of soil erosion.
AGR 2302: INTRODUCTION TO FORESTRY
178
Renewable natural resources, availability distribution and potential. The important forest trees and
wildlife (Wildlife emphasis on Nigerian species). Classification, morphology and distribution of important
forest trees. Forest and games reserves in Nigeria silviculture, a forestation characteristics of manor timber
and their uses, Felling and log transportation.
AGR 2402: PRINCIPLES OF FOOD SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
Scope and definition of food science and technology. Food habits. Food poisoning and its prevention.
Principles of food processing and preservations. Deterioration and spoilage of foods, other post harvest
changes in food.
Contamination of foods from natural sources. Composition and structures of Nigerian/West African food,
factors contributing to texture, colour, aroma and flavour of food. Cost, traditional and ethnic influences
of food preparation and consumption pattern.
COURSE OUTLINE:YEAR THREE
1ST SEMESTER
Course
Code
AGA3101
AGC3101
AGC3201
AGE3101
AGR3101
AGS3101
GSS2111
2ND SEMESTER
Course title
Credit Hr
Non-Ruminant
Animal
Production
Field Crop Production
3
Course
Code
AGA3202
3
AGA3302
Principles
of
Crop
Production
Intro
to
Farm
Management & Prod.
Econs
Introduction to
Farm
Mechanics
Soil
Chemistry
and
Micro-Biology
Computer Application I
3
Courses title
Ruminant Animal Production
Credit
Hr
3
3
AGC3302
Intro to Animal Genetics and
Breeding
Tree Crop Production
3
AGX3202
Extension Education
3
2
AGC3302
Farming Systems
3
3
AGR3302
2
3
AGS3402
Introduction to Fisheries and
Wildlife
Computer Appl. &
experimental Designs
Computer Application II
GSS2112
3
3
3
COURSE DESCRIPTION
AGA 3101 NON-RUMINANT ANIMAL PRODUCTION
Management practices involved in breeding stock, nutrition, housing equipment, disease control measures
and handling of various species of farm livestock. Health management of stock, processing and
marketing of poultry, pigs and rabbits.
AGC 3101: FIELD CROP PRODUCTION
Cultural operations for major field crops like yam, cassava, cocoyam, plantain, maize, rice, cowpea and
vegetables. Approved varieties, production practices, harvesting, utilization, processing, storage and
economic aspects of some selected arable crops.
AGC 3201: PRINCIPLES OF CROP PROTECTION
Effects of diseases, pests, fungi, bacteria, viruses and nematodes and weeds on crops. Principles and
methods of diseases, pests and weed control. Major pest, diseases, bacteria, viruses and nematodes.
Classification of chemical used in crop protection, mode of application, problems of usage, toxicity safety
and their ecological and environmental hazards.
AGE 3101: INTRODUCTION TO FARM MANAGEMENT AND PRODUCTION ECONOMICS
Introduction, definition of applied terms and relevant economic principles guiding resource use are
emphasized. These include: factor, factor-product and product-product relations.
Analysis of farm records, farm planning and evaluation of partial budget, total budgets and enterprise
budgets.
179
AGR 3101: INTRODUCTION TO FARM MECHANICS
Goals and Principles of Farm Mechanization: Basic Mechanics. Workshop tools. Principles of internal
combustion engines and electric motor. Study of farm machinery sued for tillage practices, ploughs,
harrows, cultivators, farm power transmission system.
Harvesting and processing equipment (Sprayers and Dusters) Equipment for livestock (automatic feed
conveyors, watering equipment: milking and milk handling equipment meat processing equipment) water
lifting and irrigation equipment. Surveying instruments using on the farm operating principles selection
and maintenance procedures of farm machinery. Farm machinery costing and records. Workshop and
building materials used on the farm.
AGS 3101: SOIL CHEMISTRY AND MICROBIOLOGY
Plant nutrition activities of cautions and their absorption by plants, mechanisms of absorptions – plant-soil
inter-phase. Micro-organisms occurring in soils, bio-chemical activities of microbial population,
contributions to soil fertility, formation, properties of soil organic matter, microbial transformation of N, P,
S, Fe and other minerals, isolation of organisms concerned, transformation of hydrocarbons and
pesticides, Rhizosphere effect and mycorrhizal association, ecological interactions.
AGA 3202: RUMINANT ANIMAL PRODUCTION
Types and Breeds of Ruminants: Breed characteristics, and specific climate adaptation. Nutritional
requirements, feeding, housing and sanitation. Practical animal Husbandry techniques and field problems
on management. Feeding: health care practices and slaughtering of Pigs and Poultry.
AGA 3302: INTRODUCTION TO ANIMAL GENETICS AND BREEDING
Objectives and History of Genetics, genetic principles and problems in breeding Animals for disease
resistance and increased production. Genetic code, Mendelism. Fundamental principles of inheritance,
quantitative and qualitative characteristics and their inheritance. Different types of gene actions, values
and means, repeatability.
AGA 3302: TREE CROP PRODUCTION
Analysis of origin, distribution, soil and climatic requirements of tropical plantation crops such as cocoa
oil palm, rubber coffee coconut mango, sugar cane bananas plantation, citrus, kola, cashew, production
practices, improvement, harvesting, utilization processing and economic aspects of some selected tree
crops.
AEX 3202: EXTENSION EDUCATION
Definition, nature and element of communication process. Principles of analyzing communication
problems in extension. The meaning of the concepts of teaching, learning and motivation. Steps and
principles of teaching and learning. Extension teaching methods. Preparation and use of teaching
materials and aids.
AGR 3302: FARMING SYSTEMS
Introduction, definition of applied term, description and analysis of the various components of the system,
major farming systems in the tropics with emphasis on African Traditional Farming System, appraisal of
the competitive factors and functions affecting the system.
AGR 3402: INTRODUCTION TO FISHERIES AND WILDLIFE
The important fishes and wildlife to West Africa with emphasis on Nigerian species. Classification
evolution, morphology and basic structure of fishes. The adaptation of fish to aquatic life. Life cycle of
principal species of fishes and wildlife. Significance of fishes and wildlife in the life of Nigerians. The
fish and wildlife industries in Nigeria. Fundamental principles of fish and wildlife management and
production.
AGR 3502: COMPUTER APPLICATIONS AND EXPERIMENTAL DESIGNS
Experiments, experimental procedures, causes and control of experimental error. Analysis of variance, one
way and multiple way classification. Factorial experiments. Split-plot designs and analysis of results.
180
Problems solving methods and algorithm development designing. Coding, debugging and documenting
programmes using techniques of COBOL, FORTRAN AND SPSS. Computer organization, programming
algorithm development. Applying computer to problems solving in Agriculture.
COURSE OUTLINE: YEAR FOUR
1ST SEMESTER
Course
Code
AGR4100
AGC4100
AGE4100
AGS4100
AGR4100
AGX4100
2ND SEMESTER
Course title
Credit Hr
Non-Ruminant Management
Techniques
Horticultural and Permanent
Crop Production
Farm
Management
and
Accounts I
Soil
Sampling
and
Description, Drainage and Soil
Fertility
Farm Design and Agric.
Mechanization Practices
Farm Survey & Extension
Practices I
4
Course
Code
AGA4200
5
AGC4200
3
AEX4200
2
AGS4200
Ruminant Management
Techniques
Arable Crop Production
Techniques
Farm Survey and Extension
Practices II
Agricultural Meteorology
2
AGR4202
Workshop Practices
2
2
AGS4300
Soil Conservation and Land
Use Planning
Farm Management &
Accounting II
3
AGE4300
Courses title
COURSE DESCRIPTION
AGA 4100: NON-RUMINANT MANAGEMENT TECHNIQUES
Animal Husbandry practices of cattle, sheep and goats.
processing of livestock products.
Credit
Hr
4
4
3
1
4
Health care practices and
AGC 4100: HORTICULTURE AND PERMANENT CROPS PRODUCTION TECHNIQUES
Crop Husbandry practices from local and exotic vegetables suited to the ecological zone. Pre-nursery and
field operations of major permanent crops including oil palm, cocoa, rubber and citrus. Post-harvest
treatment of farm produce.
AGC 4200: ARABLE CROPS PRODUCTION TECHNIQUES
Arable crop production practices for the major crops in the ecological zone, including establishment,
cultural practices and harvesting: of maize, cassava, yams, cocoyam, plantains, rice, cowpeas and melon.
Post-harvest treatments of the crops.
AGE 4100: FARM MANAGEMENT AND ACCOUNTS
This course involves one credit hour of in-class work and two credit hours of out-of-class work for 2
semesters. Major emphasis in the in-class work is in the area of record keeping, developing budgets
(partial and total) feasibility studies and analyzing a variety of market information. The out of class work
deals with actual data collection based on the students’ interest as well as reviewing the records, budgets
and profitability of the Faculty of Agriculture farms (Crops and Animals). The student as well are, during
this phase is exposed or attached to either a farm, bank or relevant Agricultural firm to have a working
knowledge of its performance.
AEX 4200: FARM SURVEY AND EXTENSION PRACTICES
Sample villages in the neighbourhood of Calabar are selected and students study the
socioeconomic and technical components of farming system in the area.
Designing of questionnaires and actual conduct of the survey. During the year the students will go out in a
group once a week and work with their clientele farmers to study the farming operations and field
management on the spot. Survey will last for 10weeks. Design of teaching aids and audio-visuals in
extension Education.
AGS 4100: SOIL SAMPLING AND DESCRIPTION, DRAINAGE AND SOIL FERTILITY
181
Soil profile descriptions, soil moisture measurements, types and importance of fertilizer. Applications rate
and methods for various crops. Safety and environmental factors affecting their efficiency. Deficiency
symptoms.
AGS 4200: AGRIC. METEOROLOGY
Elements of climate and their measurement, processing and analysis of rainfall, air and soil temperature,
humidity evapotranspiration data. Analysis of long-term records of weekly, monthly and annual rainfall
data. Climatic effects on agricultural productivity.
AGS 4300: SOIL CONSERVATION AND LAND USE PLANNING
Identification of types of soil erosion and other forms of land degradation, and their control. Practical
training in agronomic practices of soil conservation. Purpose and justification for land use planning. Land
use planning and management for rain-fed agriculture, forestry, irrigation and for non-agricultural projects.
AGR 4100: FARM DESIGN AND AGRIC MECHANIZATION PRACTICES
Simple land survey techniques and survey equipment. Land development and tillage operations.
AGR 4200: WORKSHOP PRACTICES
Procedure and practices in Agric. Mechanics workshop. Workshop tool, safety and maintenance of farm
equipment, fault finding and repairs.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS
YEAR FIVE
1ST SEMESTER
Course
Code
AGE5101
AGE5201
AGE5301
AGE5401
AGE5501
AGE5601
AGE5701
AGE5501
2ND SEMESTER
Course title
Seminar
Fundamentals
Econometrics
Production Economics
Agric.
Policy
Development
Farm Accounting
Research
Methods/Statistics
Agric. Marketing
Programme planning
Evaluation
Credit Hr
of
2
3
Course
Code
AGE5100
AGE5112
&
3
3
AGE5122
AGE5132
Agric. Business Management
Agric. Development
2
2
3
3
AGE5142
AGE5152
Agric. Finance
Livestock Economics
2
2
&
Courses title
Research Project
Agric. Cooperative
Credit
Hr
4
2
2
3
COURSE DESCRIPTION
A.
FIRST SEMESTER
AGE 5101: RESEARCH METHODS, MEASUREMENT & SCALING AND STATISTICS
Defining a research problem; developing hypothesis and objectives; principles of research design;
questionnaire preparation and collection of data, sampling and sample design, measurements of variables;
statistical theory, statistical methods for data analysis, presentation of research findings.
AGE 5201: FUNDAMENTALS OF ECONOMETRICS
Elementary discussions in productions, simple regression models, its assumptions and consequences for
violations. Problems of estimation with bad data. Multiple regression, statistical demand analysis,
statistical production and cost analysis. Methods and application of econometrics to Agricultural problems.
AGE 5301: PRODUCTION ECONOMICS
Basic economic principles in resource, utilization and allocation enterprise combination: forms of
production functions, and their characteristics. Management of resource productivity. The decision
making process, depreciation techniques, asset fixity, kinds and functions of farm records and accounts,
basic principles of accounting, nature of simple farm accounts, farm planning and analysis farm budgets,
farm records, inventory the balance sheet journal entry, income statement etc.
182
AGE 5401: AGRICULTURAL POLICY
Meaning of Agricultural Economic Development. Place of Agriculture in Economic Development. Interrelationship between Agricultural and Industrial Development. Factors affecting economic Development.
Obstacles to economic development. Nigerian Agricultural policies and programmes. Integrated Rural
Development.
AGE 5501: FARM ACCOUNTING
Basic principles of accounting, nature of simple farm accounts: farm planning and analysis farm budgets,
farm records, inventory the balance sheet journal entry, income statement etc.
AGE 5601: RESEARCH METHODS
The concept and principle of evaluation and research applied to problems in Agricultural Economics.
Measurement & scaling, descriptive & inferential statistical techniques. Techniques and procedures for
conducting investigation. Selecting a problem and developing plans for a study.
AGE 5401: AGRICULTURAL POLICY DEVELOPMENT
Meaning of Agricultural Economic Development. Place of Agriculture in Economic Development. Interrelationship between Agricultural and Industrial Development. Factors affecting economic Development.
Obstacles to economic development. Nigerian Agricultural Policies and programmes. Integrated Rural
Development.
B.
SECOND SEMESTER
AGE 5100: RESEARCH PROJECT
It is expected that a student must undertake and complete a research project under a supervisor.
AGE 5112: AGRICULTURAL CO-OPERATIVES
Definition and introduction to philosophy, basic and distinguishing characteristics of co-operative
organizations. Types, organizational, procedures, financing and business management of Agric. Cooperatives their limitations and potential contribution, structure and conduct performance of different types
of markets. The community boards, supply and demand elasticity and their effect on marketing decisions
of Agricultural products.
AGE 5122: AGRIC. BUSINESS MANAGEMENT
The scope of Agricultural Business Management, types of Agricultural Business Management and
Organizations. Enterprise selection: Production planning, public policies affecting Agricultural Business
Farm Growth. Organization of large scale farms, Legal organizations and tax strategies. Economics of
Agricultural Processing, Marketing management, principles of Agriculture Finance, Principles of farm
credit capital needs of Agricultural Industries sources of loan funds and collateral security for loans, Credit
Agencies and Government Credit Policies and approaches to efficient credit management, farm
Accounting, inventory, Balance Sheet, Cash book, Cash Book Analysis.
AGE 5401: AGRIC. MARKETING
Integrated analysis of major, marketing decisions including products, advertising, distribution and sales
policies. Marketing research application of statistical and other quantitative concepts to marketing
management problems.
AGE 5122: AGRIC. FINANCE
The scope of Agricultural Business Management, types of Agricultural Business Management and
Organizations: Enterprise selection: Production planning, public policies affecting Agricultural Business
Farm Growth, Organization of large scale farms, Legal organizations and tax strategies. Economics of
Agricultural processing, Marketing management. Principles of Agriculture Finance, principles of farm
Credit, Capital needs of Agricultural industries sources of loan funds and collateral security for loans,
Credit Agencies and Government Credit Policies and approaches to efficient credit management, Farm
Accounting, Inventory, Balance sheet, Cash book, Cash Book Analysis.
AGE 5152: LIVESTOCK ECONOMICS
183
Importance of livestock in the Nigerian Economy. Consumption and consumer patterns of livestock
products. Micro and economic principles in animal production, Agricultural production functions
including data collection and analysis.
Marketing theory in relation to livestock production Application of economic theory and quantitative
analysis. Capital investment and depreciation of capital: The economics of egg. Meat and milk
production, livestock feed economics, input/output relationship in livestock production
AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION UNIT:
YEAR FIVE
1ST SEMESTER
Course
Code
AEX5101
AEX5601
2ND SEMESTER
Course title
Credit Hr
Seminar
Research
Methods,
Measurement and Scaling
and Statistics
Theory & Practice of
Extension Administration
& supervision
Programme Planning &
Evaluation
Diffusion and Adoption of
Agric. Technology
Psychology in Extension
2
3
Course
Code
AEX5100
AEX5132
3
AEX5142
Social & Technological
Change in Agriculture
3
3
AEX5152
2
2
AEX5162
2
AEX5122
AEX 5201
Agric.
Communication
&Information Technology
2
AGE5112
Agric. Laws, Policies and
Reforms
Comparative Extension
Systems
Gender and Rural Youth
Development Studies
Agric. Cooperative
AGE 5701
Agric. Marketing
Cooperative
2
AEX 5701
AEX 5501
AEX 5401
AEX 5301
&
Courses title
Research Project
Rural/Community
Development
Credit
Hr
4
3
2
2
2
COURSE DESCRIPTION
FIRST SEMESTER
AGE 5101: SEMINAR
Discussion and presentation of various topics in Agricultural Economics, the student is also expected to
prepare and participate in all seminars and present a seminar in the course and also submit a hard copy of
the seminar work to the department.
AEX 5601:
RESEARCH METHODS, MEASUREMENT & SCALING AND STATISTICS
Defining a research problem; developing hypothesis and objectives; principles of research design;
questionnaire preparation and collection of data, sampling and sample design, measurements of variables;
statistical theory, statistical methods for data analysis, presentation of research findings.
AEX 5701:
THEORY & PRACTICE OF EXTENSION ADMINISTRATION AND
SUPERVISION
Concepts of Administration, Extension administration, management etc. theory and principles of
extension administration by Henri Fayol, Management Schools of thought and their application to
extension work (Administration theory).– Relationship between extension and other organizations or
agencies – Functions and Responsibilities of extension administrators/directors including planning,
organization, supervision and coordination – Organization/administration of extension services at village,
division, state and federal levels. The frame work and approach towards management – The perspectives
on management and organization – Staff recruitment, selection, placement and supervision. Staffing
process and training in Extension organization, training of Extension leaders in Extension. Office
management in extension, principles of morale and motivation; implication for Extension staff
development and promotion, discipline, assessment (appraisal of extension work, extension workers’
training and types of training, bureaucracy in extension administration; extension administration in the
ADPs in Nigeria. Problems of extension administration in Nigeria.
184
AEX 5501:
PROGRAMME PLANNING AND EVALUATION
Concepts – plan, planning, programme, programme development etc. Types, sources, characteristics and
levels of planning, Assumptions and importance of programme planning. Planning needs and needs
assessment, motivation – i.e. hierarchy of human needs (Maslow). Involvement – levels, method: individuals – Group. Reasons for involvement, problem identification. Stages/models of programme
planning – situation analysis, solution (Objectives – levels of objectives, uses, importance, characteristics
of good objectives) execution, evaluation and reconsideration. Practical application and design of plan of
work and calendar of work – i.e. planning a programnme or project. Practical application and design of
plan of work and calendar of work – i.e. planning a programme or project. Evaluation – meaning, types,
differences between evaluation and monitoring. Concept of evaluation in agricultural extension,
programmes monitoring and Evaluation. Steps in evaluation (standards, criteria, indications and
judgment), Barriers to evaluation. SWOT and PERT analysis. Budget development and fiscal control –
meaning, types of budget, how to prepare budget, etc.
AEX 5401: DIFFUSION AND ADOPTION OF AGRICULTURAL TECHNOLOGY
Concepts of diffusion and adoption, process of diffusion and adoption. Theories of Diffusion & Adoption.
Factors affecting adoption – Farmers related and technology related. Stages of Adoption (AIETA),
adoption rate and adopters categories and diffusion curves. Abandoned and Sustainable adoption.
Elements of diffusion. The innovation decision. Characteristics of innovation.
AEX 5301: PSYCHOLOGY OF EXTENSION
Instructional Objectives: At the end of the courses students are to among other things, understand the
concepts of psychology, extension teaching and learning strategies. Farmers’ personalities and
determinants of personalities. Developmental Psychology and there characteristics features. Intelligence,
attitudes, behavioural patterns, values and decision concepts, motives, motivation and its theories, needs,
teaching – learning process. Theories of learning, application of psychological concepts in teaching –
learning.
AEX 5201: AGRICULTURAL COMMUNICATION & INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
Meaning and concepts of communication and information technology. Elements of communication and
their characteristics.
Importance of communication in extension. Models of communication.
Communication and behavioural change. Influence of communication on rural development.
Communication processes in extension. Development communication systems. Importance of
development communication in agricultur Modern information technologies relevant in agriculture and
extension service. Problems and prospects of use of modern information technology. Indigenous
knowledge system. Advantages and disadvantages of use of indigenous knowledge system in agriculture.
SECOND SEMESTER
AEX 5200:
RESEARCH PROJECT
It is expected that as final year students must undertake and complete a research project under a
supervisor.
AEX 5132:
RURAL/COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT
Sociological economic and related policy perspectives as they relate to rural development. The theories of
community; community as a unit of social change. The micro and macro approaches to social change;
Dimensions of innovations; approaches to community development; community development and other
developments (agriculture, and rural developments); model of rural/agricultural development and their
relevance to Nigerian situation; processes and methods of community development/agricultural
developments; problems of institutions and infrastructural community case studies on community
development in Nigeria and other developing countries; Features of communities in Nigeria; assessment of
rural community development in Nigeria; challenges of rural community development in Nigeria; lessons
learnt in rural community development over the years; community leadership and rural livelihoods.
AEX 5412:
Social & Technological Change in Agriculture
Understanding technological change; basic sociological concepts of change; technological change and
societies; general principles in introducing technological change. Technological change in Nigerian
185
agricultural development; obstacles of agricultural change; Reducing resistance to change; ethical
consideration in introducing technology change; agricultural engineers and public extension system.
Impact of technological change in agriculture, role of extension workers in technology transfer, technology
change and indigenous technology systems.
AGE 5152: AGRARIAN LAWS AND REFORMS
General concepts and sources of law. Property ownership, acquisition and disposition in general setting
(types of land ownership). Land tenure system and small scale farmers in Nigeria. Restrictions on the use
and ownership of land: contracts; landlords and tenant relationship; Agency law; sales commercial papers
(Banks) torts right in the use of water (the riparian right): pure food produce and legal environment (Food
and drug laws). Partnership, concurrent/co-ownership of properties; will, gifts and policies relating to
agricultural insurance fishing training – research – Extension, bush burning, marketing and export and
import of commodities. Factors affecting agrarian laws.
AEX 5162: COMPARATIVE EXTENSION SYSTEM
Extension education strategies and organization in selected countries. Historical revolution of Agricultural
extension system. Comparison of extension systems – Cooperative, Ministry, University based,
commodity based. Animation rurale, T & V, Integrated RuralDevelopment, community based, etc. their
objectives, target group, focus, problems and prospect, source of funding, etc. alternative extension
approaches/systems. Private/public/NGO extension system. Contemporary issues in agricultural extension
system.
AEX 5122: GENDER & RURAL YOUTH DEVELOPMENT STUDIES
Concept, philosophy, principles of Rural Youth Agricultural Extension Programmes, characteristics of
Agricultural Extension Workers and club leaders. Initiators and aims of setting up rural youth clubs; youth
programmes in Nigeria and the world; evolution, administration, programme planning and organization of
rural youth agricultural extension programme, the problems etc. Educational activities used to promote
rural youth agricultural extension programmes. Gender issues and programmes in Nigeria. gender
mainstreaming in agricultural extension, evaluation of gender participation in agricultural extension.
Problems associated with gender studies in Nigeria. Concept of leadership, types, characteristics,
principles of leadership in agricultural extension programmes.
DEPARTMENT OF ANIMAL SCIENCE
Historical Background
The Department was created in January 1986 during the 1985/86 academic session. Prior to this, it existed
along with other departments as a single unit of agriculture. The undergraduate programme was developed
to give the Students the breadth of training, the basic concepts and principles, the practical experience and
discipline on which they can build and adopt throughout their career. Since the inception, the student and
staff population had been on the increase. Also training facilities like laboratories and farm infrastructure
have been developed to meet the modern training needs in the various areas of animal science.
The Department has grown beyond the initial degree (B. Agric.) Programme and now offers programmes
for PGD, M. Sc. and Ph. D. degrees in the various specialties in animal sciences (Animal Breeding and
Genetics, Animal Nutrition and Biochemistry, Animal Physiology and Health, Animal Production and
Management, and Meat Science).
The graduate programme provides training especially in the areas of research to enable the beneficiaries to
take up challenges of training others as well as make gainful self-employment in livestock
production/husbandry.
Vision and Mission
The vision and mission of the founding fathers of the department were to produce trained young men and
women who would provide the leadership needed in all aspects of animal production. The curriculum so
developed provides a good balance of subjects in the physical, biological, and social sciences and
humanities. Theses afford the undergraduates the opportunity to learn how to diagnose and solve practical
problems of livestock development programmes.
186
Admission Requirements
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMME
Admission of students into the Department is through the Unified Tertiary Matriculation Examination
(UTME), Direct Entry and the Remedial Programme of the University of Calabar, which is aimed at
rectifying student’s deficiencies before embarking on the full programme.
To qualify for admission into degree course in Bachelor of Agriculture with specialization in Animal
Science, the candidate must satisfy general requirements as outlined in the Joint Admission and
Matriculation Board (JAMB) brochure Guidelines for Admission for First Degree Courses in Nigerian
Universities (obtained from JAMB). The candidates must as well fulfill the Faculty and Department
requirements prescribed below:
DIRECT ENTRY
A candidate may qualify for direct admission into the Department by possessing either HND/OND/NCE
(at Distinction or Credit Level) Certificate in Agricultural Science or related Science courses, in addition
to the basic departmental requirements (Credit passes in at least five O/L subjects including English
Language, Mathematics, Agricultural Science or Biology, Chemistry and Physics.). Candidates with B. Sc.
in a related discipline (as stipulated by the Department) may also be considered for admission.
JOINT ADMISSION AND MATRICULATION BOARD
A candidate may qualify for admission into the Department by satisfying the following:
(a) Obtaining a score on the Unified Tertiary Matriculation Examination (UTME) of not less than the
Minimum score required by the Department.
(b) Possessing one of the following qualifications:
i) West African School Certificate or NECO with passes at Credit in at least five subjects including
English Language, Mathematics, Agricultural Science or Biology, Chemistry and Physics.
ii) General Certificate of Education with passes at Ordinary Level in at least five subjects including
English Language, Mathematics, Agricultural Science or Biology, Chemistry and Physics.
REMEDIAL PROGRAMME
The Department also admits candidates who have successfully remedied all their deficiencies. Remedial
students are not allowed to matriculate until they have completely remedied their deficiencies. Candidates
who fail to remedy such deficiencies after one session are required to withdraw from the University.
POST GRADUATE PROGRAMME
Objectives
The implementation of the Bachelor of Agriculture (B. Agric.) Degree Programme in Nigerian University
has resulted in de-emphasizing specialization at the first degree level. A Graduate Programme in Animal
Science will therefore seek to:
(a) Train and equip the students with the fundamental principles of the various aspects of animal
production, livestock nutrition and biochemistry, livestock breeding and Genetics, livestock
physiology, livestock production and Management, livestock behaviour, meat science and wildlife
domestication/conservation and management.
(b) Train students in modern research methods in various aspects of Animal Science.
(c) Train students who will take up the challenge of training others in tertiary institutions.
(d) Train students to use the knowledge acquired for gainful self-employment in livestock production
and eventually ensure the effective and efficient implementation of the livestock farming, breeding
and feed manufacturing programmes.
(e) The Programme is suitable for graduates of Animal Science and holders of other certificates
registrable by the Nigerian Institute of Animal Science (NIAS), with appropriate academic
background for higher career opportunities.
POST GRADUATE DIPLOMA
Admission Requirements
Candidates seeking admission into the Post Graduate Diploma (PGD) Programme in Animal Science need
to possess a first degree with an acceptable cumulative grade point average (CGPA) in a NIAS registrable
discipline. Example, Bachelor of Agriculture (Animal Science) or related disciplines as may be approved
187
by the Departmental Post Graduate Programme Board, University of Calabar Graduate School Board and
the University Senate. Such first degree must come from a University recognized by the University of
Calabar Senate. With permission from the Graduate School Board, candidates having first degree with
lower CGPA plus sufficient relevant work experience as may be prescribed by the Departmental Post
Grade Board could be admitted.
Duration
The PGD Programme in Animal Science is run on full-time basis. The Programme duration will usually be
2 to 3 Semesters.
Course Work
Candidates shall be required to register for and pass a total of 30 credit units of courses at the PGD 6000
level.
Thesis
Candidates shall be expected to undertake a research project from one of the areas of specialization offered
in the department. The PGD Thesis shall be based on the Research Project approved by the Departmental
and Graduate School Boards.
MASTER’S PROGRAMME
Admission Requirements
Candidates seeking admission into the Master’s degree (M. Sc.) Programme in Animal Science should
hold a first Degree with an acceptable Second Class Honours cumulative grade point average (CGPA) in a
NIAS registrable discipline. Example, Bachelor of Agriculture (Animal Science) or related disciplines as
may be approved by the Departmental Post Graduate Programme Board, University of Calabar Graduate
School Board and the University Senate. The first Degree should be obtained from the University of
Calabar or any other University recognized by the Senate.
Duration
Full-time students on M. Sc. Programme will be required to complete the Programme in a minimum of 3
Semesters and a maximum of 5 Semesters. Students on Part-time Programme will be expected to spend a
minimum of 4 Semesters and a maximum of 6 Semesters.
Course Work
Candidates shall be required to register for and pass a total of 30 credit units of courses at the 6000 level.
Thesis
Candidates shall be expected to undertake a research project from one of the areas of specialization offered
in the department. The M. Sc. Thesis shall be based on the Research Project approved by the Departmental
and Graduate School Boards.
DOCTORAL PROGRAMME IN ANIMAL SCIENCE
Admission Requirements
Candidates seeking admission into the Doctor of Philosophy (Ph. D.) degree Programme in Animal
Science should possess a Master’s Degree in Animal Science or in a NIAS registrable discipline. The M.
Sc. Degree should be obtained from the University of Calabar or any other University recognized by the
Senate.
Duration
Candidates on full-time students on Ph. D. Programme shall be expected to complete the Programme in a
minimum of 6 Semesters and a maximum of 10 Semesters. Part-time students shall be required to spend a
minimum of 10 Semesters and a maximum of 14 Semesters.
Course Work
Candidates will be expected to take minimum of 12 credit units of courses at the 7000 level selected from
courses listed by the Department.
Thesis
188
Candidates will undertake research work in any of the four areas of specialization as approved by the
Departmental and Graduate School Boards. Such work should be of high standard and publishable.
Areas of Specialization
i. Animal Production and Management with sub-specializations in Poultry Production, Ruminant
Animal, Cattle (Beef and Dairy) Production and Micro-livestock (Rabbit, grasscutter, snail)
Production.
ii.
Animal Breeding and Genetics
iii.
Agricultural Biochemistry and Animal Nutrition
iv.
Animal Physiology
COURSE OUTLINE
Undergraduate Programme
YEAR ONE
1ST SEMESTER
Course
Code
BIO1101
Introductory Biology I
CHM1011
MTH1111
Introductory Chemistry
Algebra and Trigonometry
ECS1101
PHY1101
GSS 1101
GSS1121
Course title
2ND SEMESTER
Credit
Hr
3
Course
Code
BIO1102
3
CHM1022
MTH 1352
Introduction to Microeconomics
Introductory Physics I
3
PHY1102
3
ECS1102
Use of English I
Philosophy and Logic
Total Credit Number of
Hours
2
2
19
GSS1102
GSS 1112
Courses title
Introduction to Biology II
Credit
Hr
3
Organic Chemistry I
Co-ordinate Geometry &
Calculus
Introduction Physics II
3
3
Introduction to MacroEconomics
Use of English
Citizenship Education
Total Credit Number of
Hours
3
3
2
2
19
YEAR TWO
1ST SEMESTER
Course
Code
AGR2001
AGR2101
AGA2101
AGC2101
AGC2201
AGE2101
AGS2101
Course title
Intro. To Agriculture
Introduction to Agric.
Biochemistry
Principles of Animal
Production
Principles
of
Crop
Production
Botany
and
Crop
Physiology
Intro. To Agric. Ext. &
Rural Sociology
Principles
of
Soil
Science
Total Credit Number of
Hours
2ND SEMESTER
Credit
Hr
3
3
Course
Code
AGC2302
CHM2122
3
AGA2202
3
AGE2202
3
AGS2202
3
AGR2202
3
AGF2302
21
AGR2402
Courses title
Cytology and Genetics
Inorganic Chemistry
Anatomy and Physiology of
farm Animals
Introduction to Agric.
Economics
Intro. To Pedology & Soil
Physics
Introduction to Agric.
Engineering
Introduction to Forestry
3
Principles of Food Science
and Technology
Total Credit Number of
Hours
3
YEAR THREE
1ST SEMESTER
2ND SEMESTER
189
Credit
Hr
3
3
3
3
2
3
21
Course
Code
AGA3101
AGA3201
AGC3101
AGC3201
AGE3101
AGR3101
AGS3101
GSS2111
GSS3101
Course title
Non-Ruminant Animal
Production
Agricultural
Biochemistry
and
Methods
Field Crop Production
Principles
of
Crop
Protection
Intro. to Farm Mgt. &
Prod. Econs
Introduction to
Farm
Mechanics
Soil Chemistry and
Micro-Biology
Introduction
to
Computers
Entrepreneurship Dev. I
Total Credit Number of
Hours
Credit
Hr
3
Course
Code
AGA3202
Courses title
2
AGA3302
3
AGC3302
Tree Crop Production
3
AGR3302
Farming Systems
2
3
AGR3302
2
3
AGR3402
3
3
AGE3202
AGR3502
2
GSS2112
Introduction to Fisheries &
Wildlife
Introduction to Fisheries &
Wildlife
Extension Education
Statistics and Experimental
Designs
Computer Application II
2
24
GSS3102
Entrepreneurship Dev. II
Total Credit Number of
Hours
2
23
Ruminant Animal
Production
Intro. to Animal Breeding &
Genetics
Credit
Hr
3
3
3
2
3
2
YEAR FOUR
1ST SEMESTER
Course
Code
AGA4100
AGA4101
AGC4100
AGE4100
AGS4100
AGR4100
Course title
Non-Ruminant
Mgt.
Techniques
Animal
Health
Management
Horticultural
and
Permanent Crop Prod.
Techniques
Farm Management and
Accounts I
Soil
Sampling
and
Description, Drainage and
Soil Fertility
Farm Design and Agric.
Mechanization Practices
Total Credit Number of
Hours
2ND SEMESTER
Credit
Hr
3
Course
Code
AGA4200
1
AGA4202
5
AGC4200
3
AGE4200
2
AGS4200
2
AGS4300
16
AGR4202
AGR4102
Courses title
Ruminant Mgt. Techniques
Credit
Hr
3
Animal Health
Management
Arable Crop Production
Techniques
1
Farm Survey and
Extension Practices II
Agricultural Meteorology
3
Soil Conservation and
Land Use Planning
Workshop Practices
3
Viva
Total Credit Number of
Hours
3
20
4
1
2
YEAR FIVE
1ST SEMESTER
Course Code
2ND SEMESTER
Course title
Credit Hr
Course Code
AGA5200
AGA5201
Seminar
Applied Animal Breeding
2
2
AGA5100
AGA5112
AGA5301
AGA5401
AGA5501
Non-Ruminant Production
Ruminant Production
Feeds and Feeding
3
3
3
AGA5122
AGA5132
AGA5142
190
Courses title
Research Project
Non-Ruminant Animal
Production
Ruminant Animal Nutrition
Animal Health
Processing of Livestock
Credit
Hr
4
2
2
3
3
AGA5601
AGA5701
AGA5801
*AGE5501
*AGC5201
Products
Animal Experimentation
3
AGA5152
Pasture Management &
& Research Techniques
Utilization
Animal Reproduction
2
*AGA5152
Livestock Economics
Micro-livestock
3
*AGA5152
Agric. Business Math. &
Production
Finance
Programme Planning &
3
Total Credit Number of
Evaluation
Hours
Field Crop Husbandry
3
Total Credit Number of
24
Hours
*Elective Courses: Students should take one elective per semester
191
3
3
3
21
POST GRADUATE PROGAMMES
Post Graduate Diploma
1ST SEMESTER
Course Code
2ND SEMESTER
Course title
Credit Hr
Course Code
AGA PGD 6111
AGA PGD 6121
AGA PGD 6131
AGA PGD 6141
AGA PGD 6151
Poultry Production
2
AGA PGD 6112
Applied Animal Breeding
2
AGA PGD 6122
Beef and Dairy Cattle Production
2
AGA PGD 6132
Feeds and Feedstuffs
3
AGA PGD 6152
Animal Experimentation, Biostatistics and
3
AGA PGD 6162
Research Techniques
AGA PGD 6001
Seminar
2
AGA PGD 6172
AGA PGD 6171
Anatomy and Physiology of Farm Animals
2
AGA PGD 6000
Total Credit Number of Hours
16
Courses offered are based on areas of specialization, but with a minimum of 15 credit hours per Semester.
Courses title
Animal Nutrition
Sheep and Goat Production
Feed mill Technology and Feed Formulation
Animal Health and Diseases Management
Animal Products and Processing Technology
Pasture and Range Management
Project
Total Credit Number of Hours
Credit
Hr
2
2
2
3
2
2
6
21
MASTERS PROGRAMME
1ST SEMESTER
Course Code
Course title
2ND SEMESTER
Credit Hr
Course Code
AGA6001
Biostatistics
3
AGA 6102
AGA6101
Animal
Behaviour
and
Environmental Physiology
Advance Pig and Poultry
Production
Biochemical Genetics
3
AGA 6112
3
AGA 6122
3
AGA 6202
Animal Breeding
Feeds and Feeding
Instrumentation
in
Agricultural Biochemistry
Seminar
3
3
3
AGA 6212
AGA 6222
AGA 6302
3
AGA 6312
AHA6111
AGA6201
AGA6221
AGA6121
AGA6321
AGA6800
Courses title
Advance Sheep, Goat and
Rabbit Production
Advance Animal Beef and
Dairy Cattle Production
Animal Products and
Processing
Micro-livestock Production
& Management
Population Genetics
Quantitative Genetics
Animal Nutrition
Feed Formulation for Farm
Animals
192
3RD SEMESTER
Credit
Hr
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Course
Code
AGA 6900
Courses title
Research Project
Credit
Hr
6
AGA6801
Computer Programming
3
AGA 6322
AGA6301
Advance
Courses
in
Carbohydrate, Lipid, Energy
Nutrition and Metabolism
Advance Courses in Protein,
Minerals, Vitamins Nutrition
and Metabolism
Animal Health and Diseases
Aspects
of
Livestock
Products
Total Credit Number of
Hours
3
AGA 6332
3
AGA 6342
3
3
AGA 6502
AGA 6602
AGA6311
AGA6401
AGA6501
Biochemistry of Hormonal
Action
Growth and Development
3
Reproduction in Farm
Animals
3
Nutritional Toxicology
Advances in Livestock
Products Technology
Total Credit Number of
15
Hours
Grand Total for the three Semesters
3
3
3
Total Credit Number of
Hours
15
6
36
DOCTORAL PROGRAMME
1ST SEMESTER
Course Code
2ND SEMESTER
Course title
Credit Hr
Environmental
Animal
Physiology
Artificial Insemination
Intermediary Metabolism
3
AGA7101
3
3
AGA7201
AGA7211
AGA7221
AGA7311
Reproductive Physiology
Feed Resources and Storage
Procedures
3
3
AGA7401
Advance Techniques in
Animal Breeding
Total Credit No. of Hours
AGA7101
AGA7201
AGA7211
Course Code
Courses title
Rumen Physiology and
Metabolism
Advance Animal Breeding
Recent Advances in Animal
Production
3RD SEMESTER
Credit
Hr
3
Course
Code
AGA 6900
Courses title
Research Project
Credit
Hr
6
3
3
3
3
15
Total Credit No. of Hours
Grand Total for the three Semesters
Candidates are required to take a minimum of 6 Credit Hours per Semeste
193
15
Total Credit No. of Hours
6
18
FACULTY INTRODUCTORY COURSES.
AGR 2001: INTRODUCTION TO AGRICULTURE
The course exposes students to definition of agriculture; The origin, scope and importance of agriculture to
man; Food supply situation in the world; Trend of distribution; Characteristic features of tropical agriculture
and how production is affected. Farming system practices; land tenure; land use types; Forestry, Fish, Farming
and Wildlife agriculture.
AGR 2101: INTRODUCTION TO AGRICULTURAL BIOCHEMISTRY
This course covers Structure, properties of biological pigments; vitamins; amino acid, peptides, proteins,
enzymes, coenzymes, hormones, plant growth factors, Purine, pyrimidine, nucleotide and nucleic acid and
porphyrines. Enzymes: nature, classification, inhibition, activation, control of Activity; Specificity; Active sites
and mechanisms of action; Intermediary metabolism; Biological oxidation and bioenergetics.
AGF 2102: INTRODUCTION TO FORESTRY
The course entails renewable natural resources, availability, distribution and potentials. Important forest trees
and wildlife (wildlife emphasis on Nigerian species). Classification, morphology and distribution of important
forest trees. Forest and game reserves in Nigeria. Silviculture, afforestation; characteristics of major timber and
their uses. Felling and log transportation.
AGR 2202: INTRODUCTION TO AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING
In this course, students are exposed to definitions; areas of specialization and role of agricultural engineering in
national economy. Prospects and job opportunities. Work, power, energy, heat and basic electricity. Simple
machines and principles of hydraulic theory. Machines efficiency. Weather, rainfall, soil and water
conservation. Drying and storage, moisture content. Introduction to tools and workshop practice.
AGR 2402: PRINCIPLES OF FOOD SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
The course covers: Scope and definition of Food Science and Technology; food distribution and marketing.
Food and its functions, food habits, food poisoning and its prevention, Principles of food processing and
preservation. Deterioration and spoilage of food, contamination of food from natural sources. Composition and
structures of Nigerian/West African food; factors contributing to texture, colour, aroma and flavour of food.
Cost, tradition and ethnic influences of food preparation and consumption pattern.
AGR 3101: INTRODUCTION TO FARM MECHANICS
In this course, students are expected to cover the following: Goals and principles of farm mechanization. Basic
mechanics, workshop tools, principles of internal combustion engine and electric motor. Farm machinery used
for tillage practices; ploughs, harrows, cultivators, farm power transmission systems; harvesting and processing
equipment (sprayers and dusters). Equipment for livestock (automatic feed conveyers, watering equipment),
water lifting and irrigation equipment; and surveying equipment used in the farm; operating principles,
selection and maintenance procedures of farm machinery. Farm machinery costing and records; workshop and
building materials used in the farm.
AGR 3302: FARMING SYSTEMS
The course exposes the students to: Introduction and definition of applied terms. Description and analysis of
the various components of the system: major farming systems in the tropics with emphasis on African
traditional farming systems. Appraisal of the competitive factors and functions affecting the system.
AGR 3402: INTRODUCTION TO FISHERIES AND WILDLIFE
The course covers the important fishes and wildlife of West Africa with emphasis on Nigerian species.
Classification, evolution, morphology and basic structure of fishes. The adaptation of fish to aquatic life. Life
cycle of principal species of fish and wildlife. Significance of fishes and wildlife in the life of Nigerians. The
fish and wildlife industries in Nigeria. Fundamental principles of fish, wildlife management and production.
AGR 3502: STATISTICS AND EXPERIMENTAL DESIGNS
The course covers: Experiments, experimental procedures, cause and control of experimental error; analysis of
variance, one way and multiple ways classification; factor experiments, split-plot designs and analysis of
results. Regression analysis, correlation analysis, Mean comparison techniques and calculator application.
194
AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS AND EXTENSION COURSES
AGE
2101:
INTRODUCTION
TO
AGRICULTURAL
EXTENSION
AND
RURAL
SOCIOLOGY
This course entails: Definition, objective of Agricultural Extension, Institutional setting of Agricultural
Extension. Basic concepts and principles of rural sociology to the understanding of rural situations. Importance
of rural communities and institutions, social stratification, social processes and social changes in rural areas.
The rural revolution and social transformation, changing rural-urban problems and Elimination of rural-urban
distribution and the future of rural communities.
AGE 2202: INTRODUCTION TO AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS
The course covers: The nature of economics and economic problems; scope and method; price theory and
functions of the market with particular reference to agriculture. Concept of demand,
supply, price
determination and elasticity are handled. Emphasis is also placed on the structure and changes in the Nigerian
Agriculture as well as agricultural problems. The national income and employment theories. Types of market
structures, investment, interest rate, inflation, international trade, Commodity agreements and balance of
payments. Money and banking.
AGE 3101: INTRODUCTION TO FARM MANAGEMENT AND
PRODUCTION ECONOMICS
The following areas are emphasized in this course: Introduction, definition of applied terms and relevant
economics principles guiding resources use are emphasized. These include: farm planning and evaluation of
partial budget, total budget and enterprise budget. Production, apportionment of production cost to different
farm cost enterprises, linear programming.
AGE 3202: EXTENSION EDUCATION
This course entails definition, nature and elements of communication process. Principles of analyzing
communication problems in extension. The meaning of the concept of teaching, learning and motivation. Steps
and principles of teaching and learning. Extension teaching methods. Preparation and use of teaching materials
and aids. A general introduction of the use of rnathematics involving micro-economic problems of agriculture.
Brief introduction to the role of Theory, Micro-economics and the role of mathematics in resolving problems is
introduced. Special emphasis on the theory of consumer behaviour, utility functions, indifference curves,
maximization of utility, ordering and compensated demand functions as well as the theory of the farm firm and
market equilibrium are quantified and dealt with.
AGE 3402: AGRICULTURAL MARKETING
This is a course with a two-prong perspective: the theory and the practical aspects. For the theoretical aspects,
the following areas are emphasized. The systems approach in the study of marketing structures, conduct and
performance of different markets. Controlled markets and the relevance to Nigerian marketing institutions;
Supply and demand elasticities and their effect in marketing decisions, and agricultural products.
The practical aspect involves the use of sample using native forecasting models on the data collected (sample)
from different markets around Calabar Municipality, Studies are arranged in various groups for the purpose of
this project.
AGE4100: FARM MANAGEMENT AND ACCOUNTING
This course involves two credit hours of in-class work and one other credit of out of class work for two
semesters. Major emphasis in the in-class is in the area of record keeping, developing budgets (partial and
total) feasibility studies and analyzing a variety of market information. The out of class work deals with actual
data collection based on the students interest as well as reviewing the records, budgets and profitability of the
Faculty of Agriculture Farms (Crops and Animals), the students as well during this phase are exposed or
attached to either farm, bank or relevant agricultural firm to have a working knowledge of its performance.
AGE 4200: FARM SURVEY AND EXTENSION PRACTICES
In this course, sample villages in the neighbourhood of Calabar are selected and students study the socioeconomic and technical components of farming systems in the area. Designing of questionnaires and actual
conduct of the survey. During the year the students will go out in a group once a week with their clientele
farmers to study the farming operations and field management on the spot. Survey will last for 24 weeks.
Design of teaching aids and audio-visuals in Extension Education is emphasized.
AGE 5001: PROGRAMME PLANNING AND EVALUATION
The course involves definition and principles of planning. The planning process, systems, and levels of
planning. Advanced techniques in programme planning, operation and evaluation of extension, including use
of research findings and preparation of reports. Professional improvement of extension workers. The role of
195
specialists in extension. Extension programme analysis and procedures for systematic evaluation of rural
development projects.
AGE 5122: AGRICULTURAL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT AND FINANCE
Scope of agricultural business and management; types of agricultural business management and organizations,
enterprise selection; production planning; public policies affecting agricultural business, farm growth;
Organization of large scale farms; legal organizations and tax strategies. Economics of agricultural processing;
marketing management, principles of agricultural finance; principles of farm credit; capital needs of
agricultural industries, sources of loan funds and collateral security for loans; credit agencies and government
credit policies and approaches to efficient credit management; Farm accounting; inventory; balance sheet, cash
book and cash book analysis.
AGE 5152: LIVESTOCK ECONOMICS
The course covers the importance of livestock in the Nigerian economy, Consumption and consumer patterns
of livestock products; micro- and macro- economics in animal production; agricultural production functions,
including data collection and analysis. Marketing theory in relation to livestock production, application of
economic theory and quantitative analysis. Capital investment and depreciation of capital; the economics of
egg, meat and milk production. Livestock feed economics, input/output relationship in livestock production.
ANIMAL SCIENCE COURSES
AGA 2101: PRINCIPLES OF ANIMAL PRODUCTION
In this course, students are exposed to history of animal agriculture, classification and distribution of important
world breeds of cattle, sheep, goats, pigs, poultry and rabbits. Climate and other factors affecting the livestock
and poultry industries in Nigeria. Management practices and systems, and effects on behaviour and handling of
animals.
AGA 2202: ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY OF FARM ANIMALS
The course cover: Anatomy and physiology of farm animals such as cattle, sheep, goats, pigs, rabbits and
poultry. Anatomy and physiology of the cell, types, animal tissues, nervous system, skeletal system, muscle,
bone, circulatory system, reproductive, digestive, special senses and other systems of farm animals. Elements
of physiology and environmental behaviour. Growth and bio-energetics.
AGA 3101: NON-RUMINANT ANIMAL PRODUCTION
This course covers: Management practices involved in breeding stock, nutrition, housing, equipment, disease
control measures and handling of various species of farm livestock. Health management of stock, processing
and marketing of poultry, pigs and rabbits.
AGA 3201: AGRICULTURAL BIOCHEMISTRY AND METHODS
This course covers: Metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids and proteins, vitamins and minerals. Chemistry and
mode of action of enzymes and hormones. Composition, chemistry and analysis of selected agricultural
products. Prerequisite: AGR 2101.
AGA 3202: RUMINANT ANIMAL PRODUCTION
This course covers: Types and breeds of ruminants. Breed characteristics and specific climatic adaptations.
Nutritional requirements, feeding, housing and sanitation. Practical animal husbandry techniques and field
problems on management. Feeding, health care practices and slaughtering of ruminant animals (cattle, sheep
and goats).
AGA 3302: INTRODUCTION TO ANIMAL BREEDING AND GENETICS
The course exposes students to objectives and history of genetics, genetic principles and problems in breeding
animals for disease resistance and increased production. Different types of gene actions, values and means,
repeatability, heritability.
AGA 4100: NON-RUMINANT MANAGEMENT TECHNIQUES
This course covers animal husbandry practices and exposure to herd problems on management and feeding of
swine, poultry and rabbits. Breed identification, feeding of non-conventional feed and forages. Wing banding,
debeaking in birds, ear notching and castration in pigs. Vaccination procedures. Hatchery operations.
Restraining techniques and handling.
AGA 4101: ANIMAL HEALTH MANAGEMENT I
In this course, students will be involved in practical aspects of different systems of animal handling and
restraining: identification of common diseases of farm animals (non-ruminants) with particular reference to
poultry, swine and rabbits. Participation in post-mortem operation, routine health operations e.g. Deworming,
drenching drug administration, vaccination etc, meat inspection and certification.
AGA 4200: RUMINANT MANAGEMENT TECHNIQUES
196
The course entails animal husbandry practices of cattle, sheep and goats. Health care practices and processing
of livestock products. Management Systems in cattle, tethering and zero grazing. Identification and
management of dairy breeds. Milking procedures, processing of livestock products, dehorning, hoof trimming
and castration. Feed and feeding systems. Identification of forages, hay and silage making.
AGA 4202: ANIMAL HEALTH MANAGEMENT II
In this course, students will be involved in practical aspects of different systems of animal handling and
restraining: identification of common diseases of farm animals (ruminants) with particular reference to cattle,
sheep goats and grasscutters. Participation in post-mortem operation, routine health operations e.g.
Deworming, drenching drug administration, vaccination etc, meat inspection and certification.
CROP SCIENCE COURSES
AGC 2101: PRINCIPLES OF CROP PRODUCTION
Development of crop production. Cultural practices for major crops including soil and water conservation,
irrigation and drainage, fertility maintenance and pest control. Weeds and their impact on crop production.
Basic mode-media genetics. Harvesting, processing and storage of agricultural products.
AGC 2201: BOTANY AND CROP PHYSIOLOGY
Botanical and other methods of classification of cultivated crops, with particular reference to tropical crops.
Study, of the internal and external structures of plants, including plant cell, plant tissue, plant root, stem, leaf,
flower, seed and fruit. Reproduction in plants, including pollination, fertilization and fruit formation. Physical
and chemical hormones in the living functions of plants. Environmental influences in crop growth, variations in
photosynthetic capacities on factors affecting their yield maximization. Storage and mobilization of reserves.
AGC 2302: CYTOLOGY AND GENETICS
Concept of Mendelian genetics; monohybrid and dihybrid inheritance; modification of dihybrid ratios and
epistasis. Co-dominance and incomplete dominance, probability and chi square test; sex determination and sexlinked genes. Cell theory; instrumentation and techniques in cytology; prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Cell
organelles, structures and functions, chromosomes structure of karyotype and number; Cell division.
AGC 3101: FIELD CROP PRODUCTION
The origin, characteristics and production of major field crops in Nigeria. Climatic and soil requirements,
fertilization, culture, rotation, harvesting and storage of crop products.
AGC 3201: PRINCIPLES OF CROP PROTECTION
Effects of diseases, pests fungi, bacteria, viruses and nematodes and weeds on crops and man. Definition of key
terms and terminologies. Major pests, diseases, bacteria, viruses and nematodes of crops. Classification of
major pests and pathogens, assessment of crop losses, stages in disease development. Factors that affect pest
infection/disease spread and development. Methods of isolating micro-organisms and establishment of
pathogenecity.
AGC 3202: TREE CROP PRODUCTION
Analysis of origin, distribution, soil and climatic requirements of tropical plantation crops, such as cocoa, oil
palm, rubber, kola, cashew production practices, improvement, harvesting, utilization, processing and
economics of some selected tree crops. Economic pests of these crops and their control.
AGC 4100: HORTICULTURAL AND PERMANENT CROPS PRODUCTION
TECHNIQUES
Crop husbandry practices for local and exotic vegetables suited to the ecological zone. Pre-nursery, nursery and
field operations of major permanent crops including the oil palm, rubber, cocoa and citrus. Post-harvest
treatment of farm produce, identification and management of pests and pathogens and weeds associated with
these crops. Estimation of pest and disease incidence and survey.
AGC 4200: ARABLE CROP PRODUCTION TECHNIQUES
Arable crop production practices for the major crops in the ecological zone, including establishment, cultural
practices and harvesting of maize, cassava, yam, cocoyam, plantain, rice, cowpea and melon. Post-harvest
treatment of the crops. Identification and management of pests, diseases and weed associated with these crops.
AGC 4400: INSECT PEST MANAGEMENT
The course will give a basic knowledge of the insects and the relationships existing between crops, animals as
insects. Pest Management, principles and methods of control of insects of agricultural, household and
veterinary importance will be treated.
SOIL SCIENCE COURSES
197
AGS 2101: PRINCIPLES OF SOIL SCIENCE
Physical, chemical and biological properties and processes of soils. Soil moisture, air and temperature; Soil
survey and classification; roles and use of lime, fertilizers, organic matter and manure. Soil-plant relationship
with emphasis on functions of essential elements in plants, their availability, requirements and deficiency
symptoms.
AGS 2202: INTRODUCTION TO PEDOLOGY AND SOIL PHYSICS
The soil, its origin and formation; soil morphological characteristics, soil components, soil forming rocks and
minerals. Weathering of rocks and minerals. Profile description, soil survey, mapping and soil classification.
Properties and management of Nigerian soils. Classification of soil separates, soil texture, surface area of
particles; aggregation, soil structure, and stability, porosity, soil water relations, soil and the hydrologic cycle.
Soil temperature and conduction of soil erosion.
AGS 3101: SOIL CHEMISTRY AND MICROBIOLOGY
Plant nutrition, activities of cations and their absorption by plants, mechanism of absorption plant-soil
interphase. Micro-organisms occurring in soils, bio-chemical activities of microbial population. Contributions
to soil fertility, properties of soil organic matter; microbial transformations of N, P, S, Fe and other minerals;
isolation of organisms concerned; transformations of hydrocarbons and pesticides. Rhizosphere effect and
mycorrhizai association; ecological interactions of degraded soils. Water pollution and soil degradation.
AGS 3201 SOIL DEGRADATION AND AMELIORATION
Definition of soil degradation. Causes, detrimental effects and control, acidic and saline soils. The development
of restricted drainage negative effects and remedies. Classification, processes and factors of water and wind
erosion. Principles, classification, design of terraces. Vegetated water ways, selected mechanical conservation
structures, wind-breaks and shelters. Physical characteristics of degraded soils. Water pollutions and soil
degradation.
AGS 4100: SOIL SAMPLING, DESCRIPTION, DRAINAGE AND SOIL FERTILITY
Methods of taking soil samples for various purposes, soil profile descriptions, soil moisture measurements,
types and importance of fertilizers, application rates and methods for various crops. Safety and environmental
factors affecting their efficiency; deficiency symptoms.
AGS 4200: AGRICULTURAL METEOROLOGY
Elements of climate and their measurements, processing and analysis of rainfall, air and soil temperature,
humidity, evaporation and evapo-transpiration data. Analysis of long-term records of weekly, monthly and
annual rainfall data. Climatic effects on agricultural productivity.
AGS 4300: SOIL CONSERVATION AND LANDUSE PLANNING
Field identification of types of soil erosion and other forms of land degradation and their control: Practical
training in biological, mechanical, gully and wind erosion control. Tillage and husbandry practices for soil
conservation. Purpose and justification of land use planning. Land use planning and management for rain-fed
agriculture, forestry; irrigation, and for non-agricultural projects.
DEPARTMENT OF CROP AND HORTICULTURAL SCIENCES
HISTORICAL BAKGROUND
The Department of Crop Science and Horticulture, University of Calabar, came into existence in 1986/1987
academic year when the former Department of agronomy was split into two new departments namely, Crop
Science and Horticulture and Soil Science Departments. Since then, the Department has continued to carry our
effectively tripartite roles of teaching, research and community service.
The academic programme for undergraduates that runs for five years is designed to impact on students modern
agricultural techniques in Crop Husbandry, Horticulture, Crop Protection, and Plant Genetics/Breeding and
Farm Mechanization.
The first set of students admitted into the Department for a B.Agric programme graduated in 1992.
PHILOSOPHY OF THE DEPARTMENT OF CROP AND HORTICULTURAL SCIENCES
198
To meet the need for increased crop productivity through effective training of manpower. This is translated
into:
i)
The Vision
The vision of the Department of Crop and Horticultural Sciences is to constitute a formidable base for
improved crop production and development through effective teaching, research and collaborative
research networking to prepare students with interest to take up farming as a career in addition to
academic pursuit.
ii) The Mission
The mission of Department of Crop and Horticultural Sciences is to provide students with improved
knowledge of basic principles of crop production and Horticulture and impact on them the current
improved crop production techniques. It is also the responsibility of the Department to conduct research
into genetic improvement of crops, agronomy of crop production, horticulture, crop protection, storage,
processing and utilization of the crops.
iii) The Goals
The goals of the Department of Crop and Horticultural Sciences are to carry out teaching and research
on crop production and development with the aim of graduating students both at undergraduate and
postgraduate levels with enough crop production techniques and research capabilities towards increased
crop productivity for food security and economic enhancement.
THE SPECIFIC OBJECTIVES
1. To teach the students basic principles:- theory and practice of crop production, horticulture, protection,
crop improvement and utilization
2. To prepare students for professional academic careers through research work.
3. To equip graduates with the relevant skills for employment in agricultural sector, schools, or engage in
gainful self-employment in agribusiness.
COURSE OUTLINE
YEAR ONE
Course
Code
BIO1101
CHM1011
MTH1111
ECS1101
GSS 1101
PHY1101
GSS1121
1ST SEMESTER
Course title
Credit
Hr
3
Course
Code
BIO1102
Introductory Chemistry
Algebra
and
Trigonometry
Introduction to Microeconomics
Use of English I
3
3
CHM1022
MTH1352
3
PHY1102
3
ECS1102
Introductory Physics
Philosophy and Logic
Total Number of Credit
Hours
3
3
21
GSS1102
GSS 1112
Introductory Biology I
2ND SEMESTER
Courses title
Introduction to Biology II
Credit
Hr
3
Organic Chemistry I
Co-ordinate Geometry &
Calculus
Introduction Physics II
3
3
Introduction to MacroEconomics
Use of English
Citizenship Education
Total Number of Credit
Hours
3
3
3
3
21
YEAR TWO
Course
Code
AGR2001
AGR2101
AGA2101
AGC2101
1ST SEMESTER
Course title
Introductory
to
Agriculture
Intro. To Agric. BioChemistry
Principles of Animal
Production
Principles
of
Crop
Production
Credit Hr
2ND SEMESTER
Courses title
3
Course
Code
AGC2302
Cytology and Genetics
Credit
Hr
3
3
CHM2422
Analytical Chemistry
2
3
AGA2202
3
3
AGE2202
Anatomy and Physiology of
farm Animals
Introduction to Agric.
Economics
199
3
AGE2101
AGS2101
AGC2201
Principles
to
Agric.
Extension and Rural
Principles of Soil Science
3
AGR2202
3
AGS2202
Botany
and
Physiology
3
AGR2302
Crop
AGR2402
Total Number of Credit
Hours
21
Introduction to Agric.
Engineering
Intro. To Pedology & Soil
Physics
Introduction to Forestry
Principles of Food Science
and
Technology
Total Number of Credit
Hours
3
3
2
2
21
YEAR THREE
Course
Code
AGA3101
AGC3101
AGC3201
AGE3101
AGR3101
AGS3101
GSS2111
1ST SEMESTER
Course title
Credit Hr
Non-Ruminant Animal
Production
Field Crop Production
3
Course
Code
AGA3202
3
AGA3302
Principles
of
Crop
Production
Intro to Farm Mgt. &
Prod. Economics
Introduction to
Farm
Mechanics
Soil
Chemistry
and
Micro-Biology
Computer Programme I
3
Ruminant Animal Production
Credit
Hr
3
3
AGC3202
Intro to Animal Genetics and
Breeding
Principles of Horticulture
3
AGC3302
Tree Crop Production
3
2
AGX3202
Extension Education
3
3
AGC3302
Farming Systems
2
3
AGR3602
Introduction to
Biotechnology
Introduction to Fisheries and
Wildlife
Experimental Design
Computer Application II
Total Number of Credit
Hours
3
AGR3302
AGS3402
GSS2112
Total Number of Credit
Hours
2ND SEMESTER
Courses title
21
3
2
3
3
25
YEAR FOUR
Course
Code
AGA4100
AGC 4101
AGC4100
AGE4100
AGR4100
AGS4100
N/A:
(1)
(2)
1ST SEMESTER
Course title
Non-Ruminant
Management Techniques
Permanent
crops
production Techniques
Horticultural
and
Permanent
Crop
Techniques
Farm Management and
Accounts
Farm Design and Agric.
Mechanization Practices
Sampling and Description,
Drainage and Soil Fertility
Total Number of Credit
Hours
Credit Hr
2ND SEMESTER
Courses title
4
Course
Code
AGA4200
2
AGC4200
3
AEX4200
2
AGS4200
Agricultural Meteorology
1
2
AGR4202
Workshop Practices
2
2
AGS4300
3
16
AGE4300
Soil Conservation and Land
Use Planning
Farm Management &
Accounting II
Ruminant Management
Techniques
Arable Crop Production
Techniques
Farm Survey and Extension
Practices II
Attendance at Farm Practice is mandatory
Students will submit a report on completion of each training area.
200
Credit
Hr
4
4
3
4
YEAR FIVE
Course
Code
AGC5101
AGC5201
AGC5301
AGC 5401
AGC 5601
AGS 5501
AGS 5301
AGA5501
AGE 5401
1ST SEMESTER
Course title
Credit Hr
Seminar
Crop physiology
Plant Breeding
Vegetable and
Horticultural Crops
Field Experimentation
2
3
3
3
Course
Code
AGC5100
AGC5112
AGC5122
AGC5132
3
AGC5142
Soil Testing & Plant
Analysis
Soil Physics
3
AGS5112
2
AGA5152
Feeds and Feeding
Agric. Policy &
Development
Total Number of Credit
Hours
3
3
AGA5501
AGE5112
25
2ND SEMESTER
Courses title
Research Project
Seed production system
Weed Science
Crop Protection
Processing and storage
of agric. Prod
Soil Fertility & Plant
Nutrition
Pasture Management & Utiliz
ation
Feeds and Feeding
Agric. Cooperative &
Marketing
Total Number of Credit
Hours
Credit
Hr
4
2
2
2
2
2
26
Electives to be chosen from other Departments. Students are required to take any one of the
courses listed above.
.
AGC 5601: RESEARCH METHODOLOGY AND FIELD EXPERIMENTATION
Research proposal, Defining a research problem, Developing hypothesis and objectives, Principles of research
design,
Normal
distribution,
Experimental
layout,
Sampling
in
experimentation, Sampling and measurement, Data collection, and Descriptive data presentation. Analysis of
co-variance, Correlation, Regression analysis, DMRT, and Test of significant differences (LSD) in comparing
means.
SECOND SEMESTER
AGS 5100: RESEARCH PROJECT
Students are expected to choose and execute special projects under the supervisor of
Academic Staff. The project lasts for 2 semesters.
AGC 5122: WEED SCIENCE
Characteristics, classification and biology of weeds. Importance of weeds on Nigeria Agriculture, principles
and methods of weed control viz, mechanical, biological,chemical etc. classification, chemistry
formulation, selectivityapplication and mode of action of herbicides, storage, safety and environmental
consideration in their usage.
AGC 5132: CROP PROTECTION
Effect of diseases, pest and weeds on plants. Principles and methods of disease, pest and weed control
classification of chemicals used in plant protection, mode of application, problems of usage, toxicity, safety
and their econological and environmental hazards.
AGC 5142: PROCESSINGAND STORAGE OFAGRICULTURE PRODUCTS
Concepts of size reduction, separation, cleaning, grading and sorting. Handling and conveying of equipment.
Psychometric charts, principles of drying and equipment for agriculturalproducts. Harvesting, handling
techniques and Transportation to minimize losses. Simple drying and storage methods.
AGS 5112: SOIL FERTILITY AND PLANT NUTRITION
Fertility in tropical soils, Soil organic matter; its properties and maintenance limning and its soilplant relationships; nitrogen, potassium, phosphorus and sulphur contents of soils. The soil as a plant nutrient
medium; fertilizers and fertilizer management their manufacture sources, applications, methods, rates and
timing:
handling
and
storage of fertilizers.
Crop
growth
and
response
to
soil
201
nutrients; major, secondary and trace elements in crop nutrition; nutrient absorption, maintenance and loss in
soil fertility in extensive and intensive agriculture Role of legume.
AGS 5152: AGRICULTURAL ECOLOGY
Meaning of Agricultural Ecology, types of Agro ecology, ecological effects of pollution (air, water and land).
Natural resources management and conservation, environmental restoration. Environmental Impact of
assessment: Scope and limitations.
AGE 5112: AGRICULTURAL COOPERATIVES AND MARKETING (Elective)
Definition and introduction to philosophy, basic anddistinguishing characteristics of cooperative organizations.
Types, organizational procedures, financing and Business
Management of Agricultural Cooperatives, their limitations and potential contributions, structure conduct
performance of different types of markets. The commodity boards; Supply and demand elasticities and their
effects on marketing decisions of agricultural products.
DEPARTMENT OF FORESTRY AND WILDLIFE RESOURCES MANAGEMENT
History of the Programmes Sub-Discipline/Discipline
The first proposal for the establishment of the department was submitted to the Faculty Board in 1997/98
academic session.
The Faculty Board approved the proposal in 2000 and forwarded it to the committee of Deans. The Committee
of Deans approved and presented it to Senate.
Senate approval was given in 2002. An NUC visitation team came in September, 2002 to ascertain the state of
readiness, inspected facilities and endorsed the commencement of the department. The department was created
and an Acting Head of Department appointed on 1st October, 2002. The 1st set of academic staff (4) were
drawn from the staff of the department of Crop Science who were professionals in Forestry & Wildlife.
Students. And (22) students were admitted through the University of Calabar Remedial (Agriculture)
programme in 2002/2003 academic session. In the 2004/2005 academic session the Department had students
up to the third year, totaling 80 students. By 2010, the department had about 180 students and had graduated
about 49 students.
Furthermore, the department has made a dramatic improvement in the number and quality of staff, academic
and non – academic staff. Currently, the Department has 14 academic staff, 1 Professor, 1 Reader, 2 Senior
Lecturers, 5 Lecturer 1, and 4 Lecturer 11.
In the area teaching and research, the department has about 15 hectares of Forestry Teaching and Research
Farm and a Wild Domestication Unit, where grasscutters and snails are reared. In addition the department
has10 hives for the production of bee products, and a forest nursery stocked with both indigenous and exotic
plant species. The department has also made a great achievement as the post graduate programme in Forestry
and Wildlife Resources Management was approved by Senate in the 2010/2011 academic session. The
department commenced the postgraduate programme with the admission of eleven (11) students: six (6) M.Sc
and five (5) PGD.
The Philosophy behind Forest and Wildlife Resources Management
The guiding principle behind Forest and Wildlife Resources Management is to create awareness among our
young people and the rural dwellers that forest resources when wisely used can improve and sustain one’s per
capital income and contribute to the Gross Domestic Product of Nigeria. Throughout the five-year course of
study, the lectures would consciously make efforts to produce competent human resources that will sustainably
manage the forest resources at our disposal.
The overall philosophy is to train students to acquire scholastic competence and technical skills to enable them
apply themselves well as forest and wildlife resources managers in the development of the Nigerian economy.
The Objectives of Training in Forest and Wildlife Resources Management
a) Carry out tripartite roles of teaching researching and disseminating information through publication of
papers for the benefit of mankind;
202
b) Draw up good and flexible forest and wildlife resources management plans that will stimulate the
interest of stakeholders to manage their resources on sustainable basis.
c) Provide the students with the relevant skills to carry out independent research in forest and wildlife
resources and produce useful results or guidelines for the modification of management plans when the
needs arise;
d) Compete very well in the job markets for positions that call for using skills in resource management
and perform well when such positions are entrusted to them;
e) Advise community forest and woodlot owners on how best they can use their forest and wildlife
resources to improve their standard of living on sustainable basis and
f) Usefully apply the skills they have acquired to establish and operate private enterprises of their own.
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
Requirements For Direct Entry
Two “A” level passes in Chemistry and Biology or Agricultural Science or Zoology or Botany.
Special consideration (Waiver): Calabar accepts NCE/OND in Agriculture. Forestry, Wildlife or Fisheries
Management from recognized institutions into 200 level. Calabar accepts HND in Forestry, Wildlife and
Fisheries Management from recognized institutions into 300 level.
Ume Admission
Five O’ level Credit passes in English, Chemistry, Mathematics, Biology and one of Physics, Economics,
Further Mathematics, Statistics and Geography.
Special consideration (Waiver) Calabar requires 5 Credit passes at not more than two (2) sittings to include
English Language, Biology/Agricultural Science, Chemistry, Mathematics and any one of Geography, Physics
and Economics.
Ume Subjects
Chemistry, Biology or Agricultural Science and Mathematics or Physics.
Pre-Degree Programme
The Faculty of Agriculture runs a One-Year Pre-degree Programme to enable candidates make up for their
deficiencies. There are two categories of remedial admissions.
1)
Candidates who satisfy the requirements in section (2) above, i.e have five ‘O’ level credits and at least
a minimum acceptable score in the Joint Matriculation Examination but have a pass in English and
Mathematics are allowed to remedy these subjects preparatory to being admitted into the Faculty.
NOTE:
All direct entry applications must be made through the Joint Admission and Matriculation Board (JAMB).
Joint Admission And Matriculation Board
1) A candidate may qualify for admission into the Faculty of Agriculture by satisfying the following:
(a) Obtaining a score in Joint Matriculation Examination of not less than the minimum score required by
the Faculty.
(b) Possessing one of the following qualifications:
i. West African School Certificate with passes at credit level in at least five subjects including
English, Mathematics, Agricultural Sciences or biology, Chemistry and Physics.
ii General Certificate of Education with passes at ordinary level in at least five subjects including:
English Language, Mathematics, Agricultural Science or Biology, Chemistry and Physics.
iii Senior Secondary School Certificate with credits in at least five subjects including: English
Language, Mathematics, Agricultural Science or Biology, Chemistry and Physics.
COURSE OUTLINE
Forestry And Wildlife Resources Management
YEAR ONE
Course
Code
BIO1101
CHM1011
MTH1111
1ST SEMESTER
Course title
Introductory Biology I
Introductory Chemistry
Algebra and Trigonometry
Credit
Hr
3
3
3
Course
Code
BIO1102
CHM1022
MTH1352
203
2ND SEMESTER
Courses title
Introduction to Biology II
Organic Chemistry I
Co-ordinate Geometry &
Credit
Hr
3
3
3
ECS1101
GSS 1101
PHY1101
GSS1121
Introduction to
Economics
Use of English I
Micro-
Introductory Physics I
Philosophy and Logic
Total Number of Credit
Hours
3
PHY1102
2
ECS1102
3
2
19
GSS1102
GSS 1112
Calculus
Introduction Physics II
3
Introduction to MacroEconomics
Use of English
Citizenship Education
Total Number of Credit Hours
3
2
2
19
YEAR TWO
Course
Code
AGR2001
AGR2101
AGA2101
AGC2101
AGE2101
AGC2201
1ST SEMESTER
Course title
Introductory
to
Agriculture
Intro. To Agric. BioChemistry
Principles of Animal
Production
Principles
of
Crop
Science
Introduction to Agric.
Extension and Rural
Sociology
Botany
and
Crop
Physiology
Total number of Credit
Hours
Credit Hr
2ND SEMESTER
Courses title
3
Course
Code
AGC2302
Cytology and Genetics
Credit
Hr
3
3
CHM2422
Analytical Chemistry
2
3
AGA2202
3
3
AGE2202
3
AGR2202
Anatomy and Physiology of
farm Animals
Introduction to Agric.
Economics
Introduction to Agric.
Engineering
3
AGS2202
3
3
AGF2102
AGR2412
Intro. To Pedology & Soil
Physics
Introduction to Forestry
Principles of Food Science
and Technology
Total Number of Credit
Hours
18
3
2
3
2
22
YEAR THREE
Course
Code
AGF3101
AGF3201
AGF3301
AGF3401
AGF3501
AGF3601
GSS2111
GRP3391
1ST SEMESTER
Course title
Credit Hr
Non-Ruminant Animal
Production
Field Crop Production
2
Course
Code
AGF3102
2
AGF3202
Principles
of
Crop
Production
Intro to Farm Mgt. &
Prod. Economics
Forest soils and Land Use
Survey
Forest
Ecology
and
Conservation
(Natural
Ecosystems)
Introduction
to
Computers
Climatology
and
Biogeography
Total Number of Credit
Hours
2
AGF3302
3
AGF3402
3
AGF3502
3
3
2ND SEMESTER
Courses title
Forest Management Concepts
and Analysis
Wood Formation and
General Properties of Wood
Credit
Hr
2
2
Forest & Wildlife Policy,
Law and Administration
Forest Products and
Marketing Dynamics
Forest Economics
3
AGF3602
Forest Biometrics Forest
Biometrics
3
GSS2112
Computer Application II
3
Total Number
Hours
18
2
3
3
21
YEAR FOUR
204
of
Credit
Course
Code
AGF4101
AGF4201
AGF4301
AGF4401
AGF4501
AGF4601
AGF4701
1ST SEMESTER
Course title
Credit Hr
Forest Taxonomy and
Species Preservation and
Wildlife Classification
Plant Propagation and
Nursery Techniques
Sliviculture
and
Management of Natural &
Artificial Forests
Forests Inventory and
Mensuration Practices
Ground Forest surveying
Techniques
Forest Civil and Logging
Operations
3
Course
Code
AGF 4102
3
AGF4202
3
AGF 4302
3
AGF 4402
3
AGF 4502
3
AGF 4602
Agroforestry Practices
Total Number of Credit
Hours
3
21
2ND SEMESTER
Courses title
Credit
Hr
3
Wood Technology and
Utilization
Wildlife Capture and
Domestication
Forest & Wildlife Biometrics
3
Forest and Wildlife
Ecological Survey
Park and Zoo Design and
Management
Aerial Photo-Interpretation of
Vegetation
Wildlife
Composition and Mapping
3
Total Number
Hours
of
Credit
3
3
2
17
YEAR FIVE
1ST SEMESTER
Course title
Course
Code
AGF5100
Seminar
2
Course
Code
AGF 5102
AGF5101
Forest Entompgy
2
AGF 5202
AGF5201
Forest Biological Erosion
and Fire Control
Forest
and
Wildlife
Management Practices
Extension and Community
Forests Development
Environmental
Impact
Assessment in Natural
Forest Ecosystems
Forest Soils
2
AGF 5302
3
AGF 5402
3
AGF 5502
3
AGF 5602
2
AGF 5112
Wildlife Protection and
Conservation
Egocentric Behaviour of
Tropical
Wildlife in Response to
Environment
Total Number of Credit
Hours
2
AGF 5132
2
AGF 5200
AGF5301
AGF5401
AGF5501
AGF5601
AGF5111
AGF5311
Credit Hr
21
205
2ND SEMESTER
Courses title
Forest and Wildlife
Biometrics
Wood Processing and
Quality Control
Forest Pathology and
Entomology
Forest Genetics and Tree
Improvement
Range Ecology and Multiple
Land Use Management
Forest Mensuration
Credit
Hr
4
2
2
2
2
2
Wildlife Management and
Utilization
Fish/Wildlife Ecology and
Population Dynamics
Final Year Forest Resource
Project Final Year Forest
Resource Project
3
Total Number of Credit
Hours
22
3
4
COURSE DESCRIPTION
YEAR THREE (FIRST SEMESTER) FORESTRY AND WILDLIFE OPTIONS
AGF 3101:
ELEMENTARY FOREST SURVEY: 2
UNITS: 50% THEORY AND 50%
PRACTICAL.
Maintenance of ground survey equipment, compasses, tapes, chains, range poles and survey pins.
Determination of simple angles – 900, 600 on a plane with the aid of compasses, open survey involving forest
tracts, roads, an rivers, scaling, plotting and mapping.
AGF 3201:
FOREST INVENTORY AND MENSURATION: 2 UNITS 25% THEORY
AND 75% PRACTICAL.
Definition of forest inventory, justification for tree measurement and cost consideration determination
of horizontal distance by pacing and chaining. Principles and measurement of standing trees, Determination of
wood content by cord, weight and cubic volume, common sampling designs – sample random, systemic and
stratified sampling for discrete variables and problems.
AGF 3301:
SILVICS, THE FOUNDATIONS OF SILVICULTURE: 2 UNITS, 70%
THEORY AND 30% PRACTICAL.
Environmental factors affecting forest vegetations with emphasis on soil, water, temperature and light,
also included are the atmospheric, biotic, fine and environmental complex factors, concepts of ecologic
adaptations and evolution.
AGF 3401:
PRINCIPLES OF WILDLIFE AND PARK MANAGEMENT: 3 UNITS 25%
THEORY AND 75% PRACTICAL.
Principles and concepts of wildlife management including forest resources, population analysis and
manipulation of habitat, analysis and design.
AGF 3501:
FOREST SOILS AND LAND USE SURVEY: 3 UNITS, 25% THEORY
AND 75% PRACTICAL.
The genesis of forest soils, upland forest soils and hydronorphic forest soils, physical and chemical
properties of forest soils, relationship of vegetation to soils, forest soils issues in soils conservation and
management with special reference to the tropics.
AGF 3601:
FOREST ECOLOGY AND CONSERVATION (NATURAL
ECOSYSTEMS: 3 UNITS, 20% THEORY AND 80% PRACTICAL.
The concept of forest ecology, plant communities – synecology component of ecology; analysis and
description of plant communities, plant succession and soil conservation; vegetation and natural ecosystems
and the classification thereof, readings in forest soils and forest land management.
YEAR THREE (SECOND SEMESTER) FORESTRY AND WILDLIFE OPTIONS
AGF 3102:
FOREST MANAGEMENT CONCEPTS AND ANALYSIS: 2 UNIT 70%
THEORY AND 30% PRACTICAL
Renevability and sustainability of forest resources; the Malthusian equation and its implication in
forest management. The foundations of forest management with special interest in site, stocking and spacing.
Forest yield and forest growth, regulations structures of forest and determination of annual cut, definition and
implication of rotation age.
AGF 3202:
WOOD FORMATION AND GENERAL PROPERTIES OF WOOD: 2
UNITS 50% THEORY AND 50% PRACTICAL.
The plant and origin of wood: tree growth and cell differentiation, fiber lengths of tropical timber
species in Nigeria; properties of wood – physical, mechanical and (Chemical & Biological)
AGF 3302:
FOREST AND WILDLIFE POLICY, LAW AND ADMINISTRATION: 3
UNITS, 80% THEORY AND 20% PRACTICAL
206
Forest and Wildlife Policy in Nigeria, drawing, Gross River State as a case study. the search for forest
law and regulations that will stabilize the forest resources base in Cross River State, Inter – relationship
between forest and wildlife resources administration and the executive council in various states of the
Federation of Nigeria.
AGF 3402:
FOREST PRODUCTS AND MARKETING DYNAMICS: 2 UNITS, 50%
THEORY AND 50% PRACTICAL
Economics of forest utilization, wood products and uses, the lumber industry, veneer and plywood,
wood furniture, rail wood lilies, sawdust, shavings and wood as fuel; chemically derived products such as pulp
and paper; cellulose derive products such as fibers. Carbonization and destructive distillation of wood, mirror
forest products in Cross River State.
AGF 3502:
FOREST ECONOMICS: 3 UNITS, 70% THEORY AND 30% PRACTICAL
The role of forest products in the Nigerian Economy; demand for and supply forest products; price and
quantity determination; marketing agencies and their function of forest products; centers of influence in the
forest economy of Nigeria, the forest capital and workability.
AGF 3602:
FOREST BIOMETRICS: 3 UNITS 30% THEORY AND 70% PRACTICAL.
Application of basic biometric techniques to problems of Forest Resources Management, Distribution,
sampling and Tests of hypotheses.
YEAR FOUR: PRACTICAL YEAR (FIRST SEMESTER)
AGF 4101:
FOREST TAXONOMY AND SPECIES PRESERVATION AND
WILDLIFE CLASSIFICATION: 3 UNITS, 25% THEORY AND 75%
PRACTICAL
Identification of Nigerian tree species using botanical classification and the use of herbarium
techniques in the preservation of Nigerian flora, classification and identification of indigenous wildlife. Visit to
National park.
AGF 4201:
PLANT PROPAGATION AND NURSERY TECHNIQUES: 3 UNITS, 30%
THEORY AND 70% PRACTICAL.
Principles and techniques of plant propagation, propagating structures such as media, fertilizers, soil
mixtures and containers, vegetative propagation, Aratomic and physiological basis of propagation, grating and
budding. Selection of nursery sites, development of nursery and permanent and temporary nurseries, irrigated,
nurseries.
AGF 4301:
SILVICULTURE AND MANAGEMENT OF TURAL & ARTIFICIAL
FORESTS: 3 ITS, 25% THEORY AND 75% PRACTICAL
Tropical Forest formations, distribution and major silviculture features, aforestation on re-forestation
methods, natural & artificial establishment of new genetic pools, silviculture systems, high forest and coppice
forest methods, intermediate cutting involving things, release and improvement cutting, pruning and salvage of
forest stands.
207
AGF 4401:
FOREST INVENTORY AND NSURATION PRACTICES: 3 UNITS, 25%
THEORY AND 75% PRACTICAL
Closed traverse survey, Theoretical basis for using specific instruments in measuring tree heights –
sunto clinometers, hypsometers and relascope, timber cruising strip and plot sampling methods; magnitude of
inventory – 5%, 10%, volume computations and projections, the significance of form class.
AGF 4501:
GROUND FOREST SURVEY TECHNIQUES: 3 UNITS, 25% THEORY
AND 75% PRACTICAL
Closed traverse survey involving forest fields, villages and towns, insertion of control points and
description thereof, insertion of care topographic features, the use of ground positioning survey to establish
control points, plotting and mapping and computations of angular closure error.
AGF 4601:
FOREST CIVIL AND LOGGING OPERATIONS: 3 UNITS, 20% THEORY
AND 80% PRACTICAL.
Logging planning and cost control, Felling and bucking, logging gradient to minimize erosion,
skidding, hauling and transport facilities, marking and peeling of logs, peeling devices and maintenance of
logging equipment and tools. Construction of logging roads and bridges.
AGF 4701:
AGRO FORESTRY PRACTICES: 3 UNITS 20% THEORY AND 80%
PRACTICAL.
Natural agroforestry in natural forest stands; studies to reveal the natural interaction, biotic factors, the
most favoured biological entity: integration of various agricultural crops with forest trees in carefully
determined combinations, yields and their relationship with the combined crops.
YEAR FOUR: PRACTICAL YEAR (SECOND SEMESTER)
AGF 4102:
WOOD TECHNOLOGY AND UTILIZATION: 3 CREDITS, 25%
PRACTICAL
Wood identification using structural features, wood conversion in wood workshop, wood colour, heart
and sap wood, wood density; physical properties of wood – bending strength, compression strength, resistance
to impact, wood borers and fungi attacks; and wood shrinkage and movement, working properties – blunting,
sawing, machining, nailing and gluing, wood flexibility in design and construction, practical project in wood
construction.
AGF 4202:
WILDLIFE CAPTURE AND DOMESTICATION: 3 UNITS, 25%
THEORY AND 75% PRACTICAL.
Techniques of capturing wildlife especially the dangerous ones, training in the use of fire arms, storage
and handling, bullet loading and trigger release, fire arms lock, control and carrying, wildlife maintenance,
feeding, succulent fruit, protein grass, animal feed etc.
AGF 4302:
FOREST & WILDLIFE BIOMETRICS (PRACTICAL APPLICATION OF
EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN); 3 UNITS, 20% THEORY AND 80%
PRACTICAL
Application of simple biometrics techniques to Forestry and Wildlife management problems, sampling
analysis and predictions.
208
AGF 4402:
FOREST/WILDLIFE ECOLOGICAL SURVEY: 3 UNITS, 20% THEORY
AND 80% PRACTICAL.
Wildlife population assessment, carrying capacities in reserved areas and regulatory dynamics to
provide a base for income generation, sustainability strategies for the rare fauna species, selected terrestrial and
aquatic project areas.
AGF 4502:
PARK AND ZOO DESIGN AND MANAGEMENT: 2 UNITS, 20%
THEORY AND 80% PRACTICAL.
National parks, Principles, purposes and objectives, public participation in park design and
management, resource information base for planning, landscape architecture , Zoo Planning, Design and
Development.
AGF 4602:
AERIAL PHOTO-INTERPRETATION OF VEGETATION/WILDLIFE
COMPOSITION AND MAPPING: 2 UNITS, 20% THEORY AND 80 %
PRACTICAL
Orientation and study of aerial photographs, stereoscopic parallax, mapping from aerial photographs,
and remote sensing techniques; delineation of land forms and physiographic features from aerial photos.
YEAR FIVE: FINAL YEAR (FIRST SEMESTER)
AGF 5100:
SEMINAR: 2 UNTS
Each students is expected to prepare and deliver a seminar in the final year.
AGF 5101:
FOREST ENTOMOLOGY: 2 UNITS 30% THEORY AND 70%
PRACTICAL
The structure, physiology and development of insects, insects classification, defoliating, bank boring,
wood boring and sap sucking insects, insect pest control using: biological, physical, chemical and cultural
treatment upgrade input on pathology.
AGF 5201:
FOREST BIOLOGICAL EROSION AND FIRE CONTROL: 2 UNITS, 20%
THEORY AND 80% PRACTICAL
Preservation of man-caused fires, Hazard reduction and fire suppression, soil care and control of
erosion on cultivated lands. Rate of spread in different vegetations, seasons and effect on wildlife.
AGF 5301:
FOREST MANAGEMENT PRACTICES: 4 UNITS 25% THEORY AND
75% PRACTICAL.
Forest Management planning and drawing of management plans for the ecological zones or specific
forest locations; organization of the forest with reference to administrative controls, forest resources valuation.
AGF 5401:
EXTENSION AND COMMUNITY FORESTS DEVELOPMENT: 2 UNITS
50% THEORY AND 50% PRACTICAL
Forest education in rural communities, methodology and techniques, vegetation control and non-timber
products, community legislation and control; organization and community forest administration, financing
processes and man power development.
AGF 5501:
ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT IN NATURAL FOREST
ECOSYSTEMS: 2 CREDIT HOURS, 40% THEORY AND 60%
PRACTICAL.
Definition of the type of natural ecosystems forest operation; logging forest plantation development,
forestry nursery development, Access routes and forestry villages establishment etc. general description of the
area, soil type, vegetation, wildlife composition, slopes, water courses or lakes, ground map covering the
operational area silviculture prescription to prevent erosion, water silation and maintenance of drainage; soil
and wildlife conservation and control, preservation of rare flora and fauna.
AGF 5601:
FOREST SOILS; 2 UNITS, 30% THEORY AND 70% PRACTICAL.
209
Understanding of soil dynamics and influence upon forest composition, stand regeneration, tree vigour
and tree growth rate; forest soil physical, chemistry and micro-biology, soil moisture movement forest nursery,
soil management, forests soil fertility determination, maintenance and improvement with special reference to
tropical conditions.
AGF 5111:
WILDLIFE PROTECTION AND CONSERVATION: 2 CREDITS HOURS,
30% THEORY AND 70% PRACTICAL.
Protection of wildlife against poachers, diseases and pests, genetic and environmental control, use of
fire, control of pesticides and their adverse effects on the reproductive system of wildlife.
AGF 5311:
EGOCENTRIC BEHAVIOUR OF TROPICAL WILDLIFE IN RESPONSE
TO ENVIRONMENT: 2 CREDIT HOURS, 70% THEORY AND 30%
PRACTICAL
YEAR FIVE: FINAL YEAR (SECOND SEMESTER)
AGF 5102:
FOREST AND WILDLIFE BIOMETRICS: 2 CREDITS HOURS, 305
THEORY AND 70% PRACTICAL
Practical concept in the design and analysis of experiments on tree crops and wildlife. Survey
techniques as they relate to forestry problems. Processing of resources inventory and mensuration data for
management purposes. Application of multivariate analysis to forestry and wildlife, basic techniques in survey
sampling and design.
AGF 5202:
WOOD PROCESSING AND QUALITY CONTROL: 2 CREDIT HOURS,
30% THEORY AND 70% PRACTICAL, INVESTIGATIVE COURSE.
Biological assessment of timber species for continuation and wildlife domestication; seed provenance
and site quality control in wood extraction.
AGF 5302:
FOREST PATHOLOGY AND ENTOMOLOGY: 2 CREDIT HOURS, 30%
THEORY AND 70% PRACTICAL.
Pathological virus, bacteria, fungi and other timber species, root, stem and folar diseases, stem
diseases, dieback and wilts, caused by mistletoes, lichens and climbers. The pathogens of timber species in
Nigeria.
AGF 5402:
FOREST GENETICS AND TREE IMPROVEMENT: 2 CREDIT HOURS,
20% THEORY AND 80% PRACTICAL.
Mendelism, sex chromosomes and sex linkage, inheritance, chemical basis of heredity, life cycles and
reproduction, techniques of grating and budding.
AGF 5502:
RANGE ECOSYSTEM AND MULTIPLE LAND USE MANAGEMENT: 2
CREDIT HOURS, 30% THEORY AND 70% PRACTICAL
Integrated use of land for wildlife, fisheries and forestry, Dynamic planning to accommodate human residence,
small scale and commercial crop production, general agricultural land use management, construction of
management tables.
AGF 5112:
WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT AND UTILIZATION: 3 CREDIT HOURS,
30% THEORY AND 70% PRACTICAL
Principles of wildlife management, habitat analysis, evaluation and improvement practices. Animal behaviour
and predators, problems, capturing and utilization of wild animals, taxidermy.
AGF 5312:
FISH/WILDLIFE ECOLOGY AND POPULATION DYNAMICS: 2
CREDIT HOURS, 30% THEORY AND 70% PRACTICAL.
The niche concept, adaptation of animals and fish to specialized habitats, wildlife productivity, fish and animal
census methods in different habitats. The importance of population structure and tables of population ecology.
AGF 5200:
FINAL YEAR RESEARCH PROJECT - 4 CREDIT HOURS, 20%
210
THEORY AND 80% PRACTICAL.
Data collection and collation, analysis and interpretation, presentation, before an External Examiner. Proposed
elective course to be taken from Department of Agricultural Economics and Extension.
AGE 5601 THEORY AND PRACTICE OF EXTENSION ADMINISTRATION.
Course contents: Definition, theory and principles of administration organization and administration of
Extension services at village, divisional, state and federal levels.Relationship of Extension with other agencies.
The functions and responsibilities of extension administrators including planning, organizing, supervising,
coordinating, budgeting and personal management. Decision making and problems of extension administration
in Nigeria. Training and development of extension leaders.
AGE 5132
Course content: philosophy, objectives and History of efforts in community development Basic educational
process, concept of group interaction, community organization and organization matrix.the young farmers
clubs and the history, programme development, administration, organization and maintenance, junior and adult
local leaders, their role in club work. Other club activities, problems of growth work.
DEPARTMENT OF SOIL SCIENCE
INTRODUCTION.
In a developing country like Nigeria, regular review of curricula at undergraduate and postgraduate levels in
universities are required, to prepare again regular, graduating students for emerging national and global issues.
Soil Science is both basic and applied science, with its own set of tools and techniques. It is also basically an
environmental science which has hitherto been restricted to solving agricultural problems. On a wider
perspective, Soil Science is fundamental to environmental programmes such as environmental conservation
and forestry; environmental impact assessment; erosion, flood and coastal area management; pollution control
and environmental health; drought and desertification control, soil engineering; research institutions and
universities, etc.
Need for Review of the Curriculum
(i)
To implement the directives from the Federal Government of Nigeria, National University
Commission and Senate of the University of Calabar to reflect on the national development goals
and policies.
(ii)
To satisfy the yearning of the Department of Soil Science since 1999 to broaden the scope of soil
science discipline to cover agronomy and environmental science in line with regional/global needs
and trend.
(iii)
To develop soil scientists that will meet the manpower needs of the Federal and State Governments
in the Federal Ministry of Agriculture and Water Resources, Ministry of Environment and Housing,
Universities, Research Institutions, Oil Companies, etc.
(iv)
The curriculum adopts a holistic approach to the study of soil, not only for agronomic productivity
but also for addressing relevant environmental and engineering issues.
(v)
To increase number of students entering research based programme in “Soil Science and
Environmental Science” in the Department of Soil and Environmental Sciences, University of
Calabar.
The feedback from our past graduating students in governments, industries, private sector, has given the
Department concern to take up the directive on curriculum review seriously so as to re-position the Department
to meet the present and the future challenges in soil environment. Against this background, the Board of
Examiners of the Department of Soil Science met on February 12, 2007 and reviewed the Departmental
curriculum with the following modifications:
(i)
(ii)
Title of the programme has been changed from “Bachelor of Agriculture (Hons) Degree in Soil
Science” to “Bachelor of Agriculture (Hons) Degree in Soil and Environmental Sciences”, to reflect
the relevance of the subjects to agronomy and environmental science.
Increase in credit hours from two hundred and five (205) for Bachelor Degree in Soil Science to two
hundred and ten (207) for Bachelor Degree in Soil and Environmental Sciences.
211
COURSE OUTLINES
YEAR ONE
1ST SEMESTER
Course title
Course
Code
BIO1101
Introductory Biology I
CHM1011
MTH1111
PHY1101
AGE1101
GSS 1101
GSS1121
AGR1001
Credit
Hr
3
Course
Code
BIO1102
Introductory Chemistry I
Algebra and Trigonometry
3
3
CHM1022
MTH1352
Introductory Physics I
Introduction
Microeconomics
Use of English I
3
3
PHY1102
AGE1102
3
GSS1102
3
3
21
GSS 1112
AGR1102
to
Philosophy and Logic
Introduction to Agriculture
Total Number of Credit
Hours
2ND SEMESTER
Courses title
Introduction to Biology II
Credit
Hr
3
Organic Chemistry I
Co-ordinate Geometry &
Calculus
Introduction Physics II
Introduction
to
Microeconomics II
Use of English II
3
3
Citizenship Education
Introduction to Forestry
Total Number of Credit
Hours
3
3
24
TOTAL
3
3
45
YEAR TWO
Course
Code
AGA2101
AGC2101
AGR2001
AGR2101
AGE2101
AGS2101
AGC2201
GSS2111
1ST SEMESTER
Course title
Principles of Animal
Production
Principles
of
Crop
Production
Introductory
to
Agriculture
Intro. To Agric. BioChemistry
Principles
to
Agric.
Extension and Rural
Principles of Soil Science
Botany
and
Crop
Physiology
Introduction
to
Computers
Credit Hr
3
Genetics and Cytology
Credit
Hr
3
3
CHM2422
Analytical Chemistry
2
AGA2202
Anatomy and Physiology of
farm Animals
Introduction to Agric.
Economics
Introduction to Agric.
Engineering
Pedology & Soil Physics
Introduction to Forestry
3
3
AGE2202
3
AGR2202
3
3
AGS2202
AGF2112
3
AGR2402
GSS 2112
Total Number of Credit
Hours
2ND SEMESTER
Courses title
Course
Code
AGC2302
24
3
3
3
2
Principles of Food Science
and
Technology
Computer Applications
2
Total Number
Hours
24
of
Credit
TOTAL
3
45
YEAR THREE
Course
Code
AGA3101
1ST SEMESTER
Course title
Animal
3
Course
Code
AGS3202
AGC3101
Field Crop Production
3
AGA3302
AGC3201
Principles
of
Crop
Production
Intro to Farm Mgt. &
Prod. Economics
3
AGC3302
3
AGE3302
AGE3101
Non-Ruminant
Production
Credit Hr
212
2ND SEMESTER
Courses title
Soil Resources org. Agric
Degradation, Rehabilitation
and Management
Animal Genetics and
Breeding
Tree Crop Production
Agric. Info., Extension
Education & Communication
Credit
Hr
3
3
3
3
AGR3101
AGS3101
GSS2111
GLG 1001
Introduction to
Farm
Mechanics
Soil
Chemistry
and
Micro-Biology
Intro. Computer I
Physical geology
Total Number of Credit
Hours
3
AGR3402
3
AGC3302
3
3
24
AGR3502
GSS2112
Introduction to Fisheries and
Wildlife
Farming Systems
2
Experimental Design
Computer Application
Total Number of Credit
Hours
3
3
25
TOTAL
2
43
YEAR FOUR
Course
Code
AGS4100
AGC4100
AGE4100
AGR4100
AGS4100
AGS4200
1ST SEMESTER
Course title
Non-Ruminant
Mgt.
Techniques
Horticulture and Permanent
Crop Techniques
Farm Management and
Accounting
Farm Design and Agric.
Mechanization Practices
Sampling and Description,
Drainage and Soil Fertility
Soil/Water Analysis and
Interpretation
Total Number of Credit
Hours
Credit Hr
3
Course
Code
AGA4200
5
AGC4200
3
AEX4200
2
AGS4200
3
AGR4200
2
AGS4300
18
AGR4102
2ND SEMESTER
Courses title
Ruminant Management
Techniques
Arable Crop Production
Techniques
Farm Survey and Extension
Practices II
Agricultural Meteorology
Agricultural Engineering
Workshop
Soil Conservation and Land
Use Planning
VIVA
Credit
Hr
3
4
2
1
2
3
3
YEAR FIVE
Course
Code
AGS5101
AGS5201
AGS 5301
AGS 5401
AGS5501
AGS5601
AGS5701
AGS5801
AGS 5701
AGS 5901
1ST SEMESTER
Course title
Seminar papers on Soil and
Envir. Sciences
Soil Genesis, Survey and
Land use Planning
Soil
Chemistry
and
Mineralogy
Soil
Chemistry
and
Mineralogy
Soil /Plant Analysis &
Instrumentation
Soil
and
Water
Conservation
Research
Methods
&
Scientific Writing
Environmental
impact
Assessment Studies
+Environmental Pollution
& Climate change
+ Environmental Law
Total Number of Credit
Hours
Credit Hr
2
Course
Code
AGS5100
3
AGS5112
3
AGS5122
3
AGS5202
3
AGS5802
3
AGS5902
2
AGS5602
3
AGS5802
3
AGS5502
2
28
Ags 5702
TOTAL
2ND SEMESTER
Courses title
Research Project on Soil and
Envir. Sciences
Soil Fertility & Plant
Nutrition
Irrigation and drainage
Credit
Hr
4
3
3
Soil Microbiology &
Biochemistry
Soil Pollution & Mgt.
3
Management of Tropical
Soils
Soils & Waste Management
& Control
Agricultural systems analysis
and simulation
+Tropical Ecology &
Agroecosyetem
+Environmental Economic
Total Number of Credit
Hours
2
3
3
3
2
2
26
48
213
DESCRIPTION OF COURSES
AGS 2101
PRINCIPLES OF SOIL SCIENCE AND ENVIRONMENT (3 UNITS)
Concepts of soil: composition of the earth-crust and its environment, pedogenic factors and their interactions,
major components of soils. Introduction to inorganic components of soils (origin and nature of rocks). Soil
physics: soil as a three-phase dispersed system, definition of physical quantities, the solid phase, soil texture,
classification systems, specific surface, bulk density, particle density. Chemistry of clay minerals; soil acidity
and effects on the soil environment; liming and liming materials. Agricultural chemicals and soil: fertilizers,
pesticides, etc. Soil Microbiology and Biochemistry: Major groups of micro-organisms, soil organic N
compounds. Enzymes and their roles in the soil. Environment: components of and processes, in physical
environment, key concepts, the nature and implications of the interactions between physical and human
environments. Environmental changes brought about by Homo sapiens since the discovery and use of fire and
the associated environmental hazards.
AGS 2202:
PEDOLOGY AND SOIL PHYSICS
(3 UNITS)
Soil Genesis/Formation: Inorganic components of soils; rocks and minerals, primary minerals, secondary
minerals, clay minerals. Weathering of rocks and minerals: types of weathering, types of parent materials. Soil
formation and profile development: processes and factors of profile development; nomenclature and
identification of soil horizons: master and sub-horizons and layers, transitional and combination horizons,
suffix symbols, soil catena concept. Soil Physics: Concepts of Soil Physics. Physical & rheological properties
of the soil. Stoke’s law and particle size analysis; Basic hydrology: soil water content, & methods of its
determination; soil water storage, concept of equivalent depth, soil water potentials, soil moisture characteristic
and use, available water capacity, saturated water flow in soils, Darcy’s law.
AGR 3101
INTRODUCTION TO AGRICULTURAL MECHANIZATION (3 UNITS)
Goals and principles of agricultural mechanization. Basic mechanics; force, distance, time, velocity,
acceleration, etc. Principles of internal combustion engines, and electric motor. Farm power transmission
system. Farm machinery used for tillage operations. Equipment for planting and sowing, crop protection,
water lifting and irrigation, harvesting and processing. Livestock equipment: automatic feed connector,
watering, milking and milk, and meat processing. Agricultural machinery costings and Records. Surveying
instruments/equipment used on the farm. Materials used for farm building. Workshop materials/equipment.
AGS 3101
SOIL CHEMISTRY & MICROBIOLOGY
(3 UNITS)
Clay minerals: composition and chemical nature of clay minerals, soil colloids and ion exchange phenomenon,
soil reaction, soil as a buffer, nutrient elements: forms and their availability in soils, functions in plants,
deficiency symptoms, fertilizers and calculations involving rates of application. Soil mineralogy: crystal
chemistry and mineral structures: types of and properties of bonding; Structural classification of soil minerals;
minerals in soil environment. Clay mineralogy; phyllosilicates, allophanes, imogolites; Mineral separation and
identification: fractionation and analytical methods; applications of clay minerals in industry, agriculture and
environmental management. The role and functions of macro organism in the soil – termites, rats, human,
millipedes, ants, earthworms, etc. Methods of studying the soil microbial population, factors influencing
microbial growth, microbial nutrition, autotrophy and heterotrophy, inter-relationships between soil organisms,
symbiosis, proto-cooperation, commensalisms, amensalism, predation, parasitism and competition. Organic
matter: composition and functions, the C/N ratio compost and composting and other forms of organic source.
Impact of soil organism and natural symbiosis in organic systems, composting. Soil physical processes and
conservation. Soil organic inputs, dynamics and management.
AGS 3101:
SOIL DEGRADATION REHABILITATION
(3 UNITS)
Definition of soil degradation , Causes, detrimental effects and control . Soil quality concepts: resilience and
rehabilitation; Soil physical degradation; extent in Nigeria and their causes, e.g. deforestation, water and wind
erosion, mining, water-logging, etc.; Soil chemical degradation; extent in Nigeria, depletion of soil nutrients
and organic matter, causes of chemical degradation and ameliorative measures; Soil biology degradation;
214
extent in Nigeria and causes, Pudding and soil piping. Soil restoration and reclamation practices. Remediation
of contaminated Soils Microbial and chemical techniques to reclaim contaminated soils; Use of vetiver grass.
Emerging technologies such as intrinsic remediation , bio-augmentation etc; Chemical techniques; sorption of
non-ionic organic contaminant by soil.
AGS 3202:
SOIL DEGRADATION AND REHABILITATION
(3 UNITS)
Definition of soil degradation: causes, detrimental effects and control. Soil quality concepts: resilience and
rehabilitation; Soil physical degradation: extent in Nigeria and their causes, e.g. deforestation, water and wind
erosion, mining, water-logging, etc.; Soil chemical degradation: extent in Nigeria, depletion of soil nutrients
and organic matter, causes of chemical degradation & ameliorative measures; Soil biological degradation:
extent in Nigeria and causes; puddling and soil piping. Soil restoration and reclamation practices. Remediation
of contaminated soils: Microbial and chemical techniques to reclaim contaminated soils; use of vetiver grass.
Emerging technologies such as intrinsic remediation, bio-augmentation etc; chemical techniques; sorption of
non-ionic organic contaminant by soil.
Nature of the soil and evaluation of soil. Soil processes and reaction. Soil fertility assessment and
maintenance.
AGR 3502: EXPERIMENTAL DESIGNS
(3 UNITS)
Descriptive Statistics: Measures of central tendency; summary statistics; measures of dispersion. Probability
and sampling distributions: normal distribution; Student’s t-distribution; F-distribution; x2-distribution.
Sampling: Simple Random Sampling; Stratified Sampling; Cluster Sampling; Independent Samples and Paired
observation. Estimation and Hypothesis Testing: Bias, Precision, Accuracy; Type I and Type II Errors; ChiSquare Analysis and Contingency Tables, Correlation Analysis: Types of Correlation, etc. Test of
significance; Comparisons of Correlations, Simple Correlation Analysis.
AGR 4100: FARM DESIGN & AGRICULTURAL MECHANIZATION PRACTICE
(2
UNITS)
Farm Design: principles and techniques. Surveying and mapping, use of instruments/equipments, and the
design procedures. Agricultural mechanization practice: operations and equipment used. Tillage operations,
sowing and planting operations, herbicides and fertilizer distribution operations, Harvesting and processing
operations, Handling, Transport, and storage operations. Visit to mechanized agricultural farms.
AGS 4100:
SOIL SAMPLING DESCRIPTION
(3 UNITS)
Methods of taking soil samples for various purposes and physical, chemical, biological and mineralogical
studies. Soil profile description: soil depth, boundary between horizons, texture by feel, soil colour,
consistence. Soil structure determination: aggregate stability by mean weight diameter, water stable aggregates.
Soil strength determination using shear box method and penetrometer(s). Other soil sampling techniques, Tools
and equipment for field work. Cadastral/Land surveying; definitions and types of surveying. Field Surveying:
Measurements, mistakes, errors correction, obstacles etc, staking and right angles. Calculations of areas by
Simpson’s and Trapezoidal rules, squares etc. Levelling Instruments: Differential and profile levelling.
Contours – Establish contours with simple devices, Map work, scale, reading interpreting map. Land Levelling:
Constructing Terraces. Processing and Analysis of soil, water and plant samples. Lab methods of soil
analysis. Interpretation of soil analysis results. Soil fertility and Fertilizers: Primary & Secondary Nutrients,
etc.
AGS 4200:
SOIL/WATER ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION
(2 UNITS)
Laboratory determination of physical, chemical, biological properties of soils. Identification of minerals and
rocks; soil moisture content determinations using different methods (gravimetric, volumetric, gypsum blocks,
etc.), saturated hydraulic conductivity. Water sampling, analysis and interpretation of results. Drinking,
industrial and irrigation water standards. New methods of soil analysis, assessment of soil productivity rating,
special topics in soil and environmental science: term papers based on reviews of previous works;
interpretation and discussion of analytical data.
AGR 4200: AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING WORKSHOP
215
(2 UNITS)
Terminologies in Agricultural Engineering workshop. Layout of agricultural engineering Workshop.
Workshop act, procedures and practice. Workshop tools: identification, use and safety precautions, repairs and
maintenance. Farm equipment/machines: identification of the equipment and their component parts, functions
and breakdown maintenance. Fault detection in farm equipment: likely possible causes and remedies. General
repairs and maintenance of farm equipment. Farm machines test and driving operations.
AGS 4300: SOIL CONSERVATION & LAND USE MANAGEMENT
(3 UNITS)
Field identification of types of soil erosion and other forms of land degradation and their control. Practical
training in biological, mechanical, gully and wind erosion control. Tillage and husbandry practices for soil
conservation. Purpose and justification of land use planning. Land use planning and management for rainfed
agriculture, forestry, irrigation, and for non-agricultural projects.
AGS 4200: AGRICULTURAL METEOROLOGY
(1 UNIT)
Elements of climate and their measurements, processing and analysis of rainfall, air and soil temperature,
Humidity, evaporation and evapotranspiration data. Analysis of long term records of weekly, monthly and
annual rainfall data., Use of software such as CLIMGEN in climatic data estimation and generation. Climate
effects on agricultural productivity. Introduction to the Climate System.
AGS 4500
DRAINAGE IRRIGATION PRACTICES
(2 UNITS)**
This will be carried out alongside crop production. Students will be exposed to different types of irrigation and
drainage practices. A short field trip to Basin town or specific places where commercial practices are
demonstrated is part of the course. From hand watering can to pressurized overhead sprinkler, drip and
surface irrigation to be demonstrated. Drainage materials and designs, vegetative waterways, and various
drainage techniques to be illustrated.
AGS 5101: SEMINAR
(2 UNITS)
Discussion and presentation of various topics in Soil Science and Environmental Science. The student is also
expected to prepare and participate in all seminars and present a seminar in the course. The goal is to equip the
student with necessary skills in literature review and paper presentation. Use of up-to-date audio visuals are
encouraged, including the use of multimedia projector and Microsoft Power Point presentations.
AGS 5201 - SOIL GENESIS, SURVEY AND LAND-USE PLANNING
(3 UNITS)
Reactions and processes of soil genesis: weathering and end-products of inorganic and organic fractions;
eluviation and illuviation of bases, silica, aluminium, iron, clay and organic matter; development of pans,
nodules and concretions; progressive soil development; soil orders and the genesis of their diagnostic horizons.
Soil survey: scales and kinds of soil survey, soil mapping units, soil survey operations. Understanding what we
see in terms of soil genesis: concept of benchmark soils, defining soil series. Soil survey reports: land
evaluation, land-use planning, introduction to Geographic Information Systems. Pedology: essence of soil
classification, types of soil classification (natural and technical), basic characteristics of the USDA Soil Orders
and their FAO (WRB) equivalents, basic problems associated with the soil orders, management of soil orders
for agricultural and other purposes, profile characteristics of major soil orders in Nigeria. Soil classification in
relation to land use suitability for rainfed and irrigated agriculture, land capability, productivity indices.
Presentation of soil survey results and information.
AGS 5301
SOIL PHYSICS & MECHANICS
(3 UNITS)
Soil physical properties and their relevance. Determinations of soil physical properties. The soil as a system.
Soil water potentials: the soil water characteristics, infiltration, water flow in soils; Steady and non-steady state
flow, continuity equation, Darcy Richards equation, transport of solute and nutrients in soil; Physics of rainfall:
amount, intensity, kinetic energy, momentum. Soil temperature and heat movement. Climatic factors affecting
plant growth: Demonstration of transport models. Soil structure, aggregate stability, factors affecting soil
structure, surface residue management. Engineering/Index Properties of Soils: Soil particles, soil density,
moisture contents, moisture – density relations, consistency, etc. Soil compressibility, shearing strength and
stress analysis. Soil compaction and stabilization. Soil aeration.
AGS 5401
SOIL CHEMISTRY
(3 UNITS)
Basic concepts: law of mass action and equilibrium constant – solubility product, dissociation of strong and
weak electrolytes, equilibrium constant and ion exchange in soils, equilibrium and constant free energy
relationship. Solid phase: origin and distribution of charge on soil colloid surface, point of zero charge,
216
electrical characteristics of soil/water interface, double layer theory; mechanism of cation and anion fixation in
soils. Liquid phase: composition, concentration, activities and activity coefficients. Fertilizers: chemistry of
fertilizer, manufacture and use. Soil acidity. Chemical factors affecting plant growth: growth expressions,
Mitscherlich’s law of diminishing returns, Liebig’s of the minimum. Soil and plant factors that affect N
availability to plants. Behaviour of P fertilizers and their availability in soils. Fixation and release of nutrients.
Chelating agents.
AGS 5501
SOIL TESTING, PLANT ANALYSIS & INSTRUMENTATION (3 UNITS)
Soil and plant sampling and sample preparation. Theories and procedures for chemical analysis of soil and
plant materials. Analysis of soil and plant for major elements and the interpretation of data. Determination of
pH. Principles of instrumentation. Operations and maintenance of major analytical instruments; flame
photometer, calorimeter, spectrophotometer, photometers, amino acid analyser, IRU UVR, pH meters,
conductivity bridges, gas systems for monitoring analytical procedures; features and functions of a soil testing
laboratory. Students need to be fully exposed to the theory and functionality of each of the
instrument/equipment used for soil, water and plant analyses; ranging from weighing balances to Atomic
Absorption Spectrophotometer.
AGS 5601: SOIL AND WATER CONSERVATION
(3 UNITS)
Soil erosion and conservation: agents & types of soil erosion (wind, water, glacial, etc); mechanisms of water
and wind erosion, Elements of the hydrologic cycle. Factors affecting soil erosion. mechanical, biological and
agronomic control measures. Design of open channels for erosion control. Conservation Agriculture. Soil Loss
tolerance. Measurements of soil erosion/ modelling: The Universal Soil loss Equation (USLE), the modified
universal soil loss equation (MUSLE), the revised universal soil loss equation (RUSLE), WEPP, and other
models. Soil erosion research methods. Harvesting of agricultural water: rainwater harvesting, dams, ponds,
wells, etc. Water conservation and management. Desertification and control measures.
AGS 5701
RESEARCH METHODS & SCIENTIFIC WRITING
(2 UNITS)
Principles of scientific experimentation; major experimental designs; treatment arrangements. Sampling
methods: grid systematic, random, cluster, judgement. Sampling procedures and their criteria. Data
information gathering, Qualitative/Quantitative methods of data collection. Methods of extrapolation of
remote data. Scientific writing: Principles of effective communication and technical writings. Preparation of
manuscripts for oral presentation and publications.
Simple Linear Regression: Assumptions and pitfalls;
Least Squares Estimation of parameters; Test of Significance and R2 Comparing Regression models
(*Introduction to Multiple Regression & parametric modelling). Introduction Analysis of Variance: The Simple
One-Factor Model; Two-Factor Models; Interactions in Analysis of Variance. Principles of Scientific
Experimentation. Experimental Designs.
AGS 5801
+ ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT
(3 UNITS)
Meaning and theory of Environmental Impact Assessments (EIAs). Types of Environmental Assessment. The
context of environmental analysis: policy framework, social context, institutional framework, legal framework,
building institutional capacity etc. Process of environmental impact assessment: project proposal, initial
environmental examination, screening, scoping, EIA study, prediction & mitigation, management, review,
decision making, monitoring, auditing, public participation. Environmental Impact Assessment format.
Environmental Impact Assessment reports. Project mandatory study activities.
AGS 5771: +ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTION & CLIMATE CHANGE
(3 UNITS)
Environment and comfort : The range of human comfort conditions of the environment : air, light, sound and
temperature, Conditions of the natural environment and the sources of natural and artificial change. Human
vulnerability to environmental changes. The Nigeria Environment: Oil Spillage in Nigeria history & other
hazards. Disasters caused by natural hazards & consequences, Energy, air land, marine and freshwater
pollution. Tolerable limits of substances in the environment. Dealing with air pollution: Indoor, outdoor,
urban air pollution. Use of pesticides and fertilizers: Agriculture in a changing climate. Climate Change &
Global Warming phenomena. Population, globalization and environmental change. Pollutants Effects on
natural vegetation and on evolution; ozone/CO2 interactions and the determination of critical loads; effects of
CO2 at low temperatures; effect of climate change on evolution.
AGS 5901:
+ENVIRONMENTAL LAW
(2 UNITS)
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An interdisciplinary programme; background to environmental law; analyses contemporary developments and
debate in the study of the emergence of environmental problems and the development of policy responses to
them.
Federal Environment Protection Agency (FEPA) and States environmental protection policies.
Nigerian Laws relating to forestry, wildlife, water, pollution, waste management, and gas flaring, Land use
policies/law in Nigeria. Environmental Governance – Regulation and Planning. Cleaner Production & ecoefficiency. The ISO 9000 and ISO 14000 series. Emission Standards and integrated pollution control.
AGS 5100
RESEARCH PROJECT
(4 UNITS)
A project to be carried out by the student under the supervision of senior members(s) of the Department. The
student will be required to investigate, in some depth, a selected problem in soil science or agronomy and
present a dissertation that will be defended before an external examiner in partial fulfilment of the requirements
of the award of B. Agric. (Hons) Degree in Soil Environmental Science.
AGS 5112
SOIL FERTILITY AND PLANT NUTRITION
(3 UNITS)
Fertility of tropical soils; soil organic matter, its properties and maintenance; liming and its soil-plant
relationships. Nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium and sulphur contents of soils. The soil as a plant nutrient
medium, fertilizers and fertilizer management; their manufacture, sources, applications, methods, rates and
timing. Handling and storage of fertilizers. Crop growth response to soil nutrients. Major, secondary and trace
elements in crop nutrition; nutrient absorption, maintenance and loss in soil fertility, in extensive and intensive
agriculture. Application of the principles of soil fertility to soil management – fertilizer application, mulching,
green manuring & composting. Methods of evaluating soil fertility. Farming systems. Soil management in
shifting cultivation areas. Role of legumes in soil fertility enhancement.
AGS 5122
IRRIGATION & DRAINAGE
(3 UNITS)
Definition of irrigation, reasons for irrigation, irrigation worldwide and in Africa. Irrigation principles &
terminologies; basic soil-water-plant relations; sources & quality of water for irrigation; diversion works; water
harvesting & storage. Delivery and application systems. Irrigation scheduling: evapotranspiration
measurement and predictions using different models. Types of irrigation systems; components, advantages and
disadvantages of various irrigation types.
Vegetative waterways and erosion control. Plants water
requirements, system uniformities and irrigation efficiencies. Fertigation and its application in tropical soils.
Agricultural drainage: reasons for drainage, surface and subsurface drainage systems. Drainage coefficients
and porosity; problems of subsurface drainage. Darcy’s equation, rational formula for drainage design.
AGS 5202:
SOIL MICROBIOLOGY AND BIOCHEMISTRY
(3 UNITS)
Decomposition of organic residues in soils; legume bacteriology; transformations of sulphur, iron, manganese
in soils, decomposition of pesticide. Biological nitrogen fixation: symbiosis (including grain-legumes, trees,
Azolla, pasture/forage) and non symbiotic. Biochemistry of nitrogen fixation (symbiotic and non symbiotic),
methods of measuring biological nitrogen fixation (BNF). Legume bacteriology, inoculation, mycorrhiza,
methods of studying microbial ecology-antibiotic resistance and selectable markers, serology, gene typing and
other methods of molecular biology. Biochemistry of nitrification, denitrification and nitrate reduction;
biochemical transformation of phosphorus, sulphur, hydrocarbons and pesticides (including herbicides).
Biochemical processes in the rhizosphere.
AGS 5802:
SOIL POLLUTION AND POLLUTION MANAGEMENT (3 UNITS)
What is soil pollution? Sources of air, water, land and soil pollution. Sewage and sewage sludge. Heavy
metals and radio nuclides (Mg, Cd, Pb, Zn F) and their hazardous levels in soil & environment. Hydrocarbon
and oil spillage. Fate of pesticides, herbicides and other pollutants. Acid rain and its impacts. Effects of
pollution on humans, plants and animals. Erosion and transport of pollutants from terrestrial to aquatic
environments. Microbial environment of soil and sediments. Controlling land, air and water pollutions. Nonpoint pollution control. Rehabilitation of lands after oil spills. Reclamation of other polluted soils
environments using different approaches.
AGS 5902:
MANAGEMENT OF TROPICAL SOILS
(2 UNITS)
Soil Management Techniques; Soil Quality Management: Soil quality and health. Potential, problems and
management of major soil orders in Nigeria, use of soil classification in soil management and extrapolation of
agronomic research results. Strategies in soil quality maintenance. Environmental soil chemistry: soil
218
physicochemical reactions in relation to agriculture, forestry and ecosystem health; Solution chemistry of
nutrients and pollutants: hydrolysis and, polymerization, dissolution-precipitation, complexation, ion-pair
formation; Surface chemistry of nutrients and pollutants: anion, molecular adsorption; Chemistry of N, P, K,
and Microelements in soils.
A GS 5602:
SOILS & WASTE MANAGEMENT & CONTROL
(2 UNITS)
Types of waste and wastes generation origin. Organic and inorganic wastes, sewage, agricultural and industrial
wastes. Urban and peri-urban wastes disposal system. Waste treatment and control. Toxiclogy of wastes.
Problems of waste; control of communicable diseases. Introduction to environmental health, health education.
Land reclamation, environmental quality.
AGS 5802:
AGRICULTURAL SYSTEMS ANALYSIS AND SIMULATION (3 UNITS)*
Systems dynamics: definition, types of systems, causal and flow diagrams, Behaviour of systems, homeostasis,
heterostasis, chaos, Simulation of biology systems; Models: what is a model? Types of agricultural models,
methods of modelling, validating models, analysis, construction of simple models using DYNAMO, for
population growth, predator- prey systems, nitrogen cycle, pesticide transport and nutrient leaching.
Demonstration of some soil/crop models and decision support tools e.g. QUEFTS and NuMaSS, CERES,
EPIC, SWIM, SUNDIAL, RUSLE, CENTURY, SOILPAR, SPAW, etc to estimate soil parameters. Setting up
and maintaining databases; FAOSTAT, SOTER.
AGS 5702:
+ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS
Introduction. Environmental resources. Economic aspects of natural resources utilisation and management.
Economics of land, soil and water use/productivity. Land and soil resources assessments. Physical and human
resources economics. The economics of sustainable environmental development. Short and long term
sustainability. Risk and hazards management.
FACULTY OF ALLIED MEDICAL SCIENCES
Historical background of the Faculty
The Faculty of Allied Medical Sciences is one of the three faculties in the College of Medical Sciences of the
University of Calabar.
Vision and mission.
Our vision is to become a centre of excellence in research in medical sciences and in the training of
paramedical personnel who will be sought after not only in Nigeria but also in other nations of the world. Our
mission is to produce exceptionally well-trained personnel for health service that are well equipped not only
with skill but also with sound scientific knowledge which will enable them to innovate and invent for the good
of our health service.
DEPARTMENT OF MEDICAL LABORATORY SCIENCE
HISTORICAL BACKGROUND
Medical Laboratory Science Programme in University of Calabar
The Medical Laboratory Science Programme commenced under the Department of Chemical Pathology of the
University of Calabar in 1983 with a pioneer intake of 10 students admitted through the University
Matriculation Examination (UME). The person in charge of the Department then was designated Co-ordinator.
The pioneer students of the programme were enrolled for a four- year study programme leading to the award of
the degree of Bachelor of Science in Medical Laboratory Technology (B. Sc MLT). Our programme was the
first of its kind east of the Niger. The first batch of students (8) graduated in 1987. From this humble
beginning, the programme has grown from year to year. Subsequently, the programme was granted full status
as a Department in 1998. The total number of students in the programme as at the 2003/04 session stood at
400. The success story of the programme in the University of Calabar has encouraged other institutions to
commence theirs.
219
In line with the National Universities Commission (N.U.C) requirement that professional courses be made fiveyear programmes, and in response to our experience that four years was insufficient for proper training, the
Senate of the University of Calabar in 1993, upgraded the programme to a five-year degree programme to take
effect from the beginning of the 1995/96 academic-year. The degree nomenclature was also changed to
Bachelor of Medical Laboratory Sciences (BMLS). The first batch of BMLS graduates completed their studies
in the 2000/20001 session. The last set of students in the four-year programme graduated at the end of the
1997/1998 session.
PHILOSOPHY OF THE PROGRAMME
a) To provide an in-depth scientific background to enrich the practice of Medical Laboratory Science.
b) To produce Medical Laboratory Scientists with professional and scientific competence and sufficient
management ability, who can:
(i) Perform effectively in hospital diagnostic services, preventive and public health services, research
and academics.
(ii) Function independently or in collaboration with other members of the health-care team.
(iii) Be the vanguard for the production of biological and diagnostic reagents and be able to design and
fabricate laboratory equipment.
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
WAEC, GCE or Senior Secondary School Certificate with credit level passes in Physics, Mathematics,
Chemistry, Biology and English at not more than two sittings, together with a relevant pass in the Joint
Matriculation Examination (JME). Pass in General Certificate of Education at Advanced Level in Chemistry,
Physics, Biology (or Zoology).
Structure of the Progamme
The programme is designed to include a period of formal studies in the University, Industrial Training, planned
visits and projects work.
Year 1
Study of basic sciences: Students are required to take lectures and examination in Physics, Chemistry, Biology
and Mathematics. Courses in General Studies; [(a) and (b) are undertaken in two semesters]
Year 2
(a)
(b)
Basic Medical Sciences (1st and 2nd semester)
Anatomy, Physiology, and Biochemistry.
Introduction to Medical Laboratory Science and Introduction to Medical Parasitology.
Year 3
Courses in discipline closely related to Medical laboratory Science.
1st Semester: Courses are taken in Pharmacology, Medical Physics, Electronics and Biometry.
2nd Semester: Mainframe courses in Medical Laboratory Science (students undertake laboratory posting in
each of the two semesters and are also examined.
Year 4
Courses in Medical Laboratory Science for the first Semester. The second Semester is devoted entirely to
Clinical Laboratory practice which carries 18 credit units.
Year 5
Mainframe courses and project for both Semesters. (All long vacations from year 3 onwards are devoted to
Mandatory Clinical Laboratory Practice.
COURSE OUTLINE
YEAR ONE
1ST SEMESTER
2ND SEMESTER
220
Course
Code
BIO1101
Introductory Biology I
CHM1011
MTH1111
PHY1101
GSS 1101
GSS1131
BIO2031
Course title
Credit
Hr
3
Course
Code
BIO1102
Courses title
Credit
Hr
3
Introduction to Biology II
Introductory Chemistry I
Algebra and Trigonometry
3
3
CHM1022
PHY1102
Organic Chemistry
Introduction Physics II
3
3
Introductory Physics I
Use of English I
History & Philosophy of
Science
Introductory
Cytology
Genetics
Total Number of Credit
Hours
3
3
3
GSS1122
GSS1102
GSS 1112
Philosophy and Logic
Use of English II
Citizenship Education
3
Total Number of Credit
Hours
18
3
3
21
All year one courses are offered by the relevant departments in the Faculty of Science and the Centre for General Studies.
YEAR TWO
Course
Code
ANA2011
ANA2021
ANA2031
BCM2031
BCM2021
PHS 2011
PHS 2021
1ST SEMESTER
Course title
Credit
Hr
2
2
3
ANA2022
BCM2053
PHS 2042
Carbohydrate
Biochemistry
Enzymes and Intro. to
Metabolism
Introduction to Physiology
2
PHS 2052
2
MLS2012
2
MMP 2012
Blood and Cardiovascular
Physiology
Total credit hours
2
Gross Anatomy
Histology
Embryology/Medical
Genetics
Course Code
18
2ND SEMESTER
Courses title
Histology II
Biochemistry of Proteins
Renal Physiology, Body
Fluid and Temperature
Regulation
Respiratory System
Credit
Hr
2
3
3
2
Introduction to Med. Lab.
Science
Medical Microbiology and
Parasitology
2
Total credit hours
18
3
The relevant departments in the Faculty of Basic Medical Sciences in the College of Medical Sciences offer all year two
courses except MLS 2012 and MMP 2012..
YEAR THREE
Course
Code
MLS 3021
MMP 3011
PHM 3011
MLS 3011
MLS 3031
MLS 3041
MLS 3051
1ST SEMESTER
Course title
Biomedical Electronics
General Microbiology
Pharmacology (offered by
Pharmacology
Department)
Medical
Laboratory
Science Ethics
Medical Physics
Biometrics (offered by
Mathematics Department)
Laboratory Posting
Total credit hours
Course Code
2ND SEMESTER
Courses title
Credit
Hr
3
GSS 1152
3
3
PTH 3012
MLS 3032
Computer
Applications
(offered by
the
Centre
for
General
Studies)
General Pathology
Laboratory Posting
2
MLS 3022
Instrumentation
4
3
3
CHP 3012
MLS 3012
Immunology I
Laboratory
Management
and Organization
3
3
Total credit hours
19
3
20
221
Credit
Hr
3
3
3
(Year three marks the beginning of the professional training. Core Courses are handled by qualified and registered
Medical Laboratory Scientists).
YEAR FOUR
Course
Code
CHP 4011
MMP4011
HEM4011
HEM4021
PTH 4011
MMP4021
MMP4031
CHP 4021
1ST SEMESTER
Course title
Basic Chemical Pathology
Basic Medical Parasitology Med.
Entomology
Basic Haematology
Basic Blood Group Serology
Basic Histopathology
Virology
Basic Bacteriology/ Mycology
Immunology II
Total credit hours
Credit
Hr
3
3
3
3
3
2
3
3
23
MLS 4012 – Posting of each student to all four sections of Laboratory work (In-Built Internship/Industrial
Attachment) for the whole Semester - 18 Credit units.
During this period students are engaged to perform routine analysis of patient samples under the supervision of
their teachers and technical staff. Assessment of student performance is based on 1. Attendance, 2. Daily work
record – showing ability to follow proper analytical procedure and accuracy of results obtained from analysis,
3. End of posting examination in each unit, 4. Written examinations at the end of all postings (two papers), 5. A
five-hour practical examination
CHEMICAL PATHOLOGY (Specialty)
YEAR FIVE
Course
Code
CHP 5011
1ST SEMESTER
Course title
Chemical pathology I
Credit
Hr
3
Course Code
CHP 5012
CHP 5022
CHP 5032
CHP 5042
CHP 5000
CHP 5002
2ND SEMESTER
Courses title
Endocrinology
Toxicology
Advanced Chemical
Pathology Techniques
Seminar
Project
Laboratory Posting
Total credit hours
Credit
Hr
3
3
3
2
3
3
17
HISTOPATHOLOGY
YEAR FIVE
1ST SEMESTER
Course title
Course
Code
PTH 5051
PTH 5001
PTH 5000
PTH 5011
Credit
Hr
2
3
3
3
Research Methodology
Laboratory Posting.
Project
Histopathology I
PTH 5021
PTH 5031
PTH 5041
Histopathology II
Histopathology III
Exfoliative Cytology
3
3
3
Total credit hours
20
Course Code
PTH 5042
PTH 5000
PTH 5012
PTH 5022
PTH 5032
PTH 5002
2ND SEMESTER
Courses title
Seminar
Project
Cytogenetics
Advanced
Histopatholoy
Technique/Embalment
Museum Techniques
Laboratory Posting
Total credit hours
222
Credit
Hr
2
3
3
3
3
3
17
HAEMATOLOGY/B.G.S (Specialty)
YEAR FIVE
1ST SEMESTER
Course title
Course
Code
HEM5011
HEM5021
MEM5031
HEM5041
Credit
Hr
3
3
3
3
Histopathology I
Histopathology II
Blood Group Serology I
Blood Group Serology II
HEM5051
HEM5000
HEM5001
Course Code
HEM 5000
HEM5042
HEM5012
HEM5022
Research Methods
2
HEM 5032
Project
Laboratory Posting
3
3
PTH 5002
Total credit hours
20
2ND SEMESTER
Courses title
Project
Seminar
Cytogenetics
Advanced
Hematological
Technique/Embalment
Advanced Blood Group
Serology Techniques
Laboratory Posting
Total credit hours
Credit
Hr
3
2
2
3
3
3
17
MICROBIOLOGY (Specialty)
YEAR FIVE
Course
Code
MMP5011
MMP5021
MMP5031
MMP5041
MMP5000
MMP5001
MMP5051
1ST SEMESTER
Course title
MMP5012
MMP 5022
Advanced
Parasitology/
Epidemiology
Public
Health
Microbiology
Project
Laboratory Posting
Research Methods
3
MPP5042
Medical Mycology
Pharmaceutical
Microbiology and Advanced
Techniques
Seminar
3
MPP 5000
Project
3
2
3
2
MPP5032
MPP 5002
Microbial Genetics
Laboratory Posting
3
3
Total credit hours
20
Total credit hours
17
Medical Microbiology I
Medical Microbiology II
Course Code
2ND SEMESTER
Courses title
Credit
Hr
3
3
Credit
Hr
3
3
2
DEPARTMENT OF NURSING SCIENCE
BACHELOR OF NURSING SCIENCE PROGRAMME
(Established 1993)
Introduction
The Nigeria public places a high value on health and therefore demands access to high quality health care as a
guaranteed right. In response to this, there is need for highly qualified nursing manpower. Nurses must become
better educated if they are to keep pace with new findings and improved technology.
Technological advancement and innovation, increasing computerization, and the complexities of today’s
clients, require a radical change in nursing knowledge, skills and attitudes. This demands that the practicing
professional nurse has a science-based education with a strong liberal arts background. The Bachelor of
Nursing Science in the University of Calabar offers this liberal and professional education for nurses. The
curriculum prepares the nurse to understand the multivariate factors involved in health promotion and
maintenance, make rational judgments and use analytic problem solving processes in caring for clients in a
variety of settings.
223
Philosophy of the Programme
The objectives of the University of Calabar serve as a guide for the philosophy of the B. N. Sc. programme.
The programme also takes cognizance of the philosophy of education, healthcare and nursing in Nigeria.
Programme Objectives
The objectives of the programme are
 To prepare professional nurse/midwive/psychiatric nurse practitioners capable of assuming
professional responsibility in any case setting.
 To advance public welfare through the preparation of competent polyskilled nurse practitioners who
will provide safe, acceptable, effective and high quality health services to individuals, families and
communities.
 To contribute to the national health manpower needs by producing an adequate number of
academically and professionally qualified nurses, midwives and psychiatric nurses capable of giving
care in health care agencies, industries and communities.
 To improve the standard of nursing care by providing continuing education for nursing personnel.
 To increase research awareness among nurses and provide a focus for the development and
maintenance of high professional standards in nursing.
 To uphold the academic standards stipulated by the University of Calabar
Admission Requirements
U. M. E. Entry
Candidates must have an appropriate pass in the UME examination of the joint Admission and Matriculation
Board (JAMB). In addition, the candidate must hold the WASC/SSCE/GCEO/L or its equivalent with Credit in
at least 5 subjects (at not more than 2 sittings) including English Language, Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics
and Physics.
Direct Entry
(a)
Candidate must possess the Advanced level GCE or Higher School Certificate in at least 2 science
subjects, chosen from Biology/Zoology, Physics and Chemistry. In addition candidates must have
credit in 5 other subjects in ‘O’ Level GCE/SSCE including Mathematics, Chemistry, Biology, Physics
and English Language.
(b)
Already trained nurses must possess the Registered
Nurse certificate (RN) of the Nursing &
Midwifery Council of Nigeria (N&MCN) and in addition hold the GCE/SSCE/WASC or its
equivalent; with credit in at least 5 subjects (at not more than 2 settings) including English Language,
Biology, Chemistry and Mathematics.
Direct entry candidates will be placed at the 200 level of study. The non-nursing qualified direct
candidates will be expected to sit for at least 2 professional examinations like the UME candidates
(that is, General Nursing and Midwifery or Psychiatric Nursing).
Duration of the Course:
UME
- 5 YEARS
Direct Entry
- 4 YEARS
STRATEGIES FOR IMPLEMENTING THE B.N.Sc PROGRAMME
Programme Structure
Programme implementation consists of theory and practice with courses organized into units. One course unit
in one contact hour per week (theory/tutorial) and three contact hours per week (practical/clinical). There are 5
levels of courses and nursing courses are prefixed with the letters NSC. Courses will comprise
core/compulsory courses, which must be taken and passed, required courses and elective courses which are
taken to enrich and increase student’s total units. In line with the University regulation, students shall be
required to register for not less than 15 credits units and not more than 24 units per semester. Permission can
however be obtained from Senate to carry 27 credit units in the final year.
Each semester is made up of periods of classroom teaching, clinical teaching and practice in hospital and
primary health care settings. All clinical postings are compulsory. Students also have planned visits to some
industries, communities and health care agencies in some courses. Care studies and projects are integral
components of the programme
224
The programme curriculum is both modular, and integrated and is implemented as such. Students must fulfill
the requirements at the lower level before they can proceed to the higher level. Each semester from Part II to
Part V is made up of periods of classroom teaching and clinical practice (direct patient care in the hospital and
primary healthcare settings). The programme has two types of students: first those who come in through the
Universities Matriculation Examination (U.M.E) - these undergo a Generic programme for five years after
which they sit for and pass two professional nursing examinations and register with the Nursing and Midwifery
Council of Nigeria (N & MCN) as General Nurses and Midwives or psychiatric Nurses. The second type of
students are those who come in through Direct Entry either as already trained nurses or with Advanced level
GCE and spend four years. The later are expected to sit for and pass professional examinations in General
Nursing and Midwifery or Psychiatric Nursing. The students undergoing a Generic programme are expected to
meet the prescribed professional clinical requirements; they must spend part of the long vacation periods for
clinical postings and must meet all professional requirements before sitting for the professional examinations.
All Clinical postings are compulsory. Students also have planned visits to some industries, communities and
health care agencies in some courses. Care studies and projects are integral components of the programme.
NOTE:
Registered Nurse (RN) or the final qualifying examination for general nursing must be taken and
passed before attempting the midwifery and psychiatric programmes or degree examination.
PART I
This is the Preliminary year for students, who come in through UME. Courses taken are in basic sciences
(Physics, Chemistry, Biology and Mathematics) and General studies (GSS). In preparation for Part II, Students
also have lectures in History of Nursing in the second semester and Foundations of Nursing during the long
vacation. Students are to submit photocopies of their credentials and pay for W.A.E.C verification. This is a
requirement of the N & MCN for indexing. Only verified certificates are accepted by N & MCN for indexing
before the end of the second semester. Indexing fee of N4,000.00 per student payable in bank draft should be
sent along with completed indexing form, 4 passport photographs and verified credentials to the N & MCN.
Late indexing attracts a fine of N10,000.00 per school. All fees are subject to review by the Council from time
to time.
PART II
Students take courses in Medical Sciences (Anatomy, Physiology, Biochemistry, Parasitology), Sociology and
Nursing. The direct entry students begin the programme in clinical experience which runs two days a week
throughout the two semesters. During the long vacation there is intensive clinical practice for 6 weeks.
Therefore all students undergoing the generic programme must stay back for this exercise to run shift duty.
PART III
Students take mainly Nursing courses such as (medical – surgical Nursing. Maternal and Child Health,
Psychiatric Nursing, Public health courses), Medical Jurisprudence, Pharmacology, Pathology and
Microbiology. There is supervised clinical experience, two days a week throughout the semester. The pre-part
four has to do with intensive clinical practice for the generic programme. It is mainly hospital based to prepare
the students for the Final Qualifying Examination for General Nurses.
PART IV
Students take courses in advanced Medical – Surgical Nursing, Family Health, Nursing Administration and
Teaching, Research and Medical Sociology and two elective courses in Sociology or Political Science and
Education. They also go for Teaching and Administrative Practice. Qualified candidates will sit for the final
qualifying examinations for Generic Nurses in May or November of the fourth Year. Hereafter they are
indexed for Midwifery or Psychiatric nursing option. Examination fee for General Nursing, which is
N14,000.00 is subject to up ward revision.
PART V
Courses include advanced maternity nursing/advanced psychiatric nursing, Research project and seminar, at
least two elective courses and clinical practice. Professional examination for midwifery is in March or
September of each year while that for psychiatric Nursing is in May or November,. Student midwives are
expected to have done ten (10) vaginal examinations, palpated fifty pregnant women and assisted in thirty (30)
225
deliveries before taking the Nursing and Midwifery Council of Nigeria (N & MCN) Final Qualifying
Examinations for Midwives.
COURSE OUTLINE
PART ONE (15 Weeks)
Course
Code
BIO1101
CHM1022
MTH1111
PHY1101
GSS 1101
GSS1131
BIO2031
1ST SEMESTER
Course title
General Biology
Introductory Chemistry
General Mathematics
Introductory Physics I
Use of English I
History & Philosophy of
Science
General Physiology
Total credit hours/load
2ND SEMESTER
Courses title
Credit
Hr
3
Course
Code
BIO1102
Credit
Hr
3
General Biology II
4
3
3
3
3
PHY1102
CHM1022
GSS1122
GSS1102
GSS 1112
Introduction Physics II
Introductory Chemistry II
Philosophy and Logic
Use of English II
Citizenship Education
3
4
3
3
3
3
22
NCS1012
History of Nursing
Total credit hours/load
2
21
PART TWO (15 Weeks)
Course
Code
NSC 2011
GSS 2111
ANA2031
ANA2041
PHS 2041
PHS 2051
BCM 2211
SOC 1201
1ST SEMESTER
Course title
Foundation of Nursing
Intro. to Computer
Comp. Prog
General
Embryology/Genetics
Gen/Gross Anatomy
&
Intro. & Gen. Physiology
System Physiology
Biochemistry for Nurses
Introduction to Social
Antrop.
Total credit hours/load
2ND SEMESTER
Courses title
Credit
Hr
3
3
Course
Code
NSC 2012
NSC 2022
Professional Nursing Care
Ethics & Trends in Nursing
Credit
Hr
3
2
3
NSC 2032
Medical-Surgical Nursing I
3
3
SOC 1102
Introd. To Soc. Psychology
3
3
3
3
3
ANA2042
PHS 2062
BCM2222
GSS 2112
Gross Anatomy II
Neuro-Endocrinology
Biochemistry for Nurses II
Computers & Comp. Prog.
II
Total credit hours/load
3
3
3
3
24
23
PRE-PART TWO
NSC2000
Introduction to professional Nursing (4 weeks)
PART THREE (15 Weeks)
Course
Code
NSC 3011
NSC 3021
NSC 3031
NSC 3061
PUH 3011
1ST SEMESTER
Course title
Concepts in Professional
Nursing
Med-Surg. Nursing II
Maternal & Child Health
(MCH) Nursing
Princs./Pract.
of
Mental/Psych. Nursing
Princs. Of P.H.C
2ND SEMESTER
Courses title
Credit
Hr
3
Course
Code
PHM3032
3
NSC 3022
3
NSC 3062
3
NSC 3082
Clin.
Pharmacol.
Chemotherapy
Advanced Medical Surg.
Nursing I
Human behaviour in health
& illness
Gen Cellular Pathology
3
PUH 3012
Planning & Implementation
226
Credit
Hr
3
3
2
2
3
JRD 3011
MMP3011
PHM3021
Medical Jurisprudence
Medical
Microbiology/
Parasitology
Clinical Pharmacol. &
Chemotherapy II
Total credit hours/load
3
3
PUH 3022
MMP3011
3
NSC3012
24
of P.H.C.
Epidemiology
Biostatistics & Research
methods
Nutrition in
Health &
illness
Total credit hours/load
3
3
2
21
Includes Practicum
PRE-PART THREE
NSC 3000 – Concentrated clinical practice in Medical – Surgical Nursing (5 – 6 Weeks).
PART FOUR (15 weeks)
Course
Code
NSC4011
NSC4021
NSC4041
NSC4051
SOC4701
NSC4081
HCP4011
NSC4091
1ST SEMESTER
Course title
Credit
Hr
Family Health I
2
Advanced Medical –Surg.
3
Nursing II
Gynaecological Nursing
3
Princs.
Of
2
Admin/Teaching
Social problems & Social
3
works
Systemic Pathology
2
Haematology & Chem.
3
Pathology
Research
Methods
in
3
Nursing
Total credit hours/load
22
Course
Code
NSC4012
NSC4032
NSC4042
NSC4052
2ND SEMESTER
Courses title
Family Health II
Mental & Psych. Nursing I or
Credit
Hr
2
3
3
3
PUH4012
Midwifery I (Normal)
Admin. & Org. of Health
Services
Health Education
NSC4062
NSC4072
Teaching Practice
Admin Practice
2
2
SOC4702
Sociology in health & illness
3
NSC4082
Nursing Practicum
4
Total credit hours/load
21
PRE-PART FOUR
NSC 4000 Concentrated clinical practice in Community Health Nursing
NSC 4001 Medical surgical Nursing (Peri-operative)
2
- 3 weeks
- 3 weeks
PART FIVE (15 weeks)
Course
Code
NSC 5011
NSC 5021
NSC 5031
PUH 5011
NSC5311
1ST SEMESTER
Course title
Credit
Hr
3
Course
Code
PHM3032
Research
Project
&
Seminar
Midwifery II (Abnormal)
3
NSC 3022
3
NSC 3062
Control of communicable
diseases in community
Clinical electives I
3
NSC 3082
3
PUH 3012
One course elective
3
PUH 3022
MMP3011
Pub Health Nursing I
NSC3012
227
2ND SEMESTER
Courses title
Clin.
Pharmacol.
Chemotherapy
Advanced Medical Surg.
Nursing I
Human behaviour in health
& illness
Gen Cellular Pathology
Planning & Implementation
of P.H.C.
Epidemiology
Biostatistics & Research
methods
Nutrition in
Health &
illness
Credit
Hr
3
3
2
2
3
3
3
2
Total credit hours/load
Total credit hours/load
15
21
Includes practicum
PRE- PART FIVE
NSC 5000 – concentrated clinical practice in the community/ primary health care facilities for 4 weeks.
NOTE:
UME students can only sit for degree examinations after passing at least the final qualifying
examination for general nurses.
Student at all levels (Part 1 – 5) are expected to register each semester/session in the Department
and Faculty. Anyone not registered in the department is not a bonafide student of the department.
DEPARTMENT OF RADIOGRAPHY
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE, RADIOGRAPHY
Historical Background
The need for a degree programme in Medical Radiography that provides a broad based education arose due to
the increasing complexity/sensitivity of the equipment handled by radiographers. The B.Sc. programme in
radiography was started in the University of Calabar in 1980/81 session. The programme hitherto covered a
period of 4 years, this was reviewed in 1990/91 Session to 5 years following the N.U.C. recommendation. The
programme was run in Radiography Department and has now been accorded a full department status –
Department of Radiography.
Radiography
Radiography is all about the art and science of application of various forms of radiation for the purpose of
promotion of health, diagnosis and treatment of various forms of diseases, carrying out of non-destructive
testing/detective scanning in industries and for research purposes. Medical radiography therefore covers the
areas of radio diagnoses with imaging modalities such as CT, MRI, ultrasonography, scintigraphy and
radiotherapy as well as personnel and environmental radiation protection and monitoring.
Radiographers are professionals that have gone through prescribed curriculum of training required to develop
the needed skill to effectively quantify and administer various forms of radiation with minimum or no damage
to the population and the environment.
In keeping with the requirements of the National University Commission (NUC) for all Nigerian Universities,
and full participation of the Radiographers Registration Board of Nigeria (RRBN) as well as the global
technological advancement in medical imaging modalities the Bachelor of Science Degree in Radiography
programme strives to produce highly skilled professionals.
Philosophy and Objectives
The department believes that Nigeria must not lag behind in the global technological advancement in medical
imaging modalities. There is the need for a broad based education in radiography as a result of increasing
complexity of the equipment handled by Radiographers and the high standard expected by the Medical
Profession. This level of University training is essential for appropriate comprehension and efficient
application of the current and sophisticated Radiographic Equipment and thus the B.Sc. in Radiography is
designed to produce highly skilled professionals to meet the expected objective.
The objective is to provide graduate with a comprehensive theoretical and practical knowledge of diagnostic
and therapeutic as well as other allied imaging techniques. In furtherance of this the programme seek to fulfill
the following specific roles.
To produce Radiographers that can hold competently clinical positions involving the use of the most complex
radio-diagnostic/therapeutic equipment and procedures in the practice of radiography in the primary, secondary
and tertiary levels of healthcare delivery.
228
To produce professionals with sufficient managerial and professional proficiency to practice in Nigeria and
satisfy international standards.
To produce professionals who will be engaged in teaching, research and development of equipment in
industries, and be eligible to pursue post-graduate studies leading to award of M.Sc. AND Ph.D degrees.
Entry Qualification
The minimum entry requirements for admission into the College of Medical Sciences are applicable. This
include five ‘O’ level (SSCE of GCE/WASC or NECO) credits in Physics, Chemistry, Biology, English
Language and Mathematics, plus a pass in the Joint Admission Matriculation Examination, provided the cutoff point is met.
Duration of the Course and Nomenclature of the Award
The programme takes a period of five academic years leading to the award of a Bachelors of Science degree in
Radiography (B.Sc. Radiography).
Content and Training Format
The courses are covered in stages. The courses are delivered in the form of lectures, tutorials, seminars,
laboratory work/practical; clinical postings and faculty research study. Courses at the preliminary stage (100
level) are taught and examined by Faculty of Science and Department of General Studies. Courses at the
preclinical stage [200 LEVEL] are moderated by Faculty of Basic Medical Sciences, Faculty of Health
Sciences, except Radiation Physics, Hospital Practice and Care of Patient. Courses at the clinical stage (300 –
500 levels) are moderated by Faculties of Cinical Sciences, Health Sciences as prescribed by the Department of
Radiography.
Courses at the preliminary and prelinical stages are taken in University of Campus while at the clinical stage
courses are taken in University of Calabar of Calabar Campus, University of Calabar Teaching Hospital, the
state general hospital accredited Federal Medical Centres and Teaching Hospitals in the neighboring
states/student home and a mandatory posting to National Hospital Abuja, RadMed Diagnostic Centre, Lagos,
St Nocholas, Lagos, and Teaching Hospital Nation wide with MRI and CT and MRI experience. Graduating
students are registered with the RRBN for one-year mandatory internship programme jointly monitored by the
RRBN and the Department of Radiography, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Calabar.
Examination Regulation for the Degree of B.Sc Rad (Radiography)
These regulations are made in accordance with, and subject to the general provisions of the regulations
governing First-degree Programmes in the University of Calabar.
i.
In order to be admitted to take part in the examination leading to a degree of B.Sc. RAD, (Radiography)
a student is required to complete satisfactorily the courses, practical, assignments or project that are laid
down for the relevant parts of the programme of studies.
ii. All courses are examined at the termination of the course unit and candidates are credited with the
number of credit hours assigned to the course unit for which they have passed the examination.
iii. In addition to the course unit examinations, students shall be required to undergo a final degree
examination. The final examination shall be the University examination, set with a professional
inclination and moderated by external examiners. It shall consist of THREE 3-hour written papers plus
research project defense as well as an oral examination or viva voce.
iv. The pass mark for the core Radiography courses shall be 50%. This is a professional requirement.
v. To qualify for the award of a degree of B.Sc. Rad. (Radiography), the student must also satisfy the
professional requirement of 1,000 Radio-diagnostic Examinations.
COURSE OUTLINE
YEAR ONE
Course
Code
BIO1101
CHM1011
1ST SEMESTER
Course title
General Biology I
Basic
principles
Chemistry/Practical
of
Credit
Hr
3
Course
Code
BIO1102
3
CHM1022
229
2ND SEMESTER
Courses title
General Biology II(Genetics
& Citology)
Basic principles of Organic
Chemistry
Credit
Hr
3
4
MTH1101
PHY1101
GSS 1101
GSS1131
BIO2031
General Mathematics I
Basic
principles
of
physics/practical Physics
Use of English I
History & Philosophy of
Science
General Physiology
Total Number of Credit
Hours
3
3
PHY1102
MTH1122
Physics II
General Mathematics II
3
3
3
GSS1122
GSS1102
Philosophy and Logic
Use of English II
3
3
3
22
GSS 1112
Citizenship Education
Total Number of Credit
Hours
3
22
200 Level Courses
YEAR TWO
Course
Code
ANA2011
1ST SEMESTER
Course title
Course
Code
ANA2021
2
ANA2022
2ND SEMESTER
Courses title
ANA2031
General Embryology and
Genetics
2
ANA2032
PHS2011
PHS2021
Introductory Physiology
Hematology
2
2
PHS2042
PHS2052
PHS2031
RAD.2011
Cardiovascular System
Radiation Physics I
2
2
RAD2021
RAD2022
RAD.2021
Hospital and Departmental
Procedures/Care of Patient
Introduction
to
Biochemistry
Computer
2
RAD2032
Gross Anatomy of thorax
and abdomen
Histology of Urogenital and
Lymphatic System
Systemic Embryology of
structures of thorax and
abdomen
Renal Physiology
Physiology
of
the
Respiratory system
Radiation Physics II
Hospital Procedures/Care of
Patient II
Pathology I
2
PHS2032
Nurophysiology
2
ANA2052
GSS2112
Total Number of Credit
Hours
20
Nuroanatomy
Computer
Total Number of Credit
Hours
ANA2021
BCM2011
GSS2111
Gross Anatomy of Upper
and lower limbs
Histology of GIT
Credit
Hr
2
Credit
Hr
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
22
YEAR THREE
Course
Code
ANA3011
ANA3021
ANA3031
PHS3011
PHS3021
RAD3011
RAD3041
RAD3051
RAD3061
PHS3031
ANA3041
1ST SEMESTER
Course title
Gross Anatomy of head
and neck
Histology of the nervous
system and Special senses
Embryology of nervous
system
GIT Physiology
Endocrinology
and
Reproduction
Radiation Physics III
Radiographic Technique I
Clinical Biochemistry and
Immunology
Pathology II
Neuro Physiology
Neuro Anatomy
Total Number of Credit
Hours
2ND SEMESTER
Courses title
Credit
Hr
2
Course
Code
RAD3092
Credit
Hr
4
Radiographic Photography I
2
RAD3042
Radiographic Technique
4
2
RAD3102
Radiographic Equipment
4
2
2
RAD3132
PHM3022
Microbiology
Pharmacology
2
2
2
RAD3072
Radiological Health
Management
2
Total credit hours/load
18
2
2
2
2
22
230
YEAR FOUR
Course
Code
RAD4191
RAD4091
RAD4101
RAD4041
RAD4081
RAD4121
RAD4201
RAD4171
1ST SEMESTER
Course title
2ND SEMESTER
Courses title
Credit
Hr
3
2
Course
Code
RAD4192
RAD4092
2
RAD4102
Clinical Posting
Radiographic photography
& Imaging III
Radiographic Equipment III
Radiographic Technique
III
Radiographic Anatomy
Research Methodology
3
RAD4042
RadiographicTechnique IV
4
2
2
RAD4142
RAD4162
2
2
Public Health
Biostatistics
Tota credit hours/load
2
2
18
RAD4152
Radiobiology
Principle of Radiotherapy
and Oncology
Psychology for Radiography
Clinical Posting
Radiographic Photography
II
Radiographic Equipment II
Total credit hours/load
Credit
Hr
4
2
2
2
2
18
YEAR FIVE
Course
Code
RAD5091
RAD5101
RAD5041
RAD5121
RAD5081
RAD5081
RAD5191
1ST SEMESTER
Course title
Radiographic Photography
& Imaging VI
Radiographic Equipment
IV
Radiographic Photography
V
Seminar
Radiographic Anatomy II
Other Imaging Modalities
(USS, NMR, ECT)
Clinical Radiography
Tota credit hours/load
Credit
Hr
2
Course
Code
RAD5192
2
RAD5092
3
2
3
2
2ND SEMESTER
Courses title
Clinical Posting
Credit
Hr
3
2
RAD5102
Radiographic photography
& Imaging III
Radiographic Equipment V
RAD5212
RAD5122
RAD5232
Project
Seminar
Viva voce
5
2
2
Total credit hours/load
16
4
18
2
DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC HEALTH
Introduction
The Department of Environmental Health Sciences currently runs a Bachelor and Postgraduate programmes in
Public Health. However, in that Department.
Mission
The mission of the Department of Public Health, University of Calabar is
therefore to be recognized as a national centre of excellence in public health
training, research, and professional leadership.
The Department intended to achieve this through:
i.
Provision of contemporary educational opportunities to facilitate the
development of professional competence in public health.
ii.
Advancement of knowledge, health research, and scholarship to
enhance health of the people;
231
iii. Leadership in public health advocacy, and education in partnership
with local, national and international bodies, and
iv. Creating enabling academic environment which promotes goals of the
College of Medical Science and the University at large.
Vision
Our vision is to explore new opportunities and knowledge that lead to
highest standard of public health training to meet present and future
national health challenges.
Goal
Goal of the Department is to provide state of the art knowledge and
professional skills in public health for community service.
THE PHILOSOPHY OF THE PROGRAMME
I.
Build capacity in Public Health through a sound theoretical foundation in the natural,
social and health sciences as well as develop professional and laboratory skills for public
health action in general disease prevention and control, control of emerging communicable
diseases like HIV/AIDS, natural/man made of emergency and disaster
management in Nigeria;
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.
vii.
emphasize problem-solving, field work, community-based approach to the management of
multidimensional public health problems;
create community awareness of the critical role of Public Health in disease prevention, control
and management to justify the age-old maxim: “Prevention is better than cure”
upgrade the knowledge and skills of numerous Public Health professionals (i.e.,
Environmental Health Officers, Community Health Officers, Public Health Nurses, Veterinary
Officers, etc) to enhance their effectiveness in the field;
develop future leaders in the Public health profession to provide service. Conduct research and
teach at the Colleges of health technology and, with Post-graduate qualifications, in higher
institutions;
train professionals who can be self-employed; and
create a learning environment that promotes creativity, hard work, merit and selfless service to
the nation.
THE OBJECTIVEAS OF THE PROGRAMME ARE AS FOLLOWS:
i.
To train professional health human resources in Public Health
ii.
To provide student-centred educational experience that encourages depth, and application
of principles and methods of Public Health;
iii.
To provide field and Community-based experience in relevant areas of Public Health;
iv.
To build capacity in critical public private sectors where public health expertise is lacking;
and
v.
To provide opportunities for career advancement in Public Health.
(c) Admission Requirements
5 YEAR PROGRAMME (UME)
232
Admission into the five years BPH programme through Universities Matriculation examination
(UME) requires minimum of five(5) ordinary level (O/L) Credit in English Language, Mathematics,
Physics, Chemistry and Biology at not more than two (2) sittings.
4 YEAR PROGRAMME (DIRECT ENTRY)
Admission into the four years BPH programme through direct entry requires Higher National
Diploma (HND) in Public Health, national Diploma in Environmental Health, Public Health Nursing
from West African Health Examinations Board (WAHEB), Community Health Officers (CHO or
equivalent) in health related field with a minimum of Upper credit. In addition the candidate must
have minimum of upper credit. In addition the candidate must have minimum of five (5) ordinary
level (o/L) credits in English Language, Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry and Biology at not more
than two (2) sittings.
- COURSE REQUIREMENTS
Students are required to complete a minimum of 156 Credit Hours or Maximum of 195 Credit
Hours for graduation, spread into 8 semesters for the 4 year programme and 10 semesters for the five
years programme.
PROGRAMME CONTENT
BPH – 5 YEAR PROGRAMME
YEAR ONE :
FIRST SEMESTER
Course No
Course Title
Credit Hours
GSS 1101
Use of English & Communication Skills
2
MTH 1111
General mathematics and Statistics
3
PHY 1101
Introductory Physics 1
3
BIO 1011
Introductory Biology I
3
CHM 1011
Introductory Chemistry 1
3
SOC 1111
Introduction to Sociology
3
GSS 1121
Philosophy and Logic
2
GSS 1131
History and Philosophy of Science
2_____
21
YEAR ONE
Course No.
GSS 1102
GSS 1112
PHY 1102
BIO 1012
CHM 1012
SOC 1112
PUH 1012
SECOND SEMESTER
Course Title
Use of English II Library Skills
Citizenship Education
Introductory Physics II
Introductory Biology II
Introductory Chemistry
Introduction to Psychology
Introduction to Public Health
YEAR TWO
GSS 2111
PHS 2041
BCM 2211
FIRST SEMESTER
Introduction to Computer
Introductory to Physiology
Biochemistry for Public Health
233
Credit Hours
2
2
3
3
3
3
3__
19
CREDIT UNIT
2
3
3
PUH 2011
PUH 2021
ANA 2041
PUH 2031
GSS 1101
GSS 1131
Environment and Health
Mental Health
General and Gross Anatomy
Introduction to Demography
Use of English
History and Philosophy of Science
YEAR TWO
MMP 2012
SECOND SEMESTER
Introduction to Medical Microbiology/
Parasitology
Public Health Nutrition I
Biostatistics I
Computer Applications
School Health Programme
Family Health I
Principles of Health Education
Use of English II
Citizenship Education
Philosophy & Logic
PUH 2012
PUH 2022
GSS 2112
PUH 2042
PUH 2052
PUH 2062
GSS 1102
GSS 1112
GSS 1121
YEAR THREE
Course No.
PUH 3011
PUH 3021
PUH 3031
PUH 3041
PUH 3051
PUH 3061
PUH 3071
GSS 3101
YEAR THREE
PUH 3012
PUH 3022
PUH 3032
PUH 3042
PUH 3052
PUH 3062
PUH 3072
GSS 3102
YEAR FOUR
Course No.
PUH 4011
3
3
3
3
2
2___
24
CREDIT HOURS
3
3
3
2
3
3
3
2
2
2____
26
FIRST SEMESTER
Course Title
Credit Hours
Biostatistics II
3
Principles of Epidemiology
3
Water Supply and Sanitation
3
Solid waste Management
3
Public Health Nutrition II
3
Community Health Education and Promotion
3
Introduction to Health Services Management3
Entrepreneurship Development I
2___
23
SECOND SEMESTER
CREDIT UNIT
International Health
3
Family Health II
3
Occupational Health and Safety
3
Contemporary Issues in Public Health
3
Health Education Practice
3
Epidemiology of Communicable Diseases
3
Health Economics, Financing and Budgeting
3
Entrepreneurship Development II
2___
23
FIRST SEMESTER
CREDIT HOUR
Course Title
Research Methods in Public Health
3
234
PUH 4021
MMP 4011
PUH 4031
PUH 4041
PUH 4051
PUH 4061
Quality Assurance in Public Health Services
Basic Parasitology/Medical Entomology
Principles of Primary Health Care (PHC)
Control of Disease Vectors
Epidemiology of Non-Communicable Diseases
Disaster and Emergency Management
YEAR FOUR
PUH 4012
PUH 4022
PUH 4032
PUH 4042
PUH 4052
PUH 4062
SECOND SEMESTER
PHC Planning and Implementation
Public Health Law
Consumer Health Education
Laboratory/Field Methods in Public Health
(Team teaching)
Stress Reduction and Management
Sociology in Health and Disease
YEAR FIVE
PUH 5000
PUH 5011
PUH 5021
FIRST SEMESTER
Project
Field Work Experience
Seminar
YEAR FIVE
PUH 5000
PUH 5022
SECOND SEMESTER
Project
Seminar
3
3
3
3
3
3___
21
CREDIT HOUR
3
3
3
3
3
3___
18
CREDIT HOUR
3
9
3___
15
3
3___
6
NOTE: Students are required to present and participate in Departmental Seminars at the 500 level.
BPH 4 –YEAR PROGRAMME
YEAR TWO
FIRST SEMESTER
Course No.
Course Title
GSS 2111
Introduction to Computers
PHS 2041
Introductory to Physiology
BCM 2211
Biochemistry for Public Health
PUH 2011
Environment and Health
PUH 2021
Mental health
ANA 2041
General and Gross Anatomy
PUH 2031
Introduction to Demography
GSS 1101
Use of English & Communication Skills I
GSS 1131
History and Philosophy of Science
YEAR TWO
MMP 2012
PUH 2012
PUH 2022
GSS 2112
PUH 2042
PUH 2052
SECOND SEMESTER
Introduction to Medical Microbiology/
Parasitology
Public Health Nutrition I
Biostatistics I
Computer Applications
School Health Programme
Family Health I
235
CREDIT HOUR
Credit Hour
2
3
3
3
3
3
3
2
2___
24
CREDIT HOUR
3
3
3
2
3
3
PUH 2062
GSS 1102
GSS 1112
GSS 1121
Principles of Health Education
Use of English & Communication Skill II
Citizenship Education
Philosophy & Logic
YEAR THREE
Course No.
PUH 3011
PUH 3021
PUH 3031
PUH 3041
PUH 3051
PUH 3061
PUH 3071
GSS 3101
FIRST SEMESTER
Course Title
Biostatistics II
Principles of Epidemiology
Water Supply and Sanitation
Solid Waste Management
Public Health Nutrition II
Community Health Education and Promotion
Introduction to Health Services Management
Entrepreneurship Development I
YEAR THREE
SECOND SEMESTER
3
2
2
2___
26
Credit Hour
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
2___
23
CREDIT HOUR
PUH 3012
PUH 3022
PUH 3032
PUH 3042
PUH 3052
PUH 3062
PUH 3072
GSS 3102
International Health
Family Health II
Occupational Health and Safety
Contemporary Issues in Public Health
Health Education Practice
Epidemiology of Communicable Disease
Health Economics, Financing and Budgeting
Entrepreneurship Development II
YEAR FOUR
Course No.
PUH 4011
PUH 4021
MMP 4011
PUH 4031
PUH 4041
PUH 4051
PUH 4061
FIRST SEMESTER
Course Title
Credit Hour
Research Methods in Public Health
3
Quality Assurance in Public Health Services
Basic Parasitology/Medical Entomology
3
Principles of Primary Health Care (PHC)
3
Control of Disease Vectors
3
Epidemiology of Non-Communicable Disease
3
Disaster and Emergency Management
3
YEAR FOUR
PUH 4012
PUH 4022
PUH 4032
PUH 4042
SECOND SEMESTER
PHC Planning and Implementation
Public Health Law
Consumer Health Education
Laboratory/Field Methods in Public Health
(Team teaching)
Stress Reduction and Management
Sociology in Health and Disease
PUH 4052
PUH 4062
236
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
2___
23
3
CREDIT HOUR
3
3
3
3
3
3___
18
YEAR FIVE
PUH 5000
PUH 5011
PUH 5021
FIRST SEMESTER
Project
Field Work Experience
Seminar
YEAR FIVE
PUH 5000
PUH 5022
SECOND SEMESTER
Project
Seminar
CREDIT HOUR
3
9
3____
15
3
3_____
The Master in Public Health (MPH) Programme.
Although the name of the Department was officially changed from Department of Community Health to
Department of Public Health on 16th April, 1999, the name of the graduate program remains Master of Public
Health (MPH)
Public Health is the “Crossroads” of the disciplines of community medicine and relevant social sciences. The
existing Master of Public Health (MPH) programmes in Nigeria, owing to their professional bias, cannot fill
the gap of the dearth of need for graduates with a “core” background in Public Health, to provide a strong base
for teachers, researchers in and/or administrators of public health programmes in a developing country. The
need is even more urgent and necessary in the face of a new challenge for health professionals to make their
training and skills relevant to Public Health needs of the nation.
Objectives
a)
To accomplish these broad purposes stated above, the following specific objectives are pursued:
b)
To create an intellectual and professional environment for the education and training of qualified
individuals leading to the Master of Public Health (MPH) degree.
c)
To provide leadership and active response to community and national public health needs.
d)
To provide opportunities for continuing education for public health professionals through learning
and experiential situation.
e)
To promote active research environment which includes the encouragement of innovative responses
to health care needs.
Areas of Concentration:
 Health Education
 Public Health Nutrition
 Primary Health Care
 Epidemiology
 Health Services Management
 Environmental Health and such other areas as the Department may determine
in the future.
Admission requirements:
Admission to the programme is open to graduates of the University of Calabar and of other universities
recognized by the Senate and applicants should hold at least a second class honours (upper Division, 21)
degree (or its equivalent ) in the health sciences (including health education); adequate background in
biomedical sciences, biological sciences; M.B..B.Ch and B.D.S. (Bachelor of Dental Surgery) DVM or their
equivalents or sociology with adequate background in biomedical sciences. The department expects eligible
applicants to attend a personal interview as part of the selection process.
Curriculum Model
The curriculum is based on three components – didactic, experiential and research.
237
Didactic
The didactic component will cover the core courses which are considered to be basic to public health
including, but not restricted to biostatistics, epidemiology, environmental health, maternal and child health.
etc?
a) The required or core courses are basic courses that are intended for all students in the MPH program.
These include health education, primary health care, epidemiology, nutrition, health service
management, introductory computer course, environmental health – and other areas as may be
determined in future by the department.
b) Area of Concentration: Additional in-depth upper level courses will be taken in respective
concentration areas of the program.
c) Electives consist of such other courses as the student and/or his adviser may consider to be related to
or of general educational interest to the program.
Experiential
Training creates a learning environment which stimulates and allows individual trainee to assume
responsibility for his own learning. Experiential training facilitates the acquisition of specific competencies
during training and encourages the application of these competencies by trainees, through flexible learnercentred exposures. This approach is based on a few assumptions:
 Learning emerges from people as a result of their experiences.
 Training focuses on issues and problems relevant to peoples’ lives;
 Learning is meaningless if it is merely confined to the acquisition of facts and figures.
Research
Following the completion of adequate number of course work which provides sufficient knowledge base in the
student’s area of concentration, the student will end up with a thesis. Research should run concurrently with
course work. Students are free to choose topics, subject to the approval of their departmental graduate
committee and the Graduate School Board.
Regulations
a) Duration of Program: The duration of the program shall be 2 years on full time basis.
b) Course Load: Candidates shall be required to complete 45 credit hours at 500 level or above. This
will consist of 36 credit hours of course work, 3 credit hours of field experience and 6 credit hours of
Thesis Project. Each thesis project shall be preceded by a thesis proposalSeminar: In addition to the
course work, all candidates will be required to attend departmental
seminars and to present
papers at such seminars.
c) Concurrent Experience: The Concurrent Experience is a credit flexible (0 or 3 Cr) course required of
all graduate students throughout the duration of course work, except the last semester of the second
year. It is designed to expose the student to relevant field experience in order to enhance his/her skills
and experience. Typically, students whose primary degree did not involve exposure to clinical hospital,
or health service management are sent to these areas to acquire practical experience
Thesis defence
The thesis shall be defended before a Board of Examiners, at least one member of the Board of Examiners
must be an External Examiner.
COURSE OUTLINE
Core Courses
Year I 1st Semester
PUH 5011 Health Care Delivery Systems/ International Health
PUH 5021 Intro. to Environmental Health
PUH 5031 Introduction to Epidemiology
PUH 5041 Control of Communicable Diseases
PUH 5051 Intro. to Primary Health Care
PUH 5030 Concurrent Experience (Field Report)
238
3 units
3 units
3 units
3 units
3 units
0* units
2nd Semester
PUH 5052 PUH 5072 PUH 5082 PUH 5092 PUH 5002 PUH 5030 -
Biostatistics
Intro. to Health Education
Introduction to Health Services Management
Sociology in Health/Community Development
Introduction to Family Health
Seminar/Research Methods
CONCENTRATION IN PRIMARY HEALTH CARE (1)
Year II – 1st Semester
CPH 5151 Computer Applications
PUH 5311 Methods in Primary Health Care Practice
PUH 5181 Introduction to Promotion
PUH 5151 Methods in Health Education
PUH 5251 Topics and Readings in Primary Health Care (Assessment
by Term Paper and participation)
PUH 5030 Seminar
PUH 5332 Concurrent Experience/Field work in Primary Health Care
2nd Semester
PUH 5200 PUH 5030 -
Thesis
Seminar
3 units
3 units
3 units
3 units
3 units
0* units
3 units
3 units
3 units
3 units
3 units
0* units
3 units
6 units
0*unit
CONCENTRATION IN PUBLIC HEALTH EDUCATION (2)
Year I
Semesters I and II : Core courses plus PUH 5080
1st semester
PUH 5111 PUH 5131 PUH 5181 PUH 5141 PUH 5112 PUH 5080 PUH 5030 -
Principles of Health Education
School Health
Intro. to Health Promotion
Advanced Health Education
Methods in Health Education
Concurrent Experience
Seminar
3 units
3 units
3 units
3 units
2nd Semester
PUH 5200 PUH 5030 -
Thesis
Research Methods/Seminar
6 units
0* units
0* units
0* units
CONCENTRATION IN EPIDEMIOLOGY (3)
Year I
Semesters I and II:
Core courses plus PUH 5080
Year II
1st Semester
PUH 5411 PUH 5421 PUH 5431 PUH 5411 CPH 5151 PUH 5080 PUH 5030 -
Principles of Epidemiology
Advanced Biostatistics
Methods in Epidemiology
Principles of Chronic and Communicable Diseases
Computer Applications
Concurrent Experience (Field work)
Seminar
3 units
3 units
3 units
3 units
3 units
0* units
0* units
2nd Semester
PUH 5200 -
Thesis
6 units
239
PUH 5030 -
Seminar
0* units
CONCENTRATION IN PUBLIC HEALTH NUTRITION (4)
Year I
Semesters I and II: Core courses plus
PUH 5032 Nutritional Physiology/Biochemistry
PUH 5341 Clinical Nutrition Growth and Energy
PUH 5351 Food Control and Management
PUH 5372 Nutrition Education
PUH 5382 Food, Culture and Nutrition
PUH 5030 Seminar/Research Methods (See below)
PUH 5200 Master’s Thesis
PUH 5082 Core Course
CONCENTRATION IN HEALTH ECONOMICS AND FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT (5)
Year I
Semesters I and II:
Core course plus
PUH 5611 Health Economics and Financial Management
PUH 5612 Quality Management and Health Management Information
*Required non-credit participation, offered in lieu of thesis, if thesis is not in progress.
Ph.D PROGRAMME IN PUBLIC HEALTH
Objectives
The objectives of the programmes are:

To train high level manpower for teaching, research and service;

To create improved career opportunities for individuals with doctorate degrees in Public Health .

To equip professionals with in-depth theoretical knowledge and research skills in
Public Health, and
 To promote scholarship and advance frontiers of knowledge in Public Health.
Admission Requirements
a)
MPH or its equivalent with a minimum of 3.0 cumulative grade point average (CGPA) on a scale of
5.0 OR 2.75 on scale of 4.0.
b)
Applicants are required to submit a one page Mission Statement and to attend personal interview in the
Department.
Programme Duration and Structure
1. The duration for the Ph.D programme is 6 semesters on full-time basis

First semester:
Core Courses

Second semester:
Core Courses

Third semester: Thesis concentration/Electives

Fourth semester:
Research

Fifth semester:
Research

Sixth semester: Dissertation writing and defense
2. Ph.D candidates shall be required to sit and pass a comprehensive examination

Part I General field of Public Health

Part II Area of thesis topic/concentration

Part III Comprehensive Oral Examination in I & II above
3. Ph.D Dissertation can be written in the following areas of Public Health:

Health Education/Health Promotion

Primary Health Care

Environmental Health
240
consisting of:


Epidemiology
or any other area of Public Health
COURSE OUTLINE
Course Code
1ST SEMESTER
Course title
Credit
Hr
3
Course
Code
PUH 6052
*PUH6011
Advanced Biostatistics
PUH6021
3
PUH 6062
3
PUH
3
PUH6041
Maternal
&
Child
Health/Family Planning
Is a pr-requisite for PUH
6011
Population and Public
Health
Stress Management
PUH6201
Research Seminar
*PUH5052
PUH6031
6072
PUH6101
PUH6111
PUH6121
PUH6131
PUH6141
PUH6151
PUH6161
PUH 6203
3RD SEMESTER
Course title
Contemporary Issues in
Public Health
Emergency and Disaster
Management
Solid Waste Management
PHC
Planning,
Implementation
&
Evaluation
Problems
of
Health
Education/Health
Promotion in Nigeria
Applied Epidemiology
Research Methods
a. Environmental Health
b. PHC
c. Health
Education/Health
Promotion
d. Epidemiology
Research Seminar
Tota credit hours/load
3
3
PHM5052
3
PUH 6082
Water Supply and Sanitation
3
1
PUH 6092
Problems of Rural & Urban
PHC Services
Implementation
Theoretical Basis of Health
Educ/Health Promotion
Epidemiological Methods
Research Seminar
Total credit hours/load
3
PUH 6122
PUH 6202
Course Code
Health Planning and
Management
Health Systems Research
Credit
Hr
3
Advanced Computer
Applications
Toxicology
PUH 6112
Tota credit hours/load
2ND SEMESTER
Courses title
13
4TH SEMESTER
Courses title
3
3
3
1
*23(for
13)
Credit
Hr
3
Course
Code
PUH 6000
Research
3
PUH 6204
Research Seminar
1
Tota credit hours/load
7
3
3
Credit
Hr
6
3
3
1
22** (for
13)
*Each student takes only one of PHM 5052, PUH 6092, PUH 6112 & PUH 6122 to make a total credit load of 13 credits.
**Each student takes only one of PUH 6121, PUH 6121, PUH 6131, PUH 6141 & PUH 6151 to make a total credit load
of 13.
241
Course Code
5TH SEMESTER
Course title
PUH 6000
Research
PUH 6205
Open Seminar
Tota credit hours/load
Credit
Hr
6
Course
Code
PUH 6000
3
9
6TH SEMESTER
Courses title
Dissertation Writing and
Defence
Total credit hours/load
Credit
Hr
6
6
FACULTY OF ARTS
HISTORY
At the inception of the University of Calabar in October 1, 1975, the Faculty of Arts was one of the first
Faculties established for academic purposes. Faculty of Arts comprises the following

English and Literary Studies

History and International Studies

Modern Languages and Translation Studies

Linguistics and Communication Studies

Philosophy

Religious Studies and Cultural Studies

Theatre and Media Studies
The above named Departments make up the area of knowledge frequently known as the Humanities. The
Faculty reflects the interest of people in themselves and in their role in the world they live in. It also attempts to
give men and women an understanding not only of culture and the society, but also of the ideas, values and
aspirations of humankind. Through Literature, Art and Drama, the student in Theatre Arts studies man’s
expression of beauty and through History he looks at the past, the deeds of our ancestors and how they enable
us to understand ourselves and our present world.
In Religion and Philosophy, he studies mankind’s search for knowledge and understanding of both the
immediate world around us and the unseen world. He studies language, the means by which we communicate
with one another, the means by which we express our knowledge and transmit it to our children.
The Faculty of Arts is headed by the Dean, who co-ordinates the activities of all its Departments.
VISION
The vision of the Faculty as conceived by its founders, is one where “Nigerianness”, nay, ‘Africanness’
of a philosophy for learning is the core of conception, in order to achieve and maintain greatest
excellencies in teaching, research, publications and service in the above-listed disciplines. In
furtherance of this, each department is saddled with the responsibility of scholarship, yet this learning
is to be firmly anchored in the rich cultural traditions of the peoples of the geo-graphical zone in which
the university is located.
MISSION
The mission of the Faculty is to strive to stimulate, develop, sharpen and enrich student’s critical,
creative, imaginative and expressive faculties and skills for them to be able to respond efficiently and
effectively to academic and professional challenges in such areas as teaching, research and public
service. In other words, our mission is to produce graduates whose education in Liberal Arts imbues
them with humanistic qualities and the intellectual skills needed to function productively within the
professional and administrative structures of a developing nation.
242
DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH AND LITERARY STUDIES
HISTORY OF THE DEPARTMENT
The Department of English and Literary Studies started as a pioneer Department in 1976 after having been a
part of the English Department University of Nigeria, Nsukka when Calabar was one of its Campuses.
PHILOSOPHY
The Philosophy of the Department of English and Literary studies is centred around the ultimate goal of
promoting the evolution of a highly literate society that can sustain social, cultural, political, economic,
technological and scientific progress through self-realization of the individuals within the community, their
ability to defend acceptable principles of freedom, equality and justice, and the promotion of interpersonal,
national and world harmony, using language for social interaction.
To achieve these, our Mission has been the provision of competencies in English language and literary studies
for academic, recreational and informal relationships for our students and other clientele by highly skilled and
committed staff through structured academic programmes involving lectures, research, seminars, workshops,
exchange programmes and mentoring services within and outside the University.
At the center of this is the advanced study and acquisition of the English Language and its application as
medium of national as well as international exchange, and Literature as a variable medium of analytical
humanistic studies directed at a critical understanding of human behaviour and the improvement of social
living.
The two sub-disciplines of the English Language and Literary Studies are, in concert, aimed at producing
graduates who can affect society positively, and contribute immensely to socio-cultural, political and economic
development and advancement.
Programme Objectives
The course components offered by the Department are guided by the following objectives:
a) To provide a variety of courses that would lead the students to advance their knowledge of the English
language and Literature expressed in the language.
b) To provide academic tasks and intellectual challenges that would lead the students to apply their
knowledge of English and Literature to solve problems associated with everyday living.
c) To guide the students to acquire appropriate language and literary skills particularly in the content of
English as a Second Language environment and the Literature associated with it.
d) To expose the students to current advances in scholarship in the areas of Literature, particularly African
Literature and Literature in the Diaspora, English Language acquisition and language use.
Admission Requirements
JME candidates need to fulfill the regular University requirement of five credits at O’ Level including English
Language and English Literature. Direct Entry candidates must satisfy UME requirement and;
a. Two ‘A’ Level passes to include Literature in English and one other Arts subject (excluding African
Languages)
b. NCE (merit) in English Literature and English Language.
c. Diploma in English Studies and Communication from the University of Calabar
d. Related Diploma from the Faculty of arts.
GENERAL REGULATIONS
(Four-Year Degree Programme)
To obtain a B.A. in English and Literary Studies a student must successfully complete courses to a minimum of
120 credit hours. A least 90 of these units must be in courses offered in the department, including authorized
electives from other departments.
All students must take and pass the five General Studies courses (Use of English, Citizenship Education,
Philosophy and Logic, History and Philosophy of Science, Introduction to the Computer and Computer
Practical). In addition, students must offer electives up to 12 credit hours, six of which must be in French.
243
Students are free to offer the remaining electives from any of the following disciplines, French, History,
Languages and Linguistics, Religious studies and Philosophy. Theater Arts, Political Science, Sociology,
Education. In the third year of studies students will undertake a supervised Oral Literature original project in
which they would be expected to collect and analyze the literary contents of selected Oral Art
Forms/Performance or Festivals preferably from their Local Government Area
In the final year students are required to take a number of options from both Language and Literature courses.
In the first semester of the final year, they will be required to take one optional courses, one Language or
Literature. In the second semester, the options will be specified at the Beginning of the semester.
In addition, students will be required in their final year, to produce under supervision a Long Essay on a
Literary or Language topic of their choice, approved by the Department.
At the end of the fourth year, all students will sit a three-hour Comprehensive examination designed to test
their broad understanding of basic ideas after four years of tuition in the Department.
Regulations and Curriculum for Direct Entry at the Second-Year Level into the Four-Year Degree
PROGRAMME REQUIREMENT FOR GRADUATION
(Three-Year Degree Programme)
To obtain a B.A in English and Literary Studies a direct entry student must successfully complete courses to a
minimum of 99 units. At least 84 of these units must be in courses offered in the Department including
authorized electives in other Departments. The three-year programme is open to holders of N.C.E, B.S.C. GCE
A level, UMB, ND (Mass Com.) and relevant Diploma programmes from recognized Universities in the
relevant subjects. All non-NCE Direct Entry students must take and pass the General Studies courses. Use of
English, Citizenship Education, and History and Philosophy of Science, Philosophy and Logic, and
Introduction to the Use of the Computer Practical. N.C.E graduate are exempted from General Studies courses.
In addition, students must, offer 6 credit hours from two related discipline, in keeping with Departmental
regulations.
FOUR YEAR DEGREE CURRICULUM
FIRST YEAR
Course
Code
GSS 1101
GSS1111
1ST SEMESTER
Course title
Use of English I
Citizenship Education
Credit
Hr
3
3
Course
Code
GSS1102
GSS1132
GSS1121
ELS1011
ELS1021
Philosophy and Logic
English Composition
Introduction to Prose
3
3
3
ELS1012
ELS1022
ELS1032
ELS1031
Introduction to Poetry
3
ELS1042
ELS1041
Introduction to Linguistics
Total credit hours/load
3
21
2ND SEMESTER
Courses title
Use of English II
History and Physiology of
Science
English Composition II
Introduction to Drama
Introduction
to
Oral
Literature
History of English Language
Total credit hours/load
Credit
Hr
3
3
3
3
3
3
18
SECOND YEAR
Course
Code
GSS 2111
ELS2011
ELS2021
1ST SEMESTER
Course title
Introduction
to
the
Computer
African Prose
Joseph
Oral Literature Theory and
Forms
Credit
Hr
3
Course
Code
GSS 2112
3
3
ELS 2012
ELS2022
244
2ND SEMESTER
Courses title
Computer Practicals
African Poetry
Research Methods in Oral
Literature
Credit
Hr
3
3
3
ELS2031
ELS1041
ELS2051
ELS2061
Survey
of
Caribbean
Literature
Survey
of
English
Literature I
Structure of English
Introduction to French
Language
Total credit hours/load
3
ELS2032
Advanced Composition
3
3
ELS1042
3
3
3
ELS2052
ELS2062
Survey of English Literature
II
English Syntax
Intro. To Simple French
Tests
Total credit hours/load
21
3
21
THIRD YEAR
Course
Code
ELS3011
ELS3021
ELS3031
1ST SEMESTER
Course title
2ND SEMESTER
Courses title
Credit
Hr
3
3
3
Course
Code
ELS3012
ELS3022
ELS3032
Critical Theory
Nigerian Literature
African Drama
3
ELS3042
Afro-American Literature II
3
ELS3052
Teaching of English as a
Second Language (Methods
and Materials Production
Elective in Related
Discipline
Total credit hours/load
3
ELS3041
The African Novel
Oral Literature Projects
European
Renaissance
Literature
Afro-American Literature I
ELS3051
Discourse Analysis
3
Elective
in
Related
Discipline
Total credit hours/load
3
18
Credit
Hr
3
3
3
3
21
FOURTH YEAR
Course
Code
ELS4011
ELS4021
ELS4031
ELS4041
1ST SEMESTER
Course title
Realism and Romanticism
In Western Literature
Graduating Essay
English and the Nigerian
Situation
Stylistics
Option either Language or
Lit.
Total credit hours/load
Credit
Hr
3
Course Code
ELS4012
3
3
ELS4022
ELS4032
2ND SEMESTER
Courses title
Criticism of African
Literature
Advanced Stylistics
Comprehensive
Credit
Hr
3
3
3
3
3
Option (Language)
Option (Literature)
3
3
15
Total credit hours/load
3
15
THREE YEAR DIRECT ENTRY DEGREE PROGRAMME
(FOR POSSESSORS OF N.C.E.)
FIRST YEAR
Course
Code
ELS1041
ELS2011
ELS2021
ELS2031
ELS2051
ELS1041
1ST SEMESTER
Course title
Introduction
Linguistics
African Prose
to
the
Oral Literature Theory
Forms
Survey
of
Caribbean
Literature
Structure of English
Survey
of
English
Literature I
Credit
Hr
3
Course
Code
ELS 2012
3
ELS2022
3
ELS2032
3
ELS2042
3
3
ELS1052
ELS1042
245
2ND SEMESTER
Courses title
African Poetry
Credit
Hr
3
Research Methods in Oral
Literature
Advanced Composition
3
Survey of English Literature
II
English Syntax
History of English Language
3
3
3
3
Total credit hours/load
18
Total credit hours/load
18
SECOND YEAR
Course
Code
ELS3011
ELS3021
ELS3031
1ST SEMESTER
Course title
2ND SEMESTER
Courses title
Credit
Hr
3
3
3
Course
Code
ELS3012
ELS3022
ELS3032
Critical Theory
Nigerian Literature
African Drama
3
ELS3042
Afro-American Literature II
3
ELS3052
Teaching of English as a
Second Language (Methods
and Materials Production
Elective in Related
Discipline
Total credit hours/load
3
ELS3041
The African Novel
Oral Literature Projects
European
Renaissance
Literature
Afro-American Literature I
ELS3051
Discourse Analysis
3
Elective
in
Related
Discipline
Total credit hours/load
3
18
Credit
Hr
3
3
3
3
21
FOURTH YEAR (FINAL YEAR)
Course
Code
ELS4011
ELS4021
ELS4031
ELS4041
1ST SEMESTER
Course title
Realism and Romanticism
In Western Literature
Graduating Essay
English and the Nigerian
Situation
Stylistics
Option either Language or
Lit.
Total credit hours/load
Credit
Hr
3
Course Code
ELS4012
3
3
ELS4022
ELS4032
2ND SEMESTER
Courses title
Criticism of African
Literature
Advanced Stylistics
Comprehensive
Credit
Hr
3
3
3
3
3
Option (Language)
Option (Literature)
3
3
15
Total credit hours/load
3
15
246
THREE-YEAR DIRECT ENTRY DEGREE PROGRAMME FOR HOLDERS OF B.SC,
GCE, ‘A’ LEVEL, UMB, ND IN MASS COMM., AND APPROVED UNIVERSITY DIPLOMA
FIRST YEAR
Course
Code
GSS1101
GSS1111
GSS1121
ELS1041
ELS2021
ELS2031
ELS2041
ELS2051
1ST SEMESTER
Course title
Credit
Hr
3
3
Course
Code
GSS1102
GSS1132
Philosophy and Logic
Introduction
to
the
Linguistics
Oral Literature Theory
Forms
Survey
of
Caribbean
Literature
Survey
of
English
Literature I
Structure of English
3
3
ELS 2012
ELS2022
3
ELS2032
3
ELS2042
3
ELS1042
Total credit hours/load
24
Use of English I
Citizenship Education
2ND SEMESTER
Courses title
Use of English II
History and Philosophy
of Science
African Poetry
Research Methods in Oral
Literature
Advanced Composition
Survey
of
Literature II
History
of
Language
English
Credit
Hr
3
3
3
3
3
3
English
3
Total credit hours/load
3
3
21
SECOND YEAR
Course
Code
GSS2111
1ST SEMESTER
Course title
Course
Code
GSS2112
Computer Practical
Credit
Hr
3
3
3
3
ELS3012
ELS3022
ELS3032
Critical Theory
Nigerian Literature
African Drama
3
3
3
3
ELS3042
3
ELS3052
Afro-American
Literature II
Teaching of English as a
Second
Language
(Methods and Materials
Production
Elective in Related
Discipline
Total credit hours/load
ELS3041
Introduction
to
the
Computer
The African Novel
Oral Literature Projects
European
Renaissance
Literature
Afro-African Literature I
ELS3051
Discover Analysis
3
Total credit hours/load
21
ELS3011
ELS3021
ELS3031
2ND SEMESTER
Courses title
Credit
Hr
3
247
3
21
FOURTH YEAR (FINAL YEAR)
Course
Code
ELS4011
ELS4021
ELS4031
ELS4041
1ST SEMESTER
Course title
Realism and Romanticism
In Western Literature
Graduating Essay
English and the Nigerian
Situation
Stylistics
Option either Language or
Lit.
Total credit hours/load
Credit
Hr
3
Course Code
ELS4012
3
3
ELS4022
ELS4032
B.
C.
D.
E.
Criticism of African
Literature
Advanced Stylistics
Comprehensive
Credit
Hr
3
3
3
3
3
Option (Language)
Option (Literature)
3
3
15
Total credit hours/load
3
15
OPTIONAL COURSES
A.
AFRICAN LITERATURE
Group One
ELS 4051 South African Literature
ELS 4151 East African Literature
ELS 4251 North African Literature
Group Two
ELS 4052
ELS 4152
ELS 4252
2ND SEMESTER
Courses title
3
3
3
Negritude
African in European Literature
Women Writers in Africa
LITERATURE IN SOCIAL CONTEXT
ELS 4061 Literature and Revolution
ELS 4062 The Sociology of Literature
3
3
3
3
3
WORLD LITERATURE
ELS 4071 Survey of American Literature I
ELS 4072 Survey of American Literature II
ELS 4171 Harlem Renaissance
ELS 4172 Comparative Studies on Black Women Writers 3
3
3
3
COURSE STUDIES
ELS 4081 The 19th Century European Novel
ELS 4082 The Novel in the Modern World 3
ELS 4181 19th Century Poetry
ELS 4281 American Poetry
3
3
3
3
LANGUAGE STUDIES
ELS 4091 Advanced English Grammar and Lexicology
ELS 4092 Semantics
3
3
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
ELS 1011 & 1012:
ENGLISH COMPOSITION I AND II
Two successive courses intended to improve the student’s competence in, and understanding of the use of
writing, skills in the English Language.
ELS 1021:
INTRODUCTION TO PROSE
248
An introduction to the origins and nature of prose in art, and as a form to include a critical theory of prose as an
art form. Characteristics to be drawn from texts of English, European, American, African and Caribbean
Literature plus a fundamental knowledge of the poetics of prose.
ELS 1022:
INTRODUCTION TO DRAMA
To introduce students to drama in its different forms e.g. tragedy, comedy, melodrama, farce etc., and the
theory behind its evolution. To equip students with the skills to appreciate the aesthetics of drama as art and as
form. Students should be introduced to the germinal text, Aristotle’s.
ELS 1031:
INTRODUCTION TO POETRY
Designed to acquaint students with the nature of poetry and its different forms, provide the critical criteria over
the years, for the appreciation of poetry as an art form.
ELS 1032:
INTRODUCTION TO ORAL LITERATURE
This course is designed to introduce students to the unique world of oral literature, it aspires to a global view of
oral literature, paying attention to, among other things, its nature, characteristics and varying concepts in time
and Millie.
ELS 1041:
INTRODUCTION TO LINGUISTICS
A course designed to acquaint students with an understanding of the study of the principles of linguistics and to
examine the characteristics and properties of language.
ELS 1042:
HISTORY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE:
A short study of the major treads, emphasizing the developments which have produced contemporary English
including a consideration of the use of English as an international language.
ELS 2011:
AFRICAN PROSE
This course will build on ELS 1021, Introduction to Prose. It will explore different forms of prose narrative in
Africa, autobiography, short story, and the Novel. It will be a concentration on variety of prose forms and the
minor writers in anticipation of the study of the major achievement of the African Novel in ELS 3011.
ELS 2012:
AFRICAN POETRY
A study of traditional and modern, African poetic forms and techniques, through an examination of the style,
content and themes of both oral and written poetry.
ELS 2021:
ORAL LITERATURE: THEORY AND FORMS
An examination of oral Literature as a field of study linking it with related disciplines like folklore and
anthropology. Emphasis will be on the consideration of Oral Literature theories, their origin and effects on the
study of Oral Literature.
ELS 2031:
SURVEY OF CARIBBEAN LITERATURE
This course will expose students to the Caribbean and its literature. It will study historical development in the
Caribbean and relate it to the literature of the area. Selection of texts will be chronological and regional.
ELS 2041 & 2042:
SURVEY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE I & II
A two-part study of the historical development of English Literature from, first the Anglo-Season period to
1660 and in the second part, from 1660 to the modern age. Interest will be on the relationship between political
and social history and the emergence of literary movements, forms and genres.
ELS 2051:
STRUCTURE OF ENGLISH
A course involving a close study of the nature and structure of modern English Language, intended to assist the
student in acquiring writing and comprehension skills. It will examine the phonology and morphology of the
English Language (prerequisite ELS 1031).
ELS 2052:
ENGLISH SYNTAX
A course designed to introduce the students to the theory of grammar and grammatical structure of English.
249
ELS 2022:
RESEARCH METHOD IN ORAL LITERATURE
The course is designed to prepare students for future research work in oral literature. Concentration will be on
the choice or research topics, preparation of prospectus (research proposals) selection of information, notetaking, note-making, presentation and documentation.
ELS 2032:
ADVANCED COMPOSITION
The course is designed to stabilize the written expression of the students by exposing them to texts based on
selection of prose writing of modern/contemporary English. The practical aspects of the course will lay
emphasis on improvement of vocabulary, comprehension, guided and free composition.
ELS 3011:
THE AFRICAN NOVEL
A detailed study of a variety of texts intended to illustrate the significant achievements of the African fiction.
ELS 3012:
CRITICAL THEORY
An introduction to the history of critical theories and of the ideologies and methods, which have influenced
contemporary literary critical activity.
ELS 3022:
NIGERIAN LITERATURE
A detailed study of the literature of Nigeria, relating modern to traditional forms and including popular
Nigerian Literature.
ELS 3031:
EUROPEAN RENAISSANCE LITERATURE
A study of one of the major periods in Western Cultural history through its literature, emphasis will be placed
on the rise of humanism, emergence of national literatures and the influence of classical sources.
ELS 3031:
AFRICAN DRAMA
A detailed study in the field of African Drama, traditional and modern, and an examination of the various
works of writers to illustrate their contribution to the development of this art form.
ELS 3041:
AFRICAN-AMERICAN LITERATURE II
A survey of Afro-American Literature from the 1920s to the present. Interest will be on Black man’s
contemporary, cultural dilemma in America and its expressions in their literature.
ELS 3051:
DISCOURSE ANALYSIS
A look at language as a social activity. General principles of discourse analysis in relation to English language
usage, the endophoric nature of texts, and an analysis of language events under the three main aspects of the
substantial, the formal and the situational, Spoken versus written discourse, Co-reference and coherence in
written discourse. Attempts will be made to apply Discourse analysis to language teaching.
ELS 3052:
THE TEACHING OF ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE
The principles of the various methods of teaching, with emphasis on the modern theory of language teaching.
This will include the theory of material production as an accessory of language teaching.
ELS 4011:
REALISM AND ROMANTICISM IN WESTERN LITERATURE
A study of the emergence and development of two primary and interacting features of European Literature
from the late eighteenth century to the 20th century.
ELS 4012:
CRITICISM OF AFRICAN LITERATURE
A study of the emergence of a body specifically African critical theory relating to various genres and applied to
different texts.
ELS 4021:
GRADUATE ESSAY
A substantial piece of critical writing on a literary or language topic to be selected in consultation with the
Department and to be written under tutorial supervision. The subject will normally be on or about African
Literature, the literature of African Diaspora and English Language in the Nigerian Situation.
ELS 4041:
STYLISTICS
250
This course treats stylistics as an extension of practical criticism and seeks to explore the uses of linguistic
understanding and other critical tools in textual analysis.
ELS 4042:
ADVANCED STYLISTICS
A study of the use of linguistic, stylistic, analysis as a means of supporting a literary or interpretative basis. It
will consist of attempts to find the artistic principles underlying a written choice of language with emphasis on
such categories that yield stylistically relevant information as lexical categories, grammatical categories,
figures of speech etc.
ELS 4031:
ENGLISH AND THE NIGERIAN SITUATION
An examination of the Nigeria Linguistic situation with particular reference to such concepts as a lingua franca,
and English as a second or foreign language. The national language policy shall be studied in particular as it
affects the teaching and learning of English in Nigeria.
ELS 4032:
COMPREHENSIVE
A series of lectures by various members of the Department designed to re-acquaint students with the scope and
intentions of the degree programme.
ELS 4051:
SOUTH AFRICAN LITERATURE
A study focusing on apartheid and post apartheid society through selected words by South African writers in
prose, poetry and drama.
ELS 4251:
EAST AFRICAN LITERATURE
East African literary achievement in English or in translation of both minor and major works that show the
development of this literature.
ELS 4251
NORTH AFRICAN LITERATURE
A study of various literary works, in English and through translation, from Africa North of the Sahara.
ELS 4052:
NEGRITUDE
A study of the Negritude movements in Africa and the Caribbean with particular reference to its cultural
nationalism in poetry.
ELS 4061
LITERATURE AND REVOLUTION
Studies the position of all forms of literature (Prose, Drama, Poetry) in relation to social revolution. Emphasis
should be on the uses to which literature can and has been put in man’s guest for social transformation.
ELS 4062:
THE SOCIOLOGY OF LITERATURE
A study of the relationship between literature and social phenomenon. The forces from within society create
certain conditions which shape literature in specific ways; literature in turn, selectively records and shapes
social events and phenomenon.
ELS 4071:
SURVEY OF AMERICAN LITERATURE I
A survey of the history of American Literature from the colonial times to the American Renaissance. Emphasis
will be on early American literature as a creation of peculiar historical circumstances. All literary genres, prose
(fiction and non-fiction) poetry and drama shall be covered.
ELS 4072
SURVEY OF AMERICAN LITERATURE II
A study of late 19th C and 20th C. American Literature. Emphasis will be on modes of literary response to
America’s industrialization cultural and political stature. All literary genres shall be covered (ELS 4071 Prerequisite.
ELS 4171:
HARLEM RENAISSANCE
A study of the Harlem Renaissance, a significance epoch in Black American writing, through a detailed study
of selected texts (pre-requisite, ELS 3041 and 3042).
251
ELS 4172:
COMPARATIVE STUDIES ON BLACK WOMEN WRITERS
This course is a study of selected major works of leading African, African American and Caribbean women
writers. It is comparative in nature to help students appreciate the cross-cultural parallels and differences in
vision and art.
ELS 4081:
THE 19TH CENTURY EUROPEAN NOVEL
A comparative study of one of European literature’s most significant achievements, the novel in Britain,
France, Germany and Russia.
ELS 4082:
THE NOVEL IN THE MODERN WORLD
A comparative study of novels from various cultures which aims to demonstrate the diversity of an inherited
literary form in twentieth century writing.
ELS 4181
19TH CENTURY EUROPEAN POETRY
A comparative study of poetry from Western Europe after romanticism and until the outbreak of the First
World War, involving an examination of style and social content.
ELS 4182:
20TH CENTURY POETRY
A comparative study of early modern and contemporary poetry from Europe. North and South America, Asia
and Africa with attention on thematic parallels and stylistic divergences.
ELS 4281:
AMERICAN POETRY
A study of the development of American poetry from colonial times to contemporary experimental writing,
with reference to the various influences, literary and social, which helped to shape this tradition.
ELS 4091:
ADVANCED ENGLISH GRAMMAR AND LEXICOLOGY
This course examines grammatical categories and functions in English and subjects them to traditional and
structural analysis. It also touches on general principles of lexicology; lexical description and theory, the
lexicon in English and the dictionary.
ELS 4092:
SEMANTICS
Studies the meaning of utterances.
constructions.
It tries to go into the function or meaning of different syntactic
ELS 4252:
WOMEN WRITERS IN AFRICA
A course designed for a contextual study of such areas as “The Place of the Women Writers in contemporary
Africa”. “The Impact of Feminist ideology on Prose and Poetry” and the general contribution of female writers
to the growth and development of contemporary African writing in English and French.
DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY AND INTERNATIONAL STUDIES
Programme Philosophy and Objectives
The History and international Studies Programme of the University of Calabar is designed to enable students
acquire good grasp of the content and methodology of Nigerian and African History in the context of World
History, and to develop the abilities and benefits traditionally associated with historical study such as critical,
analytical faculties, and balanced judgment. Furthermore, the programme reflects the belief that a proper
understanding of History, apart from being indispensable to the education of any civilized man, should provide
some perspective to related subjects in the humanities, social sciences and the natural sciences. The overall
University programme caters for this multi-disciplinary approach to the study o the development of human
society.
Although the programme emphasizes Nigerian and African history in that order, the realities of our shrinking
world necessitate the comparable development, in the long run, of other major areas of Europe, the Middle
East, Asia, North America, Latin America and the Caribbean. These regional studies and the recent injection of
courses in International Relations and Diplomacy are meant to emphasize the international dimensions of
252
historical studies. This would give the students opportunity to appreciate the main economic, political and
social forces that have shaped would historical events.
In summary, the programme aims at achieving the following objectives:
 To give students a thorough understanding of the content and methodology of Nigerian and African
history in the context or world history.
 To enable students develop the abilities and benefits traditionally associated with historical study such
as critical, analytical faculties and balanced judgment needed particularly in administrative and
managerial responsibilities.
 To educate students on historical movements of global importance to enable them acquire better
knowledge of the world and thus promote world peace.
 To make students understand the historical forces and developments which have shaped and are still
shaping the lives of the peoples of Nigeria, Africa and the world. This understanding will enable them
to consciously relate to these forces and developments in such a way that national unity, independence
and prosperity can be achieved.
Entry Requirement
Prospective degree candidatures must satisfy both the general University Entry Requirements and the specific
Faculty and Departmental Requirements.
1. Candidates for the four-year (8 semesters) B. A programme, admitted through JAMB University
Matriculation Examination, must posses W.A.S.C., S.S.C.E., G.C.E. O/Level, NECO or other equivalent
Certificate with credit level passes in at least five subjects taken at not more than two sittings. The five
subjects must include English Language and History or Government.
2. Candidates for the three-year (6 semesters) B. A Programme that is, Direct Entry (D. E) candidates, must
posses one of the following:
(a) Diploma in History or in any other related discipline obtained from the University of Calabar or from
any other institutions recognized by the University of Calabar with an overall pass of at least merit
level.
(b) G.C.E. A/Level Certificate with a minimum of two subjects, including History Or Government with at
least a “D” Grade pass in each subject.
(c) The National Certificate in Education (N.C.E.) with merit level passes in at least two subjects that
should include History or Government.
In all cases, D.E. candidates must possess the University Minimum Entry Requirements and the specific
Faculty and Department Entry Requirement stated in (1) above.
Degree Requirements
In addition to any general requirements of the University of Calabar, a student must successfully complete a
minimum of 129 course units, 90 of which must be in courses offered in the History Department, to obtain a B.
A degree in History. The remaining 39 courses units are distributed as follows:
a) General Studies
21 courses units
b) Related Discipline
18 courses units
Although the Department does not restrict students in their choice of Related Discipline Courses, these courses
will be selected in consultation with their Academic Adviser and with the final approval of the Head of
department.
No student will be allowed to register for more than 24 course units in any one semester or 48 course units in
any one session without approval.
Examinations
All courses shall be examined at the end of the semester in which they are offered. The only exceptions are the
year-long courses, viz: the Project (or Long Essay) and the Special Paper courses which will be examined at
the end of the academic session. In addition, there will be a comprehensive (or General Paper) examination in
the second semester of the final year.
253
This examination is designed to assess historical knowledge across a broad spectrum, and a series of lectures
will be given by the staff during the final year to assist students in the preparation for this General
Examination.
It must be emphasized that the University of Calabar operates on a course system and a grade point average
(G.P.A) computation; so a good performance in each course throughout the four or three year programme is
essential to the achievement of a good honours degree.
Academic Adviser
Each student on entering the department will be assigned an academic adviser from among the staff. The
Adviser’s primary responsibility is to help the student formulate a well-integrated academic programme which
meets the needs and interests of the student and complies with University regulations. Close liaison with an
Academic Adviser is crucial to a successful academic experience.
Project (or Long-Essay)
Every student in the Department must submit during the second semester of their final year a project paper of
approximately 10,000 words on a subject acceptable to the Department. Given the importance and complexity
of this requirement, students are encouraged to start the process of formulating an appropriate topic by at least
the beginning of their third year of studies. By the end of their third year of studies, each student must submit,
and have approved, a suitable research topic. Once a topic has been approved, the student will be assigned a
supervisor from among the academic staff. The special project will be researched and written under the
guidance of the supervisor. The project requirement is designed to enable students handle problems of
collecting, collating and synthesizing historical evidence.
COURSE OUTLINE
YEAR ONE
Course
Code
GSS1101
GSS1111
1ST SEMESTER
Course title
Use of English I
Citizenship Education
Credit
Hr
3
3
Course
Code
GSS1102
GSS1132
GSS1121
HIS1101
Philosophy and Logic
Introductory History I
3
3
HIS1102
HIS1112
HIS1111
History of Africa to 1500
3
HIS1132
HIS1121
HIS1131
History of Europe to 1848
Introductory
to
International Studies and
Diplomacy
3
3
HIS1132
2ND SEMESTER
Courses title
Use of English II
History and Philosophy of
Science
Introductory History II
History of Africa to 15001800
Law and Diplomatic
Practices in Pre-Colonial
Africa
Major World Civilization
3
Total Number of Credit
Hours
Total
Hours
21
Number of Credit
Credit
Hr
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
18
YEAR TWO
Course
Code
HIS2101
HIS2211
HIS2221
HIS2231
1ST SEMESTER
Course title
History of Africa in the
19th Century
History of Northern Africa
from Classical Times to
19th Century
History of Eastern Europe
Themes in the History of
2ND SEMESTER
Courses title
Credit
Hr
3
Course
Code
HIS2202
3
HIS2212
History of Africa in the 20th
Century
U.S Policy toward Africa
3
3
HIS2222
HIS2232
History of the Middle East
History of Asia
254
Credit
Hr
3
3
3
3
HIS2241
HIS2251
FRH1061
GSS2001
U.S.A
Europe and the wider
world since 1848
Theories and practices of
Diplomacy
French Language I
Computer Appreciation
Total Number of Credit
Hours
3
HIS2242
History of Russia
3
3
HIS2252
3
3
3
24
FRH1062
GSS2002
History of Latin. American
and the Caribbean
French Language II
Computer Appreciation
Total Number of Credit
Hours
Students to take HIS 2201, HIS 2241, HIS 2251, GSS 2001, FRH 10612 any other two History courses
from a related discipline.
3
24
andone course
Students to take HIS 2202, HIS 2242, HIS 2252, GSS 2002, FRH 1062, two other history courses and one course from a
related discipline.
YEAR THREE
Course
Code
HIS3301
HIS3311
HIS3321
HIS3331
HIS3341
HIS3351
HIS3361
HIS3371
HIS3381
1ST SEMESTER
Course title
History of Nigeria to 1800
History of West Africa to
1900
History of East and Central
Africa
History of Southern Africa
to 1910
History
of
African
Nationalism
Comparative studies in
Economic
Growth
&
Development in
the 19th and 20th Centuries
History
of
Political
Thought I
The Military in African
History
Strategic
Studies
in
Modern Times
Total Number of Credit
Hours
2ND SEMESTER
Courses title
Credit
Hr
3
Course
Code
HIS3302
3
HIS3312
3
HIS3322
3
HIS3332
3
HIS3342
3
HIS3352
The
Cold
War
Diplomacy in the
World War II Era
3
HIS3362
3
HIS3372
History of Political Thought
II
African
Diaspora
and
African Development
History of Nigeria since
1800
History of West Africa since
1900
History of East and Central
Africa since 1800
History of Southern Africa
since 1910
Field Research in History
Total
Hours
27
and
Post
Number of Credit
Students to take, HIS 3301, HIS 3341, HIS 33811, any other two history courses and two course from a
disciplines.
Students to take, HIS 330, HIS 334,
disciplines.
Credit
Hr
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
24
related
HIS 3352, any other two history courses and two course from a related
YEAR FOUR
Course
Code
HIS4401
HIS4511
HIS4410
HIS4420
HIS4430
HIS4440
1ST SEMESTER
Course title
Special Project (Long
Essay)
Comprehensive Paper
Atlantic Slave Trade
Old Calabar and its
environs
Evolution of the Nigeria
State
Society and Economy in
Nigeria
Credit
Hr
3
Course
Code
HIS4400
3
3
3
HIS4500
HIS4410
HIS4420
3
HIS4430
3
HIS4440
255
2ND SEMESTER
Courses title
Special
Project
(Long
Essay)
Comprehensive Paper
Atlantic Slave Trade
Old Calabar and its environs
Evolution of the Nigeria
State
Society and Economy in
Nigeria
Credit
Hr
3
3
3
3
3
3
HIS4450
HIS4460
HIS4470
HIS4401
HIS4411
HIS4421
HIS4431
HIS4441
HIS4451
Jihads of Northern Nigeria
People, Trade and politics
in the Cross River Region
Liberation struggles in
Africa
Philosophy of History
3
3
HIS4470
HIS4402
Regional Co-operation and
Integration in the third
World
History of Islam in Africa
HIS4432
History of Christianity in
Africa
Theories of Imperialism
Modern Revolutions
HIS4452
HIS4441
HIS4462
HIS4472
Selected case Studies
HIS4461
Historiography since 1800
HIS4471
Nigerian Urban History
HIS4481
HIS4491
HIS4450
HIS4460
Slavery in Africa and the
New World
Economic
History
of
Africa to the 19th Century
Total Number of Credit
Hours
HIS4482
HIS4492
Jihads of Northern Nigeria
People, Trade and politics in
the Cross River Region
Liberation
struggles
in
Africa
Nigeria and the International
Economy
Problems of Nation Building
in Africa
The
changing
Global,
political and Economic
Order
Blacks in the New World
Since Emancipation
History of Pan-Africanism
History of Asians in East
Africa
History of African Religion
History of African Religion
Economic History of Africa
since the 19th Century
Total
Hours
57
3
Number of Credit
51
Students to take, HIS 4400, one from HIS 4410-4470, HIS 4401, HIS 4411, HIS 4441 and any other two history courses.
COURSE DESCRIPTION
HIS 1101/HIS 1102: INTRODUCTORY HISTORY I/II
This course seeks to acquaint students with the nature of the discipline of history, to introduce them to some
historical ideas and explanations, to train them in some basic historical skills and to teach them how to collect
and use evidence. The course combines lectures with practical working sessions in order to give students
training in the methods of studying history, the process of historical research and the presentation or research
results in clear, accurate and imaginative form. Though illustrative examples are drawn from a variety of world
areas, the major focus is on the African continent.
HIS 1111:
HISTORY OF AFRICA TO 1500
This course will cover such diverse topics as; Africa and the origin of man; The domestication of plants and
animals; the Nile Valley Civilization and its impact on Africa South of the Sahara; patterns of migration and
settlement, Africa and the Moslem World; State formation, the coming of the Europeans and their impact on
African social, political and economic institutions.
HIS 1121:
HISTORY OF EUROPE TO 1848
An examination of political, social, intellectual and economic revolutions in Europe. Emphasis will be placed
on the scientific revolution; enlightened despotism in Austria, Prussia and Russia; French Revolution,
Industrial Revolution, Revolutions of 1848 and Unification of Italy and Germany.
HIS 1131:
INTRODUCTION TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES AND DIPLOMACY
This Course seeks to acquaint students with the nature of the discipline of international studies, to introduce
them to some international ideas, concepts and explanations and to train them in some basic skills in
international relations and politics. The course will cover such divers areas as: Theories of international
politics, Foreign policy, international Monetary Economics and Trade, Elements of Power and International
integration or interdependence.
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Major concepts and policies like Alliances, Balance of Power, Balance of Terror, Universal and Regional
Security Systems will be considered along with instruments of international Negotiation, Sanctions and
International Technical Assistance.
HIS 1112:
INTRODUCTION TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES AND DIPLOMACY
Expansion of European influence in Africa, the disintegration of African states and the consequences; the slave
trade and major economic, social and political developments of the period form major focus of this course.
HIS 1122:
INTERNATIONAL LAW AND DIPLOMACY IN PRE-COLONIAL
AFRICA
This course examines in detail the types of inter-state laws prevalent in pre-colonial Africa, how they were
used for the purpose of inter-state relations. It is also concerned with a thorough investigation of how the aims
and purpose of diplomacy were achieved in Africa in the period under review. Emphasis will be placed on the
origins and sources of international law in Pre-colonial Africa, Nature and uses of contractual obligations and
inter-state Agreements, General Principle, Pre-colonial African Law, the use of Force, Settlement of Disputes,
Pre-colonial Diplomatic methods and Procedures like Bargaining and Negotiation.
HIS 1132:
MAJOR WORLD CIVILIZATIONS
A general survey of some of the major world civilizations and some of their major contributions to historical
developments e.g. the Egyptians, the Arabs, the Greeks, the Romans, the Chinese and the Europeans.
HIS 2201:
AFRICA IN THE NINETEENTH CENTURY
The 19th Century as the age of religious, political, socio-economic and military revolutions, prelude to the
European colonization of Africa; the impact of the movement to abolish the slave trade through missionary
activities; African resistance to the establishment of European rule; and the partition of Africa are the major
themes of this course.
HIS 2211:
HISTORY OF NORTHERN AFRICA FROM CLASSICAL TIMES TO
THE 19TH CENTURY
This course introduces the students to the classical age of African history, when neither America nor Australia
was ever discovered and brought within the orbit of our impact of the latter on the rest of Africa, Europe and
the Near East; the rise of Greece and Rome on the opposite shores of the Mediterranean sea; the
interrelationship of the three Mediterranean continents as dictated by their physical environments and the
eventual imperialistic involvements of Mediterranean Africa within the ambit of economic, social and political
fortunes of Europe which finally left it more Europe than Africa, and whose aftermath made it an easy prey to
Arabism.
HIS 2221:
HISTORY OF EASTERN EUROPE
A survey of East European History from the times of the Slav and Magyar migrations to the present, with
emphasis on the period since the formation of nation states in the area. Particular attention will be paid to the
significance of the area in a global context; for instance, as the place where Geographically, the course will
deal with East-Central Europe and the Balkans.
HIS 2231:
THEMES IN THE HISTORY OF U.S.A.
This course is designed to introduce students to the origins of the United States and to the course of its
development until the end of the civil war. Surveys of the revolutionary war, the making of the constitution,
and the Jeffersonian and Jacksonian periods, will emphasize the ideals of distinctive institutions of the new
national studies of the growth of slavery, the phenomenon of Manifest Destiny, and the civil war itself will
indicate the challenges which the nation met or did not meet.
HIS 2241:
EUROPE AND THE WIDER WORLD SINCE 1870
The Course analyses and discusses Europe’s relations with other continents and peoples since 1870. While
focusing on important developments in Europe itself, lectures will also give sharp relieve to Europe’s
responses to challenges, and readjustments to her changing role in her mainstream of world history. Themes
considered will include the rise of the German Empire and its challenge to the status quo; shifts in alliances and
alignments; problems of Empire e.g. the “New Imperialism”; the World Wars; Dictatorship; Nazism and
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Fascism; international organizations, e.g. The League of Nations and the United Nations; new power bases, e.g.
The U.S.A., China, Russia, etc., Decolonization, and the Emergence of the Third World.
HIS 2251:
THEORIES AND PRACTICES OF DIPLOMACY
An examination of the emergence of nation states in Europe and the growth of diplomatic inter-course. The
course will also consider Diplomacy and the emergence of international law. Issues to be considered include
inter alia, the Holy Alliance, Vienna Congress 1815, Aix-La-chapelle Congress 1818, the Hague System, the
concept of Europe, Congress of Berlin, Colonialism, Trade and Diplomatic Theory.
HIS 2201:
AFRICA IN THE TWENTIETH CENTURY
Africa under European rule; the different theories and practices of the European powers in administering
Africa; the political, economic, social and cultural impact of European rule on Africa; independence
movements; the problems of nation-building in Africa; are among the principle topics dealt with in this course.
HIS 2212:
US POLICY TOWARDS AFRICA
This course examines the US policy towards Africa since the 19th Century. Issues to be considered include the
origins of US relations with Africa, the strategic, political economic and cultural importance of Africa to US
foreign policy and trade. The course shall also examine the implication of the Cold War Diplomacy on Africa
and the importance of US to Africa in post-cold war era.
HIS 2222:
HISTORY OF THE MIDDLE EAST
This course is designed to provide a survey of Middle Eastern History, starting with the rise and expansion of
Islam and ending with Petro-Dollar Diplomacy in the 20th Century. It also deals with important topics such as
the Caliphate system, the Seljuk Empire, domination of the Ottoman Empire, reaction and reform in the Middle
East, nationalism and the struggle for independence, creation of Israel, and the Arab-Israeli conflict.
HIS 2232:
HISTORY OF ASIA
This course is essentially a survey of Asian History, but it will focus on the study of Chinese, Japanese and
Indian modernization processes. Emphasis will be placed on factors that acted as catalysts, as well as
constraints, in the modernization process. A comparative study of social, economic, cultural and political
developments in these countries would provide the students an opportunity to find out resemblances, as well as
contradictions, of similar developments in African countries.
HIS 2242:
HISTORY OF RUSSIA
A survey of Russian History with emphasis on the Russian Empire in modern times, and on the soviet Union
down to the present. The course will examine major political, economic and cultural developments, as well as
the soviet impact on the world and its role as a superpower.
HIS 2252:
HISTORY OF LATIN AMERICA AND THE CARIBBEAN
This course centers on aspects of the political; social and economic history of the Latin American and
Caribbean regions from the 15th Century to the present, with special emphasis on the 19th and 20th centuries. In
examining the inter-relationships between the various peoples who came to inhabit the Countries of the region,
the course will cover such topics as, society and culture in the pre-Columbian era; Spanish conquest and
colonization; inter-European rivalry; the encomienda-system, plantation society movements; the decline of
Europe and the rise of the U.S.A. in the Americas; nation-building processes; regional integration and modern
political parties and military regimes.
HIS 3301:
HISTORY OF NIGERIA TO 1800
This course deals with the early historical development in the Niger/Benue basin before 1800. Nigeria as a
country of the Niger Basin is emphasized along with the impact of various geographical features which
determined primary inter-group association. The course also focuses on the gradual evolution of the early
communities with specific emphasis on socio-economic interaction among various groups that now inhabit
Nigeria.
HIS 3311:
WEST AFRICA TO 1800
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This course examines the main social, political, economic and cultural developments among West African
peoples before the era of increased European activities in the region. In accordance with modern African
historiography, emphasis is on the African people’s themselves-their material, intellectual and other
achievements (and failures0 as they tried to exploit their diversified environment for their livelihood. European
activities are discussed only to the extent that they affected the African initiatives. The course underscores the
underlying unity of the West African sub-region as well as the roots of the region’s present political, economic
and cultural problems and the possibilities of their solution.
HIS 3321:
EAST AND CENTRAL AFRICA TO 1800
This course takes and adopts exploratory pattern. It examines the natural and internal dynamics of African
States from the earliest times to the eve of European contact. Emphasis is placed on such themes and internal
developments like long distance trade, and state formation processes in the sub-region. A critical look is taken
at the geography of the area with the aim of assessing the implications of topography and the acquisition of
iron culture, of population distribution and state formation. Additionally, students are afforded the opportunity
to make an assessment of the extent and impact of the Indian Ocean trade on East and Central Africa.
HIS 3331:
SOUTHERN AFRICA TO 1910
An examination of the early history of Southern Africa up to the Union of South Africa in 1910. The course is
building process, economic development and social integration in the Southern Africa region, that is, south
Africa, Angola, Mozambique, Lesotho, Swaziland, Botswana and Namibia as a prelude to the events leading to
the evolution of the modern histories of the various states.
HIS 3341:
HISTORY OF AFRICAN NATIONALISM
This course concentrates on the various forms of African resistance to colonialism, from the primary struggles
against the imposition of colonial rule to the decolonization process of the post war years. Attention is also
focused on post colonial nationalist thought and strategy. The thrust of the course will be to show how the
demand for independence developed out of African participating in struggles to improve conditions under
colonialism, whether in the sphere of wages, working conditions, cash crop prices, land alienation, education,
housing or promotion. The works of leading nationalist figures, such as Casely Hayford, Jabavu and Horton etc
will of course be discussed.
HIS 3351:
COMPARATIVE STUDIES IN ECONOMIC GROWTH AND
DEVELOPMENT IN THE NINETEENTH AND TWENTIETH CENTURY
This is an advanced course, designed to explore a number of major economic themes in selected areas of
Africa, Asia, Europe and the Americas up to the mid-nineteenth century. An in-depth analysis will be made of
such economic themes as changing agricultural production structures and distribution systems, trading policies,
mercantilism, maritime technology, the slave trade as well as the economic factors behind them.
HIS 3361/HIS 3362: THE HISTORY OF POLITICAL THOUGHT-1/11
This course traces the development of political thought from Aristotle to the present. It will be structured over
two semesters as follows:
(1)
Classical and Medieval European thinkers
(2)
Modern European Political thought from Machiavelli to Marx.
(3)
Socialist thought since Marx, and
(4)
Third World Political thought. Readings will include interpretative material as well as the
original writings of some of the acknowledged scholars in this field.
HIS 3371:
THE MILITARY IN AFRICAN HISTORY
This course encompasses studies in African military history from pre-colonial times to the present. Beginning
with a look at the meaning of military historiography the course will pay attention to the nature and role of precolonial African military organization. Furthermore, it will examine in detail the beginnings, growth and role
of colonial military organizations which became the legacy of independent African States. Other significant
phenomena like the changing and expanding role of the military intervention and participation in the politics
and governance of independent African states will also be discussed.
HIS 3381:
INTRODUCTION TO STRATEGIC STUDIES
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This course will introduce students to some of the arguments over the historical origins of strategy, utility value
of strategy, analysis of the economic, psychological and military dimensions of strategy. Students will also be
exposed to some of the major economic, political, environmental and military theories of strategy as
propounded by such early thinkers in the field as Sun-Tzu, Hannibal, Carl Von Clausewitz, Otto Von Bismark,
Von Molke etc.
HIS 3302:
HISTORY OF NIGERIA 1800
This course is a study of: indigenous political and economic systems at the beginning of the 19th Century; the
Jihad in Hausa land and its impact; expansion of European influences through Consular power and the Royal
Niger Company: Nigeria under colonial rule; Economic, social and political developments since World War II:
problems of nation building in Nigeria.
HIS 3312:
WEST AFRICA SINCE 1800
This course provides an in-depth study of the West African region through analysis of the major social,
economic, cultural and political developments that occurred in the region since the beginning of 19th Century.
The major focus is of the state of the West African societies and politics at the close of the 18 th Century; the
development of indigenous states and societies during the 19th Century; Islamic religious movements,
economic activities, changing nature of West Africa’s involvement with Europe; West African responses to
expansion of European activities; European rule and its impact on West African Peoples and societies; African
nationalist activities; problems of nation building in post colonial West Africa.
HIS 3322:
EAST AND CENTRAL AFRICA SINCE 1800
This course makes a general survey of historical developments in East and Central Africa on the advent of the
first Europeans in the era of the Portuguese. This period was also one of greater European involvement and
interference in African domestic affairs with the arrival of the British, the French, the Dutch, etc. The effect
European presence on the traditional course and direction of trade is given considerable focus. An incisive
study is also made on campaigns geared towards slave trade abolition, accompanied by the era of formal
European administration, nationalism, decolonization and independence. The course generally arms the
students with the tool of effectively appraising the impact of colonial rule on Africa traditional politics.
HIS 3332:
SOUTHERN AFRICA SINCE 1910
Covering the modern histories of the various states in the region, the course will concentrate on nationalist and
liberation struggles in the region. It is designed to familiarize students with the economy, politics and the
cultures of the region as a solid basis for a proper understanding of the issues of apartheid, African resistance
movements and political integration.
HIS 3342:
FIELD RESEARCH IN HISTORY
An examination of the major problems encountered in doing research on the history of non-literate or preliterate societies. Emphasis to be placed on the techniques of collecting, collating and interpreting oral and
archaeological evidences. The course is designed to prepare students for their project papers.
HIS 3352:
COLD WAR AND ITS AFTERMATH
This course is concerned with the emergence of the USA and the USSR as superpowers, each supported by
faithful blocs in Europe and how it led to a state of global tension which centered particular on the boundaries
between them. The course then examines the implications of the internationalization of the cold war politics in
Africa. Areas to be covered in lectures include:- the geo-strategic significance of Africa miniaturization and
cold war diplomacy in the Horn of Africa and South Africa. Emphasis will be placed on the social, economic,
political and geo-strategic implications of cold war for Africa and the realities of post war politics in Africa.
HIS 3372:
AFRICAN DIASPORA AND AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT 1870 TO THE
PRESENT
This course examines the impulses which have shaped African American attitudes towards and by that token
influenced the nature of their contributions towards African development during the post-emancipation period.
Such attitudes have tended to change in sympathy with the radical climate in America, while African
development needs to be properly addressed. In view of the critical nature of diasporaic contribution to the
development of some states elsewhere, e.g. Israel, the course takes a critical look at the nature of African-
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American responses to African development and vice versa. It identifies such responses in ideas and materials
both in America and Africa.
HIS 4400:
PROJECT
Every final year student of the Department must submit a long essay of about 10,000 words on a subject
acceptable to the Department. The essay, to be written under the supervision of a senior member of the
academic staff, is designed to test the student’s skills in handling problems of collecting, collating, analyzing
and synthesizing historical evidence.
HIS 4410:
THE ATLANTIC SLAVE TRADE
Based on selected documents, travelers’ documents and autobiographies of ex-slaves, the course examines the
development of the Atlantic slave trade and its consequences for West Africa, Europe, the West Indies and the
Americas. The movement for abolition of slave trade and slavery is also emphasized.
HIS 4420:
OLD CALABAR AND ENVIRONS BEFORE THE TWENTIETH
CENTURY
A study based on travellers’ and missionary accounts, intelligence reports and relevant Provincial papers of the
evolution of the city states of old Calabar and the resultant dominant role of the Efik in the economic and
cultural life of the peoples of the Cross River Basin.
HIS 4430:
THE EVOLUTION OF THE NIGERIA STATE
A study based on documents and related material of the administrative and constitutional development in
Nigeria from 1886 to independence.
HIS 4440:
ECONOMY AND SOCIETY IN NIGERIA
This course is a study of the economic organization of the Nigerian peoples from the pre-colonial to the
colonial times. Emphasis will however, be on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Knowledge of the
traditional economic organization will be an essential background to the understanding of the economic trends
of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Among the topics to be discussed are: indigenous sources of credit
and growing crops, the money lender, the system of pledging land and leasing palm trees: the use of clubs,
bank credit and the co-operative credit societies, they will be examined against the background of their
contribution to societal growth and development.
HIS 4450:
THE JIHADS OF NORTHERN NIGERIA
This course is an in-depth study of the nineteenth century Jihad movement in Northern Nigeria.
Emphasis will be placed on its causes and consequences particularly its role in shaping the political, social and
economic institutions in Nigeria.
HIS 4460:
TRADE AND POLITICS IN THE NORTHERN CROSS RIVER REGION
TO 1900
This course examines the peopling of the Cross River Region. Its main focus will be on how various
communities were affected politically by local and external trade, especially the trade with the Europeans.
Factors that led to the evolution of social and political structures will be closely examined together with the
organization, growth and patterns of trade and trade links.
HIS 4470:
LIBERATION STRUGGLES IN AFRICA
Based on the new form of independence nationalism in Africa, the course would concentrate on the armed
struggles in Africa-Cape Verde, Guinea Bissau, Mozambique and Algeria. In its basic contents, the course will
concentrate on both the evolution and ideological content of the various struggles as well as the attendant
resistance movements. The problems of race and culture would be highlighted. It is designed to give students
an up to date account of new forms of African nationalism.
HIS 4401:
PHILOSOPHY OF HISTORY
The course examines the nature of history, its development as a discipline and its relevance to the society.
HIS 4411:
REGIONAL CO-OPERATION AND INTEGRATION IN THE THIRD
WORLD
261
This course traces and analyses the evolution and development of the concept of regional co-operation and
integration among the developing countries of the third world. In recent years, regional co-operation has
become one of the topical issues in the field of economic development and integration. It has come to be
considered as an important instrument in economic development of the third world. Regional integration and
co-operation is widely acknowledged as a major way out of the deep and worsening political and economic
crisis confronting the third world today. Students are to be introduced to the analysis of substantive issues.
Though emphasis will be placed on the third world, European experience on regional co-operation and
integration would be used to enrich the study.
HIS 4421:
HISTORY OF ISLAM IN AFRICA
This course deals with the development of Islam from the 7th century A.D to the 20th century in various parts of
Africa. The general aim of the course is to examine the degree of Islam acceptance and its consequent cultural
assimilation by the Africans. The areas of conflict and compromise between Islam and traditional African
religion are also analyzed.
HIS 4431:
HISTORY OF CHRISTIANITY IN AFRICA
This course deals with the advent of Christianity in Africa from the first century A.D to the 20 th Century. The
role of Christianity as an agent of colonialism and European cultural imperialism, as well as the more positive
contributions of Christianity in the field of Education and modernization are explored.
HIS 4441:
THEORIES OF IMPERIALISM
This course will acquaint students with some of the major economic political, sociological and psychological
theories of imperialism propounded by such thinkers as J.A. Hobson, V. I Lenin, J. A. Schumpetor, D. K. Field
house, etc; arguments over the historical origin of imperialism, the relationship of imperialism to capitalism,
underdevelopment imperialism and neo-colonialism and the possibility of imperialism without colonies. In
addition, some attempt will be made to apply the various theories to some selected case studies on a worldwide
basis.
HIS 4451:
MODERN REVOLUTIONS: SELECTED CASE STUDIES
The course seeks to raise questions about the theory and practice of revolutions by examining in detail some
theories of revolution and the applications of theory and deviation from it in modern revolutions. Students are
given the opportunity to review the literature of some of the revolutions in America. Particular attention is
focused on revolutions in Africa, especially toward the end of the course. The major objective of the course is
to develop the ability of the students to interpret the contemporary historical realities in the light of the
theoretical data and experience of the revolutions studied and to reach their own conclusion.
HIS 4461:
HISTORIOGRAPHY SINCE 1800
An analysis of the major trends and arguments concerning the nature, purpose, meaning, and varieties, of
history since the professionalization of the discipline in the nineteenth century through the works of prominent
historians and philosophers like Leopold Von Ranke, Barthold George, Niebuhr Thomas, Bebington Macaulay,
Thomas Carlyle, Karl Marx, Friedrich Engels, Arnold Toynbee and others. The major emphasis, however, will
be placed on trends in the writing of African history since the 1950s.
HIS 4471:
NIGERIA URBAN HISTORY
The growth of urban history-scope, methods and relevance, with special reference to Africa; Pre-Colonial
urbanization in Nigeria-determinants and trends; urban policies in the colonial period-urban and town planning;
administration and finance; internal characterization of towns; issues in modern urban development; and the
city in Nigerian history; are the principal themes in this course.
HIS 4481:
SLAVERY IN AFRICA AND THE NEW WORLD
A comparative analysis of the institution of slavery in pre-colonial Africa and selected areas of the New World.
Special attention will be paid to the internal social, political and cultural organization of the slave communities.
The role of white economic, social and cultural institutions in shaping life in the communities will also be
stressed.
HIS 4491:
ECONOMIC HISTORY OF AFRICA TO THE NINETEENTH CENTURY
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This is an advanced course in economic themes, on a comparative basis, throughout the African continent.
Selected regions will be covered, varying over the years, depending on available staff and expertise. The
interrelationship of internal economic developments and the growing absorption into international economy,
the increasing emphasis on commodity production and exchange factors and the economic forces behind
partition, the economics of early colonialism will be some of the major areas of concern.
HIS 4402:
NIGERIA AND THE INTERNATIONAL ECONOMY SINCE 1960
This course examines the nature and character of Nigeria economic relationship with the wider world since
independence. The course will evaluate the nature and impact of Nigeria’s relationship with international
organizations such as the World Bank, the international Monetary Fund, the International Labour Organization,
and her numerous bilateral and multi-lateral trade agreements. The position which the country occupies as one
of the biggest markets in Africa and her potentials as a major exporter to the West African region will also be
critically appraised.
HIS 4432:
PROBLEMS OF NATION BUILDING IN AFRICA SINCE 1945
The social, economic and political legacy of colonialism: party politics; problems of ethnicity with particular
reference to Nigeria; the military in African politics; are some of the problems of Nation-building dealt with in
this course.
HIS 4442:
THE CHANGING GLOBAL, POLITICAL AND ECONOMIC ORDER
This course examines the dynamic characteristics of international political economic relations in the evolving
world (global) system. The surging search for alternative international order has occasioned changes in the
global system both in model, structure, organization, etc, with varying implications for conduit, tension
cooperator, dependence, interdependence etc. Specific issues reflective of these scenarios will be examined.
HIS 4452:
BLACK COMMUNITIES IN THE NEW WORLD SINCE EMANCIPATION
A comparative analysis on the major social, political and economic issues confronting New World Blacks since
Emancipation, Comparative Race Relation in Latin America, North America and the Caribbean since
Emancipation; Black Response to segregation and discrimination, the Civil Right and Black Power
Movements; New World Blacks and their Africa consciousness in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, are to
be covered in this course.
HIS 4462:
HISTORY OF PAN-AFRICANISM
An examination of the origins, nurturing and flowering of the pan-African idea in the nineteenth and twentieth
centuries through the works of some of the better known exponents of the idea like: Henry Sylvester Williams,
W. E. B. Dubois, Marcus Carvey, Edward Blyden, Malcoln X, Kwame Nkrumah and some contemporary
Black leaders and spokesmen. Special attention will be paid to the organizational aspects of the phenomenon,
including the pan-African Conferences and Congresses, the Back-to Africa Movements, the Organization of
African Unity and similar efforts made to concretize the cultural dimensions of pan-Africanism.
HIS 4472:
HISTORY OF ASIANS IN EAST AFRICA
An analysis of the establishment of Asian communities and their social, economic and political impact on the
East Africa Region until recent times.
HIS 4482:
HISTORY OF AFRICAN RELIGION
This course will examine various aspects of African religious beliefs such as: concepts of God and other supernational forces, the nature and function of spirits, magic and rituals, and ancestor veneration all within the
framework of men’s relationship to God, nature and society. Additionally, some focus will be directed towards
the interplay of religious focus within as historical context stimulating syncretic system and the restructuring of
African cosmologies. The rise of indigenous churches, as well as the role played by some of the religions in the
independence struggles, and some of the most significant development in African religious movements since
independence, will be the other aspect studied in the final part of the course.
HIS 4492:
ECONOMIC HISTORY OF AFRICA SINCE THE NINETEENTH CENTURY
This advanced course in economic history will focus on a number of major economic themes, on a
comparative basis, throughout the Africa continent. Selected regions will be covered, varying over the years,
depending on available staff and expertise. The interrelationship of internal economic developments and the
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growing absorption into the international economy, the increasing emphasis on commodity production and
exchange, the economic factors and the economic forces behind partition, the economics of, colonialism and
post-independence strategies of development will be some of the major areas of concern.
DEPARTMENT OF MODERN LANGUAGES AND TRANSLATION STUDIES
HISTORY
This history of the Department of Modern Languages and Translation Studies, as is known today, dates back to
the 1975/76 session when the University of Calabar was still a campus of the University of Nigeria, Nsukka. In
1976 when the University was statutorily established, the Department was called Department of Modern
Languages offering a degree programme in French with subsidiary in German.
In 1982, the Department was enlarged and renamed Department of Languages and Linguistics introducing thus
the Linguistic component into the programme, that is, two programmes in one. It became necessary to
restructure and reposition the Department as constituted, so as to cater for all aspects of French studies in
addition to German, Spanish, African and Caribbean Literature, and Comparative Literature. A request for
bifurcation and creation of a separate autonomous Department of Modern Languages was put before the
Senate.
Academic Programmes
(A)
Undergraduate
The Department offers Undergraduate and Postgraduate Programmes in French Language and
Translation Studies. Courses in the two disciplines were also undertaken at the level of Diploma in The
Diploma in Language Studies (DLS) programme offered by the Department until recently.
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMME: B. A. HONS
LANGUAGES (FRENCH)
INTRODUCTION
The department offers courses leading to the award of B.A. Degree in French with subsidiary Spanish and
German. It also offers courses to B. A. Education/French majors as well as service courses to other
departments in the Faculties of Law, Arts and Science. Other languages may be introduced from time to time
depending on the availability of staff and resources and in response to need.
FRENCH
Cross River State, in which this university is located, shares a common border with the Republic of Cameroon,
a French speaking country. This proximity underlines the relevance of French not only in the state but also in
Nigeria surrounded, as it is, by French speaking counties.
Although French is taught in secondary schools, the shortage of teachers and lack of facilities severally restrict
the output of school leavers with a good foundation in French. Accordingly, courses in the Department lay
great stress on quasi-remedial teaching in the first year. For admission to syllabus “A” in French, preference is
given to candidates with GCE “O” level in French or its equivalent. A special alternative syllabus “B” is
proposed for candidates with little or no previous knowledge of French. It is hoped that through the use of
modern audio-visual methods and equipment, additional vacation courses in French speaking countries and a
semester year spent abroad, a common level is achieved for both syllabus “A” and syllabus “B” students in the
final year.
SPANISH
The introduction/teaching of Spanish is informed by the fact that Spanish is spoken in 20 countries and it is the
fourth most widely spoken language in the world. It is recognized by the U.N.O. as a world language. The fact
that it is the official language used in Equatorial Guinea, a neighbouring country also pleads in favour of its
inclusion in our academic programme.
264
GERMAN
This course is intended to be a subsidiary course primarily for students specializing in Modern Languages. It is
an audio-visual course for absolute beginners in German.
TRANSLATION
The imperative of international diplomacy, globalization and the need for integration in the West African Subregion call for increased interest in translation studies and accounts for the weighting accorded translation in
the programme.
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR A FOUR YEAR DEGREE PROGRAMME AND A THREE
YEAR DEGREE PROGRAMME IN LANGUAGES (FRENCH)
A.
1.
Four-Year Degree Programme
In addition to the general entry requirements, a candidate should posses: 5 “0” level Credit passes in 5
subjects including English language and one other arts subject. Knowledge of French or Spanish is
only an advantage but not a requirement.
B.
Three year Degree Programme Direct Entry
5 “0” Level credit passes in 5 subjects including English Language plus 2 A/L passes in two subjects
one of which must be in French.
OR
2.
4 “0” Level credit passes in 4 subjects including English Language plus 3A/L passes in 3 subjects one
of which must be in French.
OR
3.
5 “0” Level credit passes in 5 subjects including English Language plus 2 merit or credit passes in
NCE one of which must be in French.
4.
5 “0” Level credit passes in 5 subjects including English Language plus Diploma in Language Studies
at credit or merit level.
COURSE OUTLINE
B. A. (HONS.) FRENCH (Compulsory Courses)
Course Syllabus (A)
1.
YEAR ONE
Course
Code
FRT1001
FRT1011
FRT1021
FRT1031
1ST SEMESTER
Course title
Corrective Grammar I
French Comprehensive I
Oral French I
Introduction to Translation
I
Required Courses
SPN1001
Audio-Lingual Spanish I
OR
GER1001
Audio-Lingual Spanish I
GSS1101
Use of English
I
GSS1121
Philosophy and Logic
GSS1111
Citizenship Education
Total Number of Credit
Hours
Credit
Hr
3
3
3
3
Course
Code
FRT1002
FRT1012
FRT1022
FRT1031
3
SPN1002
3
GER1002
GSS1102
GSS1132
2ND SEMESTER
Courses title
Corrective Grammar II
French Comprehensive II
Oral French II
Introduction to Translation
II
Required Courses
Audio-Lingual Spanish II
OR
Audio-Lingual German II
Use of English
II
History and Philosophy of
Science
Total
Hours
24
Number of Credit
Credit
Hr
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
21
YEAR TWO
Compulsory Courses
1ST SEMESTER
Course
Course title
Code
FRT2001
French
Grammatical
Structures I
Credit
Hr
3
Course
Code
FRT2002
265
2ND SEMESTER
Courses title
French
Structures II
Grammatical
Credit
Hr
3
FRT2011
Intro. to Modern French
Literature
Oral French III (Vowels)
3
FRT2012
3
FRT2022
Aspects to Translation I
Required Courses
SPN2001
Intermediate Spanish I
OR
GER2001
Intermediate German I
LIN1001
Introduction to Linguistics
I
Elective outside the Dept.
3
FRT3032
3
SPN2001
Total Number of Credit
Hours
21
FRT2021
FRT3031
3
3
3
GER2001
LIN1001
Introduction to Francophone
Lit
Oral
French
IV
(Consonants)
Aspects to Translation II
Required Courses
Intermediate Spanish II
OR
Intermediate German II
Introduction to Linguistics II
3
GSS2112
Introduction to Computers
Elective outside the Dept.
Total Number of Credit
Hours
3
3
24
3
3
3
3
3
YEAR THREE
(Compulsory Courses)
Course
Code
FRT3001
1ST SEMESTER
Course title
2ND SEMESTER
Courses title
Credit
Hr
3
Course
Code
FRT3002
French Lexis
3
FRT3042
Survey of Frenco Lit.
3
3
3
3
FRT3052
FRT3062
FRT3072
3
3
3
3
18
FRT3082
Composition in French II
Practical French II
French
Cultural
and
Civilization
Translation II
Total Number of Credit
Hours
(One Semester is normally spent abroad or in the French Language Village, Badagry).
18
FRT3041
FRT3051
FRT3061
FRT3071
FRT3081
French
Grammatical
Structures III
Survey
of
French
Literature
Composition in French I
Practical French I
African
Cultural
and
Thought in French
Translation I
Total Number of Credit
Hours
Credit
Hr
3
3
YEAR FOUR
Compulsory Courses
Course
Code
FRT4001
FRT4011
FRT4021
FRT4051
SPN2001
GER2001
FRT4065
1ST SEMESTER
Course title
Translation III
French Literature 17th
Century
French Literature 19th
Century
Francophone Literature I
Required Courses
Intermediate Spanish I
OR
Intermediate German I
Oral Literature in French
Total Number of Credit
Hours
Credit
Hr
3
3
Course
Code
FRT4002
FRT4012
3
FRT4022
3
FRT4032
FRT4052
3
3
3
3
SPN2002
GER2002
FRT4075
18
266
2ND SEMESTER
Courses title
Translation IV
French
Literature
18th
Century
French
Literature
20th
Century
Francophone Literature II
Special Topic in French II
Required Courses
Intermediate Spanish II
Intermediate German II
Oral French and Advanced
Composition
Total Number of Credit
Hours
Credit
Hr
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
24
YEAR ONE
Course Syllabus (B) (Compulsory Courses)
1ST SEMESTER
Course
Course title
Code
FRT1031
Intro. to Translation I
FRT1051
Audio-Visual French I
FRT1071
Audio-Lingual French I
FRT1081
Audio-Oral French I
Required Courses
LIN1001
Introduction to Linguistics I
Credit
Hr
3
3
3
3
Course
Code
FRT1032
FRT1052
FRT1072
FRT1082
3
LIN1002
GSS1102
GSS1132
GSS1101
GSS1121
Use of English
I
Philosophy and Logic
3
3
GSS1111
Citizenship Education
3
Total Number
Hours
of
Credit
24
2ND SEMESTER
Courses title
Intro. to Translation I
Audio-Visual French I
Audio-Lingual French I
Audio-Oral French I
Required Courses
Audio-Lingual Spanish II
Credit
Hr
3
3
3
3
3
Use of English
II
History and Philosophy of
Science
3
3
Total
Hours
21
Number of Credit
Course Syllabus Compulsory Courses
YEAR TWO
Course
Code
FRT2001
FRT2011
FRT2021
1ST SEMESTER
Course title
French
Grammatical
Structures I
Intro. to Modern French
Literature
Oral French III (Vowels)
FRT3031
Credit
Hr
3
3
3
Aspects to Translation I
Required Courses
SPN2001
Intermediate Spanish I
OR
GER2001
Intermediate German I
LIN1001
Introduction to Linguistics
I
An elective outside the Dept.
3
Total Number of Credit
Hours
21
3
3
3
Course
Code
FRT2002
2ND SEMESTER
Courses title
French
Grammatical
Structures II
FRT2012
Introduction to Francophone
Lit
FRT2022
Oral
French
IV
(Consonants)
FRT3032
Aspects to Translation II
Required Courses
SPN2002
Audio-Lingual Spanish II
OR
GER2002
Audio-Lingual Spanish I
An elective outside the Dept.
Credit
Hr
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Total
Hours
Number of Credit
21
YEAR THREE
* YEAR 3 (One Semester is normally spent abroad or at the French
Language Village, Badagry).
1st and 2nd Semesters:
Same as Syllabus A Programme
YEAR FOUR
Same as Syllabus A Programme
DIRECT ENTRY
A.
Requirements
These students will be admitted as 2nd Year French Students. They should, therefore, complete the B.
A. Honours (French) Programme in three (3) years.
267
SYLLABUS FOR HOLDERS OF NCE (Compulsory Courses)
YEAR ONE
Course
Code
FRT2001
FRT2011
FRT2021
FRT3031
1ST SEMESTER
Course title
French
Grammatical
Structures I
Intro. to Modern French
Literature
Oral French III (Vowels)
Aspects to Translation I
Total Number of Credit
Hours
Credit
Hr
3
Course
Code
SPN1001
2ND SEMESTER
Courses title
Audio-Lingual Spanish II
3
OR
3
3
GER1001
Audio-Lingual German I
LIN1001
Introduction to Linguistics I
An elective (Outside the Dept.)
Total Number of Credit
Hours
12
Credit
Hr
3
3
3
3
12
Course Syllabus Compulsory Courses
YEAR TWO
Course
Code
FRT2001
1ST SEMESTER
Course title
French
Grammatical
Structures I
FRT2011
Intro. to Modern French
Literature
FRT2021
Oral French III (Vowels)
FRT3031
Aspects to Translation I
Required Courses
SPN2001
Intermediate Spanish I
OR
GER2001
Intermediate German I
LIN1001
Intro. to Linguistics I
An elective outside the Dept.
Total Number of Credit
Hours
Credit
Hr
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
21
Course
Code
FRT2002
2ND SEMESTER
Courses title
French
Grammatical
Structures II
FRT2012
Introduction to Francophone
Lit
FRT2022
Oral French IV (Consonants)
FRT3032
Aspects to Translation II
Required Courses
SPN2002
Audio-Lingual Spanish II
OR
GER2002
Audio-Lingual Spanish I
LIN1001
Intro. to Linguistics II
An elective outside the Dept.
Total
Number of Credit
Hours
Credit
Hr
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
21
(Compulsory Courses) Course Syllabus
YEAR THREE
Course
Code
FRT3001
FRT3041
FRT3051
FRT3061
FRT3071
FRT3081
1ST SEMESTER
Course title
Advanced
Studies
in
French Structures
Survey
of
French
Literature
Composition in French I
Practical French I
African
Cultural
and
Thought in French
Introduction to Translation
I
Total Number of Credit
Hours
Credit
Hr
3
Course
Code
FRT3002
3
FRT3042
3
FRT3052
3
3
FRT3062
FRT3072
3
FRT3082
18
2ND SEMESTER
Courses title
Advanced Studies in French
Structures
Survey of Frencophone Lit.
Communication Skills in
French II
Practical French II
Francophone Cultural and
Civilization
Introduction to Translation
II
Total Number of Credit
Hours
Year Three
Same as syllabus “B” Programme
SYLLABUS FOR HOLDERS OF ‘A’ LEVEL FRENCH OR DIPLOMA IN FRENCH
268
Credit
Hr
3
3
3
3
3
3
18
YEAR TWO
Course Syllabus Compulsory Courses
Course
Code
FRT2001
FRT2011
FRT3031
LIN1001
SPN1001
GER1001
GSS1101
GSS1121
GSS1111
1ST SEMESTER
Course title
French
Grammatical
Structures I
Intro. to Modern French
Literature
Aspects to Translation I
Required Courses
Introduction to Linguistics
I
Audio-Lingual Spanish I
OR
Audio-Lingual German I
Use of English
I
Philosophy and Logic
Citizenship Education
Total Number of Credit
Hours
Credit
Hr
3
Course
Code
FRT2002
3
FRT2012
3
FRT3032
3
LIN1002
3
SPN2002
3
3
3
GER2002
GSS1102
GSS1111
3
24
2ND SEMESTER
Courses title
French
Grammatical
Structures II
Introduction to Francophone
Lit
Aspects to Translation II
Required Courses
Introduction to Linguistics II
Credit
Hr
3
3
3
3
Audio-Lingual Spanish II
OR
Audio-Lingual Spanish I
Use of English
History and Philosophy of
Science
3
Total
Hours
24
Number of Credit
3
3
3
1st Semester (See Direct entry NCE Year 3 Programme) 3 rd Year (See Entry Post NCE Programme) COURSES FOR
EDUCATION STUDENTS (FRENCH MAJOR)
Compulsory Courses
YEAR ONE
Course
Code
FRT2001
FRT1011
FRT1031
1ST SEMESTER
Course title
Corrective Grammar I
French Comprehension I
Introduction to Translation
I
Total Number of Credit
Hours
Credit
Hr
3
3
3
Course
Code
FRT1002
FRT1012
FRT1032
9
2ND SEMESTER
Courses title
Corrective Grammar I
I
French Comprehension II
Introduction to Translation
II
Total Number of Credit
Hours
Credit
Hr
3
3
3
9
Course Syllabus Compulsory Courses
YEAR TWO
Course
Code
FRT2001
FRT2011
FRT3031
1ST SEMESTER
Course title
French
Grammatical
Structures I
Intro. to Modern French
Literature
Aspects to Translation I
Total Number of Credit
Hours
Credit
Hr
3
Course
Code
FRT2002
3
FRT2012
3
9
FRT3032
2ND SEMESTER
Courses title
French
Grammatical
Structures II
Introduction to Francophone
Lit
Aspects to Translation II
Total Number of Credit Hours
Credit
Hr
3
3
3
9
Course Syllabus (Compulsory Courses)
YEAR TWO
Course
Code
FRT2021
FRT3001
1ST SEMESTER
Course title
Oral French (Vowels)
French
Grammatical
Credit
Hr
3
3
Course
Code
FRT2022
FRT3002
269
2ND SEMESTER
Courses title
Oral French (Consonants)
French Lexis
Credit
Hr
3
3
FRT2031
Structures III
Survey
of
French
Literature
Total Number of Credit
Hours
3
FRT2032
9
Survey
of
Francophone
Literature
Total Number of Credit Hours
3
9
Compulsory Courses
YEAR FOUR
Course
Code
FRT4001
FRT4065
FRT2031
FRT4031
FRT4081
1ST SEMESTER
Course title
Translation III
Oral Literature in French
French Literature 19th
Century
OR
Francophone Literature I
OR
French
Caribbean
Literature I
Total Number of Credit
Hours
Credit
Hr
3
3
3
Course
Code
FRT4002
FRT4072
FRT4022
3
FRT4081
FRT4032
FRT4081
15
2ND SEMESTER
Courses title
Translation IV
OR
Oral French and Advanced
Composition
French
Literature
20th
Century
OR
Francophone Literature II
French Caribbean Literature
I
Total Number of Credit
Hours
Credit
Hr
3
3
3
3
3
15
COURSE DESCRIPTION
FRENCH
FRT.1001:
CORRECTIVE FRENCH GRAMMAR I
The Course focuses on basic correct French Grammatical structures through practical exercise and aims at the
elimination of areas of interference with English and the mother tongue.
FRT.1002:
CORRECTIVE FRENCH GRAMMAR II
The course focuses on the formation of simple French sentences by means of basic morphological and lexical
items and through corrective strategies.
FRT. 1011:
FRENCH COMPREHENSIVE I
Oral and written comprehension of texts by means of audio-visual aids.
FRT. 1012:
FRENCH COMPREHENSIVE II
A sustained form of FRH. 1011 supplemented by oral and written summary.
FRT. 1021:
ORAL FRENCH I
Continuation of corrective exercise with examples of literary passages and conversation practice.
FRT. 1022:
ORAL FRENCH II
Large remedial phonological analysis of phatic performance of identity areas and methods of corrective
approach to improve aural perception and phonatory reproduction.
FRT. 1031/1032:
INTRODUCTION TO TRANSLATION
This course is meant to get students introduced to the rudiments of translation.
FRT. 1000:
FRENCH FOR SCIENCE STUDENTS
Beginner’s French for science students with emphasis on translation from French to English.
FRT. 1051:
AUDIO-VISUAL FRENCH I
Intensive French Language course using modern audio-visual aids (e.g. De Vive Voix). Emphasis on lessons
and dictation.
270
FRT. 1052:
AUDIO-VISUAL FRENCH II
Continuation of FRH. 1051 De Vive Volx lessons 12-21. Emphasis on lessons and advanced dictation
exercises.
FRT. 1061:
INTRODUCTION TO FRENCH
LANGUAGE I
French Grammar, composition and vocabulary courses. (Beginners’ French course for Arts students with little
or no previous knowledge of French).
FRT. 1062:
INTRODUCTION TO FRENCH LANGUAGE II
Emphasis on Reading and Comprehension and simple translation from French to English.
FRT. 1071:
AUDIO-LINGUAL FRENCH I
Intensive French Language course using modern audio-visual aids, Emphasis on grammatical structural
exercises.
FRT. 1072:
AUDIO-LINGUAL FRENCH II
Contamination of FRH. 1071. Emphasis on other grammatical structural exercises.
FRT. 1081:
AUDIO-ORAL FRENCH II
Intensive French Language course using modern audio-visual methods. Emphasis on oral comprehension and
composition as well as on conversation, drama and laboratory work.
FRT. 1082:
TRANSITIONAL FRENCH
Passage from a predominantly oral course to a predominantly written one in comprehension and composition,
to be supplemented with conversation and laboratory work. Introduction to easy reading of French literary texts
in the second half of the second semester.
FRT. 2001:
FRENCH GRAMMATICAL STRUCTURES I
Identification of different grammatical categories, actualization and description of morphological and lexical
items in simple and complex sentences.
FRT. 2002:
FRENCH GRAMMATICAL STRUCTURES II
Continuation of FRH. 2001 with emphasis on structural exercises. At the end of the course, the student will
have been able to acquire the essential elements of French grammar and correct use of the language.
FRT. 2011:
INTRODUCTION TO FRENCH LITERATURE
Introduction to 17th Century French Literature with extracts from set books.
FRT. 2012:
INTRODUCTION TO FRANCOPHONE LITERATURE
Introduction to African and Caribbean Literature of French expression, with set books.
FRT. 2021:
ORAL FRENCH (VOWELS)
Study of French vowels with emphasis on pronunciation, spelling and phonetic transcription.
FRT. 2022:
ORAL FRENCH (CONSONANTS)
Study of French consonants with emphasis on pronunciation, spelling and phonetic transcription.
FRT. 2031:
ASPECTS OF TRANSLATION I
This is an introductory course on types and methods of translation.
FRT. 2032:
ASPECTS OF TRANSLATION II
A continuation of FRH. 2031 with more emphasis on the parameters of translation.
FRT. 2061:
INTERMEDIATE FRENCH I
Reading and comprehension of simple French texts. A continuation of subsidiary French 1061.
FRT. 2062:
INTERMEDIATE FRENCH II
271
Reading, Comprehension and Translation of French Literary texts. A continuation of FRH. 2061.
FRT. 3001:
ADVANCED STUDIES IN FRENCH GRAMMATICAL STRUCTURES
Study of Advanced grammatical principles governing the use of verbs, nouns, pronouns, adjectives, adverbs
etc. and the nature and function of simple and complex sentences.
FRT. 3002:
FRENCH LEXIS
Study of words and meaning depending on the situation of Communication; study of synonyms and antonyms,
denotation and connotation. First meaning and secondary meaning, ambiguity and dissambiguity, etc.
FRT. 3041:
SURVEY OF FRENCH LITERATURE
A panorama of French Literature from the Renaissance to the present time.
FRT. 3042:
SURVEY OF FRANCOPHONE LITERATURE
A panorama of African and Caribbean Literature of French expression.
FRT. 3051:
COMPOSITION IN FRENCH III
Techniques of composition with emphasis on organization of thought and ideas.
FRT. 3052:
COMMUNICATION SKILLS IN FRENCH
Language being an instrument of communication, this course emphasizes different oral and written
communication strategies in different situations.
FRT. 3061:
PRACTICAL FRENCH I
Commercial French, correspondence and other forms of business communication in French, such as
advertising, marketing, etc.
FRT. 3062:
PRACTICAL FRENCH II
Business and administrative correspondence of a more complex nature.
FRT. 3071:
FRENCH CULTURE AND THOUGHT
A survey of the historical, political and economic background of French from the 15the Century to the present
day.
FRT. 3072:
AFRICAN CULTURE AND CIVILIZATION
A survey of the historical, political and economic background of Africa with special reference to French
speaking countries of the continent.
FRT. 3081:
TRANSLATION I
A course on bilingualism and the techniques to translation.
FRT. 3082:
TRANSLATION II
This is practical translation course from French to English. Students will be introduced to basic skills necessary
for effective translation.
FRT. 4001:
TRANSLATION III
The theory and practice of translation. Linguistic and cultural obstacles to translation from the source language
to the target language. Translation from French to English.
FRT. 4002:
TRANSLATION IV
Practical translation course from English to French and from French to English.
FRT. 4011:
FRENCH LITERATURE: 17th CENTURY
French Literature of the classical period, with prescribed text books.
FRT. 4012:
FRENCH LITERATURE: 18th CENTURY
272
French Literature of 18th Century, with text books. Emphasis on Voltaire, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Diderot,
Montesquieu, Prevost, Baumarchais.
FRT. 4021:
FRENCH LITERATURE: 19th CENTURY
Modern French Literature of the 19th Century with textbooks. Emphasis on Honore de Balzac, Victor Hugo,
Emile Zola, Flabert, Baudeliaire, etc…
FRT. 4022:
FRENCH LITERATURE: 20th CENTURY
Modern French Literature of the 20th Century with set books. Emphasis on Sarte, Camus, Malraux, Maruriac,
Nouveau Roman.
FRT. 4031:
FRANCOPHONE LITERATURE I
Literature of French speaking African Countries: Prose. Emphasis on writers like Beti, Kourouma, laye,
Oyono, Goyemide, Kane, etc.
FRT. 4032:
FRANCOPHONE LITERATURE II
Literature of French speaking African Countries: Poetry.
FRT. 4051:
SPECIAL TOPIC I
This is a dissertation project based on literature, language, translation, culture, depending on the student’s area
of interest. It is designed to introduce students into research techniques and develop in them the qualities of
creativity and ability for continuous independent work and sound judgement. Emphasis is on detailed plan and
bibliography.
FRT. 4052:
SPECIAL TOPIC II
Continuation and completion of project dissertation resulting, in the form of a book and, thus, becoming a
document fit for public consumption.
FRT. 4061:
GENERAL PAPER
Students are required to have a broad-based knowledge of all the courses offered in the fourth year, ranging
from literature to language and translation.
FRT. 4065:
ORAL LITERATURE IN FRENCH
Oral Literature comprises different genres that are defined by their peculiar structure that is yet to be
apprehended. This course aims at a scientific study of the structure and classification of the genres that
constitute oral literature.
FRT. 4075:
ORAL FRENCH AND ADVANCED COMPOSITION
Advanced phonology of French with orthrepic reading practice. Phonetic translation. Advanced composition in
French. Advanced phonology and practice of “explication du texte” “commentaire compose” and
“commentaries stylistiques”, problems of advanced composition in French.
FRT. 4081/FRT. 4082: CARIBBEAN LITERATURE OF FRENCH EXPRESSION
This course deals in depth with the works of major Caribbean Francophone authors such as Aime Cesaire,
Jacques Roumain, Joseph Zobel, Edouard Glissant, Maryse Conde, Simone Schwarz-Bart, etc. Based on such
works, it shall identify the characteristic traits of this literature and its evolution.
GER. 10001: AUDIO-LINGUAL GERMAN I
This is an audio-lingual course for absolute beginners of German.
GER. 1002:
AUDIO-LINGUAL GERMAN II
It is a continuation of GER. 1001.
GER. 2001:
INTERMEDIATE GERMAN I
It is a continuation of GER 1001 and 1002 at intermediate level.
273
GER. 2002:
INTERMEDIATE GERMAN II
This is a continuation of GER. 2002 at a more advanced level.
SPN. 1001:
AUDIO-LINGUAL SPANISH I
This is an audio-lingual course for absolute beginners of Spanish.
SPN. 1002:
AUDIO-LINGUAL SPANISH II
A continuation of SPN. 1001 but with the introduction of reading and writing exercises including composition.
SPN. 2001:
INTERMEDIATE SPANISH I
It is a continuation of SPN. 1001 and SPN. 1002 at intermediate level.
SPN. 2002:
INTERMEDIATE SPANISH II
This is a continuation of SPN. 2001 at a more advanced. Level.
YEAR/SEMESTER ABROAD
One of the requirements in the French B. A. (Honours) Programme is that the students should spend an
approved period of their course in a French speaking territory. This period of linguistic and cultural immersion
enhances acquisition of a competence in the language. In the past, it usually lasted one academic session, hence
the name “Year Abroad”. Though this programme has remained mandatory for all Year Three students in
Nigerian Universities, it is not being implemented in the same manner by all the Departments where French is
thought. The “sejour” still lasts one full academic year for some institutions while for others, the “Semester
Abroad” has been adopted. Students of the Department of Modern Languages and Translation Studies of the
University of Calabar now spend one semester-(usually the second) of each year “Abroad”. Third Year
Students from several Nigerian Universities attend The Nigerian French Language Village in Badagry, while
many students in our Department also undergo the programme in Badagry, others travel to institutions outside
Nigeria for the course. Such countries include France, Togo, Cameroun, Benin Republic and Ivory Coast. In
the University of Calabar, sponsorship of the Programme remains the responsibility of the students involved in
the “Year Abroad”.
Post-Graduate
Objectives
The major objectives of the Post-graduate Degree Programme are to:
(a) Train graduates to teach and conduct scholarly research in a chosen area of specialization.
(b) Train students to be able to apply the knowledge acquired in their areas of specialization to
Francophone countries in many capacities including commercial, diplomatic and cultural issues.
Degrees Offered
The Department offers courses of study and research leading to the award of M. A. and Ph.D. Degrees.
Fields of Specialization
Research for the award of the M. A. and the Ph.D. can be carried out in the following areas of specialization.

Teaching of French as a Second Language

French Language

French Linguistics

Francophone African Culture and Civilization

French Literature

African/Caribbean Literatures in French

Oral Literature of Francophone Africa

Comparative Literature

French in International Relations

Translation Studies
COURSES OFFERED
(A)
M. A.
FIRST SEMESTER
274
FRT5011
Research Methods
FRT5021
Advanced Grammar
FRT5031
Selected Topics in Contemporary African Literature in French
FRT5041
Seminar French in Literature
FRT5051
African Literature and Culture in French
FRT5061
Theories & Methods of Translation
FRT5071
Introduction to Caribbean
SECOND SEMESTER
FRT5012
Approaches to Literature Criticism
FRT5022
Approaches to Language Teaching
FRT5032
Oral Literature of Africa in French
FRT5042
Seminar in Caribbean Literature in
French
FRT5052
Culture and History of French
Speaking Africa
FRT5062
Practice of Translation
FRT5072
Trends in Caribbean Literature in
French
(B)
Ph.D.
FIRST SEMESTER
FRT6011
French Linguistics
FRT6021
French in International Relations
FRT6031
French Literature
FRT6041
Seminar in African Literature in French
FRT6051
Modern Trends in Literary Criticism
FRT6061
Translation and interpretation
FRT6071
Caribbean Literature in French
SECOND SEMESTER
FRT6012
Linguistics and Literature
FRT6022
Language and language teaching
FRT6032
Selected Topics in Contemporary French Literature
FRT6042
The Evolution of Caribbean Literature in French
FRT6052
Comparative Literature
FRT6062
Critical Appreciation of Literary Translation
FRT6072
Independent Study (in area related to field of specialization).
COURSE DESCRIPTION
MASTER’S DEGREE
First Semester
FRT. 5011:
RESEARCH METHODS
The aim of the course is to acquaint the candidate with methods of literary research. It involves such topics as
tools of research, documentation, technicalities in writing a good research paper, problems of style, format,
etc…
FRT. 5021:
ADVANCED GRAMMAR (FRENCH)
This course is designed to make graduate students develop a critical approach to modern French grammar.
Attention will be on the notions of grammaticality in French. Such traditional French grammatical
classifications and categories as the idea of a sentence (parts of speech), classification relationship in simple
and complex constructions will be looked at.
FRT. 5031:
SELECTED TOPICS IN CONTEMPORARY AFRICAN LITERATURE IN
FRENCH
275
The aim of the course is to broaden and deepen students’ knowledge of African fiction, poetry and drama in
French. It will involve topics such as sources and influences of Francophone literature, protest,
disenchantment, etc…
Selection of specific authors for study will vary from year to year.
FRT. 5041:
SEMINAR IN FRENCH LITERATURE
The emphasis here could be on a period of French literary evolution, a specific theme or concept, a set of
themes and concepts in French literature. At the end of this exercise, students are required to produce a well
researched and a well written paper of substantial length and scope.
FRT. 5051:
AFRICAN LITERATURE AND CULTURE IN FRENCH
This course is designed to give students a broad, insightful and accurate picture of the social, cultural and
political history and life in African French speaking countries. The evolutionary nature of the relationship
between France and these countries will also be examined against the background of their literatures.
FRT. 5061:
THEORIES AND METHODS OF TRANSLATION
This course will focus its attention on the theories of translation as propounded by various experts in the field.
It will lay emphasis on definitions and techniques of translation to be adopted to arrive at a near perfect
translation.
FRT. 5071:
INTRODUCTION TO CARIBBEAN LITERATURE IN FRENCH
Here the students are introduced to the thoughts and ideas of the leading Caribbean writers such as Aime
Cesaire, Edouard Glissant, Patrick Chamoiseau, Maryse Conde, Joseph Zobel, Schwarz-Bart, Lacrosil, etc…
The impact of these ideas on the Caribbean society will be a major consideration.
Second Semester
FRT. 5012:
APPROACHES TO LITERARY CRITICISM
Students will be presented with a survey of different ways of studying literary texts. Emphasis will be placed
on current developments in literary criticism and their application to literary works.
FRT. 5022:
APPROACHES TO LANGUAGE TEACHING
The course aims at involving students in the critical study of different methods in language teaching. Attention
will focus on these major components (psychological, philosophical, historical, sociological, etc…). It also
includes some classroom observation and practical teaching of French in selected schools in Calabar.
FRT. 5032:
ORAL LITERATURE OF FRENCH AFRICA
Here, emphasis will be on the existence of a rich pool of oral literature still flourishing in parts of French
Africa such as Mali, Cameroun, Cote d’Ivoire, Senegal, Niger, Gabon, the two Congos, etc… the study will
include an assessment of the art of the Griot in Western Sudan and that of his equivalent in other African
French speaking societies. The material used in this course will be based on the works of such scholars and
writers as Griaule, Calame-Griaule, Dieterlin, Camera, Niane, C. Seydou, Boubou Hama, Gordon Innes,
Abdoulaye Diop, Ahmadou Hampate Ba, Birago Diop, etc… Samples of recorded, transcribed and annotated
original oral material will also be examined and analyzed.
FRT. 5032:
SEMINAR IN CARIBBEAN LITERATURE IN FRENCH
Students are required to produce a well-researched paper, substantial in length and scope. This paper could be
on a specific theme or on a set of themes drawn from works of such great writers as Aime Cesaire, Raphael
Tardon, Maryse Conde, Simone Schwraz-Zart, Joseph Zobel, Edouand Glissant, Patrick Chamoiseau, etc…
FRT. 5052:
CULTURE AND HISTORY OF FRENCH SPEAKING IN AFRICA
This course is a continuation of FRT. 5051. Emphasis will be on the literary, cultural and socio-political
development of these countries.
FRT. 5062:
PRACTICE OF TRANSLATION
276
It is a continuation of FRT 5061 except that emphasis is more on practical aspects of translation. The students
will be given passages (legal, medical, scientific, literary) to translate and, thus, put into practice the theories
learnt in the first semester.
FRT. 5072:
TRENDS IN CARIBBEAN LITERATURE IN FRENCH
This is a continuation of FRT 5071. It attempts to discuss trends such as “Negritude”, “Antiollanite” and
“Creolite” as seen in the works of French Caribbean major writers as listed in FRT 5071.
Ph.D COURSES
First Semester
FRT. 6011:
FRENCH LINGUISTICS
The course is designed to acquaint students with principles of French linguistic theories such as the three
Saussurian dichotomies: signifiant et signifie (sign and meaning), langue et parole (language as a social
phenomenon on the one hand and language as an act of the individual on the other), sychronie et dachronie
(current and historical changes in French language). It will also introduce students to theories of morphology,
syntax, semantics and phonology. This will be followed by their practical application to French grammar.
FRT. 6021:
FRENCH IN INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS
This course examines the use of French in international organization such as UNO, ECOWAS, AU, etc..
Specifically, it highlights the importance of French for Nigeria and Nigerians in their bilateral and multilateral
relations with French speaking countries and their nationals especially in the West African sub-region.
FRT. 6031:
FRENCH LITERATURE
The aim of this course is to pursue an in-depth study of a selection of some of the most outstanding
contributions to French literature of all the periods. Themes, as well as development of ideas and forms and the
various literary genres will be analyzed. The choice of authors and works will vary from year to year.
FRT. 6041:
SEMINAR IN AFRICAN LITERATURE IN FRENCH
This is an advanced seminar for graduate students who have already acquired sufficient knowledge of the
literatures of Francophone Africa. The study could centre around one or more authors such as Senghor, Beti,
Beyala, Kourouma, Ousmane, Sow Fall, Camara Laye, etc… It could also focus on specific literary genres
(poetry, drama, prose, and essay). At the end of the study, the candidates must produce a well-researched and a
well-written paper of substantial length and scope.
FRT. 6051:
MODERN TRENDS IN LITERARY CRITICISM
This is a continuation of FRT 5012. but here the students will be required to do a more profound study of major
trends in modern literary criticism such as post-modernism and gender issues as raised in literary works.
FRT. 6061:
TRANSLATION AND INTERPRETATION
The study is more or less a theoretical framework of translation and interpretation. The relationship between
the two areas of study will be highlighted. Emphasis will be laid on the techniques involved in automatic and
simultaneous translation and interpretation.
FRT. 6071:
CARIBBEAN LITERATURE IN FRENCH
This is a continuation of FRT 5071 which is taken at the master’s degree level. An in-depth and a more
profound study of some French Caribbean works and authors will be undertaken.
Second Semester
FRT. 6012:
LINGUISTICS AND LITERATURE
This course will provide students with a survey of current research in France, USA, Russia, etc… on the
relationship between linguistics and literature; it will also provide information on the collection, conservation,
transcription and other ways of translating and publishing traditional African literature.
FRT. 6022:
LANGUAGE AND LANGUAGE TEACHING
It is a continuation of FRT 5022 which is done at the M. A. level. Emphasis will be on the problem of second
language teaching/learning and bilingualism in Nigeria.
277
FRT. 6032:
SELECTED TOPICS IN CONTEMPORARY FRENCH LITERATURE
This course presupposes that the students are quite familiar with the background to 20 th century French
literature. The course could centre around contemporary authors, literary themes and genres.
FRT. 6042:
THE EVOLUTION OF CARIBBEAN LITERATURE IN FRENCH
This is a continuation of FRT 6071.
FRT. 6052:
COMPARATIVE LITERATURE
This course is intended to help students understand French and Francophone literatures within the European or
the world context. It includes the study of literary movements across international frontiers, the study of
selected works or major genres, the study of selected works from African literature in relation to non-African
wo Works in languages other than English and French.
FRT. 6062:
CRITICAL APPRECIATION OF LITERARY TRANSLATION
This course involves a critical study of some literary works in translation. It may involve a critical appreciation
of novels, plays, poems published in either French or English but translated into either of the two languages. In
doing so, the students should see now far the translations of such works have succeeded in rendering the
original message in the target language.
FRT. 6072:
INDEPENDENT STUDY
This is to be done in areas related to the field of the students’ specialization. In this wise, a student may
independently pursue the study of a specific topic or area, or a specific author relevant to the field of study.
This study involves serious reading and research, including the completion of a high quality paper under the
direct supervision of an expert or a scholar in this field. Students must obtain departmental authorization before
they can enroll in the course.
DEPARTMENT OF LINGUISTICS AND COMMUNICATION STUDIES
HISTORY
The history of this department dates from 1975-76 session when what is now known, as the University of
Calabar was still a campus of the University of Nigeria, Nsukka. Even in 1975, when the University of
Calabar was statutorily established, the department was still called Department of Modern languages offering a
degree programme in French with German as subsidiary. In 1977, the Department was enlarged and renamed
the Department of Languages and Linguistics. Thus, Linguistics as a discipline was formerly introduced in the
University of Calabar.
PHILOSOPHY
The objective of the Department is to encourage the scientific and scholarly study and practical development of
indigenous languages for wider communication. It is also to introduce and apply modern linguistic theories,
emphasize the comparative and historical origins of indigenous languages.
Linguistics provides an understanding of the general principles of the structure of language; these principles are
not only applied to the study of particular languages but also to the various areas where language is put to use.
Such areas as Literature focuse on the appreciation of literary genres both oral and written to give insight into
the social role of language. In addition, linguistics provides translation of works from English and other
modern languages into indigenous languages.
In essence, linguistics provides the scientific background in language that can be applied for a scientific
analysis of any language. Furthermore, it is to carry out research into the study and development of indigenous
languages. The Department of linguistics encourages creative writing in indigenous language to portray,
transmit and conserve the rich cultural heritage of Nigeria.
CAREER PROSPECTS FOR GRADUATES OF THE DEPARTMENT
278
In the past, certain professions, limited in number, seem to have been prescribed by popular tradition as the
unenviable domain of graduates of Linguistics. Recent developments, however, have shown that career
prospects for graduates of our Department transcend, delightfully, all regular projections.
Consequently, many graduates of our Department have been and are still being employed in the banking sector
where not a small number of them, including the ladies, are in the managerial cadre. The aviation industry has
also engaged a good number of our ex-students. Many others are known to be making their marks in Mobil
Unlimited, Shell and in oil sector generally.
The business community and the industrial sectors can boast of a large number of graduates from our
Department. The media houses also are keenly interested in graduates of Linguistics. The civil service at the
Federal and State levels have employed an impressive number of graduates from our Department. Several of
them have been offered appointments after graduation to lecture in the Universities outside the Cross River
State. Even the Drug Agency employs graduates of Linguistics. And by no means the last, the Church and
Bible translation societies have found linguistic science very useful.
Generally, the teaching profession is the theatre where the career of most graduates of our Department
commences. But it is obvious that numerous opportunities exist for graduates of our Department outside the
classroom. The foreign service has remained an attraction for graduates of our Department, a dream that so
often has become a reality. And in the uniformed services, openings abound for our graduates. Career
prospects for graduates of Linguistics are indisputably bright.
ACADEMIC PROGRAMMES – UNDERGRADUATES
The Department offers undergraduates and Post graduate programmes in Linguistics.
B.A (HONS) LINGUISTICS
Introduction
The Linguistics Department aims primarily at preparing linguists who are well-equipped theoretically,
practically and professionally to be able to describe and analyse scientifically any language, including those of
which no linguistic work has yet been undertaken in a country with a multiplicity of languages, most of which
are unwritten for a linguist has a very important role to play. The Cross River State is a complex linguistic
environment with many languages some of which have never been studied. The University of Calabar is
sensitive to the needs of the area in which it is located. Therefore, the linguistic department focuses attention
on the indigenous languages within and outside Cross River State. The multiplicity of languages in the country
and the Cross River State in particular offers an excellent opportunity for comparative studies. The
Department, therefore, emphasizes comparative linguistics.
Aims and Objectives
i. To equip the student with a good knowledge of main principles of current theories and practice of
linguistics.
ii. To train them to be able to apply the knowledge and skill acquired to language related tasks and
problems, particularly in their own environment.
iii. To prepare them for further studies in the discipline and/or relevant careers in teaching, administration,
the media, speech and hearing, remediation, and social engineering.
Admission Requirement
JME candidates need to fulfill the regular university requirement of five credits including; English language at
O’ Level passes, Direct entry candidates must possess any of the following:
i.
Two NCE subjects with at least merit in Linguistics, any Nigerian or foreign language.
ii.
OR
University College Diploma or certificate in TEFL (Teaching of English as a Foreign Language).
iii.
OR
University College Diploma in Studies in any Nigerian Language.
UNDERGRADUATE COURSE OUTLINE
279
YEAR ONE
Compulsory LPT
Course Code
LIN1001
LIN1002
LIN1011
LIN1021
LIN1022
LIN1012
GSS1000
Course title
Introduction to Linguistics I
Introduction to Linguistics II
Introduction to General Phonetics I
Language of the World
History of Linguistics
Introduction to General Phonetics II
All First year General Studies Courses
Credit Hr
2-1
2-1
2-1
2-1
2-1
2-1
2-1
YEAR TWO
Compulsory
Course Code
LIN2001
LIN2041
LIN2021
LIN2022
LIN2051
LIN2061
LIN2062
GSS2000
Course title
Introduction to Phonology
The Phonetics of English and Nigerian Languages
Introduction to Morphology
Morphologies of African Languages
Phonemic Analysis
Writing Systems I Graphic Design
Writing system II/Orthographic Design
All First year General Studies Courses
Credit Hr
2-1
2-1
2-1
2-1
2-1
2-1
2-1
Required
An elective course of 3 credit units per semester chosen from any of the following: Education, Physics, Mathematics,
Biology, Computers and Philosophy.
YEAR THREE
Compulsory
Course Code
LIN 3031
LIN 3032
LIN 3051
LIN 3092
LIN 3055
LIN 3081
LIN 3071
LIN 3041
LIN 3061
LIN 3041
LIN 3042
Course title
Introduction to Syntax
Generative Syntax
Survey of Applied Linguistics
Field Methods and Research Methodology
Introduction to Sociolinguistics
Generative Phonology
Introduction to African Linguistics
Error/Contrastive Analysis
English in the Nigerian Setting
Structure of a language I Efik/Ibibio
Structure of a Language II Efik/Ibibio
Credit Hr
2-1
2-1
2-1
2-1
2-1
2-1
2-1
2-1
2-1
2-1
Elective:
An elective course of 3 credit units per semester must be chosen from any of the following departments, Education,
Physics, Mathematics, Biology, Computer Science and Philosophy.
YEAR FOUR
Compulsory
Course Code
LIN 4011
LIN 4012
LIN 4022
LIN 4031
LIN 4051
Course title
Topics in Phonology
Topics in Syntax
The Problems of a Multilingual Nation
Semantics
Historical/Comparative Linguistics
280
Credit Hr
2-1
2-1
2-1
2-1
2-1
LIN 4081
LIN 4032
LIN 4042
LIN 4092
LIN 4041
LIN 4090
Dialectology
Lexicography
Psycholinguistics
Projects/Long Essay
Linguistics & Literature
General Paper
2-1
2-1
2-1
2-1
2-1
2-1
COURSE DESCRIPTION
LIN. 1001:
INTRODUCTION TO LINGUISTICS I
This course seeks to explain what linguistics is about, its scope, its application, as well as to examine language,
its nature and relation to animal language, relationship to culture and structure.
LIN. 1002:
INTRODUCTION TO LINGUISTICS II
Pre-requisite: LIN 1002 is a continuation of LIN 1001. This course will familiarize the students with linguistic
concepts such as the phoneme, distinctive features, morpheme, etc and introduce them to linguistic
methodology and a formal description of language.
LIN. 1001:
INTRODUCTION TO GENERAL PHONETICS I
LIN 1001 and LIN 1002 are related. They provide a general introduction to Phonetics as part of linguistics,
LIN 1011 covers the nature of the speech-producing mechanism, articulatory phonetics, practice in the
recognition, reproduction and transcription of the speech sounds of languages (preferably African) they are
familiar with.
LIN. 1002:
INTRODUCTION TO GENERAL PHONETICS II
This course is a continuation of LIN 1001, which is a pre-requisite. LIN. 1012 includes introduction to acoustic
phonetics and study of the non-segmental features such as tone, stress and intonation, in addition, the students
will be expected to apply their acquired knowledge in a practical way through the study, analysis and
transcription of the speech sounds of languages (preferably African) they are familiar with.
LIN. 1021:
LANGUAGES OF THE WORLD
This is survey of the linguistic description of selected languages throughout the world. Such a survey should
emphasis outstanding and linguistically interesting features of each language.
LIN 1022:
HISTORY OF LINGUISTICS
This course provides knowledge of the historical development of linguistics as a scientific discipline from the
Greeks days to the recent. It focuses attention on the various schools and models and the outstanding names
who have helped to shape the discipline of linguistics. Attention should also be paid to the contribution of
linguistics to language study and institutions in Nigeria.
LIN 2011:
INTRODUCTION TO PHONOLOGY
This course is a general introduction to phonology in which the relationship between phonetics and phonology
in a structural frame work and the principles of phonology are discussed. It includes the basic tenets and
analysis based on the phonemic theory, the distinctive feature theory and generative phonology.
LIN 2041
THE PHONETICS OF ENGLISH AND NIGERIAN LANGUAGES
This is a more detailed phonetic description, classification and analysis of the sounds of the English language
in comparison with those of a selected number of Nigerian languages.
LIN 2021:
INTRODUCTION TO MORPHOLOGY
In this course, an introduction to morphology is given situation of the level in its relationship to phonology and
syntax within a structural framework. The course also examines the identification of morphenmes, their
classification (e.g. root or affix, or inflection or derivation) and morphological typology (e.g. isolating,
agglutinative and fissional languages).
LIN 2022:
MORPHOLOGIES OF AFRICAN LANGUAGES
Pre-requisite; LIN 2021, LIN 2022 is an application of the knowledge in LIN 2021 to the analysis of the
morphologies of selected African Languages (e.g. Bantu).
281
LIN 2042:
PHONEMIC ANALYSIS
This course examines the different views of the phoneme and applications of these to language data analysis.
LIN 2031:
WRITING SYSTEMS: THE GRAPHIC REPRESENTATION
The aim of this course is to introduce the student to the relation between language and writing and to situate
this in the context of the needs of a developing technological and literate society. This will be done by
examining a variety of topics including relationship between spoken and written language, and examination of
different types of writing systems, the functions of writing and the relation between language and literacy.
LIN 2032:
ORTHOGRAPHIC DESIGN
A practical course focusing on the role of linguistics in designing an orthography for an unwritten language.
Students will get a practical (or an unwritten language) based principally on the framework of the
Orthographies of Nigerian Languages: published by the National Language Centre, Lagos.
LIN 3031:
INTRODUCTION TO SYNTAX
This course is an introduction to the analysis of the sentence (as a unit of linguistic description) into parts and
the grammatical description of these parts. It is a practical oriented course in which the students are exposed to
the skills, techniques and formalism in syntactic descriptions and analysis.
LIN 3032:
GENERAL SYNTAX
Pre-requisite LIN 3031. this is an introduction to the history and practice of the generative transformation
model with emphasis on the explanation of the basic assumptions and concepts postulated in model (e.g deep
and surface structures, based and transformational rules, the lexicon practical applications of these concepts
and assumptions in the analysis of phonological, morphological and syntactic data.
LIN 3051:
SURVEY OF APPLIED LINGUISTICS
This is a survey course on how, where and when general linguistics can be applied both for practical uses and
to non-linguistic fields. Such uses include language teaching and language testing, language standardization,
planning and development, the creation of orthographic and compilation of dictionaries.
LIN 3052:
ERROR/CONTRASTIVE ANALYSIS
Introduction to the principles, goals and practice of contrastive analysis. This is applicable to the study of the
English language and indigenous languages in order to establish the contrast.
LIN 3055:
INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLINGUISTICS
This course provides an introduction to the history, methodology, basic concepts and applications of sociolinguistics. It considers the relationship between language and society, focusing attention on attitudes towards
language, varieties and social dialects, and the problems of multigualism. It includes discussion on the
importance of language in relation to development.
LIN 3071:
INTRODUCTION TO AFRICAN LINGUISTICS
This course examines the findings of various works on African languages with special reference to information
on structural characteristics of the phonological and grammatical (e.g. toneme and Bantu-type noun)
classification.
LIN 3081:
GENERATIVE PHONOLOGY
This is an introduction to the principles of generative phonology and the theory of distinctive features.
Emphasis is on the treatment of phonological processes and rules within the generative framework including
topological processes and rules.
LIN 3092:
FIELD METHODS AND INTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH
METHODOLOGY
This course and LIN 4092 are complementary. In LIN 3092 the student is taught how best to approach the
gathering of data and the writing up of a grammar of a language totally new to him. The problems which are
both practically and theoretically connected with field work are discussed. Simple elicitations from different
282
information are undertaken and the students’ methods critically analysed. Students are also introduced to
research methods and project design.
LIN 4011:
TOPICS IN PHONOLOGY
This course examines selected topics of relevance or currency such as tone, stress, vowel harmony, rules
ordering, autosegmental phonology etc.
LIN 4012:
TOPICS IN SYNTAX
This course examines the syntactic treatment of topics of relevance and currency. Recommended for inclusion
are pronominalization, complement structures, case marking, thematic, roles, negation, grammatical categories
(e.g. tense, aspect, etc) ‘theta’ marking etc.
LIN 4022:
THE PROBLEMS OF MULTILINGUAL NATIONS
In a multilingual nation such as Nigeria, there are variety of linguistic issues which have social, cultural and
even political implications.
This include the problems of national languages, official orthographies languages to be taught in schools and
the general problems of language policy and language planning. These problems are identified, studied and
alnaysed in the course.
LIN 4031:
SEMANTICS
The course introduces the students to the linguistic study of semantics, situating it within the general
framework of the linguistic structure of language.
LIN 4032:
LEXICOGRAPHY/LEXICOLOGY
This course provides a general introduction to words and dictionary making, writing of unwritten languages,
phonetic transcription entries, definitions, frequency and rank cross references, lexical and semantic fields and
types of classification and presentation (mono-bi-and multilingual glossaries and dictionaries encyclopedia,
specialized glossaries, frequency dictionaries etc.)
LIN 4041:
LINGUISTICS AND LITERATURE
This course deals with the analysis of socio-politico-cultural events in society through the use of language.
LIN 4042:
PSYCHOLINGUISTICS
This course presents the psycholinguist’s account of language and the relationship between language and mind.
Topics covered include language acquisition and language learning, language thinking and cognition language
and the brain, language localization, linguistics performance and behaviour, prediction and comprehension and
language impairment etc.
LIN 4051:
HISTORICAL/COMPARATIVE LINGUISTICS
This course provides a general introduction to the subject of language classification, touching upon such
matters as language change, reconstruction, classification and different methods in use. These are applied in
the classification of selected African languages.
LIN 4090:
GENERAL PAPER
Students are required to have a broad-based knowledge of all the courses offered in the final year.
LIN 4092:
PROJECT/LONG ESSAY
The student’s maturity in linguistics should be reflected in this course. Under the direction and supervision of
a lecturer, the student is expected to choose a research area of his/her interest within which a specific topic will
be decided upon with the assistance of the supervisor. The finished project must be presented in a
departmentally approved format, and defended before the Department Board, with the external examiner as
Chairman.
ACADEMIC PROGRAMME: POST GRADUATE COURSES – LINGUISTICS
Introduction
283
The Department offers courses of study and research leading to the award of the M.A. and Ph.D degrees with
specialization in various branches of Linguistics Programme objectives emphasize training of graduates to
teach and conduct scholarly research in a chosen area of specialization at the University and comparable levels.
Specific Requirements:
Candidates with deficiencies in their chosen area of specialization will be required to make up for their
deficiencies in accordance with their supervisor’s advice and recommendation to the Department Graduate
Committee.
M.A. Degree:
With the recommendation of the major supervisor and the approval of the Departmental Board of Graduate
studies, some relevant graduate courses may be taken from other Department as part of the required course
programme for the M.A. degree.
Ph.D Degree.
I)
Ph.D candidates must include in their course work at least two graduate seminars (6 credits).
II)
On completion of course work for the Ph.D. candidates must sit and pass Ph.D comprehensive
examinations consisting of a written part and an oral part. This examination will comprise four
specific areas in accordance with the chosen field of specialization. These examination areas will be
chosen from the following list:
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.
vii.
Phonology Phonetics
Allied Linguistics
Syntax
Semantics
Socio-Linguistics
Historical Linguistics
Psycho-Linguistics
Objectives
The department offers courses of study and research leading to the award of M.A and Ph.D degrees
with specialization in various branches of Linguistics. The Programme objectives emphasize training of
graduates to teach and conduct scholarly research in a chosen area of specialization at the University and
comparable levels.
M.A Programme
Course Code
LIN 5001
LIN 5011
LIN 5005
LIN 5002
LIN 5062
LIN 071
LIN 5091
LIN 5002
LIN 5011
LIN 5102
LIN 5142
LIN 5911/5931
LIN 5962
LIN 5090
Ph.D Programme
Course Code
LIN 6001
LIN 6011
Course title
Research Methods
Phonological Theories
Psycholinguistics
Advanced Syntax
Sociolinguistics
Semantics
African Linguistics
Linguistics and Logic
Philosophy and Language
Comparative Historical Linguistics
Advances in Applied Linguistics
Seminar in Linguistics
Independent study
M. A. Thesis
Course title
Research Methods
Phonological Theories
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Credit Hr
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Credit Hr
3
3
LIN 6005
LIN 6002
LIN 6062
LIN 6071
LIN 6091
LIN 6002
LIN 6011
LIN 6102
LIN 6142
LIN 6911/6931
LIN 6962
LIN 6090
Psycholinguistics
Advanced Syntax
Sociolinguistics
Semantics
African Linguistics
Linguistics and Logic
Philosophy and Language
Comparative Historical Linguistics
Advances in Applied Linguistics
Seminar in Linguistics
Independent study
M. A. Thesis
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
DEPARTMENT OF PHILOSOPHY
Historical Background
The department took off during the 1975/76 academic session when the University of Calabar became an
autonomous institution, under a dual administrative arrangement with Religious Studies.
Philosophy and Objectives
The aim of the curriculum is to acquaint the student with the main contents of the history of ideas in the area of
Philosophy. Particular emphasis is placed on the bearing this history has on the development of ideas within
the African context. It is hoped that through this study students would be enabled to mature and develop their
capacity for critical judgment on issues that deserve individual and collective assessment and come up with
solutions that would add to the advancement of knowledge and overall societal progress.
The Department of Philosophy thus offers courses designed to help the students develop his own capacity to
reflect intelligently on questions of fundamental and lasting significance by focusing on the ideas of some of
the world’s philosophers as well as an empirical understanding of his own society. Students are trained to
appreciate African values, philosophies and world-view, with a view to encourage self-esteem, patriotism and
national consciousness. Students are groomed in critical thinking, tools of logic and argumentation as a
springboard for human, social and cultural development.
In essence, the underlisted are the objectives of the curriculum.
(i)
To train students to understand the basic issues of human existence and to understand that the purpose
of learning is to be molded into sound moral human beings.
(ii)
To train students how to use the tolls of logic, argumentation to avoid fallacies and errors which often
undermine our aspiration to grow as a nation both in the religious, economic, political and social life.
(iii) The students will be trained to appreciate African values, Philosophies and ways of doing things with
a view to upholding the identity of the African people.
(iv) To imbue in students the spirit of self-reliance and creativity, pragmatism, analytic mind, constructive
criticalness, purposefulness, integrity, resourcefulness, self-confidence, decisiveness, proactiveness,
God fearingness, vision, resilience, productiveness and high moral quality.
(v)
To train students who are knowledgably enough to handle academic issues and to analyze critical
human situations that may confront them in their personal life or in the work place.]
(vi) To produce well-rounded-off individuals who will show evidence of evaluation in character and
learning.
(vii) To train students who will come better equipped to teach both at the secondary and tertiary levels of
our educational system.
(viii) To train students who are imbued with sufficient patriotism to provide leadership at different
leadership levels.
(ix) To educate students on the need to be broadminded, global in perspective and at home with current
developments in global trends in computer and information technologies now in vogue
(x)
To train students who seek the truth, establish and disseminate the truth.
(xi) To stress and inculcate the need for entrepreneurial skills in our students. This will make for creativity
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and self reliance.
We bear the old Platonic adage in mind, which says that until philosophers becomes kings or kings be made to
imbibe the values which philosophy imbue, there will be no peace for civil society. We train for impact in all
areas of human endeavour.
Admission:
1. Candidates with five ‘O’ level credits in WAEC or NECO are admitted through UME to a four year
degree programme.
2. Candidates with diploma in philosophy, religion or theology are admitted through direct entry into a three
year degree programme.
3. All candidates must sit and pass Post UME Aptitude Test as a pre-condition for admission.
Departmental Journal
The Department publishes SOPHIA: AN AFRICAN JOURNAL OF PHILOSOPHY AND PUBLIC AFFAIRS
with the ISSN 1119 443X. The journal is published twice a year April and September and articles published are
indexed/abstracted in African Journal Online (AJOL). The journal welcomes articles in any branch of
philosophy and related disciplines, with special interest in articles which encourage philosophizing within the
African context.
CURRICULUM ANALYSIS
YEAR ONE
Course
Code
PHL1001
PHL1021
PHL1031
GSS1101
GSS1121
GSS1131
FIRST SEMESTER
Course title
Introduction to
Philosophy
Introduction to Logic
Introduction to Philosophy
Introduction to logic
Basic Methods of
Philosophical Analysis
Use of English
One elective
Total credit hours
Credit
Hr
3
Course
Code
PHL1012
3
3
3
3
PHL1022
PHL1032
GSS1102
GSS1122
3
3
21
GSS1132
SECOND SEMESTER
Course title
Credit Hr
Introduction to Philosophy 11
3
Introduction to Logic 11
Philosophy of Culture
Use of English
History and Philosophy of
Science
Citizenship Education
One elective
Total credit hours
3
3
3
3
3
3
21
YEAR TWO
Course
Code
PHL2011
FIRST SEMESTER
Course title
Credit
Hr
3
Course
Code
PHL2012
3
3
PHL2022
PHL2032
PHL2021
PHL2031
History of Ancient
Philosophy
Symbolic Logic
Ethics
PHL2041
Epistemology I
3
PHL2042
PHL2051
PHL2061
Research Methodology
Metaphysics
3
3
PHL2052
PHL2062
One Elective
3
PHL2072
PHL2082
Total credit hours
21
SECOND SEMESTER
Course title
History of Medieval
Philosophy
Symbolic Logic II
Philosophy of Language
(optional)
Leadership Philosophies and
Decision theories
Philosophy and Gender Issues
Philosophy of Religion
(optional)
Philosophy of Environment
Philosophy of History
(optional)
One Elective
Total credit hours
YEAR THREE
FIRST SEMESTER
SECOND SEMESTER
286
Credit Hr
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
21
Course
Code
PHL3011
PHL3021
PHL3031
PHL3041
PHL3051
PHL3061
PHL3071
Course title
History of Modern
Philosophy
African Philosophy and
Values
Basic Notions of Science
Social and Political
Philosophy
Professional Ethics
Epistemology II
Philosophy of Economics
& Social Development
Credit
Hr
3
Course
Code
PHL3012
3
PHL3022
3
3
PHL3032
PHL3042
3
3
3
PHL3052
PHL3062
PHL3072
PHL3082
PHL3092
Total credit hours
21
Course title
Credit Hr
History of Modern Philosophy
3
African Philosophy and
Values 11
Philosophy of Science
Social and Political
Philosophy
Philosophy of Medicine
Aesthetics
Philosophy of Law (optional)
3
Philosophy of Peace and
Conflict Resolution (Optional)
Sociobiology (optional)
Total credit hours
3
3
21
SECOND SEMESTER
Course title
Credit Hr
3
3
3
3
3
YEAR FOUR
Course
Code
PHL4011
PHL4021
PHL4031
PHL4041
PHL4051
PHL4061
PHL4071
PHL4081
PHL4091
PHL4000
FIRST SEMESTER
Course title
Credit
Hr
3
Course
Code
PHL4012
3
3
3
PHL4022
PHL4032
PHL4042
Analysis of Selected Texts
(Optional)
Philosophy of the Social
Sciences (Optional)
Philosophy of Law
3
Philosophy of Education
Marxist Philosophy
(Optional)
Long Essay
Total credit hours
Kant and 19th Century
Philosophers
Philosophy of Mathematics
Islamic Philosophy
Oriental Philosophy
3
PHL4062
Phenomenology and
Existentialism
Comparative Philosophy
Christian Philosophy
Contemporary Analytic
Philosophy
Post Modernism (Optional)
3
PHL4072
Hermeneutics (Optional)
3
3
PHL4082
3
3
3
PHL4000
History & Philosophy of
Technology
Long Essay
Total credit hours
21
3
21
3
3
3
3
3
COURSE DESCRIPTION (Year One)
PHL 1011:
INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY
A general introduction and definition of philosophy, the nature of philosophical problems and concept,
language. Style and method of philosophy. A brief survey of the relationship between philosophy and other
fields of study such as science, social science and other humanities. A brief survey of the history of philosophy.
PHL 1021:
INTRODUCTION TO LOGIC
A general introduction of the definition, nature, purpose and importance of logic. A study of the key logical
concepts, laws of thought, the nature of arguments, fallacies, nature of propositions definitions, types of logic
(deductive and inductive, predicate and propositional).
Logical contrasts, truth tables and translation from natural language to formal language, etc.
PHL 1031:
BASIC METHODS OF PHILOSOPICAL ANALYSIS
Different methods of philosophical analysis will be examined namely, Socratic, deductive analysis, existential,
phenomenological, Linguistic, etc. Emphasis also will be on how to identify philosophical problems and how
to tackle them. It will include the application of the methods studied in the first Semester for analyzing
philosophic texts and problems
Electives
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One Elective from the Humanities, Social Sciences, Education and Law.
General Studies Requirement:
 Use of English
 Philosophy and Logic
 Citizenship Education
This gives our first years a total of Eight Courses
PHL 1012:
INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY II
This course continues with exposing the students to the nature of philosophical problems and the outline of the
history of philosophy. It examines in fuller details the problems of being, substance, existence and essence,
universals and particulars, unity and diversity, causality, body and mind, freedom and determinism, etc. Major
Philosophical Schools like Idealism, Realism, Materialism, Phenomenalism, Marxism, etc, will be studied.
Philosophical issues like abstraction, knowledge by acquaintance and description, nature of truth, and positions
like objectivism, absolutism, subjectivism, relativism, etc, will also be examined, etc.
PHL 1022:
INTRODUCTION TO LOGIC II
The study and exercises on truth tables will continue. Conditional and direct proof, proving tautologies and
invalidity will be taught. This will include standard form, the square of opposition, distribution, etc,
syllogisms, types and application in ordinary reasoning.
PHL 1032:
PHILOSOPHY OF CULTURE
This course introduces the students to the subject matter of culture and the concepts that arise from it. It is a
philosophical examination of the nature of culture and how best to philosophically understand cultures.
Approaches to the study of African cultures are examined with reference to such scholars as Bassey Andah and
Cheikh Anta Diop. It also examines the question of whether cross cultural communication is possible.
Electives
In addition the Student will take one elective from the Humanities, Social Sciences, Education and Law.
General Studies Requirements:
(i)
Use of English
(ii)
History and Philosophy of Science
Year Two
PHL 2011:
HISTORY OF ANCIENT PHILOSOPHY
This covers the beginnings of Western Philosophy with a background to the pre-philosophical thought
(writings) of the poets, such as Homer and Hesiod; then, to the transition to the philosophical thoughts of the
ancient philosophers, namely, Thales, Anaximander and Anaximenes. This will span through Presocratic,
Platonic, Aristotelian to post Aristotelian periods. Special attention will be paid to their cosmology,
epistemology and ethical theories.
PHL 2021:
SYMBOLIC LOGIC I
The propositional Calculus: This course will be concerned with the nature of prepositions, truth tables and
other decision procedures, translation from a natural to a formal language and deductive proofs in both
propositional and predicate logic. The purpose of the course is to give students a good working knowledge of
formal logic.
PHL 2031:
ETHICS
A general introduction into the nature, branches and scope of ethics will be considered. Examination of basic
ethical concepts will be carried out. There will be a distinction between normative, descriptive and meta
ethics. A critical analysis of classical and modern ethical theories such as deontologism, teleologism,
utilitarism, intuitionism, emotivism, prescriptivism, descriptivism, situation ethics, and Marxist ethics.
Attention will also be focused on classical ethical theories like Platonism, Aristotelianism, Hedonism,
Cyncism, Skepticism, Christian Ethics. We shall also study conceptual problems in Ethics, namely, the concept
of good and evil, rightness and wrongness of actions, obligation and duty. We shall consider some moral
philosophers such as Immanuel Kant, Hegel, Hume, Nietzsche, Kierkegaard, G. E. Moore, J. S. Mill, etc, the
good life – Socrates as a test case.
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PHL 2041:
EPISTEMOLOGY 1
The aim of this course is to introduce students to the fundamentals of Epistemology. It will include an
examination of the definition of Epistemology, knowledge and cognition. It shall also deal with the
epistemological theories from the ancient Greek era to modern epistemology (Descartes, Locke, Berkeley,
Hume and Kant). The nature of knowledge will be discussed. Other topics will include knowledge as justified –
True – Belief, error and probable opinion, Memory, Judgment, knowing and believing. The empiricist and the
rationalist theories of knowledge will be examined.
PHL 2051:
RESEARCH METHODOLOGY
Students shall be introduced to the importance of research. Also the concept of methodology will be exposed.
The Research methodology used in the Arts, Humanities and the social sciences will be taught. Students are
taught how to make use of different methods used in philosophy. The analytical, logical, synthetical,
pragmatic, existential, experiential, methods will be examined the systematic and proper documentation of
research materials used the procedure for proper adoption of the MLA will also be taught.
PHL 2061:
METAPHYSICS
This course focuses on the definitions of metaphysics and on the different areas of metaphysics. It also touches
on the nature and scope of metaphysics. Metaphysics and ontological cosmology, rational psychology are
examined.Problems and theories of being, appearance and reality, universals and particulars, form and matter,
space and time causality, induction and the uniformity of nature, mind-body problem, freewill and
determinism, etc. shall be considered.
PHL 2012:
HISTORY OF MEDIEVAL PHILOSOOPHY
This course is tailored to acquaint the students with the historical development of philosophical thought during
the Medieval period. We shall see the relationship between philosophy and theology. Thereafter, we shall see
the influence of the Christian faith on the philosophical thought patterns of the philosophers of this period. We
shall examine the philosophers of St. Augustine’s William of Ockham, St. Thomas Aquinas, St. Anselm,
Bonaventure, Don Scotus, Boethius, etc.
PHL 2022:
SYMBOLIC LOGIC II
Studies in predicate calculus continue. We shall advance to quantificational logic, Quantifiers, Relations and
Multiple Quantification, set theory, theory of deductive system, synthetic system, semantic concepts, Concepts
of consistency, proofs of consistency, proof of decidability, etc.
PHL 2032:
PHILOSOPHY OF LANGUAGE (Optional)
This course aims at acquainting students with the subject matter of philosophy of language. Questions such as
what is the philosophy of language? What necessitated it and what is the value as a course in philosophy will
be handled. We shall also consider the problems of the philosophy of language, the problem of meaning,
theories of meaning, theories of reference, dimensions of meaning, empirical criteria of meaning fullness and
meaninglessness language and reality, the rules of language, logical positivism, logical atomism, language
games, verificationism.
PHL 2042:
LEADERSHIP PHILOSOPHIES & DECISION THEORIES
This course focuses on the nature of leadership, types of leadership, goals of leadership, ancient, modern and
contemporary theories of leadership, and the problem of leadership in contemporary Africa. Emphasis will not
only be on political leadership but leadership even at the domestic and corporate level. The goal of this course
is to present a philosophic critique of leadership theories and to show the path for authentic leadership in
various levels of our society. A critical examination of decision theories and strategic planning in the politics
and economics of the new global order will be undertaken.
PHL 2052:
PHILOSOPHY AND GENDER ISSUES
This is a relatively new area in philosophy. Its focus shall be on issues bordering on gender and human rights.
Issues such as the justification for women empowerment, the role of women in the family and society, the need
for greater education of women, human rights question, gender sensitivity. The issue of complementarity in
gender discourse, right of mothers to abortion, rights of women to vote and be voted for, feminism and the
environment, equality, justice, fairness as it relates to gender discourse, the new world order and gender, will
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be examined in the course.
PHL 2062:
PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION (Optional)
This course will focus on the philosophical interpretation of religion with particular reference to Christianity,
Judaism, Islam, Hinduism, Jainism, Buddhism, African traditional religion. It will define what philosophy of
religion is, its nature and scope. It will acquaint students with the philosophical analysis of concepts such as
God, proof of the existence of God, religious or mystical experience, the problem of evil, meaning and
significance of religious language. The relationship between religion and morality will be examined. The
analyses of issues like miracles, immorality of the soul will be carried out.
PHL 2072:
PHILOSOPHY OF ENVIRONMENT
One of the central philosophical themes of the 20th century is environmental philosophy. One of its founders is
Arne Naess, a Norwegian who has called it “ecophilosophy” or “ecosophy”. This course will focus on
philosophical reason for environment. Questions to be addressed in this course will include. Is man the only
being to be considered in existence? Are other animals rational? Do they have a right to existence? Other topics
to be examined in the course include: Philosophical defence of wildlife, the preservation of the flora and fauna
of our environment, Environmental pollution, Gas flaring, water pollution, etc., Resource control and
philosophical implications.
PHL 2082:
PHILOSOPHY OF HISTORY (Optional)
This course is tailored to acquaint students with the methodology and scope of philosophy of History such
questions as; can history be studied philosophically? will be considered. Is there a law which provides a handle
for the interpretation of history? Does the past bear any semblance to the present and the future? An
examination of some theories of historical progress will be considered. (e.g. we have Vico, the French
enlightenment philosophers, Herder, Hegel, Marx, Spengler, Toynbee, etc). We shall consider philosophical
problems which arise in the course of historical explanation. Can history be studied scientifically?
In addition to the courses listed above, the student is expected to take one elective from either the Humanities,
Social Sciences, Education or Law.
Year Three
PHL 3011:
HISTORY OF MODERN PHILOSOPHY (RATIONALISM)
This course will be concerned with the general characteristics of rationalism as a philosophical school. The
major exponents of this school, namely, Descartes, Spinoza and Leibniz will be examined. This study will be
prefaced by the study of Francis Bacon for his position is igniting a renewed scientific spirit of that period.
PHL 3021:
AFRICAN PHILOSOPHY AND VALUES I
The student will be acquainted with the problem of definition and existence of African philosophy. Is there an
African philosophy? If there, is what is it? The students will be introduced to the progress made in African
philosophy through the works of African philosophers such as Nkrumah, Nyerere, Fanon, Azikiwe, Awolowo,
Senghor, Bodurin, Wiredu, Oruka, Hountondji, and others.
PHL 3031:
BASIC NOTIONS OF SCIENCE
Here, we shall focus on the core notions of science, the methods and laws of the sciences and the fundamental
concepts and principles of physics and chemistry. Students should also be acquainted with the nature of
scientific explanation, the problem of induction, relationship between explanation and prediction, observation
and theory, the role of hypothesis, experiment, theory, law, models, analogues, ontological status of theoretical
entities. We shall also focus on the relationship between scientific knowledge and other spheres of human
experience.
PHL 3041:
SOCIAL AND POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY I
This course will involve analyses of political ideas such as justice and equality, freedom and responsibility,
authority and political obligation, civil disobedience and resolution, state and nation, and a consideration of the
concept of ideology with reference to such ideologies as socialism communism capitalism. The political ideas
of Plato, Aristotle, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Hegel, Bentham, J. S. Mill, Engels, Marx, Lenin, Gandhi,
Popper, Claude Ake and others will be considered.
PHL 3051:
PROFESSIONAL ETHICS
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This course will focus on the application of some fundamental theories in ethics to the various professions
which present moral/ethical problem to their practitioners and clients. It is a practical oriented course which
focuses on medical, business, legal, engineering ethics and so on. Allocation of medical resources, moral
foundation of the medical profession, Research involving Human subjects, its morality, hazards and prospects
(scientific freedom and its limit). All the above will be examined.
PHL 3061:
EPISTEMOLOGY II
Here, we shall consider more rigorously Kantian epistemology, the place of skepticism in Epistemology,
Foundationalism and non-foundationalism, Coherentism, the Gettier problem, justification of knowledge
claims, Naturalized and Humanized epistemology, Postmodernism and Epistemology, a critique of traditional
western epistemological concepts and the quest for alternative epistemologies.
PHL 3071:
PHILOSOPHY OF ECONOMICS AND SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT
(Optional)
A study of the subject matter of Economics, economic theories and social development. An evaluation of the
role of philosophy in the development of human society. A study of the concept of economic development,
development theories and their consequence on the African continent and global politics. Major economic and
political thinkers will also be studied. The role of economic institutions like IMF, World Bank, WTO, in the
creation of value in Africa and the developing nations.
PHL 3012:
HISTORY OF MODERN PHILOSOPHY (EMPIRICISM)
We shall acquaint students with the basic contents of the ideas of the British empiricist philosophers. We shall
consider the meaning of Idea, theories of Perception, Knowledge, Impression, etc. There will be a systematic
comparison of their philosophies. These philosophers include John Locke, George Berkeley, and David Hume.
We shall see Kant’s attempt at a synthesis of rationalism and empiricism.
PHL 3022:
AFRICAN PHILOSOPHY AND VALUES II
We shall make further progress by examining the history of African philosophy, the controversies concerning
the Greek origin of Philosophy and the question of African philosophy; the problems of the stolen legacy (see
Anta Diop, Onyewuenyi, Bassey Andah, and others). We shall consider in detail the many works that are on
African philosophy. Examination of concepts of philosophical interest will be carried out with the African
mind set, e.g. Ujamaa, communalism, immorality, Body-mind problem, personhood, African identity, etc.,
ways of making African philosophy relevant will be further explored.
PHL 3032:
PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE
We shall examine what the philosophy of science is all about. This will include a critical assessment of the
scientific method. We shall examine the place of objectivity in science. How does science grow cumulatively
or non-cumulatively? The idea of paradigms, normal science, revolutionary science will be examined. We shall
examine the views of philosophers of science, such as, Thomas Kuhn, Karl Popper, Paul Feyerabend, Imre
Lakatos, W. V. O. Quine, Hilary Putnam and others. In what ways does the philosopher contribute to the
growth of science? Fundamental issues in the philosophy of Physics and the Philosophy of Biology will be
examined, e.g. Bio-politics.
PHL 3042:
SOCIAL AND POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY II
This course will continue with a consideration of the subject matter of social and political philosophy. It will
evaluate the role of philosophy in the development of human society and its place in the system of social
phenomena. We shall examine the paradox involved in the theory of democracy, the doctrine of justice as
fairness, the concepts of liberty, equality, social responsibility, social determination and totalitarianism will be
discussed. Comparative studies of Capitalism, Socialism and Communism will be carried out. Contemporary
concerns like globalization, terrorism, resource control and minority rights will be studied.
PHL 3052:
PHILOSOPHY OF MEDICINE
An in-depth understanding of the field of medicine and its relationship with philosophy. The role of logic in
medicine, will also be examined. A metaphysical understanding of life, disease and death, holistic and African
perspectives on the human person as against western perspectives on the person, Health from both the
perspective of the patient and that of the physician, the role of the physician, the issue of confidentiality, lying
and medical practice, the moral issue surrounding some contemporary medical practice such as cloning and
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artificial insemination, contemporary issues that have bearing on man, his health, his environment will be
explored and examined.
PHL 3062:
AESTHETICS
A consideration of philosophical problems arising from the expression of art, arts representation, emotive
expression, symbols. The role of intention, metaphor and analogy. Functionalist accounts of art and values.
This course shall also ask such questions as: What is Aesthetics? Its brief history, what is a work of Art?
Furthermore, the course will examine aesthetic description and evaluation, the possibility of a methodology of
criticism, and the role of intention and the nature of metaphor and analogy.
PHL 3082:
PHILOSOPHY OF PEACE AND CONFLICTRESOLUTION (Optional)
A Philosophical study of war and peace. Theories of conflicts and conflict resolution are critically examined.
Perspectives ranging from metaphysical, ethical, historical, etc, are also considered. This course shall also
examine Islamic, Christian and other cultural perspectives. And the positions of Marx, Marcuse, Gandhi,
Luther King, Thoreau, Fanon, Malcolm X, etc., shall also be considered.
There will also be a philosophical understanding of human nature, the dynamics of society and the
preconditions for peace.
PHL 3092:
SOCIOBIOLOGY (Optional)
This course will introduce the students to the fundamental issues in the Sociobiology debate, theories of human
nature, biological determinism, the genetics of sociobiology, sociobiology versus biosociology, genetic
engineering and biological reductionism, etc.
Year Four
PHL 4011:
KANT AND 19TH CENTURY PHILOSOPHERS
Kant’s philosophy shall be carefully studied. Deliberate attempts must be made to enable the student
understand the fundamental outline of Kant’s philosophy and the structure of the three Critiques. The line
connecting Kant to the philosophical developments in the 19th century should be drawn (the transcendental
pretence). Other philosophers such as J. S. Mill, Schopenhauer, Hegel, Kierkegaard, Nietzsche will be studied.
Critical questions on their epistemology, metaphysics and ethics shall be considered.
PHL 4021:
PHILOSOPHY OF MATHEMATICS
The nature of philosophy of mathematics will be considered. Issues bordering on intuitionism, logicism,
formalism will be discussed. The nature and characterization of mathematical concepts will be examined. The
relation between logic and mathematics, the nature of mathematics and its relation to concepts of necessity,
analyticity and certainty and the place of mathematics in human knowledge will be examined.
PHL 4031:
ISLAMIC PHILOSOPHY
This course will examine the philosophies of outstanding Islamic philosophers, such as, Avicenna, Ibn
Khaldun, etc. The basic tenets of Islam are examined and put through the philosophical crucible of analysis and
criticism. The way of life enjoined by Islam, its moral foundations and metaphysics are considered in the light
of alternative worldviews.
PHL 4041:
ORIENTAL PHILOSOPHY
This course surveys oriental philosophical traditions and concepts. Important issues in Japanese, Korean,
Chinese, Indian and other eastern philosophies are studied. This course therefore covers issues in Hinduism,
Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, Shintoism, and so forth.
PHL 4051:
ANALYSIS OF SELECTED TEXTS (Optional)
This course involves the analytical study of selected philosophical classics. Students will be supervised to
ensure that they read the original work themselves.
PHL 4061:
PHILOSOPHY OF THE SOCIAL SCIENCES (Optional)
This course is concerned with examining the character of the courses in the social science. It asks the question:
can the social sciences be truly scientific? It looks at the place of value in social research. It examines the
concepts of explanation, laws, theories, causality, prediction in physical science and the applicability of these
to the understanding of social life, the relation between theory and social science. The holistic, individualistic,
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structuralist and functionalist approaches to the study of the social sciences will be examined, other concepts
include, rationality, alienation, false consciousness, anomies deviance.
PHL.4071:
PHILOSOPHY OF LAW
Students are to be acquainted with the basic issues in Law e.g. The Concept of law, law and other social
concepts (eg. morality, justice, etc), schools of law, legal reasoning, justification of punishment, judicial
precedent, etc.
PHL 4081:
PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION
In this course, the relationship between philosophy and education will be examined. The course undertakes to
elucidate basic concepts in education from a philosophical perspective. Different theories of education such as
realist, idealist, pragmatist, existentialist theories will be considered. Students will be exposed to philosophical
debate on how to fashion a fruitful philosophy of education for Nigeria. Themes such as, education for national
development will be considered.
PHL 4091:
MARXIST PHILOSOPHY (Optional)
In this course, students will be exposed to the historical development of Marxism both as a system of thought
and as an ideology. It will consider matter as a philosophical category leading to the theory of dialectical
materialism. We shall also consider the basic precepts and laws of dialects. The unity and struggle of
opposite, quantitative and qualitative changes, the rogation of rogation. We shall consider the materialist theory
of knowledge practice as the criterion of materialist truth. The Marxist conception of science, society, religion
and politics in general will be discussed.
PHL 4000:
LONG ESSAY
All students in the graduating class will be required to write a long essay of about 30 to 40 quarto pages on any
topic approved by the Department. This long essay will be defended before the Departmental board before a
final grade is awarded. Or the Department will organize the defence on the basis of 1st and 2nd readers before
whom the candidate must orally defend his long essay.
PHL 4012:
PHENOMENOLOGY AND EXISTENTIALISM
This course shall acquaint students with the development and nature of phenomenology as a method and as a
philosophy of arriving at the essence of reality. Edmund Husser is the chief proponent of this philosophy.
Issues such as descriptive phenomenology and transcendental phenomenology will be examined. Prevalent
phenomenological terms such as eidetic reduction, phenomenological epoch, and intentionality will be
considered. The phenomenological existentialism of Martin Heidegger will be thoroughly examined. His sein
desein, facticity, existentiality, fallenness, etc, will be examined. Other existentialist. Philosophers such as Jean
Paul Sartre, Albert Camus, Merleau Ponty, Gabriel Marcel, Karl Jaspers, Martin Buber will be considered.
PHL 4022:
COMPARATIVE PHILOSOPHY
This course examines and compares concepts in the African, Western and Oriental traditions. The concepts can
be derived from language, literature, philosophy and the norms of the three traditions. Such concepts as Soul,
Mind, death, knowledge, truth, belief, liberty, equality, etc., can be studied.
PHL 4032:
CHRISTIAN PHILOSOPHY
This course covers the philosophical study of the Christian religion. It examines the metaphysical,
epistemological, aesthetic, political, ethical aspects of the religion, and so forth. Christian concepts like
salvation, predestination, trinity, incarnation, baptism and ressurrection will also be examined. Issues like
union and communion, salvation history, feminist perspectives and socio-political liberation will also be
considered.
PHL 4042:
CONTEMPORARY ANALYTIC PHILOSOPHY
We shall in this course consider the development of analytic philosophic tradition after the collapse of the
Absolute idealism of Hegel and the Neo-Hegelians, such as, Bradley and McTaggart (the metaphysical angle).
We shall also consider the developments in mathematical logic in which Frege, Russell and Whitehead play
important roles. The new analytic vision for philosophy through W.V.O Quine, Logical positivism, logical
atomism, Wittgenstein’s Tractatus and Investigations will also be considered.
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PHL 4062:
POST MODERNISM (Optional)
This course will dig deep into the origin and growth of Post Modernism and will examine the critique of
reason, historicism, meaning, grand theorizing and philosophy as a whole. The students will be made to be
acquainted with deconstructionism, structuralism and post structuralist philosophies. In particular, the
philosophies of Lacan, Derrida, Foucault, Lyotard and feminists like Luce Irigeray will be studied.
PHL 4072:
HERMENEUTICS (Optional)
This course will examine the meaning, origin and growth of Hermeneutics and its role in Philosophy today. It
will also examine the ramifications and implications of interpretations. The works of scholars like Jurgen
Habermas, Gadamer and Jacques Derrida will also be studied. The hermeneutic challenge as it relates to
African studies and multicultural communication will also be examined.
PHL 4082:
HISTORY AND PHILOSOPHY OF TECHNOLOGY (Optional)
This course will dwell on the history and development of technology and will examine the philosophical issues
that have arisen from the growth of technology. The connection between technology and development will be
discussed and questions relating to technology, culture, alienation, and so on, will be raised.
PHL 4000:
LONG ESSAY
The long essay concludes in the second semester. At the beginning of the second semester the coordinator of
the philosophy unit of the Department will group lecturers for the purposes of oral defence by the students they
are supervising either as first or second readers. A weeklong period called “Defence week” shall be scheduled
by the Department and information about it made available in advance to affected students.
DEPARTMENT OF RELIGIOUS AND CULTURAL STUDIES
Aims and Objectives of Curriculum Revision
1. The emerging curriculum is designed to incorporate new ideas that will enhance progressive
vocationalization and professionalization of Religious Studies.
2. The revised curriculum will assist the University to maintain the highest standards of accuracyand
scholarship in Religious Studies.
3. As a core curriculum, course content are framed around individual interests, abilities and experiences. In
conformity with contemporary trend in curriculum development, we have placed more emphasis on
flexibility, adaptability and learner-centered approach. The philosophy of the revised curriculum is lifted
from Benjamin Bloom’s Taxonomy (1965) which covers three domains of learning: affective (attitudes and
emotions), cognitive (knowledge and information) and psychomotor (practical or physical skills).
4. The primary objective of the Department is academic, – that is, to pursue the truth, discover the truth,
establish and disseminate the truth.
5. The curriculum will develop in the students the capacity to think clearly and objectively, with a reasonable
degree of sophistication about religious, cultural and philosophical issues, drawing conclusions logically
from an informed analysis of factual and descriptive situations.
6. The curriculum will develop in the students the capacity to distinguish between matters of fact and matters
of opinion and between scientific (objective) statement and value judgment.
7. It will expand and fortify the intellectual horizon of the students to attain self – actualization, mental
flexibility, openness to new ideas and dispassionate neutrality in
the comparative study of Religion.
9. The curriculum will sharpen the intellectual potentials of the students to prepare them to be responsible
citizens in the service of their country that is, people who can stand upto the spiritual, political and ethical
problems which plague the nation.
10. The curriculum will equip the students to intellectually cope with the challenges facing religion in a
complex technological and scientific age. It develops in the students the capacity to perceive the manysidedness of religious studies.
11. The curriculum will seek to articulate the indispensability and contributions of religion to the development
of culture and society. In that bid, it stimulates and proffers informed scientific approaches to research in
the areas of religion, culture and society .
Rationale for adding a Cultural Component
294
Following the recommendations of the committee set up by the Religious Studies unit to review the
nomenclature, curriculum and philosophy of the Department, it was decided that in view of the fact that other
Nigerian universities have recently highlighted the cultural dimensions of religion, it was necessary to
incorporate a cultural component into the reviewed and integrated curriculum of Religious Studies in the
University of Calabar.
In the face of modern trends in globalization, African culture faces the stiff challenge of (cultural) survival. As
a result of this, academic discourses in matters related to culture have been brought to the fore. Besides, the
contemporary emphasis on tourism has brought issues of culture into great prominence in this part of the
world. In view of these, and given the fact that every religion is embedded in a culture, the need to highlight
the cultural context of religions becomes imperative. The need to study culture in an academic setting cannot
be over-emphasized. Culture adds value to tourism, which has become a viable foreign exchange earner for
many countries of the world
COURSE OUTLINE
FIRST YEAR
First Semester
Course No
RCS 1011
RCS 1021
RCS 1031
RCS 1041
RCS 1051
GSS 1101
GSS 1121
Course Title
Remarks On Status
Introduction to Religious Studies
Same as in old curriculum
Religions of Africa I (optional)
Updated
Introduction to Cultural Studies
Newly introduced
Introduction to Religious and Moral
Education I (optional)
Newly introduced
Introduction to the Practice of Research in
Newly introduced
Humanities
Use of English
Same as in old Curriculum
Philosophy and Logic
“ “
Second Semester
RCS 1012
Varieties of Religious Experience (optional)
Updated
RCS 1022
Religions of Africa II
Same as in old Curriculum
RCS 1032
Introduction to Cultural Studies II
Newly introduced
RCS 1042
Intro. to Religious and Moral
Newly introduced
Education II (optional)
GSS 1102
Use of English
Same as in old curriculum
GSS 1132
History and Philosophy of Science
“ “
GSS 1112
Citizenship Education
“ “
INSTRUCTIONS: First year students are expected to offer a minimum of five courses and one elective from a
related discipline in every semester. All courses are assigned three credit hours.
SECOND YEAR
First Semester
RCS 2011
RCS 2021
RCS 2031
RCS 2041
RCS 2051
RCS 2061
RCS 2071
RCS 2081
RCS 2101
RCS 2201
GSS 2111
Sociology of Religion I
Psychology of Religion I
Christianity in West Africa
Background to New Testament
Religion and Art in Africa (optional)
Religion, Medicine and Health 1
Introduction to Islam
Cultural Anthropology 1
Background to Old Testament
Culture and Personality I
Introduction to Computer Practical
Updated
Newly introduced
Updated
“ “
Newly introduced
Newly introduced
Updated
Newly introduced
Updated
Newly introduced
Same as in old curriculum
Second Semester
RCS 2012
Sociology of Religion II
Updated
295
RCS 2022
RCS 2032
RCS 2042
RCS 2052
RCS 2062
RCS 2072
RCS 2082
RCS 2102
RCS 2202
GSS 2112
Psychology of Religion II
Newly Introduced
Impact of Christianity in West Africa
Updated
New Testament Studies: The Gospels Updated
Religion and Art: Western and Oriental Art
Newly introduced
Religion, Medicine and Health II
Newly introduced
Introduction to Islamic Civilization
Newly introduced
Cultural Anthropology II
“ “ “
History and Religion of Israel
Updated
Culture and Personality II
Newly introduced
Introduction to Computer Practicals
Same as in old curriculum
INSTRUCTIONS: Second year students are expected to offer six courses and one elective from a related
discipline in every semester. All courses are assigned three credit hours.
THIRD YEAR
First Semester
RCS 3011
RCS 3021
RCS 3031
RCS 3041
RCS 3051
RCS 3061
RCS 3071
RCS 3081
RCS 3091
RCS 3101
RCS 3201
RCS 3401
RCS 3501
RCS 3601
Anthropology of Religion I
Newly introduced
Peoples and Cultures of Africa
“ “
African Traditional Religion
Updated
Introduction to Missiology I
Newly introduced
New Religious Movements I
Updated
Contemporary Religious and Philosophical
Thought I
Updated
Culture and Psychopathology I
Newly introduced
Religion and Medical Ethics I
Newly Introduced
History and Doctrines of the
Christian Church, 5 BC-AD 590
Updated
History of Medieval Islam
Newly introduced
New Testament Studies: Acts of the Apostles Updated
Social Psychology of Religion I
“ “
Social and Cultural Evolution
Newly introduced
Media, Communication and Culture I Newly introduced
THIRD YEAR
Second Semester
RCS 3012
Anthropology of Religion II
RCS 3022
Nigerian Peoples and Cultures
RCS 3042
Introduction to Missiology II
RCS 3052
New Religious Movements in Africa
RCS 3062
Contemporary Religious and
Philosophical Thought II
RCS 3072
Culture and Psychopathology II
RCS 3082
Religion and Medical Ethics II
RCS 3092
History and Doctrines of the
Christian Church, 590-1517
RCS 3102
History of Islam in West Africa
RCS 3202
New Testament Studies:
Pauline and General Epistles
RCS 3402
Social Psychology of Religion II
RCS 3502
Comparative Culture
RCS 3602
Media, Communication and Culture II
INSTRUCTIONS: Third year students are expected to offer a minimum of seven courses in every semester.
All courses are assigned three credit hours.
FINAL YEAR
First Semester
296
RCS 4000
RCS 4011
RCS 4021
RCS 4041
RCS 4051
RCS 4071
RCS 4081
RCS 4101
RCS 4201
RCS 4301
RCS 4401
RCS 4501
Long Essay
World Religious Traditions
Philosophy of Religion I
History and Doctrines of the
Christian Church, 1517-1648
Religion, Science and Technology
Peacemaking and Conflict Resolution 1
Ethics of Science
Social Ethics I
Christianity and Modern Psychotherapies 1
Religion and Psychology of Women I
Religion and Feminism I
Religion and Cultural Tourism I
Second Semester
RCS 4000
Long Essay
RCS 4002
General Paper
RCS 4012
Comparative Religion
RCS 4022
Philosophy of Religion II
RCS 4102
Social Ethics II
RCS 4042
History and Doctrines of the
Christian Church, 1648-2006
RCS 4052
Religion and Nigerian Youth
RCS 4072
Peacemaking and Conflict Resolution II
RCS 4082
Ethics and Human Sexuality
RCS 4202
Christianity and Modern Psychotherapies II
RCS 4302
Religion and Psychology of Women II
RCS 4402
Religion and Feminism II
RCS 4502
Religion and Cultural Tourism II
INSTRUCTIONS: Final year students are expected to offer a minimum of seven courses in every semester.
All courses are assigned three credit hours.
CLASSIFICATION OF COURSES
1. CULTURAL STUDIES:
RCS 1031
–
RCS 1032
–
RCS 2051
–
RCS 2052
–
RCS 2081
–
RCS 2082
–
RCS 3021
–
RCS 3022
–
RCS 3031
–
RCS 3501
RCS 3502
–
RCS 3601
RCS 3602
RCS 4011
–
RCS 4012
–
RCS 4501
RCS 4502
-
Introduction to Cultural Studies I
Introduction to Cultural Studies II (compulsory)
Religion and Art in Africa
Religion and Art: Western and Oriental Art
Cultural Anthropology 1(compulsory)
Cultural Anthropology II (compulsory)
Peoples and Cultures of Africa
Nigerian Peoples and Cultures
African Traditional Religion (compulsory)
Social and Cultural Evolution
Comparative Culture (compulsory)
Media, Communication and Culture I (compulsory)
Media, Communication and Culture II
World Religious Traditions (compulsory)
Comparative Religion
Religion and Cultural Tourism I
Religion and Cultural Tourism II
2. SOCIAL – PSYCHOLOGICAL STUDIES OF RELIGION
RCS 1011
–
Introduction to Religious Studies (compulsory)
RCS 1012
–
Varieties of Religious Experience
297
RCS 2011
RCS 2012
RCS 2021
RCS 2022
RCS 2061
RCS 2062
RCS 2201
RCS 2202
RCS 3011
RCS 3012
RCS 3071
RCS 3072
RCS 3081
RCS 3082
RCS 3401
RCS 3402
RCS 4021
RCS 4022
RCS 4301
RCS 4302
RCS 4201
RCS 4202
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
-
3. CHRISTIAN STUDIES:
RCS 2041
RCS 2042
–
RCS 2101
–
RCS 2102
–
RCS 3041
–
RCS 3042
–
RCS 3201
RCS 3202
-
Sociology of Religion I (compulsory)
Sociology of Religion II
Psychology of Religion I (compulsory)
Psychology of Religion II
Religion, Medicine and Health I
Religion, Medicine and Health II
Culture and Personality I (compulsory)
Culture and Personality II
Anthropology of Religion I (compulsory)
Anthropology of Religion II
Culture and Psychopathology I
Culture and Psychopathology II
Religion and Medical Ethics I
Religion and Medical Ethics II
Social Psychology of Religion 1 (compulsory)
Social Psychology of Religion II
Philosophy of Religion I (compulsory)
Philosophy of Religion II
Religion and Psychology of Women I
Religion and Psychology of Women II
Christianity and Modern Psychotherapies I
Christianity and Modern Psychotherapies II
Background to New Testament (compulsory)
New Testament Studies: The Gospels
Background to Old Testament (compulsory)
History and Religion of Israel
Introduction to Missiology I (compulsory)
Introduction to Missiology II
New Testament Studies: Act of the Apostles
New Testament Studies: Pauline and General Epistles
4. HISTORICAL STUDIES OF RELIGION
RCS 1021
–
Religions of Africa I (compulsory)
RCS 1022
–
Religions of Africa II
RCS 2071
–
Introduction to Islam (compulsory)
RCS 2072
–
Introduction to Islamic Civilization
RCS 2031
–
Christianity in West Africa
(compulsory)
RCS 2032
–
Impact of Christianity in West Africa
RCS 3091
–
History and Doctrines of the Christian Church, 5 BC (compulsory)
RCS 3092
–
History and Doctrines of the Christian Church, 590-1517
(compulsory)
RCS 3101
–
History of Medieval Islam (compulsory)
RCS 3102
–
History of Islam in West Africa
RCS 4041
History and Doctrines of the Christian Church, 1517-1648 (compulsory)
RCS 4042
History and Doctrines of the Christian Church, 1648-2006
(compulsory)
5. CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN RELIGIOUS STUDIES
RCS 1041
–
Introduction to Religious and Moral Education I
RCS 1042
–
Introduction to Religious and Moral Education II
RCS 3051
–
New Religious Movements
RCS 3052
–
New Religious Movements in Africa
RCS 3061
–
Contemporary Religious and Philosophical Thought I
RCS 3062
–
Contemporary Religious and Philosophical Thought II
RCS 4051
–
Religion, Science, and Technology
298
RCS 4052
RCS 4081
RCS 4082
RCS 4071
RCS 4072
RCS 4101
RCS 4102
RCS 4401
RCS 4402
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
Religion and Nigerian Youth
Ethics of Science
Ethics and Human Sexuality
Peacemaking and Conflict Resolution I
Peacemaking, and Conflict Resolution II
Social Ethics I
Social Ethics II
Religion and Feminism I
Religion and Feminism II
COURSE DESCRIPTION
RCS 1051:
THE PRACTICE OF RESEARCH IN HUMANITIES
This is a compulsory audited course, which every first year student must offer and pass in the first semester. It
is an enrichment course, which is required for graduation. A combined team of three lecturers will teach the
course.
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
FIRST YEAR
RCS 1011:
INTRODUCTION TO RELIGIOUS STUDIES
This course introduces students to the academic study of religion, and to the variety and complexity of religion.
There is a discussion on the various methods of studying the phenomenon of religion. These include the
philosophical, historical, phenomenological, psychological, theological, sociological and anthropological
dimensions. The course will cover topics such as the origins of religion, definitions of religion, magic and
animism, totem and taboo, ancestor worship, and methodological issues in the study of religion as an academic
discipline.
RCS 1012:
VARIETIES OF RELIGIOUS EXPERIENCE
This course is an attempt to expose the students to the religious experiences of mankind. The meaning of
transcendence, ecstasy and the various modes of spirituality are explored through the theories of historians of
religion, phenomenologists, psychologists and sociologists. The course will probe the mind–set and psychic–
vent of homo religiosus in its variegated dimensions.
RCS 1021:
RELIGIONS OF AFRICA I
A socio – historical study of three contending religious traditions in Africa--Christianity, Islam and traditional
religion. The course will commence with a descriptive study of the peoples, geography and religious
classification of Africa. The course content in the first semester will cover topics in African Traditional
Religion and Islam. For ATR, the following topics will be treated; African Traditional Religion: A definition,
nature of ATR, the structure and main features of ATR; the purpose of studying ATR; ATR in Western
conceptual scheme; the concept of God in Africa and the cult of ancestors. For Islam, the following topics will
be treated: the rise of Islam; Prophet Muhammad; the articles of faith; the prophets of Allah; the Quran; the
concept of God in Islam; the advent of Islam in Egypt and North Africa, West Africa, Eastern Sudan and
Central Africa.
RCS 1022:
RELIGIONS OF AFRICA II
This course is a continuation of RCS 1021. In the second semester the course will concentrate on Christianity
as an African religion. Students will be introduced to the history of ancient African Christianity. Topics will
include the planting of Christianity at Kush, Axum, Egypt, Ethiopia and Alexandria. The involvement and
contributions of Africans to ancient Christianity will be highlighted. Other topics include African Church
fathers, mission Christianity in Africa, independent African churches, Africanization of Christianity, accretion
and syncretism, the Aladura movement, Brotherhood of the Cross and Star, Godianism, Kimbanguism etc.
RCS 1031/1032:
INTRODUCTION TO CULTURAL STUDIES
A multi–disciplinary exploration of culture as the sum total of man’s achievement and success in social life. An
examination of the normative basis of social action. The course will examine the various definitions of culture,
theories of culture, dimensions of culture, cultural diversity, cultural integration, culture and the social order,
299
the development of social norms, symbols, meanings and cultural interpretation of the African continent. The
historical dimension of the course will include a study of cultural imperialism in colonial Africa and the
perception of Africa in Western ethnocentric vision.
RCS 1041/1042:
INTRODUCTION TO RELIGIOUS AND MORAL EDUCATION
A study of historical development of educational thought with particular reference to religious and moral
education. The course will highlight the relevance of religious and moral education in national development.
Other topics include, the aims of religious and moral education, religious education and cultural development,
religious education and citizenship, religion and morality, education of the conscience, nature and significance
of moral education, moral education in historical perspectives, religious education from the perspective of
world religious traditions, the contribution of psychology to religious education, religious thinking of the infant
and adolescent, moral decadence and juvenile delinquency.
RCS 1051:
INTRODUCTION TO THE PRACTICE OF RESEARCH IN HUMANITIES
This course introduces the students to the aims of research in humanities. Topics will include, research
methods, evidence and causal analysis, selection and conceptual formation, population sampling, research
design, methods of observation, data analysis, decision-making in scientific research, classification of ideas,
writing from observation and imagination, research proposals, library research, documentation: APA
guidelines, MLA guidelines and works cited.
SECOND YEAR
RCS 2011:
SOCIOLOGY OF RELIGION I
This course provides a basic introduction to the sociological study of religion – its aims, scope and
methodology. The course will cover the following topics, the social foundations of religion, theories of
religion, theories of society, religious classification, religious organization, the protestant ethic, secularization,
the social construction of reality, dimensions of religious commitment, and religious evolution. Students will
be guided to study the writings of Emile Durkheim, Karl Marx, Max Weber, Robert Bellah, Peter Berger,
Talcott Parsons et al.
RCS 2012:
SOCIOLOGY OF RELIGION II
This course examines the negative role of religion in the perpetuation of social inequality within the various
cultures of the world. The course will study the origins and dimensions of social inequality. Other topics
include, social stratification, class and status, race and racism, caste system in India, Osu in Igbo land, religion
and the plight of the Negroes in the United States, racism in apartheid and post-apartheid South Africa, religion
and the status of Women, feminism and the social construction of gender, religion in pre-industrial, industrial
and industrializing societies, religion, economics and society, the social origins of denominationalism, Church
and sect, Proliferation of Christianity in Africa etc.
RCS 2021:
PSYCHOLOGY OF RELIGION I
This course examines the phenomena of religion both in individuals and groups. A critical study of the
psychological dimensions of religious actions and practices. students will be guided to read the writings of
Sigmund Freud, Carl Jung, Erik Erikson, Abraham Maslow, Adrian van Kaam et al. Other topics include,
Psychological definitions of religion, Psychological theories of religion, Sigmund Freud and the psychoanalytic
movement, Gnosticism and faith, religion and extra – sensory – perception, religious dress and vestments etc.
RCS 2022:
PSYCHOLOGY OF RELIGION II
This course examines the various means, which the religious man adopts to express his faith. Topics will
include, religious leadership, religious experience, sacred places and sacred objects, Aladura pneumatology,
Pentecostal spirit possession and ecstasy, liturgical practices, healing and exorcism, totems and taboos,
integration of psychology with religion etc.
RCS 2031:
CHRISTIANITY IN WEST AFRICA 1800-2006
An historical exploration of the advent of Christianity in the West African sub-region. A study of the strategies
and methods of promoting the expansion of Christianity in West Africa. Topics will include, the formation of
missionary movements in Europe and America, the planting of Christianity in Nigeria, Ghana, Sierra Leone,
Liberia, Togo, Senegal, Cameroon and Gabon. Students will be guided to read the writings of Jacob Ajayi,
Emmanuel Ayandele, Ogbu Kalu, Patrick Crampton, Lamin Sanneh et al.
300
RCS 2032:
IMPACT OF CHRISTIANITY IN WEST AFRICA 1800 – 2006
A study of the factors that aided the spread of Christianity in West Africa. Topics will include, missionaries
and colonialism, Missionaries as agents of civilization, missionaries and social reforms, colonial education, the
development of the health sector, the negative impacts of the missionary enterprise, the contributions of
missionaries to the nationalist struggle, the emergence of African independent churches etc. The course will
involve a comprehensive study of the biographies of foreign and indigenous missionaries like Hope Waddel,
Mary Mitchell Slessor, Henry Venn, Essien Essien Ukpabio, Donald Ekong, Henry Townsend, J. C. Taylor,
Thomas Birch Freeman, Father Lutz, William de Graft, Thomas Bowen, David Babcock, Samuel Crowder,
David Hinderer, Hugh Goldie, Edgerly, Simon Jonas, Jean Coquard, Samuel Bill,
RCS 2041: BACKGROUND TO NEW TESTAMENT
A critical introduction to the traditions of Jesus in line with contemporary consensus in biblical scholarship.
The social, cultural and political background of the period will be examined. Topics will include the biography
of Jesus of Nazareth, the quest for the historical Jesus, the implication of the quest for Africa, the synoptic
problems, the Qumran community, sects in Judaism, biblical criticism, history of interpretation, Hellenism, the
peace of Rome etc.
RCS 2042:
NEW TESTAMENT STUDIES: THE GOSPELS
A comprehensive study of the first four books of the New Testament --- Mathew, Mark, Luke and John -- in
line with contemporary biblical scholarship.
RCS 2051:
RELIGION AND ART IN AFRICA
An inter- disciplinary study of the cultural history of Africa and a reflection on the intellectual and creative
background of Africa’s visual arts. Topics slated for discussion include primitive culture, primitive art, art in
the service of religion, African music and dance, religion and agricultural festivals in Africa, African
prehistory, African archaeology, sources of African art, stone age art in Africa, Negro art, African art in Europe
and America, African cultures in the later stone age, the rock paintings and engravings of Africa, the history,
purpose and types of museums, Nigerian museums. Students will be escorted on a lecture tour to the National
Museum at Oron, Old Residency Museum in Calabar among others.
RCS 2052:
RELIGION AND ART: WESTERN AND ORIENTAL ARTS
This course is an introduction to the cultural history of Euro- America and Oriental countries. Topics will
include prehistory and early cultures of Euro-America, Asian arts and cultures, early civilizations, the origins
of civilization, the Mesolithic period in northern Europe, the art of the steppes, Korean visual arts, ancient near
Eastern visual arts, visual arts of European metal age cultures, ancient Greek visual arts, Roman visual arts,
Byzantine visual arts, Japanese visual arts, Chinese visual arts, Russian visual arts, Georgian visual arts,
Armenian visual arts, Coptic arts, Romanesque visual arts, Gothic visual arts, Renaissance visual arts, Baroque
visual arts, neo-classical and Romantic visual arts, the age of reason, the industrial revolution , modernist
revolution in art, impressionism, Fauvism and surrealism.
RCS 2071:
INTRODUCTION TO ISLAM
This course seeks to introduce the students to the fundamental tenets of Islam. The rks.course will cover the
following topics, Prophet Muhammad, the articles of faith, the prophets of Allah, God in Islam, the Islamic
order for human society, introduction to the Hadith, introduction to Sharia, introduction to the Quran, ritual
purity, the function of the Mosque, poor–rate, fasting, pilgrimage, marriage and divorce, Jihad, secularism and
the concept of the way in Islam.
RCS 2072:
INTRODUCTION TO ISLAMIC CIVILIZATION
An historical exploration of the contributions of Islam to global civilization. Topics will include, Islamic
jurisprudence, the historical background of Islamic civilization, Arabic literature, Persian literature, Turkish
literature, Islamic art, the contributions of Islam to science and medicines, classical Islamic philosophy and
theology. Islamic influence in the Persian Gulf.
RCS 2201/2202:
CULTURE AND PERSONALITY
This course will focus on the impact of culture on personality development. It will highlight the symbiotic
relationship between the physical environment and human personality, with a conclusion that man is a product
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of social and cultural upbringing. Other topics will include, culture and society, the meaning of personality,
cultural factors in personality development. Karen Horney’s view of culture, culture and thought, cultural
environment, beliefs and reasoning, cultural dimension of thinking, personality prejudice, ethnocentrism,
egocentrism, social class and childhood personality, temperament and mentality, childhood and modalities of
social life, cultural and social adjustment, the self and identity formation, the course will review theories of
personality by G Stanley Hall, Sigmund Freud, Anna Freud, Ruth Benedict, Margaret Mead, Albert Bandura,
Robert Havighurst, Abraham Maslow, Erik Erikson, John Coleman, Carl Gustav Jung et al.
RCS 2101:
BACKGROUND TO OLD TESTAMENT
An examination of the historical sources of Old Testament. The course will examine contemporary trends in
Old Testament study. Topics will include the development of Hebrew religion, archeology and Old Testament,
the text of the Old Testament, Old Testament canon, the environmental background of the Old Testament,
inspiration of the Old Testament, Apocrypha and Pseudepigrapha, Old Testament manuscripts, the
development of textual criticism, monotheism, sovereignty, election, covenant, theocracy, law, sacrifice, faith,
redemption, interpretation of the Old Testament, introduction to the pentateuch, pentateuchal criticism, semitic
epigraphy and Hebrew philology, the historical books, chronology of the Old Testament, wisdom literature,
poetical books, prophetic literature etc.
RCS 2061/2062:
RELIGION, MEDICINE AND HEALTH
This course examines the relationship between religion, medicine and health. The concept of health is far more
social than biological. It does not connote absence of physical ailment, but an apparent reciprocity between
mind and matter. The course will analyze the magico-religious dimensions of traditional medicine in Africa.
The course will offer guidance for future research in African traditional medicine, and suggest possible ways
for its integration with modern medicines.
RCS 2102:
HISTORY AND RELIGION OF ISRAEL: FROM ABRAHAM TO THE
RETURN FROM EXILE
The course will examine the history, geography and religion of Israel, from the call of Abraham, through
slavery in Egypt, to the institution of the monarchy, and the return from the exile.
RCS 2081/ 2082:
CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY
The scientific study of all aspects of the world’s cultures and the factors that have affected their development.
The course will study cultural diversities of Africans, Asians, Aboriginal Australians, Pacific Islanders,
Europeans and Americans. Other topics will include, methods and theories in the study of cultural
anthropology, technology, economic organization, kinship, associations, authority systems, law and organized
aggression, marriage and the organization of domestic groups, symbolism and communication, the nature and
aims of archaeology, dating methods and chronology, documenting cultural change, reconstructing the past,
transmission of civilization through time and space, early civilizations, the origins of civilization, cities, states
and empires in early civilization, pre-historic archaeology, African archaeology, archaeology and oral tradition.
Writing and literacy, early writing, sound and syllable, ancient scripts, alphabets, literacy and education,
technology of the intellect, consequences of literacy, literacy in traditional china, India, Thailand, Sudan,
Ghana, New Guinea, Melanesia, and Nsibidi script in the lower and upper Cross River Basin.
THIRD YEAR
RCS 3011:
ANTHROPOLOGY OF RELIGION I
An overview of the study of religion by classical anthropologists. The course will examine the link between
ethnology, ethology, and religious studies. Topics will include, anthropological definitions of religions,
methodological problems in the study of pre-historic religions, polytheism, monotheism, priesthood, rituals,
sacrifice, mythology, prayer, purification rites and customs, morality in primitive societies etc. writings of
leading theorists in the field like E. B. Tylor, J. F. Frazer, Levi-Strauss, B. Malinowski, Mary Douglas, V.
Turner, C. Geertz, Levy – Bruhl, Margaret Mead, Radcliffe- Brown, Evans–Pritchard, Lucy Mair, John Beattie,
Ruth Benedict et al will be studied.
RCS 3012:
ANTHROPOLOGY OF RELIGION II
A study of religion in primitive societies and cultures. A social – anthropological analysis of the meaning and
significance of primitive beliefs and symbols. Topics will include, primitive culture, rites of passage,
symbolism, body rituals, the naked and the nude, primitive man’s early development, the development of
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natural instincts, naturism, spirit and spiritualism, burial, sacred places, witchcraft and sorcery, ancient Greek
religions, ancient Roman religions, ancient German religions, ancient Celts religions, ancient Egyptian
religions, ancient Mesopotamian religions, ancient Asian religions and African traditional religion. Students
will be guided to read the writings of P. A. Talbot, M. D. W. Jeffreys, Jan Vansina, Mary H. Kingsley, Major
Arthur Leonard et al.
RCS 3021:
PEOPLES AND CULTURES OF AFRICA
A cross – cultural study of the peoples and societies of Africa. An objective examination of the cultural
peculiarities and universality of African people. The course involves a descriptive study of the geography,
ethnography and prehistory of Africa. An interesting dimension of the course will be an indepth ethnographic
study of the following African societies and cultures: the Ganda of Uganda, the Kpelle of Liberia, the Kung
Bushmen of the Kalahari Desert, the Northern Pastoral Somali of the Horn, the Zulu of South Africa, the
Kasongo Neimbo of Zaire, the Lele of Kasai, the Abaluyia of Kavirondo, the Lovedu of the Transvaal, the
Dogon of Sudan, the Mende of Sierra Leone, the Shilluk of the Upper Nile, the Bunyoro of Western Uganda,
the Kingdom of Ruanda, the Fon of Dahomey, the Suku of Southern Congo, the Swazi of Swaziland, the
Kaguru of East Africa, the Dinka of the Sudan, the Barabaig of East Africa, the Lugbara of Uganda, the Massai
of East Africa etc. other topics includes, pastoralism, domestication and utilization of animals, development of
agriculture, food gathering economies, external contacts. Students will be acquainted with the writings of
Daryll Forde, James Gibbs, Newell Booth, Arthur Leonard, Mary Kingsley, P.A.Talbot, G.P. Murdock, J.H.
Greenberg, V.C. Uchendu, John Beatties, Okon Uya, Mary Douglas, Lucy Mair, M. Fortes, E.E. Evan Pritchard et al.
RCS 3022:
NIGERIAN PEOPLES AND CULTURES
A socio-historical study of the cultural regions of Nigeria. This course will examine the fundamental cultural
problems of the Nigerian nation. Culture is studied as a catalyst for nation-building. Topics include national
character, Nigeria’s natural landscapes, migrations and acculturation, urban Nigeria, cultural regions of
Nigeria, Nigerian manners, Nigerian arts, Nigerian literature, entertainment and the mass media in Nigeria,
sports and Nigerian culture, women in Nigeria, status and social class in Nigeria, centripetal and centrifugal
forces in nation- building, ethnicity and the development of distinct nationalities, the course will involve a
study of the ethnography of the following Nigerian peoples and cultures viz the Igbo of South – Eastern
Nigeria, the Yoruba of South – Western Nigeria, the pastoral Fulani of Northern Nigeria, the Kanuri of Borno,
the Ibibio of Southern Nigeria, the Efik of Southern Nigeria, the Oron people of the lower Cross River Basin of
Nigeria, the Isoko people of Nigeria, the peoples and cultures of the upper Cross River Basin of Nigeria.
RCS 3031:
AFRICAN TRADITIONAL RELIGION
The aim of this course is to introduce students to the study of the traditional religion of Africa. Social life in
Africa is a religious phenomenon. Topics will include the divinities, God and man, the rites of passage, God
and society, secret societies and the social order, the concept of reincarnation, oath–taking and detection of
crime. Students will be guided to read the writings of John Mbiti, Bolaji Idowu, E. G. Parrinder, E. Ilogu,
Emefie Ikenga – Metuh et al.
RCS 3051:
NEW RELIGIOUS MOVEMENTS
This course introduces the students to some of the Western oriented religious movements which have
infiltrated Africa. Topics will include, definitions of new religious movements, methods and theories in the
study of new religious movements, causal factors of new religious movements, messianism, millennialism,
prophetism, psychedelic movements, youth religion and spirituality, the charismatic leader, Madhist tradition
in Islam, Christian science, spiritism, New Age Movement, Mormonism, Theosophy, Unity School of
Christianity, Worldwide Church of God (Anglo - Israelism), Scientology, the Rosicrucian Order, Eckankar,
Grail Message, Swedenborgianism, Satanism, Astrology, transcendental meditation, Hare -Krishna movement,
the divine light, the way international, Aquarian gospel etc.
RCS 3052:
NEW RELIGIOUS MOVEMENTS IN AFRICA
This course seeks to examine new religious movements in Africa. As an outgrowth of Euro–American
Christianity, African new religious movements represent a resilient force and a counter culture aimed at
engrafting “Africanness” into Christianity. The new religious movements represent a bold step toward
Africanisation of Christianity. Topics include, African Independent churches, Pentecostal churches in Africa,
typology of new religious movements in Africa.
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RCS 3061:
CONTEMPORARY RELIGIOUS AND PHILOSOPHICALTHOUGHT I
A critical and objective analysis of the confrontation between fundamentalism and modernism in Christian
theology. The course will focus on the impact of secularism, and the re–definition of the fundamental doctrines
of Christianity by modernist theologians. Topics will include, fundamentalism, the liberal revolt, neo–
orthodoxy, socialism, religion and violence, Jesus in modernist theology, Pentecostalism, Evagelicalism,
Ecumenism, Pope John XXIII and the Second Vatican Council.
RCS 3062:
CONTEMPORARY RELIGIOUS AND PHILOSOPHICALTHOUGHT II
This course will examine ideological and philosophical movements like scientism, civil religion,
psychoanalysis, analytical psychology, communism, Marxism, humanism, existentialism, phenomenology
pragmatism, socialism, classical positivism etc. The purpose of the course is to examine all the presuppositions
of non–religious, ideological movements with a view to ascertaining whether such movements perform
functions that are similar to the social functions of organized religion.
HISTORY AND DOCTRINES OF THE CHRISTIAN CHURCH 5 B. C – A.
D 590.
An historical investigation of the decisive epoch of earliest Christianity from the beginnings of Jesus
movement to the rise of the imperial Church. Topics will include, Judaism in first century Palestine, Greco–
Roman empire, Gnosticism, Marcionism, Pelegianism, Montanism, Church fathers, Arianism, Monasticism,
the rise of the Papacy, Constantine, christological and trinitarian controversies, pax Romana, Hellenism,
mystery religions, ancient philosophies etc.
RCS 3091:
RCS 3092:
HISTORY AND DOCTRINES OF THE CHRISTIAN CHURCH 590 - 1517
A study of Christianity in the medieval period from the rise of the papacy to the Renaissance. Topics will
include, the first medieval pope, the Holy Roman empire, the supremacy of the papacy, the rise of the
universities, medieval philosophy, the crusades, scholasticism, the mystics, conflict in the papacy, the
Renaissance etc.
RCS 3101:
HISTORY OF MEDIEVAL ISLAM
An historical study of Islam in the middle ages. Topics will include, Arabia and her neighbours, Arabia at the
time of Muhammad, the first conquest, the civil wars, the Arab empire, the Abbasid revolut ion, the breakup of
the Caliphate, the Ismailian schism, the Turkish erruption, the Christian counter-attack, the Mongol etc.
RCS 3102:
HISTORY OF ISLAM IN WEST AFRICA
This course seeks to study from the historical perspective the advent of Islam in West Africa. The influence of
Islam in the Western Sudan states of Ghana, Mali, Songhai, Kanem Borno and Hausa land. Great historical
personages like Idris Alooma, Shehu Ahmad, Usman Fodio, Alhaji Umar, El-Kanemi, Rabeh Zubair, Samoi
Toure et al will be studied in line with their contributions to the development of Islam in Western Sudan.
RCS 3201:
NEW TESTAMENT STUDIES: ACTS OF THE APOSTLES
A study of the history of earliest Christianity as presented by Luke in the Acts of Apostles. The course will
examine the status of Luke both as a theologian and as an historian, other topics are, leadership of St. Peter, the
calling of St. Paul, persecution and global expansion of Christianity, the biographies of the Apostles from extra
biblical sources etc.
RCS 3202:
NEW TESTAMENT STUDIES: PAULINE AND GENERAL EPISTLES
This course examines all the writings of St. Paul. Paul is studied as a leading and crucial figure at the
beginnings of Jesus movement. Apart from studying Paul’s biography, the course will focus on the specific
reasons which led Paul to write each of the letters. Topics will include, extra biblical facts on Paul’s
background, sources of Paul’s thought, Pauline psychology, Paul and Judaism, Paul and Old Testament, Paul
and the mystery religions, revelation and tradition in Pauline thought, Pauline christology, soteriology,
eschatology, ecclesiology, pneumatology. The course will also address topics such as Gnosticism, legalism,
Hellenism, celibacy, glossolalia, stoicism and misogynism. The course will examine the seven epistles written
by James, Peter, John and Jude, from the perspective of authorship, dates and place of writing, chapter analysis,
theological messages, purpose of writing, style of writing, and the audience. The course will identify New
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Testament theology from each of the books. Through group discussion and research findings, students will
identify whether a particular book was apologetical, or polemical.
RCS 3041/ 3042:
INTRODUCTION TO MISSIOLOGY
The purpose of this course is to introduce the students to theoretical issues in Christian missions: Topics will
include Christianity as a universalistic religion, universalism, definitions of missions, missions in the Bible, the
birth of missions, Israel as a missionary nation, hermeneutical problems in missions, missions and dialogue,
missions and ecumenism, missions and theology of religions, the Church and missions, missions and
modernism, missionary task, instruments of missions, the dynamics of missions, missions and evangelism,
missions and anthropology, Christianity and culture, cultural differences, cultural assumptions of Western
missionaries, cultural assimilation, vernacularization, theory of natural grouping, biculturalism. Students will
be guided to read the writings of Michael Green, George Peters, Harold Lindsell, Adolf Harnack, Kenneth
Latourette, Louis Luzbetak, Lucien Legard, Marvin Mayers, Lamin Sanneth, Paul Hiebert, E. Stanley Jones,
Carrol Stuhmneller, Donald McGavran, Peter Wagner et al.
RCS 3071/3072:
CULTURE AND PSYCHOPATHOLOGY
A psychological study of the impact of culture on the human psyche. Topics will include, definitions and scope
of psychopathology, mental torture, models of the mind, the conscious, unconscious and subconscious mind,
nature of consciousness, tension and feelings, the human brain, the mind and somatic illness, childhood
psychosis, madness, dimensions of mental disorder cross-cultural studies of behaviour, paranoia, neurosis,
schizophrenia, depression, phobia, hysteria, anxiety, grieving and mourning, suicidology etc.
RCS 3501:
SOCIAL AND CULTURAL EVOLUTION
A socio – anthropological study of cultural evolution and human societies. Topics will include, the study of
evolution, legal evolution, religious evolution, the emergence of cultural essentials, early humans, essentials of
human culture, evolutionary theory, socio-cultural continuity, socio-cultural diversification, structure and
function of human societies, types and varieties of societies, pre-industrial societies, industrial and
industrializing societies, the emergence of food production, theories of social change, socio-cultural
development, modernization and development, sociology of development, the concept of social distance,
education and cultural crises, the marginal man, religion and ethnicity, religion and racism, religion and
ethnocentrism, segregation and discrimination, the world of minorities, structures and processes in multi-group
society, blacks in United States of America, race and culture, race and behaviour, race and democracy, race
and social status, racial attitudes, race and intelligence, man’s evolutionary origins, man in Africa, Charles
Darwin and evolution theory, scientific creationism, the principles of inheritance, population and variability,
evolution of species, natural selection and the mental capacities of mankind,
RCS 3502:
COMPARATIVE CULTURE.
The aim of this course is to help students to appreciate cultural similarities and differences across the world.
Topics will include society and culture, social institutions, cultural universals, cultural differences, cultural
relativism,, cultural imperialism, Japanese culture, Indian culture, Korean culture, Chinese culture, AngloAmerican culture, Russian culture, Islamic culture, Anglo-Saxon culture, African culture etc.
RCS 3601/3602:
MEDIA, COMMUNICATION AND CULTURE:
This course will examine the positive and negative impacts of the mass media in contemporary culture, topics
will include, communication and civilization, communication and society, means of communication, images of
the world, the nature of human language, semantics, social aspects of language, language in the computer age,
living language, visual communication, written language, words in print, the language of science, stored
communication, long-distance communication, brain, mind and language, language and mental development,
the mass media as custodian of culture, cultural perspectives in the African mass media, mass communication
and development in Nigeria, history of the mass media, evolution of the press in Nigeria, the contributions of
Christian missionaries to the evolution of the print media in Africa, the church and the book industry in Africa,
Africa and the new world information order, Christianity and communication, the rights and responsibilities of
journalists, propaganda and public opinions, etc.
FINAL YEAR
RCS 4000:
LONG ESSAY
305
This is a two semesters work. Every student is expected to submit a project report of not more than three
thousand words. The topic must be approved by the department and supervised by a lecturer assigned to the
student. The long essay topic must be selected from the students area of specialization.
RCS 4011:
WORLD RELIGIOUS TRADITIONS
Set in the general context of the history of religion this course examines historically and phenomenological the
world’s major religious traditions, viz Hinduism, Buddhism, Sikhism, Confucianism, Taoism, Shintoism,
Jainism, Zoroastrianism etc.
RCS 4012:
COMPARATIVE RELIGION
A chapter in the science of religion. This course introduces students to the materials, methods and motive in the
comparative study of religions. Students will be encouraged to apply theory to practice by comparing selected
themes and topics among the various religious traditions of the world.
RCS 4021:
PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION I
This course seeks to analyze through the aid of human reasoning and insight the nature of religion in the
framework of a universal cosmology. Topics include, definitions of religion and philosophy, the subject matter
and scope of philosophy of religion, the dimensions of religion for insiders, dimensions of religion for
outsiders, existence of God, atheism, agnosticism, skepticism, the Vienna Circle and logical positivism, the
challenge of science, subjective justifications of belief in God etc.
RCS 4022:
PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION II
Practical applications of theoretical issues are made in this semester. In line with modern approaches to the
subject, materials are drawn from the major religious traditions. Topics will include the problem of evil,
problem of suffering, immortality, miracles, etc
RCS 4041:
HISTORY AND DOCTRINES OF THE CHRISTIAN CHURCH 1517-1648
This course seeks to examine the causes and consequences of the reformation movement and its spread to
different countries: Germany, Switzerland, France, England, Holland and Scotland. Special mention will be
made of the dramatis personae of the reformation movement – Luther, Melanchton, Calvin, Loyola, Erasmus,
Menno Simons, Zwingili and John Knox et al. the course will analyze the cultural impact of the reformation in
world history, and the rise of the protestant movement. The history, expansion and doctrines of Protestantism
will be treated.
HISTORY AND DOCTRINES OF THE CHRISTIAN CHURCH 1648 –
2006
A comprehensive study of the development and global expansion of Christianity. Christianity is studied
authoritatively as the custodian of culture and civilization. Topics will include, the establishment of
Christianity in North America, the religious foundation of American nation, religious freedom in America,
rationalism, Deism, Pietism, Methodism, revivalism, the American revolution, the French revolution, modern
liberalism, the industrial revolution, foreign and domestic world wars, Martin Luther King Jr. and civil rights
movement in America, Pope John XXIII and the Second Vatican Council.
RCS 4042:
RCS 4051:
RELIGION, SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
A consideration of the status of religion in a scientific age. A reflection on the historic conflict between science
and religion. Topics will include, the scientific and technological revolution, the industrial revolution,
communication and information technology, scientific world- view, cosmology, cosmogony, the birth of
modern science, the challenge of science, Darwin and the evolutionary theory, religion and science etc.
RCS 4081:
ETHICS OF SCIENCE
An empirical and theoretical study of the ethical and humanitarian issues in scientific cognition. A critical
evaluation of humanistic values, and a reflection on the negative consequences of scientific research. As a
relevant research, the course will cover the following topics: man as the subject and object of scientific studies,
science and the devastation of war, science and global ecological problems, ethics and pornography, ethical
issues in the development of nuclear power, technological progress, automation and unemployment.
RCS 4071:
PEACEMAKING AND CONFLICT RESOLUTION I
306
A study of contemporary issues in peacemaking, dialogue and conflict resolution. The course will cover the
following topics, causes of war, social conflict, theories of war, war and disarmanent, human rights violation,
justice and peace, pacifism, the concept of peace in Islam, Islamic concept of tolerance, peace-passages in the
Quran, Islamic fundamentalism and peace in Nigeria, Islamic guidelines on inter-religious relations, ChristianMuslim dialogue in Nigeria, religious pluralism, religion as an instrument of peace in Nigeria, religious
freedom in Nigeria etc.
RCS 4072:
PEACEMAKING AND CONFLICT RESOLUTION II
A study of the role of religion in the resolution of conflict between nations, topics will include, religion and
international diplomacy, religious influence in foreign policy development, religion and the use of force in
international law, the concept of peace in international diplomacy, the impact of war on religious institutions.
Mediation, arbitration and conciliation in international law, the religious dimension of the Middle East conflict,
the status of Islam, Judaism and Christianity in the Middle East, Islamization and Arabization, the
establishment of the Jewish state in 1948, Balfour declaration, Zionism, the manifesto of the United Arab
Republic, Palestinian Liberation Organization, UN resolution on the internationalization of Jerusalem. The role
of international organizations like the Red Cross, UN, AU, EU, OAS, ECOWAS, World Council of Churches,
All-African Conference of Churches, International Court of Justice at Hague in conflict resolution.
RCS 4052:
RELIGION, AND NIGERIAN YOUTH
This course examines the perception, interaction and mutual influence of religion and culture upon the
Nigerian youth. It analyses critically, substance abuse, delinquent behaviour, gangsterism, sexual revolution,
parental influence, childhood and society, anti–social behaviours, youth religion, peer groups, campus
fellowships, adolescent sub-culture, sexually transmitted diseases, political thuggery, armed robbery, collective
violence, unemployment, youth counseling, self – education, self–employment, career guidance, talent
development etc.
RCS 4101/4102:
SOCIAL ETHICS
A study of socio–ethical issues in contemporary society. The course will proffer solutions to protracted ethical
problems. Topics will include, ethical options like absolutism, universalism, utilitarianism and situationism,
ethical statements will be made concerning capital punishment, pluralism, alienation, human rights, dignity of
labour, work, leisure, unemployment, poverty, wealth, equality, freedom, discrimination, dogmatism, civil
liberty, civil disobedience, justice, rule of law, democracy, separation of power, prostitution, the function of the
judiciary, social conflict, violence and respect for womanhood. Students will be guided to read the decrees of
the Second Vatican council on social issues.
RCS 4102:
RELIGION AND MEDICAL ETHICS
This course examines the symbiotic relationship between religion, ethics and medicine. It will address
contemporary ethical issues in eugenics, human transplantation, artificial insemination (in vitro fertilization),
embryo transfer, surrogate motherhood, abortion, sex education, euthanasia, family planning, contemporary
development in suicidology, sanctity of human life, sterilization, hysterectomy, hospitalization, procreation,
infertility, homosexuality, incest, rape, gerontology, ethical theory in the medical context, the Hippocratic
oath, doctor-patient relationship, ethical medicine in a revolutionary age, medical paternalism, legalism and
medical ethics, informed consent, professional responsibilities, definition of death, the right to refuse treatment,
doxy consent for adults, legality and morality of abortion, infanticide, experimentation with human subjects,
psychosurgery, genetic screening and prenatal diagnosis, human genetics. The pledge of Florence Nightingale,
International Code of Medical Ethics, The Declaration of Geneva, ethical and religious directives for Catholic
hospitals. Student will be guided to read John Arras and Nancy Rhoden, Ethical Issues in Modern Medicine.
(1977), Karsten Struhl and Paula Struhl, Ethics in Perspective: A Reader. (1975),and Charles Mcfadden,
Medical Ethics. (1961).
RCS 4201/4202:
CHRISTIANITY AND MODERN PSYCHOTHERAPIES
Application of the principles of modern psychotherapies to social problems from the Christian perspective. A
study of selected personality theorists, with a focus on the nature of personhood and meaning of human
existence, behaviour therapy, classical psychoanalysis, rational emotive therapy, cognitive- behavioral therapy,
Adlerian and reality therapy, person-centred therapy, transactional therapy, marriage and family therapies,
Christian psychotherapy, oriental therapy, Theorists slated for consideration includes: Sigmund Freud, Karen
Horney, Harry Stack Sullivan, Carl Gustav Jung, Alfred Adler, Otto Rank, Melanie Klein, Wilhelm Reich,
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Adolf Meyer, Abraham Maslow, Rollo May, Carl Rogers, Gordon Allport, Eric Fromm, Ann Freud, Albert
Bandura, John Coleman, Robert Havighurst, Peter Blos, G.S. Hall, Raymond Cattel, Henry Murray, Ronald
Rohner, Adrian van Kaam, Ruth Benedict and Margaret Mead.
RCS 3401/3402:
SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY OF RELIGION
A social-psychological study of the pervasive influence of religion on social organization and relationship.
Topics will include, psychology and social structure, interpersonal relationships, roles and stereotypes,
perceptions and attributions, attitude and attitudinal changes, conformity impulse control, altruism, self –
perception, theories of the self, perceiving others, self-disclosure, self-knowledge, self-evaluation, selfregulation, self-assertion, collective violence, religious riots, psychology of the crowd, the development of
attachment, Carl Rogers, Erich Fromm, Rollo May and Martin Buber on interpersonal communication, theories
of early social development, temperament, theories of moral development, moral reasoning.
RCS 4401/4402:
RELIGION AND FEMINISM
A sociological perspective on religion and feminism. Topics will include, definitions of feminism, theories of
feminism , academic roots of feminism, sociology of sex and gender, women and social construction of
knowledge, sex literacy, feminist criticisms of theology, psychology and sociology, feminist theory of the state,
feminism and Marxism , sex equality, feminist jurisprudence, feminization of poverty in Africa, historical
trends in women’s paid employment, women’s movement in the nineteenth and twentieth century, outstanding
Nigerian women, feminist interpretation of the Bible, female genital mutilation, Paul and women, misogyny,
misogamy, virgin Mary and feminism, feminine spirituality, the status of women in Islam, the status of women
in Judaic- Christian tradition, the ordination of women, Tertullian and St. Jerome on women, Richard Hooker
and Karl Barth on women.
RCS 4301/4302:
RELIGION AND PSYCHOLOGY OF WOMEN
A religio- psychological study of the emotional lives of women. Topics will include, introduction to femininity,
women understanding of men, social and biologic aspects of femininity, motherhood, motherliness and
sexuality, redefining dependency, the sexual dilemma, women and health, women and religion, women, crime
and deviance, women and work , women and housework, women and mid-life crisis, the neurotic woman,
feminine spirituality, women and prayer, women and divorce, the flight from womanhood, feminine
masochism, penis envy, cultural pressures, denial of women’s sexual pleasure, personal identity and sexual
identity, masculinity and femininity, phobias after marriage, the trauma of eventlessness, innate biological
passivity, submissiveness and helplessness, female psycho-sexual dysfunctions and religious belief, anatomical
distinction, women and rites of passage, dream, anger and jealousy, sleep and sleep disorder etc.
RCS 4082:
ETHICS AND HUMAN SEXUALITY
This course examines the symbiotic relationship between religion and human sexuality. Topics will include,
definitions of sexuality, history of sexuality, sexuality and spirituality, body theology of James B. Nelson,
adolescent and sexual freedom, premarital intercourse, moral codes on sex, ethics, morality and sex, marriage
and adultery, the homosexual revolution, sexually transmitted diseases, rape, gay and lesbian relationships, the
church and homosexuals, psychology and human sexuality, reproductive health, abortion, pornography, sex in
internet, surrogate motherhood, family planning, sexual harassment in schools and work places, Sigmund
Freud on sex, the psychology of frigidity, the bridge to womanhood, religion and impotence, psychological
causes of impotence, myths and fallacies of impotence, psychology of sexual act, sex education.
RCS 4501/4502 :
RELIGION AND CULTURAL TOURISM
This course introduces students to the impact of religion and culture on tourism development. Topics will
include, definitions of tourism, history of tourism, organization of tourism, passenger transportation, hospitality
services in tourism, sociology of tourism, popular music and dancing, international etiquette, vacation and
travel, leisure and entertainment, recreation, sports and games, religious pilgrimages, sacred sites, festivals,
national parks, zoo, art galleries, museums, tourism development, tourism and world peace, tourism and
environment etc.
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DEPARTMENT OF THEATRE AND MEDIA STUDIES
Academic Programme
The Department of Theatre Arts offers an integrated programme of courses that may lead to the following
degrees:
1. Four-year (8-semester) B.A. Degree for UME candidates.
2. Three-year (6-semester) B.A. Degree for Degree for Direct Entry (DE) candidate.
Admission Requirements
1. Prospective degree candidate must satisfy both the general University Minimum
Entry Requirements,
and the specific Faculty and Department Requirements
2. General University Minimum Entry Requirements provide three methods of admission into the University
as follows.
3. Possession of W.A.S.C., (WA) S.S.CE., G.C.E. O/L, NECO, or other equivalent certificate with credit
level passes in at least Five subject taken at not more than two sittings (and preferable not more than five
years apart).
4. Possession of three subject at the W.A.S.C., (WA) S.S.C.E., G.C.E. O/L, NECO, or other equivalent
examination at credit at level, plus the Teachers’ Grade Two Certificate (where still applicable).
5. In both 2 & 4, the SUBJECT CREDITS MUST INCLUDE ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND ENGLISH
LITERATURE (or, LITERATURE-IN-ENGLISH).
6. Then English language of TCII Must be at least at Merit level before it can be accepted as an equivalent of
the English Language requirement.
7. By transfer from other recognized universities within and outside Nigeria. The Faculty of Arts specifically
requires that : All candidates pass the UME and reach the appropriate cut-off point for the year of
admission. All applications are routed in the first instance through J.A.M.B.
8. All candidates must obtain credit level passes in English Language at the W.A.S.C., NECO, (WA) SSCE
or G.C.E., O/L and OFFER same in U.M.E. The Department of Theatre Arts specifically requires that:
9. Candidates for the Standard Four-year B.A. Programme must have passed at least at credit level in English
Language and English Literature (or, Literature-in-English) at the W.A.S.C./N.E.C.O., (WA) S.S.C.E. or
G.C.E. O/L examination.
10. In addition to the English Language and Literature credits, candidates may possess credit level passes in
Fine Arts (Music, a Nigerian Language, or approved Social Science subjects.
11. Approved Social Science subjects acceptable include Economics, Government, Commerce, History,
Christian Religious Knowledge (or B.K).
12. Fair grounding in major science subjects at Secondary School level may be an advantage, especially when
it comes to practical theatre technology studies.
13. Candidates for the Standard Three Year B.A. Programme, that is, Direct Entry (D.E.) candidates, must
possess one of the following qualifications:
14. Any other two-year Diploma in Theatre or other related studies from an approved/recognized postsecondary or equivalent institution within or outside Nigeria, at least at Merit level.
15. Other related (i.e. cognate) studies equivalent to the D.T.A. may include Diploma in Journalism, Radio and
TV studies, Textile and Design studies, or Musical studies.
16. A G.C.E. A/L Certificate with a minimum of Three subjects, including English Literature with at least a
“D” Grade pass.
17. The National Certificate in Education (N.C.E.) in Three major subjects, including Literature-in-English at
least at Merit level pass.
18. The I.J.M.B. Certificate in Three relevant subjects including Literature-in-English with at least “D” Grade
pass.
1. A two-year OND in Mass Communication from approved/recognized University or Polytechnic with at
least a 2.75 G.P.A. at Merit level.
In all cases above, from 1 to 19 candidates MUST still possess Five Credit level passes in English Language
and Literature-in-English and any other three relevant and approved subjects in the G.C.E. O/L, NECO,
W.A.S.S.C.E., or equivalent examination, but obtained at not more than two sittings.
309
NOTE: Fair grounding in Secondary Science subjects may be an advantage, as they include, by JSSIII and
SSIII levels, element of Integrated Science, Mathematics, Chemistry and Physics, essential in applied
theatre technology and play production studies.
Areas of Specialization
1.
THEATRE HISTORY & COMPARATIVE THEATRE, CODED
Histories and Theatre “World” of Africa, Americas, Europe and the Orient. Also the Theatre “Movements”
classicism through expressionism, romanticism, realism, to absurdism and other avantagardisms.
2.
DRAMATIC THEORY AND CRITICISM, CODED
Theories and principles of criticism and evaluation from Aristotle to Patrice Pavis,:
“The poetic”
to “semiotics”, including principles of aesthetics derived from purely
Nigerian and/or African bases such as
folklore and its practice.
3.
DRAMATURGY, CODED
Play writing: scripting and structuring ideas and action for stage, radio, TV and Film
video. Directing In The Theatre & Media, Coded
(cinema) and
4.
TECHNOLOGY AND DESIGN SCRIPT ANALYSIS, CODED
Lighting and sound design: Scenery and Set and Props design and construction. Costume,
and Masks design and construction.
Make-up
5.
PERFORMANCE ARTS, CODED
Acting for stage, radio, TV and Film (cinema). Speech Communication, Mime, body language and
various movements.
6.
MEDIA AND FINE APPLIED ARTS, CODED
Radio, TV, Film Studies as broadcast arts. Graphic, textiles and sculptural studies as they reflect in or
relate to drama.
7.
THEATRE IN EDUCATION, CODED
Educational drama and its research methods creative dramatics, (including Children’s
Therapeutic Theatre. Community Theatre.
Theatre).
8.
THEATRE ADMINISTRATION & APPLIED THEATRE, CODED
Theatre Administration. Production Planning Stage management. Studio management.
9.
THEATRE MUSIC AND CHOREOGRAPHY, CODED
Dance and Kinesthetics in drama. Dance history and techniques. Music: ensemble, keyboard harmony,
opera and operatic forms, also sound effect.
Therefore, ten scholarship/subject areas shall form the core subject areas for course numbering and
organization. Each is essentially a specialization area, and the ‘zero’ and the ‘first’ areas largely merge
in practice to give Nine Working Areas.
The aim of each is to meet the specific professional and Nigerian need as dictated by the changing
times.
COURSE OUTLINE
Undergraduate Programme
YEAR ONE
Course
Code
THA1001
THA1101
FIRST SEMESTER
Course title
Traditional
Theatre
Introduction
Theatre
to
African
Credit
Hr
3
Course
Code
THA1012
Drama
3
THA1502
310
SECOND SEMESTER
Course title
History of Drama & Theatre
Beginnings to Medieval
Basic Acting Skills
Credit Hr
3
3
THA1401
THA1405
GSS1101
GSS1111
Intro. to Theatre Design &
Technology
OR
Beginning Theatre Design
& Tech
The Use of English
Communication Skill I
Citizenship Education
3
THA1602
Basic Communication Theory
3
3
THA1805
OR
Participation Orient to C.U.T.
3
3
GSS1102
3
GSS1121
Philosophic & Logic
Required Elective Courses (Any one of
the following)
ELS1021
Introduction to Prose
3
FRH1061
3
Introduction
Language I
to
French
Use of English &
Communication Skill II
GSS1131
History & Philosophy of
Science
Required Elective Courses
ELS1022
Introduction to Dramatic
Literature
FRH1062
Introduction to French
Language II
HIS1022
Introduction to History
3
EDF1202
Total credit hours
3
3
3
3
3
History & Philosophy of
Education
Total credit hours
21
3
21
YEAR TWO
Course
Code
THA2011
FIRST SEMESTER
Course title
Credit
Hr
3
Course
Code
THA 2022
3
THA 2032
3
3
THA 2202
THA 2402
3
THA 2512
THA2901
History of Drama &
Theatre Renaissance to 19th
Century
Introduction to Dramatic
Literature & Criticism
Introduction to Directing
Basic Speech Arts &
Acting Techniques Voice
on the Stage
Introduction to Dance
GSS2111
Introduction to Computer
3
THA 2702
Required Elective Courses (Any one of
the following)
EDF 2201
School & Society
3
THA 2802
3
THA 2812
PHI 2041
SOC 2301
3
3
21
THA2111
THA2311
THA2511
History of Philosophy
Sociology of the Family
Total credit hours
SECOND SEMESTER
Course title
Credit Hr
History of Drama & Theatre:
The Modern Period
3
African Dramatic Theatre:
The Colonial Period
Fundamentals of Playwriting
Basic Scene & Stage
Lighting Design
3
Basic Speech Arts & Acting
Techniques Voice in the
Media
Introduction to Creative
Dramatics
Introduction
Stage
Management
Participation Orientation to
C.U.T.
3
Total credit hours
24
3
3
3
3
3
YEAR THREE
Course
Code
THA 3001
THA 3011
THA 3201
THA 3301
FIRST SEMESTER
Course title
Research
Methods:
Definitions & the style
Manual
Modern African Drama &
Theatre
Playwriting: The Scenario
& Libretto
Script Analysis and
Interpretation
Course Code
SECOND SEMESTER
Course title
Credit
Hr
3
THA 3002
Research Methods:
Applications & Sources
3
3
THA 3012
Orientation Theatre
3
3
THA 3402
Costume & make-up design
3
3
THA 3412
Scene design & stage
lighting
3
311
Credit Hr
THA 3701
Drama in Education
3
THA 3502
THA 3901
Basic Choreography &
Kinesthetics
3
THA 3612
THA 3702
THA 3805
Total credit hours
21
Non-Verbal Communication
for Actors
Radio/TV/Film Production
techniques
OR
Children Theatre Education
3
Participation Orientation to
C.U.T.
Total credit hours
3
3
3
24
STRUCTURE AND OUTLAY FOR THE THREE-YEAR PROGRAMME
A. Direct Entry Qualification With An Agregate 5.1, Diploma Art Studies (D.T.A.)
Direct entry qualification 5.7, o.n.d. In mass communication
Course
Code
THA2011
THA2111
THA2311
THA2511
FIRST SEMESTER
Course title
History of Drama &
Theatre Renaissance to 19th
Century
Introduction to Dramatic
Literature & Criticism
Introduction to Directing
Course Code
THA 1602
Basic Communication
Theory
3
THA 2022
3
THA 2032
History of Drama &
Theatre: The Modern Period
African Dramatic Theatre:
The Colonial Period
OR
3
THA2901
Basic Speech Arts &
Acting Techniques Voice
on the Stage
Introduction to Dance
GSS1121
Philosophic & Logic
3
THA 2402
GSS1111
Citizenship of Education
3
THA 2512
GSS1101
The Use of English Comm.
Skills I
3
THA 2702
3
THA 2812
THA 2202
THA 2802
GSS 1132
Total credit hours
SECOND SEMESTER
Course title
Credit
Hr
3
24
Fundamentals of
Playwriting
Fundamentals of Design
Scenery, Lighting Design
Basic Speech Arts & Acting
Techniques Voice in the
Media Basic Scene & Stage
lighting Design
Introduction to Creative
Dramatics
Participation Orientation to
C.U.T.
Introduction Stage
Management
History & Philosophy of
Science
Total credit hours
Credit Hr
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
27
B. Direct Entry qualification with a diploma agregate score of 5.4, 5.6, G.C.E. A/L or J.A.M.B.
Course
Code
THA1001
THA1101
THA2311
GSS1111
FIRST SEMESTER
Course title
Traditional
African
Theatre
Introduction to Drama
Theatre
History of Drama &
Theatre Renaissance to the
19th Century
Citizenship Education
Credit
Hr
3
Course
Code
THA1012
3
THA1602
3
3
SECOND SEMESTER
Course title
Credit Hr
History of Drama & Theatre
Beginnings to Medieval
Basic Communication Theory
3
THA 2022
History of Drama & Theatre
the Modern Period
3
THA 2032
African Dramatic Theatre the
3
312
3
THA 2311
Introduction to Directing
3
THA 2402
THA 2511
Basic Speech Arts &
Acting Techniques Voice
on stage
Introduction to Dance
3
THA
The Use of English
Communication Skill I
3
THA 2802
3
THA 2812
GSS 1131
THA 2901
GSS 1101
Total credit hours
THA 2702
24
Colonial Period
Basic Scene & Stage lighting
Design
OR
Acting Techniques Voice on
stage
3
3
Introduction to Creative
Dramatics
Intro. to Stage Mgt.
3
Participation Orient to C.U.T.
History & Philosophy of
Science
Total credit hours
3
3
3
20
C. Direct Entry With Nigerian Certificate In Education (Nce) Qualification 5.5, (Exmpt From GSS (See Appendix 3)
Course
Code
THA1001
THA1101
THA1401
GSS2311
THA 2311
THA2011
THA 2511
THA 2901
FIRST SEMESTER
Course title
Traditional
African
Theatre
Introduction to Drama
Theatre
Introduction to Theatre
Design and Tech.
Introduction to Directing
Credit
Hr
3
Course
Code
THA1012
3
THA1602
3
THA 2022
3
THA 2032
SECOND SEMESTER
Course title
Credit Hr
History of Drama & Theatre
Beginnings to Medieval
Basic Communication Theory
3
History of Drama & Theatre
the Modern Period
African Dramatic Theatre the
Colonial Period
OR
Basic Scene & Stage Lighting
Design
3
3
3
Introduction to Directing
History of Dram & Theatre
Renaissance to the 19th
Century
Basic Speech Arts &
Acting Techniques Voice
on stage
Introduction to Dance
3
3
THA2402
3
THA 2702
Introduction to Creative
Dramatics
3
3
THA2602
3
Total credit hours
21
Basic News & Documentary
Design
Participation Orient to C.U.T.
Total credit hours
THA 2812
3
3
3
18
YEAR FOUR
(Standard 4 - Year & Standard 3-Year Programmes Merged Into The Specialization 0 – 9)
Course
Code
THA4001
THA4011
THA4201
THA4211
THA4305
THA4815
FIRST SEMESTER
Course title
Topics in Theatre Arts
Studies
Theories
of
Dramatic
Theories
of
Modern
Theatre
Advanced Playwriting
Dimensional Dramaturgy
Advanced Play Production
Directing
Industrial Theatre
Total credit hours
Credit
Hr
3
Course
Code
THA4002
3
THA4022
3
3
3
THA4005
THA4010
THA4012
THA4015
15
313
SECOND SEMESTER
Course title
Credit Hr
Criticism
3
Comparative World Theatre &
Drama
Comprehensives
Project/Thesis
Studies in Dramatic Literature
3
Nigerian Drama & Theatre
3
Total credit hours
21
3
3
3
Course
Code
THA4001
THA4011
YEAR FOUR
Year Four (Standard 4-Year & Standard 3-Year Programmes Merged Into
The Specialization 0-9
FIRST SEMESTER
SECOND SEMESTER
Course title
Credit
Course
Course title
Hr
Code
Topics in Theatre Arts
3
THA4005
Comprehensives
Studies
Theories
of
Dramatic
3
THA4201
Theories
of
Modern
Theatre
Advanced Playwriting
THA4012
3
THA4022
THA4211
THA4205
Dimensional Dramaturgy
Advanced Playwriting
3
3
THA4010
THA4202
THA4025
Total credit hours
Course
Code
THA4001
THA4011
15
3
THA4010
THA4201
3
THA4202
THA4211
THA4301
Dimensional Dramaturgy
Experimental Directing
3
3
THA4205
THA4025
Total credit hours
15
THA4415
3
Studies in Dramatic Literature
3
Comparative World Theatre &
Drama
Project/Thesis
Advanced Script Analysis &
Interpretation
Nigerian Drama & Theatre
3
Total credit hours
21
YEAR FOUR
Year Four (Standard 4-Year & Standard 3-Year Programmes Merged Into
The Specialization 0-9
FIRST SEMESTER
SECOND SEMESTER
Course title
Credit
Course
Course title
Hr
Code
Topics in Theatre Arts
3
THA4005
Comprehensives
Studies
Theories
of
Dramatic
Theories
of
Modern
Theatre
Advanced Playwriting
Credit Hr
3
3
3
Credit Hr
3
Project/Thesis
3
Advanced Script Analysis &
Interpretation
Principles of Adaptation
Nigerian Drama & Theatre
3
Technical Directing
Total credit hours
3
21
3
3
YEAR FOUR
(Standard 4-Year & Standard 3-Year Programmes Merged Into The Specialization 0-9
Course
Code
THA4001
FIRST SEMESTER
Course title
Topics in Theatre Arts
Studies
Theories
of
Dramatic
SECOND SEMESTER
Course title
Credit
Hr
3
Course
Code
THA4005
Credit Hr
Comprehensives
3
THA4405
THA4201
Design Formalism
Advanced Playwriting
3
3
THA4010
THA4025
Project
Nigerian Drama & Theatre
3
3
THA4201
THA4815
Advanced Playwriting
Industrial Theatre
Total credit hours
3
3
15
THA4205
THA4201
Principles of Adaptation
Advanced Playwriting
Total credit hours
3
3
21
FIRST SEMESTER
Course title
Credit
Course
Course
314
SECOND SEMESTER
Course title
Credit Hr
Code
THA4001
Hr
3
Code
THA4005
Comprehensives
3
3
THA4010
Project
3
THA4405
Theories
of
Modern
Theatre
Design Formalism
Nigerian Drama & Theatre
3
THA4201
Advanced Playwriting
3
THA4412
3
THA4815
Industrial Theatre
Total credit hours
3
15
THA4415
Advanced Costume & Makeup Design
Technical Directing
Total credit hours
3
21
Credit
Hr
3
Course
Code
THA4005
SECOND SEMESTER
Course title
Credit Hr
Comprehensives
3
Theories
of
Modern
Theatre
Advanced Acting
3
THA4010
Project/Thesis
3
Nigerian Drama & Theatre
3
Speech Communication
Industrial Theatre
Pantomime and Animation
Total credit hours
3
3
3
18
THA4502
THA4512
Role Interpretation
Acting Laboratory
3
3
Total credit hours
18
Credit
Hr
3
Course
Code
THA4005
Comprehensives
3
3
THA4010
Project/Thesis
3
3
3
THA 4025
THA 4605
3
3
3
THA 4702
3
21
THA 4815
Nigerian Drama & Theatre
Theories of Plastic/Graphic
Design
Advanced Theatre in
Education
Industrial Theatre
Total credit hours
Credit
Hr
3
Course
Code
THA4005
Comprehensives
3
Theories
of
Modern
Theatre
Advanced Creative
Dramatics
Education Theatre
3
THA4010
Project/Thesis
3
Nigerian Drama & Theatre
3
3
THA 4702
3
Advanced Puppetry &
Mime
3
THA 4712
Advanced Theatre in
Education
Dramatic Techniques tor the
Classroom
THA4011
Course
Code
THA4001
THA4011
THA4501
THA4505
THA4815
THA 4511
Course
Code
THA4001
THA4011
THA4205
THA4501
THA 4601
THA 4611
Course
Code
THA4001
THA4011
THA 4701
THA 4701
THA 4711
Topics in Theatre Arts
Studies
Theories
of
Dramatic
FIRST SEMESTER
Course title
Topics in Theatre Arts
Studies
FIRST SEMESTER
Course title
Topics in Theatre Arts
Studies
Theories
of
Modern
Theatre
Principle of Adaptation
Advanced Play Production
& Directing
Advanced Radio/TV
Production
Advanced Film Studies
Total credit hours
FIRST SEMESTER
Course title
Topics in Theatre Arts
Studies
3
3
3
THA4025
THA4025
THA 4025
315
SECOND SEMESTER
Course title
SECOND SEMESTER
Course title
Credit Hr
3
18
Credit Hr
3
THA 4815
Course
Code
THA4001
THA4011
THA 4011
THA 4801
THA 4815
THA 4821
Course
Code
THA4001
THA4011
THA 4815
THA 4901
THA 4905
THA 4911
Industrial Theatre
Total credit hours
3
18
THA 4802
Credit
Hr
3
Course
Code
THA4005
Comprehensives
3
Theories
of
Modern
Theatre
Principles of Adaptation
Advance Studio
Management Principles
Industrial Theatre
Advanced Theatre Aamin
3
THA4010
Project/Thesis
3
3
3
THA 4025
THA 4812
3
3
3
3
THA 4802
THA 4822
Total credit hours
18
Nigerian Drama & Theatre
Advanced Production
Planning
Commercial Theatre
Architectural Designs &
Theatre Houses
Total credit hours
FIRST SEMESTER
Course title
Topics in Theatre Arts
Studies
FIRST SEMESTER
Course title
Topics in Theatre Arts
Studies
Theories
of
Modern
Theatre
Industrial Theatre
Advanced Choreography &
Kinesthetics
Operatic Forms for the
Stage
Choreography &
Storytelling
Total credit hours
Commercial Theatre
Total credit hours
SECOND SEMESTER
Course title
SECOND SEMESTER
Course title
3
21
Credit Hr
3
3
21
Credit
Hr
3
Course
Code
THA4005
Comprehensives
3
3
THA4010
Project/Thesis
3
3
3
THA 4025
THA 4902
Nigerian Drama & Theatre
Formalism in Dance
3
3
3
THA 4912
Modern Dance and Ballet in
Drama
3
3
Credit Hr
3
18
Total credit hours
18
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS - Degree Programme
FIRST YEAR COURSE
THA 1001:
TRADITIONAL AFRICAN THEATRE
A study of traditional theatre in Africa, as a non-written drama discipline in various African communities and
as a form of theatre evolving from the festival in its various contexts and settings.
THA 1005:
ENTERTAINMENTS IN AFRICAN THEATRE ENVIRONMENTS
A study of the foundations and components of indigenous entertainment in myths, folklore, songs, riddles and
parables of various theatre cultures in Africa. The relation of my myths and festivals to the local calendar is
emphasized.
THA 1012:
HISTORY OF DRAMA AND THEATRE: BEGINNINGS TO MEDIVAL
A brief outline history of the theories of the origins and development of theatre and its practice from earliest
ritual, oral, and written traditions the world over up unto the medieval times. Various contexts and texts will
help focus attention on conditions of theatrical performance, concepts of stage house, play, and the social
conventions that realized them.
THA 1101:
INTRODUCTION TO DRAMA AND THEATRE
An introductory course which explains the fundamental distinctions between the concepts of “drama” and
“theatre” understanding the idea of drama as literature in action and the inter-relatedness of literature and
performance as prelude to semiotic studies.
316
THA 1401:
INTRODUCTION TO THEATRE DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY
An elementary study of fundamental of the major arms of theatre design, viz: scene, lighting and sound; and
costume and make-up.
THA 1405:
BEGINNING THEATRE DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY
A study scene designed to text in actual production by focusing on the factors that control design procedures
for the varying media.
THA 1502:
BASIC ACTING SKILLS
A theoretical practical introduction to the artistic and imaginative properties of the beginning actors’s
equipment of body, poise and balance. The practical aspect shall be based on graded exercises.
THA 1612:
BASIC COMMUNICATION THEORY
A study of the basic models and theories of communication as the process evolves from individual perceptions,
language habits, and behaviour in intrapersonal, interpersonal and social transactions.
THA 1805:
PARTICIPATION ORIENTATION
The participation of students in Calabar University Theatre (C.U.T.) production, as directors, actors, designers,
technical directors. Stage and house managers and crew members are evaluated by the supervising teacher.
Effective student contribution at critique meetings, before after the production is encouraged.
HISTORY OF DRAMA & THEATRE: RENAISSANCE TO 19TH
CENTURY
A historical survey of the major events and development in the theory and practice of world drama and theatre
from the Renaissance to 1860.
THA 2011:
THA 2022:
HISTORY OF DRAMA & THEATRE: THE MODERN PERIOD
A historical survey of the evolution of dram and theatre practice with their socio-economic factors since 1860.
the concept of modernism and theatre is explored through the various forms and contexts of Romanticism,
Realism, Naturalism, Symbolism, Impressionism, Expressionism, Dadaism and Absurdism.
THA 2032:
AFRICAN DRAMA & THEATRE: THE COLONIAL PERIOD
A study of indigenous theatrical activity in Africa as it was based in churches, concert party bands, minstrelsy,
and pop song groups from its beginnings to 1960.
THA 2111:
INTRODUCTION TO DRAMATIC LITERATURE & CRITICISM
An introductory study of critical methodologies since Aristotle, using selected plays. The student is expected to
understand and appreciate how the criticism of drama has shaped and been shaped by the writer’s principles of
selection and arrangement.
THA 2202:
FUNDAMENTALS OF PLAYWRITING
With emphasis on plot and plot devices, characterization, theme and dialogue, the student is introduced to the
art of play writing. Exercise will be used to develop the student’s grasp and execution of these elements in
practice.
THA 2311:
INTRODUCTION TO DIRECTING
A study of the basic mechanics of directing for the stage, the director’s application of the principles of
composition. Picturization movement, rhythm and pantomimic dramatization is emphasized.
THA 2402:
FUNDAMENTALS OF DESIGN: SCENERY, LIGHTING AND
COSTUMING AND EFFECTS
A basic course in which design in scenery, costuming, lighting and effects, including sounds, are taught in
relation to proscenium theatres and their deployment in a traveling theatre context, camping situations and,
adhoc environment.
317
THA 2505:
IMPROVISATION
An exploration of the artistic imagination by focusing on the specific technique of acting which propel the
performer emotionally, physically and verbally.
THA 2511:
BASIC SPEECH ARTS AND ACTING TECHNIQUES: VOICE ON THE
STAGE
Through basic exercise which differentiate and aid articulation and voice projection the student studies the
phonemic and stress patterns of English and their interaction with various Nigeria language tones. So grounded
the student learns to speak poetry and prose with differing dramatic effect as demanded by the acting context or
the text.
THA 2512:
BASIC SPEECH ARTS AND ACTING TECHNIQUES: VOICE IN MEDIA
Through basic exercises which differentiate and aid articulation and Voice projection the student studies public
speaking and personality development in various media contexts from the electronic to written.
THA 2602:
BASIC NEW AND DOCUMENTARY DESIGN
A study of major characteristics of the media of communication with a view to understanding the basic lay-out
of new and documentary items on radio, television and in print.
THA 2702:
INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE DRAMATICS
The student learns from historical and performance perspective, the objectives, purposes and values of
developmental drama. Emphasis is laid on creative techniques in drama such as games theories, role-playing,
story-telling, teaching strategies, the uses of the arts, music and puppetry, especially in relation to children and
adolescent activities. Exercises are used to illuminate the foundations of learning through drama.
THA 2802:
INTRODUCTION TO STAGE MANAGEMENT
THA 2812:
PARTICIPATION ORIENTATION
A supervised participation of student in Calabar University Theatre (C.U.T.) production such that the student
learns critique writing, management, acting, directing or general backstage work as part of a term.
THA 2901:
INTRODUCTION TO DANCE
A study of basic composition techniques, movement and coordination, and elementary choreographic designs
in dance.
THIRD YEAR COURSES
THA 3001:
RESEARCH METHODS: DEFINITIONS AND THE STYLE MANUAL
A course in the basic approaches to scientific gathering of data definition of methodology, evolution of
presentation style manuals, after the collection and analysis of material for research, in order to achieve a
perfect finish of the essay, or project.
THA 3002:
RESEARCH METHODS: APPLICATIONS AND SOURCES
A further development in research procedure that determines application of sources, following historically and
practically the best and latest models for scholarly re-discovery and re-ordering emphasis on application and
use of language.
THA 3011:
MODERN AFRICAN DRAMA AND THEATRE
A study of the origins and development of written works of drama in Africa since 1800. the courses shows how
major African authors have used theatre to respond to their cultural, social and political situations in various
regions of the continent.
THA 3012:
MODERN AFRICAN DRAMA AND THEATRE
A general survey of Japanese, Balinese, Indian and Chinese theatre by following their major movements,
traditions, and developments in aesthetics and other departments of the theatre and in various contexts.
THA 3022:
EXPERIMENTAL AFRICAN THEATRE
A study of how ritual, myth, history, and sociology have been used to identify and build dramatic modes and
forms in Africa today.
318
THA 3301:
DIRECTING ON STAGE: SCRIPT ANALYSIS & INTERPRETATION
This courses, emphasized, using dramatic texts of various ages and cultures, that the play script is blue-print for
the theatrical event. Students will learn to understand and appreciate the thematic and aesthetic values of
scripts, and develop the artistic sense that will enable them to articulate ideas for performance. (Prerequisite
THA 2311)
THA 3402:
COSTUME AND MAKEUP DESIGN
The student follows the history and evolution of various style of costuming through the age. In the process, he
notes how national and regional traditions of dressing, textiles, and garment textures have influenced the
conceptions of costuming for the stage, and other performance media, as well as make-up techniques.
(Prerequisite: THA 2402)
THA 3412:
SCENE DESIGN AND STAGE LIGHTING/EFFECTS
The student concentrates, after the basic on wider principles of scene design and functions, styles, aesthetic and
procedures for sound and effects designing for the stage and studio. By the end of the course, the student
should be able to conceive, to record, and supervise the execution of a scenic vision. (Prerequisite THA 2402)
THA 3502:
NON-VERBAL COMMUNICATION FOR THE ACTOR
A study of non-verbal cues as the external stimuli emanating from body motion, characteristics of appearance
and voice (kinesics) and the use of space and distancing (proxemics) which enable the actor to recognize and
interpret the cultural and racial differences in communicating roles in various contexts. (Prerequisites: THA
1602)
THA 3805:
PARTICIPATION ORIENTATION
Supervised student participation as directors, technical director, stage/studio managers, light/sound designers
and other crew work, in Calabar University Theatre (C.U.T.) production.
THA 3812:
PRODUCTION PLANNING
The student is taught the theory and practice of the processes that underline a theatrical production for stage
and cinematic and television filming from script (selection) to the opening of the show. The artistic and
commercial aspects of planning and scheduling are highlighted. The prime example will be the ‘Season’ of the
Calabar University Theatre (C.U.T.) Productions.
THA 3901:
BASIC CHOREOGRAPHY & KINESTHETICS
An exploration of the techniques of dance-drama idioms based on selected texts that reveal the interrelation of
linear and non-linear activity, traditional relationships of dance to music, variation, direction, and rhythm.
Suitable exercises will distinguish ‘set and ‘improvised’ dances.
FOURTH YEAR COURSES
THA 4001:
TOPICS IN THEATRE ARTS STUDIES
This course is a study of chief thematic categories of drama as determined from selected works of principal and
seminar playwrights. Dramatic form and content are then used as an index of the social conditions in which
plays are written, and their ideas choreographers and semoticians world-wide, Complement such major themes
as politics, society religion, love, identity and alienation.
THA 4002:
THEORIES OF DRAMATIC CRITICISM
A study of the main theories and the trends in dramatic criticism, its methodologies and approaches from
Aristotle to Patrice Pavis using appropriately illustrative play texts.
THA 4005:
COMPREHENSIVE
An integrated revisions course in which the nine basic core/scholarship areas of theatre studies, i.e. theatre
history and criticism, dramaturgy, and design, performing arts and media, education and administration,
choreography are systematized and schematized for easy comprehension as a succession of theories, ideas, and
practical endeavours, for the well-versed student of theatre.
THA 4010:
PROJECT
319
This is a research project in which a student submits a reasoned essay in selected practical or theoretical areas
of theatre arts and media studies, in not more than fifty pages, quarto-sized, typed double-spaced, and bound,
together with reference notes, cited works and appendixes in the MLA/APA documentation format.
THA 4011:
THEORIES OF THE MODERN THEATRE
An intensive study of the major theories of theatrical practice from the pre-modern through the modern into the
post-modern periods. Theories, movements and concepts will be considered both in their textual and historical
implications.
THA 4012:
STUDIES IN DRAMATIC LITERATURE
An intensive study of the works of major playwrights from Aeschylus to the present. Emphasis is laid on how
dramatic literature has reflected socio-historical, economic, cultural and intellectual traditions and values.
THA 4025:
MODERN NIGERIAN DRAMA & THEATRE
A close focus on developments and trends in Nigerian Drama and Theatre since 1900 to see how playwrights,
directors, proprietors of performance groups, designers, choreographers, technologists have handled the
revolution of contemporary times and with what prospects for the allied media serviced by drama and theatre
such as video and cinema.
THA 4022:
COMPARATIVE WORLD DRAMA AND THEATRE
An intensive study of drama and theatre practice of selected dramatists from all over the world, and
developments, as they compare with aspects of Greek, African, European and American equivalents.
THA 4032:
ADVANCED THEATRE RESEARCH
A course designed to teach the student the practical use of fieldwork techniques, project write-ups, proposal
writing and the use of achives and libraries as part of art education in developing reviews, critiques and
summaries.
THA 4201:
ADVANCED PLAYWRITING
A study and execution of exercises in the relationships between action in all its dimensions and shapes and the
scripted word for different types of stages and various genres of drama-tragedy, comedy, farce, melodrama.
Students will produce a script in any genre of their liking at the end.
THA 4205:
PRINCIPLES OF ADAPTATION
A study of how to create drama out of historical, mythical and legendary tales, fiction, narrative poems, etc.,
with emphasis on meaningful, in-depth action, characterization and situation.
THA 4211:
DIMENSIONAL DRAMATURGY
A study of how to suit styles of writing for radio, television and film to the demands of each of those arms of
the media, particularly in character and plot development and achievement of contrast and variety. Students
will complete a script in one of the areas.
THA 4305:
ADVANCED PLAY PRODUCTION AND DIRECTING
The student applies critical, aesthetic and interpretative skills to produce a full-length play on any kind of
drama arena, improvised, or proscenium such that they gain expertise in one specific area of production:
designing, acting, directing, technical directing as participates in the production process.
THA 4401: DESIGN FORMALISM
A course designed to impact practical skills in the application of varying styles of Constructivism and
Formalism to Realist and non-Realist production design, using facades and perspectives derived from
architecture.
THA 4402:
CONTROL SYSTEMS
Advanced work in the use of “Standard” lighting plans, major lighting instruments and control systems in
various production contexts such as panoramic festivals, music studios, dance-halls, etc.
THA 4405:
ADVANCED THEATRE DESIGN
320
A study of the relation, in practice, between theatre spaces and the scenic designs they hold, between elements
of text and script production approaches in any kind of venue, between artistic use of intensities, colours and
movement and the scenario.
THA 4412:
ADVANCED COSTUME AND MAKEUP DESIGN
A study of the specific theories and practices of garment and dress design and execution to suit a variety of
ceremonial, festive, quasi-theatre, and theatrical performances, together with the matching makeup design and
realization.
THA 4415:
TECHNICAL DIRECTING
The student learns the pre-production duties of a Technical Director through the planning of work schedules,
the deployment of crew, and the sharing of responsibilities.
THA 4500:
GUERILLA THEATRE
A study of the actor as the chameleon of changing social configurations in militaristic, pious, intellectual, rural
and urban settings and environments.
THA 4501:
ADVANCED ACTING
The course teaches the student actor “how to do homework”, when he is developing a character and scoring a
role with the animation of the human instrument. He learns to find the ”life” of the part within the frame of a
given scene so as to realize uniquely the essence of the role.
THA 4502:
ROLE INTERPRETATION
A study of the varied uses of intra-personal, dyadic interaction, and other awareness devices to alter and change
communicative patterns for the individual actor as he prepares for roles in a variety of scripts.
THA 4505:
SPEECH COMMUNICATION
An advanced course in which the various relationships of communication are studied as a composite of the
transmission of information, ideas, emotions and skills; the use of not only pictures and figures, but also
essentially by the use of the actor’s words articulated from a trained voice in a number of language situations.
THA 4511:
PANTOMIME AND ANIMATION
A study of practical application of the principles of mine, puppetry and animation in various social uses.
THA 4512:
ACTING LABORATORY
A practical study of dramatic texts, selected stereotypical characters, anomalous situations, and historical
models, as a means to a full grasp of the problems of the actor on any of the media.
THA 4601:
ADVANCED RADIO/TV PRODUCTION
An intensive study of Radio-TV-Film scripting of broadcast dramatics, news newsreels, advertisement jingles,
and slogans.
THA 4605:
THEORIES OF PLASTIC AND GRAPHICS DESIGN
A basic course which explores the relation of plastic, graphic, textile and sculptural arts of Nigeria to theatrical
needs in the construction of masks, maches figurines and statuettes, posters, brochures, etc., in production, or in
classroom, the demonstration arena, or other dramatic context.
THA 4611:
ADVANCED FILM STUDIES
A study of the principles that underlie motion picture structures and aesthetics; of techniques of narration in
documentaries and features, of styles of writing shooting scripts, such that a student masters them fully and can
apply the theory and practice of film production.
THA 4611:
ADVANCED CREATIVE DRAMATICS
A study of the use of creative techniques of drama, improvisation, games, theories, and narration techniques by
the teacher for a variety of audiences and audience levels: literate and illiterate; adult and adolescent;
professional and laymen, pre-school and school age.
321
THA 4702:
ADVANCED THEATRE-IN-EDUCATION
A practical application of the principles of conflict/conflict resolution, model-building, visual picturization and
other theatrical arts skills in socially meaningful situations; the family, the classroom, the club, caucuses at
bars, restaurants and motor parks.
THA 4711:
ADVANCED PUPPETRY AND MIME
Creative application in defined situations of the techniques of robot-control, silent animation, gestures and
other non-verbal characteristics of action, in order to interpret the symbolism or allegorical nature of the
situation to varied audiences.
THA 4712:
DRAMA TECHNIQUES FOR CLASSROOM
Essentially a course which elaborates the implications and methods of teaching as a performing art,
emphasizing the methods of confidence building, planning and using ordered work programmes, charismatic
projection use of audio-visual aids.
THA 4705:
EDUCATIONAL THEATRE RESEARCH METHODS
A study of scientific methodology for gathering, storing, and analyzing data and information from various
educative sources, nurseries, primary schools, secondary schools, and tertiary institutions, or order to build
relevant curricular models for the enhancement of education through drama.
THA 4801:
ADVANCED STUDIO MANAGEMENT PRINCIPLES
A practical exposition of the problems of the broadcast studio management, floor management, organization
and their solutions according to context and environmental factors.
THA 4802:
COMMERCIAL THEATRE
A course in processes of turning theatre into paying business through objective management principles, the
drawing-up of season timetables, brochures, canvassing, adverts, and other practical aids.
THA 4812:
ADVANCED PRODUCTION PLANNING
A study of integral functions of the legal, artistic, and commercial aspects of the production as it is planned
from text selection to the conclusion of the run. Students will be required to submit a model plan with a full
write-up.
THA 4815:
INDUSTRIAL THEATRE
This course studies the theatrical and practical systems whereby the administration and management of theatre
as an industry can be enhanced through productive common theatre relationships, devolution of responsibilities
in management and methods of decision-making. Students go out to the field, undertake a primary 3-month
live-in theatre work experience and write-up a report.
THA 4821:
ADVANCED THEATRE ADMINISTRATION
A study of the principles of commercial management, programming and administration of theatre houses in
widely separated regions of the world and suiting the models by selection to Nigerian conditions. Practice is
based on the organization and administration of Calabar University Theatre, and the running of Theatre Arts
Department in its non-academic aspect.
THA 4922:
ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN & THEATRE HOUSES
A study of how the architect’s functional use of space and structures can serve the theatre designer who has to
build theatre houses at given sites using ordinary local materials. Both the historical alliance and the present
interdependence of artist’s and architect’s skills are underscored, in an age when engineering, urban planning,
and political decisions on culture are prominent.
THA 4901:
ADVANCED CHOREOGRAPHY AND KINESTHETICS
A course designed to synthesize skills in dance, general movements, aesthetic awareness, yoga, acrobatics and
music.
THA 4902:
FORMALISM IN DANCE
322
A study of how a choreographer can design and teach various forms of the dance using fully concatenated
movements, shapes, and ideas from a variety of cultural contexts.
THA 4905:
OPERATIC FORMS FOR THE STAGE
A study of various musical theatre forms to explain musicals; operas, operattas, and musical theatres with
examples from West Sida Story to Demas Nwoko’s New World that is the variety of universal contexts.
THA 4911:
CHOREOGRAPHY AND STORY-TELLING
A study in which basic exercises will be used to show how dance movements and patterns can piece together a
story adapted from texts, or invented, or improvised, in a practical theatre situation.
THA 4912:
MODERN DANCE AND BALLET IN DRAMA
A course which explores and compares trends in modern dance schools: African pop, orchestrations, and
European ballet concepts with the evolving concepts of dance in Africa with a view to evolving notations,
keys, and methods of dance education for the contemporary theatre.
POSTGRADUATE PROGRAMME
Objectives
i. To train graduates for relevant careers in the managerial cadres of administration and teaching; in
broadcasting for radio and television and in the management of cultural centres, museums and community
theatres.
ii. To equip graduate scholars and critics.
iii. To equip such scholars and critics with in-depth knowledge of the latest theatrical developments and
production procedures to enable them meet the challenges of the complex, diverse and sometimes
conflicting cultural demands of a changing society.
iv. To equip such graduates to become self-employable creative artist(e)s, managers, technologists, writers,
directors, and choreographers.
Degrees Offered
M. F. A., M.A. and Ph.D Degrees.
COURSES
(a)
M.A. Courses
THA 5000
THA 5001
THA 5005
THA 5101
THA 5111
THA 5112
THA 5132
THA 5201
THA 5202
THA 5211
THA 5212
THA 5222
THA 5401
THA 5402
THA 5412
THA 5421
THA 5422
THA 5431
THA 5432
THA 5442
THA 5501
THA 5502
THA 5511
-
Nigerian Cultures and The Nigerian Cultural Policy
Research Methods in Theatre Studies
Approaches to Arts Criticism
Studies in Directing
Theory and History of Directing
Theory and History of Playwriting
Experimental Playwriting
Media History and Criticism
Playwriting for the Media
Directing for the Media
Script Analysis for Directors
Dance Education and Criticism
Creative Dramatics for Children
Theory and Criticism of Educational Drama
Drama in the African Educational System
Improvisational Techniques
Educational Theatre Organization
Techniques and Problems of Adaptation
Directing for Teachers
Teaching Practicum in Classroom Dramatic Education
Theatre Marketing Policies and Problems
Concepts, Principles and Practices of General Administration
Audience Engineering
323
THA 5512
THA 5522
THA 5532
THA 5542
THA 5552
THA 6010
-
(b) M.F.A. Courses
THA 5232
THA 5301
THA 5305
THA 5311
THA 5322
THA 5332
THA 6231
THA 6211
THA 6222
THA 6331
THA 6421
THA 6301
THA 6311
THA 6321
THA 6352
THA 6372
THA 6382
THA 6252
THA 6262
THA 7000
-
The Performing Arts and the Law
Budgeting for, and Financing Productions
Personnel Management in Theatre Institutions
The Arts as an Industry
Promotion Management
Thesis of Projects
Sociology of Dance and Choreography
History and Development of Theatre Houses
Research Methodology
Technical Management Seminar
Scenic Design for Stage and the Media
Lighting for Radio, Television and Film
Writing for Radio, Television and Film
Modern African Choreography
Studies in Directing and Theories of Acting
Improvisational Techniques and Role-playing
Educational Broadcasting
Critical Approaches to Design Conceptualization
Production Management
Sound Technology on Stage and in the Media
Scenic Styles and Special Lighting Effects
History and Evolution of African Costume and Make-Ups
Performance Venues and Functional Spaces
Semiotics of the Performance Arts
Introductory Semiotics
Projects/Thesis (in The M.F.A. Programme)
(c) M.F.A. & Ph.D Courses
THA 7201
Creative Dramatics and Professional Performance in Nigeria
THA 7212
Communication as a Social Focus
THA 7221
Semiotic Approaches to Experimental Directing
THA 7231
Issues in Choreography and Technology
THA 7232
Perspectives in Media Drama
THA 7211
Techniques and Problems of Transposition
THA 7241
Dance History and Criticism
THA 7251
Reading in Mass Communication
THA 7300
Projects/Thesis (in The M.F.A. Technical. & Design Programme)
Same in Technology and Design
THA 7301
Issues in Technology and Design
THA 7311
Communication and Technology Seminar
THA 7321
Fabricating Equipment and Materials for Performance
THA 7331
Scenery Design Procedures
THA 7341
Physiology in Costume and Make-up
THA 7351
Special Costume Design Procedure
THA 7412
Theories of Educational Theatre
THA 7422
Masters of Educational Drama Directing
THA 7401
Studies in Drama-in-Education
THA 7421
Creative Drama Workshop for Teachers
THA 7501
Philosophy and Aesthetics in the Arts
THA 7511
Artistic Concepts in Development
THA 7521
Economic History of Arts
THA 7531
Budgeting and Marketing of Arts
THA 7502
Developing Arts Patrons and Audience
THA 7512
Community Theatre and Development
THA 7522
Human Relations in Organization
324
THA 7532
THA 7541
THA 7551
THA 7561
THA 7562
THA 8100
THA 8200
-
Labour Relations and the Arts
Management/Leadership in Arts Organization
Arts Programming for Change
Problems in Arts Management
Arts Management Practicum
Thesis/Project/Dissertation (For the Ph.D Programme
Comprehensives
A BRIEF HISTORY OF THE
FACULTY OF BASIC MEDICAL SCIENCES
Introduction:
The Faculty of Basic Medical Sciences of the University of Calabar is a foundation Faculty of the College of
Medical Sciences established in 1978. It was then known as School of Basic Medical Sciences and was run by
a Deputy Provost.
DEPARTMENT OF ANATOMY
Objectives of the B.Sc. Programme
This course is designed to provide a comprehensive training in Human Anatomy. This course is therefore
planned to prepare a cadre of assistant teachers to fill the lacunae in various Medical Institutions in the country.
At the end of their training, the students are expected to have acquired sound background in theoretical
knowledge and proficiency in practical aspects of anatomical sciences to stimulate their minds into research
and teaching. They will also be eligible for postgraduate studies in the subject.
Admission Requirements
Entry qualification for the B.Sc. course in Anatomy is similar to that required for B.Sc. courses in the college
of Medical Sciences, University if Calabar.
The UME entry requirements for the B.Sc. (Hons.) Degree Programme in Anatomy are five (5) credit passes at
ordinary level SSCE or GCE which should include credit passes in the following subjects: Physics, Chemistry,
Biology, Mathematics, English Language obtained at not more than two sittings.
COURSE OUTLINE
YEAR ONE
Course
Code
PHY 1101
CHM1011
MTH1111
BIO 1011
ZEB 2031
GSS1101
GSS 1131
FIRST SEMESTER
Course title
Introductory Physics 1
General Chemistry 1
General Mathematics
General Biology 1
Introduction of Animal
Physiology
Use of English I
History and Philosophy of
Science
Total Credit Hours
SECOND SEMESTER
Course title
Credit
Hr
3
3
3
3
3
Course
Code
PHY 1102
CHM1012
BIO 1012
GSS1102
GSS1112
Introductory Physics II
Organic Chemistry
Introductory Biology
Use of English II
Citizenship Education
3
3
3
2
2
2
2
GSS1122
Philosophy and Logic
2
Total Credit Hours
15
19
Credit Hr
YEAR TWO
Course
Code
FIRST SEMESTER
Course title
Credit
Hr
Course
Code
325
SECOND SEMESTER
Course title
Credit Hr
ANA2011
ANA2021
ANA2031
ANA2041
PHS2011
PHS2021
BCM2031
GSS2111
General Anatomy and
Gross Anatomy Upper and
Lower Limbs
Cell Biology& General
Histology and Histology of
digestive system
3
ANA2012
3
ANA2022
General Embryology/
Introductory Medical
Genetics
Anatomy for the Nurses 1
Introductory Physiology
Blood
3
ANA2032
3
3
2
ANA2042
ANA2052
PHS 2042
Metabolism
Carbohydrates
Introduction
Computer
2
PHS2052
of
to
BCM2062
GSS2112
Total Credit Hours
20
Gross Anatomy of Thorax and
Abdomen, Pelvis and
Perineum
Histology of Cardiovascular,
Immune and Urogenital
systems, skin and its
appendages
Embryology of
Cardiovascular, Digestive and
Respiratory system
Anatomy for the Nurses II
Neuroanatomy I
Renal Physiology, Body fluid
and Temperature Regulations
Respiratory System
3
Chemistry and Metabolism of
Nucleic acid
Computer Applications
Total Credit Hours
3
2
26
SECOND SEMESTER
Course title
Credit Hr
3
3
3
3
3
3
YEAR THREE
Course
Code
ANA3011
ANA3021
ANA3031
ANA3041
PHS3011
BCM3031
GSS3101
FIRST SEMESTER
Course title
Gross Anatomy of Head
and
Neck and Special
Senses
Histology of Respiratory
and Nervous systems,
Special senses, Endocrine
glands
Embryology of Urogenital
System, Head and Neck,
Organs of Special Senses,
Endocrine System.
Neuroanatomy II
Gastrointestinal
Physiology
Clinical Biochemistry
Entrepreneurship
Development
Total Credit Hours
Credit
Hr
3
Course
Code
ANA3012
3
Functional Anatomy of the
limb, Back, Head and Neck
3
ANA3022
Relevant laboratory
Techniques
3
3
ANA3032
History of Anatomy/Medical
Genetics
3
3
ANA3042
3
3
PHS3012
Cranial Nerves and
Autonomic Nervous System
Histochemistry I
3
2
BCM3032
GSS3102
Introductory Pharmacology
Entrepreneurship
Development II
Total Credit Hours
3
2
20
3
20
YEAR FOUR
Course
Code
ANA4011
ANA4021
ANA4031
ANA4041
ANA4051
BCM4011
FIRST SEMESTER
Course title
Gross Anatomy I
Cell Biology 1
Histochemistry II
Functional Anatomy of
Thorax and Abdomen
Systemic Histology and
Basic Histopathology
Research Methods and
Biostatistics
SECOND SEMESTER
Course title
Credit
Hr
3
3
3
3
Course
Code
ANA4012
ANA4022
ANA4032
ANA4042
Gross Anatomy II
Systemic Embryology
Cell Biology II
Practical
3
3
3
3
3
ANA4052
Project/Viva
6
3
Credit Hr
3
326
Total Credit Hours
18
Total Credit Hours
18
COURSE DESCRIPTION
ANA2011:GENERAL ANATOMY OF UPPER AND LOWER LIMBS
Introduction, Definition of Anatomy, Subdivisions of anatomy, Anatomical terminologies, levels of structural
organization. The skin and its appendages, The Muscles, The Circulatory System, The Nervous System, The
Joints, The Skeletal System And Visceral System. Anatomical Variations. The Scapular Region, Anterior
Thoracic Wall, Pectoral Region and Breast. The Axilla, the Arm, the Forearm, The Wrist and Hand. The Hip
and The Thigh .The leg, Ankle and Foot.
ANA2021: GENERAL HISTOLOGY AND HISTOLOGY DIGESTIVE SYSTEM
Introduction, Definition of histology. Histological methods Electron microscopy, Histochemistry,
Immunocytochemistry, Autoradiography. Levels of structural organization, cells, tissues, organs. Cell
structure, General study of Primary tissues Epithelia Including Blood and Mononuclear phagocyte system,
Cartilage and Bone; Muscle tissue and Nervous Tissue. Histology of Digestive system and related organs. Oral
cavity (Teeth, tongue and salivary glands). Basic Structure of the gastrointestinal tract, Oesophagus, Stomach,
Small intestine, Large intestine, Endocrine cells of the gut. The Liver, extrahepatic biliary apparatus and the
pancreas.
ANA 2031:
GENERAL EMBRYOLOGY, EMBRYOLOGY OF BODY CAVITIES AND
INTRODUCTORY MEDICAL GENETICS
Introduction to the developing human. Developmental periods and significance of embryology. Descriptive
terms in embryology. Germ cell and gametogenesis (Spermatogenesis/Oogenesis), Female Reproduction
Cycles (Menstrual and Ovarian Cycles). Structure of ovum, Ovulation and its role in family planning.
Fertilization, Cleavage, Formation of the blastocyst. Formation of germ layers, Formation of neural tube and
notochord, Development of somites. Development and Subdivisions of Intraembryonic mesoderm and coelom,
Development of placenta and anomalies. Further development of embryonic disc, Folding of Embryo.
Formation of the tissues of the body and derivatives of germ layer. Formation of intraembryonic cavity, serous
membrane, diaphragm and thoracic cavity.
Introduction and definition of genetics. Role of genetics in the practice of medicine. Definition and structure of
chromosome, Classification of chromosomes and the role of DNA in genetics. Anomalies of autosomal and
sex chromosome structures, Mutation, Gene and Diseases.
ANA 2012: GROSS ANATOMY OF THORAX, ABDOMEN, PELVIS AND PERINEUM
The Thoracic Cage, Intercostal Spaces, The Mediastinum, The Lung and Pleura, The Heart and The
Pericardium. Thoracic Diaphragm, Abdominal wall Muscles and Fasciae of Abdominal Wall. Formation of the
Rectus Sheath, the Peritoneum. Abdominal viscera (Liver and gall bladder, stomach, intestine, spleen, kidneys,
pancreas, suprarenal glands) and their blood supply, lymphatics, Autonomic Control and applied anatomy. The
Bony Pelvis, Pelvic Peritoneum. Pelvic Viscera (Rectum, Anal Canal, Urinary Bladder, Urethra, Ovaries and
Testes). Muscles and Fasciae of Pelvic Wall. Superficial Structures of Urogenital Triangle, Superficial and
Deep Spaces of the Perineum.
ANA 2022:
HISTOLOGY OF CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM, IMMUNE SYSTEM AND
UROGENITAL SYSTEM, SKIN AND ITS APPENDAGES
Histology of Arteries, Arterioles, Veins, Venules, Capillaries, Sinusoids, Heart, Lymphatic Vessels, Lymph
Nodes, Spleen and Thymus, Kidney, Ureters, Urinary Bladder and Urethra. Gonads (Ovary and Testis) and
Accessory Urogenital Organs (Epididymis, Vas Deferens, Seminal Vesicle, Prostate Gland, Penis and Clitoris).
Skin and Its Appendages (Hairs, Sebaceous Glands, Nails, Sweat Glands)
ANA 2032: EMBRYOLOGY OF CARDIOVASCULAR, RESPIRATORY AND DIGESTIVE
SYSTEMS
Early Development of Cardiovascular System. Development of Heart and Great Vessels. Anomalies of Heart
and Great Vessels. Aortic Arch Derivatives and Its Anomalies. Foetal Circulation, Development of Lymphatic
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System. Development of The Larynx, Trachea, Bronchi, Lungs And Associated Anomalies. Development of
the Diaphragm and Its Anomalies.
Development of Digestive System (Foregut, Midgut, Hindgut) and Associated Organs –Liver, Gall Bladder,
Spleen, Pancreas. Rotation of Gut and Anomalies of Development of GIT.
ANA 2052: NEUROANATOMY I NEUROANATOMY OF SPINAL CORD, BRAIN STEM, TRACTS
OF
SPINAL CORD AND BRAIN STEM
Introduction to Neuroanatomy and General Plan of the Nervous System, The Structure of the Neuron(Cell
Bodies and Processes, Nerve Endings), Synapses, Peripheral Nerves, Degeneration and Regeneration of
Neurons. Neuroglia. Gross and Microscopic Anatomy of the Spinal Cord. Tracts of spinal cord and brain stem.
Descending tracts ending in spinal cord and brain stem, Ascending tracts of spinal cord and brain stem,
Pathways connecting the spinal cord to cerebral cortex, Ascending pathways ending in brain stem and
spinocerebellar pathways. The Brain Stem –Medulla oblongata, pons, midbrain and reticular formation.
Sections of parts of brain stem at different levels. Applied anatomy of the different part of brainstem and spinal
cord.
ANA 3011: GROSS ANATOMY OF HEAD AND NECK
The skull and cervical vertebrae. The scalp - Layers of the scalp, blood supply, nerve supply, lymphatic
drainage and applied anatomy. The Face- Superficial structures and deep structures. Cranial Cavity - Brain and
meninges, cerebral dura and its reflexions, the dural venous sinuses and their applied anatomy. Pituitary gland,
Temporal and infratemporal fossa. The orbit - Eyeball, Nerves of the orbit, Extraocular and Intraocular
muscles, vessels of the orbit, fascia(orbital and bulbar) and lacrimal Gland/sac. Parasympathetic ganglia - Otic,
pterygopalatine, submandibular and ciliary ganglia. The Nose - the external nose and the nasal cavity.
Paranasal air sinuses. The oral region - the mouth, the teeth and tongue, the hard and soft palate and palatine
tonsils. Hypoglossal and glossopharyngeal nerves. Salivary glands - parotid, submandibular and sublingual
glands. The Ear - External ear, middle ear and inner ear and vestibulocochlear nerve. Fascial planes and
compartments of the neck. Triangles of the neck. Suboccipital region and applied anatomy. Muscles of the
neck. Neck viscera - Thyroid gland and Parathyroid gland, Larynx and Trachea, Pharynx and Oesophagus.
Blood vessels and lymphatic of head and neck. Cervical plexuses and cervical sympathetic ganglia and applied
anatomy.
ANA 3021:
HISTOLOGY OF THE RESPIRATORY AND NERVOUS SYSTEM, SPECIAL
SENSES AND ENDOCRINE GLANDS
Histology of the nasal cavities, pharynx, larynx trachea and bronchial tree, the lungs. Histology of nervous
system, neuron structure, ganglia, neuroglia. Cerebrum, cerebellum and spinal cord. Histology of special
senses - Eye(sclera, cornea, choroids coat, retina, lens) and Ear (External ear, middle ear and internal ear).
Endocrine glands. Histology of the pituitary gland, pineal gland, thyroid gland, parathyroid glands, suprarenal
glands, APUD cell system.
ANA 3031: EMBRYOLOGY OF THE UROGENITAL SYSTEM, HEAD AND NECK, NERVOUS
SYSTEM, ORGANS OF SPECIAL SENSES AND ENDOCRINE SYSTEM
Development of urinary system (Kidneys, ureters, urinary bladder, urethra). Development of genital system
(development of gonads and their descent, genital ducts and associated glands, external genitalia).
Development of suprarenal gland. The Pharyngeal apparatus. Development, fate, derivative and anomalies of
pharyngeal arches, pharyngeal pouches, pharyngeal grooves and pharyngeal membranes; Development of
thyroid glands, tongue, salivary glands, face, nasal cavities and palate. Development and congenital anomalies
of spinal cord and brain. Development of peripheral nervous system and autonomic nervous system.
Development of eye and related structures.
ANA3041:NEUROANATOMY 11 NEUROANATOMY OF CEREBRUM, CEREBELLUM, THE
DIENCEPHALON, BASAL NUCLEI, SPECIAL SENSES AND AUTONOMIC NERVOUS
SYSTEM
Gross anatomy of cerebrum - Poles, surfaces, borders, lobes and ventricles of brains. Functional areas of
cerebral cortex and white matter of cerebral hemisphere. Neurons and laminae of cerebral cortex. Gross
anatomy of cerebellum - subdivisions, grey matter and white matter, cerebellar peduncles, structure of the
cerebellar cortex and major connections of the cerebellum. Cerebellar peduncles and functions of the
cerebellum.
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The diencephalons - Subdivisons, nuclei and connections (Thalamus, hypothalamus, ventral thalamus,
epithalamus.).Basal nuclei or ganglia, caudate nucleus, lentiform nucleus (Putamen and globus pallidus),
Amygdaloid nuclear complex and claustrum. The subthalamic nuclei, the substantia nigra, ventral striatum and
ventral palladium.
The ventricles of the brain. Blood supply to central nervous system. Visual pathway and applied anatomy
olfactory pathway and limbic system. Neuroanatomy of autonomic nervous system, sympathetic and
parasympathetic.
ANA 3012:
FUNCTIONAL ANATOMY OF SKELETAL SYSTEM. JOINT AND MUSCULAR
SYSTEM
Skeletal system: Overview of skeleton, the skull, vertebra column and or thoracic cage, the Pectoral Girdle and
Upper limb, the pelvic girdle and lower limb. Joints - Joint and their classification. Fibrous, cartilaginous and
synovial joint. Muscular system - Structural and functional organization of muscles. Muscles of head and
neck and trunk. Muscles acting on shoulder and upper limb. Muscles acting on hip and lower limbs.
ANA 3022: RELEVANT LABORATORY TECHNIQUES
Methods employed in preservation of cadavers ancient and modern. The aims of preservation, significance,
chemicals used and their effects. Hazards and precautions. Setting up an embalming room. Basic museum
techniques, Labeling and cataloguing of museum specimens. Care and maintenance of museum specimens.
Maceration. Introduction to animal house and maintenance of Laboratory animals, Methods of sacrificing
experimental animals. Methods of obtaining specimen from experimental animals. The processing for
microscopic studies.
ANA 3032:
HISTORY OF ANATOMY AND MEDICAL GENETICS
History of origin of Anatomy from Hippocrates through Galen to the present day. Development of anatomy
from art to scientific study including history of Anatomy in Nigeria. Medical genetics, chromosomes,
structural analysis, organization and mutation of common genetic and chromosomal phenotype. Anomalies of
chromosomes
ANA 3042:
GROSS ANATOMY OF CRANIAL NERVES AND AUTONOMIC NERVOUS
SYSTEM
Histogenesis of cranial nerves, Functional components of individual cranial nerves. The origin, course,
distribution and applied anatomy of cranial nerves. Sympathetic trunk and parasympathetic neurons.
Autonomic plexuses. Preganglionic and postganglionic and postganglionic neurons. Afferent autonomic
pathway.
ANA 3052:
HISTOCHEMISTRY I
History of Histochemistry, Introduction and definition of Histochemistry, Principles of Histochemistry,
Microscopy, Histochemical tissue processing. Enzyme and Carbohydrate Histochemistry. Seminar papers.
ANA 4011:
GROSS ANATOMY OF SELECTED TOPICS IN UPPER AND LOWER LIMBS,
HEAD AND NECK
Seminar presentations on selected topics from upper limb, lower limbs, head and neck. Skeletal plan:
Arrangement of muscles; Detailed anatomy of the nerve supply, blood supply and lymphatic drainage of upper
and lower limbs, head and neck.
ANA 4021:
CELL BIOLOGY I
The Cell Theory, Modern views of cell structure, Prokaryotic cells. Molecules in the cells. Organelles of
eukaryotic cells, Cell division.
ANA 4031:
HISTOCHEMISTRY II
Histochemistry of lipids, proteins, amino acids and nucleic acids. Histochemistry of pigment and minerals,
Quantitative Histochemistry, ultrahistochemistry, Seminar papers.
ANA 4041:
FUNCTIONAL ANATOMY OF RESPIRATORY, REPRODUCTIVE, URINARY AND
DIGESTIVE SYSTEM
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Respiratory system: Anatomy of respiratory system, mechanics and neural control of ventilation; Gas exchange
and transport; Blood Chemistry and the respiratory rhythm. Respiratory disorders. Reproductive system: Male
reproductive system, sexual reproduction, sex determination and development. Male reproductive anatomy,
puberty and climacteric, sperm and semen, male sexual response.
Female reproductive system - Reproductive anatomy, Puberty and menopause, Oogenesis and sexual cycle,
female sexual response, Pregnancy and childbirth, Lactation.
Digestive system: General anatomy and digestive processes. The mouth through oesophagus, the stomach, the
liver, gall bladder, pancreas and the Small Intestine. Chemical digestion and absorption. The Large Intestine.
Mechanism of deglutition.
Urinary system: Functions of the urinary systems. Anatomy of the kidney. Urine Formation, Glomerular
filtration. Tubular reabsorption, secretion and water conservation. Urine and renal function Tests. Urine
storage and elimination, mechanism of micturition.
ANA 4051:
SYSTEMIC HISTOLOGY AND BASIC HISTOPATHOLOGY
A more detailed histology of the digestive, respiratory, urogenital, immune, nervous and endocrine systems.
Introduction to pathology. Basic concepts of histopathology.
ANA 4012: GROSS ANATOMY OF SELECTED TOPICS IN THORAX, ABDOMEN, PELVIS AND
PERINEUM AND SELECTED TOPICS IN NEUROANATOMY
Seminar presentations on some selected topics in thorax, abdomen, pelvis and perineum and neuroanatomy. A
more detailed approach.
ANA 4022: CELL BIOLOGY II
Microtubules and cellular movement. The Nerve Cell. Electron microscopic properties of cell membranes.
Methods of study of subcellular structures.
ANA 4032: SYSTEMIC EMBRYOLOGY
A review of embryology of Digestive, Respiratory, Cardiovascular, Nervous, Urogenital Systems and Head
And Neck. Embryology of skeletal system: Development of bone and cartilage, joint, axial skeleton and
appendicular skeleton. Embryology of the muscular system: Development of skeletal, smooth and cardiac
Muscles. Development of limbs and their anomalies. Embryology of the Integumentary system: Development
of skin, hair, nails mammary glands and teeth.
ANA 4042: GROSS ANATOMY/HISTOLOGY PRACTICAL
Complete dissection of all body parts in the cadaver and their demonstration. Complete study of histological
slides of all the tissues of the body. Processing of tissue, sectioning, mounting and staining for microscopic
study.
ANA 4052: PROJECT/VIVA VOCE
Special study of a selected topic in any area of human anatomy supported by dissertation
Post-Graduate Diploma In Anatomy
Admission Requirements
In addition to “O” level requirement for admission into the University of Calabar, the candidates for admission
into the post-graduate diploma in Anatomy must have the following qualifications;
(a)
B.Sc Second class (Hons) lower division with a CGPA lower than 3.00 or third class (Hons) degree in
the subject of Anatomy from the University of Calabar or any other university approved by the senate
of the University of Calabar.
(b)
B.Sc second class (Hons) degree in any related science discipline such as physiology, Biochemistry,
Animal Science, Radiography and zoology from the University of Calabar or any other University
approved by the Senate of University of Calabar
(c)
NIST final certificate or equivalent in Anatomy and Histopathology at credit level
or above
Course Work
330
Candidates are expected to register for and pass 24 units of course work (12 units per semester). Candidates
will be expected to attend Departmental seminars and to act as demonstrators to undergraduate students as part
of their training.
Duration
For candidates with B.Sc. in Anatomy, the programme shall run for 2 semesters of 12 months (6 months per
semester). For candidates with other qualifications, the programme shall be 4 semesters of 24 months (i.e. 6
months per semester).
PGD CONTENT OUTLINE FOR NON B.Sc. ANATOMY CANDIDATES
Course
Code
ANA5011D
ANA5021D
ANA5031D
ANA5041D
FIRST SEMESTER
Course title
General anatomy, Gross
anatomy of upper and
lower limbs,
thorax and thoracic
viscera
General Histology,
Cytology, Histology of
GIT and thoracic
Viscera
General Embryology,
Systemic Embryology of
thoracic viscera and
abdominal viscera and
Genetics
Neuroanatomy of the
spinal cord, brain stem,
tracts of spinal cord and
brain stem
Total Credit Hours
Credit
Hr
3
Course
Code
ANA5012D
3
ANA5022D
3
ANA5032D
3
ANA5042D
12
SECOND SEMESTER
Course title
Credit Hr
Gross anatomy of the
abdomen, Pelvis, perineum,
head and neck
3
Histology of tissues of head
and Neck, nervous system,
special sense Lymphatic
and endocrine systems
Systemic embryology of
the structures of head and
neck, nervous system,
urogenital and endocrine
systems
Neuroanatomy of the
cerebrum, Cerebellum,
thalamic structures, special
senses and autonomic
nervous system
Total Credit Hours
3
3
2
12
Ph.D COURSES IN ANATOMY
Course Code
ANA6011
ANA6021
ANA6031
PHS6011
PHS 6041
ANA 6041
FIRST SEMESTER
Course title
Credit
Hr
Course Code
SECOND SEMESTER
Course title
Credit Hr
Radiographic and Clinical
Anatomy
Human Genetics and
Cytogenetics
Advance Developmental
Biology
3
BCM 5092
Advanced tissue Biochemistry
3
3
ANA 6012
Advanced Neurobiology
3
3
ANA 6022
3
Ion channels of excitable
tissues
Cell signaling in health and
disease
Research Seminar II
Total Credit Hours
3
ANA 6032
Advanced Histochemistry and
Modern Histological
techniques
Cellular and molecular Biolog
3
BCM 6072
2
3
18
ANA 6042
Biochemical reaction
mechanism
Research Seminar II
Total Credit Hours
331
3
3
18
Course Code
ANA 6051
ANA6061
THIRD SEMESTER
Course title
Principles and practice of Photomicrography
Research seminar
Total Credit Hours
Credit Hr
1
3
4
DEPARTMENT OF BIOCHEMISTRY
Objectives of the Department
From the start therefore the initial objectives of the department were clearly outlined. The department thus
offered course of instruction to students of Medicine, Biological Sciences and Basic Medical Sciences at the
undergraduate and post graduate levels. Research on pure and applied biochemistry form an integral part of
the academic activity. Through these training programmes, the department has contributed its rightful share in
relieving the shortage of medical and paramedical personnel, competent teachers and research workers in
biochemistry. A breakdown of courses offered is as follows:a) MBBCH
b) B.Sc(Hons)
c) M.Sc/Ph.D
M.Sc/Ph.D
-
Part I
Biochemistry
Biochemistry
Nutrition and Food Science
PGD in Applied Biochem and PGD in Nutrition and Food Science. Biochemistry courses are also offered as
part of the following programmes:
d) B.Sc.(Hons)
Anatomy
e) B.Sc(Hons)
Physiology
f) B.Sc(Hons)
Biological Science
g) B.Sc(Hons)
Medical Laboratory
h) B.Sc(Hons)
Nursing
i) B.Sc(Hons)
Radiography
j) B.Sc(Hons)
Biological Oceanography
The specific objectives of the teaching programme for a, b and c above are as follows:
(a) MBBCH
The teaching of Biochemistry consisting of lectures, practical and tutorial extends over a period of one and a
half year through the first three semesters and covers aspects of Biochemistry relevant to students of medicine
and which would be helpful for an understanding of such subjects like physiology, Pharmacology.
Microbiology, Chemical Pathology, Human Genetics and Internal Medicine. Emphasis is placed on clinical
biochemistry which is taught in detail during the first semesters of the second year in the college.
(b) B.Sc
The objective of the course is to provide a comprehensive training in theoretical and practical biochemistry to
students who having acquired the qualification can work as Graduate Assistant in medical school or serve as
biochemists in research institutes, industrial establishment or in service laboratories of hospitals. They will
also be eligible for post graduate studies leading to the M.Sc, M.Phil or Ph.D degree. The teaching of
biochemistry is spread through the second, third and fourth year.
(c) Post Graduate Courses:
The main objectives of the post graduate program is to train the much needed manpower for teaching and
research in medical, agricultural, industrial and academic establishments. New knowledge is acquired through
original research. Research work at post graduate level in the biochemistry department thus began in the areas
of nutritional biochemistry, clinical biochemistry, red cell metabolism and biochemical toxicology.
332
POST GRADUATE DIPLOMA IN PURE/APPLIED BIOCHEMISTRY
Regulations for the Post Graduate Diploma Programme in Applied Biochemistry (PGDABCM)
Course Structure: Candidates shall choose 24 credit hours from the following first and second semester
courses PGDABCM 5000 is compulsory.
Course Code
PGDABCM 5001
PGDABCM 5021
PGDABCM 5031
PGDABCM 5041
PGDABCM 5052
PGDABCM 5062
PGDABCM 5071
PGDABCM 5082
PGDABCM 5000
Course title
Credit Hr
Chemistry of Biochemistry Important
compounds
Physical and analytical aspect of Biochemistry
3
Metabolic aspects of Biochemistry
Microbial Biochemistry
Industrial Biochemistry
Biochemical aspects of Agriculture
Biochemical aspects of Medicine
Molecular Biochemistry and Genetic
Engineering
Research Project
Total Credit Hours
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
6
18
POST GRADUATE DIPLOMA IN NUTRITION AND FOOD SCIENCE
Regulations for the Postgraduate Diploma Programme in Nutrition and Food Science
Course Code
First Semester
Course title
Credit Hr
PGDABCM 5011
PGDABCM 5021
PGDABCM 5031
PGDABCM 5041
Nutrition, Food science and Food Industries
Food chemistry and food Analysis
Nutrition aspect of nutrient in food
The roles of non-nutrients in food
3
3
3
3
PGDABCM 5052
PGDABCM 5062
PGDABCM 5072
PGDABCM 5082
PGDABCM 5000
Second Semester
Food quality factors-assessment and monitoring
Food preservation and processing
Food production and formulation
Public health aspects of food and nutrition
Project in either nutrition or food science
Total Credit Hours
3
3
3
3
6
18
DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACOLOGY
Objectives
The main objectives of the postgraduate degree programmes in pharmacology are:
1. to train medical science graduates at the post-graduate level to meet the need for academic staff in this
area of specialization;
333
2. to produce research workers who are well trained in pharmacology and can contribute positively to
scientific knowledge;
3. to assist in human capacity development in this area of knowledge and produce skilled personnel who
will feed the needs in the pharmaceutical and general health system in the country;
4. to ensure that a graduate with the M.Sc. degree from this programme will be able to successfully
undertake doctorate studies in Pharmacology in this University and at any other academic institution;
5. to create improved career opportunities for individuals with a doctorate degree in pharmacology;
6. to train high-level manpower for teaching, research and service;
7. to equip professionals with in-depth theoretical knowledge and research skills in pharmacology;
8. to promote scholarship and advance the frontiers of knowledge in pharmacology.
M. Sc. Programme
The M.Sc. courses are designed to provide the students with in-depth and current academic exposure in
pharmacology. Requisite concepts in related areas and biochemistry are intended to facilitate better
appreciation of pharmacological concepts at the postgraduate level. A course in biostatistics was designed to
give the candidate the basic knowledge necessary for effective analytical manipulation of data emanating from
the thesis research project. Candidates are required to register for and pass a total of 24 (twenty four) credits of
course work.
At least 18 credit units taken shall be within the Department of Pharmacology.
Ph.D Programme
The Philosophy of the proposed Ph.d: the Ph.d. Degree in Pharmacology in the Department of Pharmacology,
University of Calabar is predicated on the premise of a societal need for pharmacological scientists who
possess broad clinical and experimental knowledge and experiences coupled with strong analytical and
problem solving skills in the area of Applied Biomedical Research.
This programme’s main focus is in the area of applied pharmacology and experimental therapeutics. This area
naturally evolved as a consequence of the critical mass of college clinical and basic science faculty with strong
research interests in experimental therapeutics. Other equally important but distinctly different areas of
emphasis (e.g., Pharmacokinetics, Medicinal Plant Research, Toxicology and Teratology, Chemotherapy,
Ethnopharmacology, Smooth Muscle Pharmacology; Neuropharmacology; Cardiopulmonary Pharmacology;
Pharmacokinetics/Pharmacodynamics, Clinical Pharmacology, and Pharmacoepidemiology) are also included
in this programme. The programme is administered from the Department of Pharmacology in conjunction with
the Graduate School, University of Calabar.
Participation of faculty from other divisions of biomedical science such as biochemistry reflects the
interrelationship of the medical sciences and this is apt because experimental pharmacology draws extensively
from methodologies of other medical sciences. Faculty members from the College of Medical Sciences will be
are essential component of the evolution of this programme. The programme requires the M.Sc degree as a
prerequisite for admission and attempts to build from this strong foundation. The programme is composed of
extensive graduate level didactic course work with a strong biological and medical science emphasis. Thesis
projects require integration of logical and laboratory skills directed toward the pursuit of knowledge relevant to
problems in contemporary pharmacotherapeutics. The programme has as its goals: (i) To expose our students
to the latest conceptual and technical developments in pharmacology and related biomedical sciences; (ii) To
mentor our students in the development of their critical thinking, problem solving and communication skills, as
well as technical proficiency in a laboratory setting; and (iii) To help our students identify and make progress
toward their personal career goals.
In addition, the doctoral programme in pharmacology is meant to link the historical development of the
discipline, the growing commitment of the nation to provide health services to all, and the documented national
need for medical scientists capable of, and committed to, quality care through novel scientific research and
education.
Courses of study are designed to meet the needs of individual students. Graduates are employed in academic
research and in the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries The Doctor of Philosophy curriculum is not
lock-step; students do NOT graduate as a class at the end of a specific semester. The average time to degree is
334
approximately 5 years of full-time, year-round study; acceptable duration of the programme is between 3 and 7
years.
The expressed needs and the goal of expanding the scientific and knowledge base of the university and the
nation in general will be served by our newly established doctoral programme in Pharmacology. The health
needs of the people is better served by a significant increase in the number of doctorally prepared
Pharmacologists who would acquire skills that will also help in the research into the potential therapeutic
benefits of a vast array of medicinal plants with which this country is richly blessed.
Admission Requirements
The M.Sc. degree programme in Pharmacology is open to University graduates who hold at least a second class
honours degree in Pharmacology or in any other closely related health sciences discipline (Biochemistry,
Physiology, Biology, Microbiology, Anatomy, Medical Laboratory Science) OR University graduates with the
basic degree in Pharmacy (B. Pharm.) or Medicine (MB. BCh.) or Vetrinary medicine (DVM, BVM).
For the Ph.D. programme, the admission requirements are as follows:
(a) M.Sc. degree in pharmacology with cumulative grade point average (CGPA) of not less than 2.50 of
max 4.0 points; 3.0 of max 5.0 points from the University of Calabar or any other recognized university.
(b) Bachelors degree in Medicine (MB.BCh); Veterinary Medicine (DVM); in addition to a M.Sc. in
Pharmacology.
(c) Applicants are also required to submit a one-page MISSION STATEMENT to the Department of
Pharmacology, University of Calabar.
PROGRAMME STRUCTURE AND COURSE OUTLINE
M.Sc. Programme
Course Code
PHM 5011
PHM 5021
PHM 5031
PHM 5052
PHM 5062
PHM 5072
PHM 6012
BCM 5041
Course title
Pharmacokinetics
Radiopharmacology Theory
Cardiovascular Pharmacology
Toxicology
Advanced Chemotherapy
Neuroendocrine Pharmacology
Biochemical Pharmacology
Research Methods and Advanced Biometry
Credit
Hr
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Ph.D Programme
Course Code
PHM 6011
PHM 6021
PHM 6031
PHM 6041
PHM 6052
PHM 6062
PHM 6072
PHM 6081
PHM 6091
PHM 6101
Course title
Advanced Neuroparmacology
Advanced Immunopharmacology
Advanced Pharmacology of Natural Products and
Recent Advances
Systematic Toxicology, Adverse Drug Reactions/
/Interactions
Pharmacokinetics and Biopharmaceutics
Instrumentation and Research Methods in
Pharmacology
Advanced Therapeutics and Recent Advances in
Pharmacology
Advanced Neurochemistry and Molecular
Pharmacology
Contemporary Issues in Drug Research and
Development
Clinical Pharmacology
335
Credit
Hr
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
PHM 7001
PHM 7002
PHM 7003
PHM 7004
PHM 7005
PHM 7006
PHM 7007
PHM 7008
PHM 7009
PHM 7010
PHM 7011
Research Seminar in Autonomic Nervous System
Research Seminar in Chemotherapy
Research Seminar in Clinical Pharmacology
Research Seminar in Toxicology
Research Seminar in Renal and Electrolyte
Pharmacology
Research Seminar in Endocrine Pharmacology
Research Seminar in Central Nervous System
Pharmacology
Research Seminar in Smooth Muscle
pharmacology
Research Seminar in Pharmaco-epidemiology
Research Seminar in Cardiopulmonary
Pharmacology
Project Dissertation/Thesis
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
12
Area of Specialization Available in the Department
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
Autonomic and Central Nervous System
Endocrine Pharmacology and Hormone Regulation of Metabolism
Chemotherapy
Ethnopharmacology
Toxicology and Teratology
Smooth Muscle Pharmacology
Cardiopulmonary Pharmacology
Renal and Electrolyte Pharmacology
Clinical pharmacology
Pharmaco-Epidemiology
COURSE CONTENT AND DESCRIPTION FOR M.Sc. DEGREE IN
PHARMACOLOGY
PHM 5011: PHARMACOKINETICS
Concepts basic to pharmacokinetics; Compartmental representation; Dose-dependent Pharmacokinetics; Timedependent pharmacokinetics; Drug metabolite kinetics; Kinetics of drug-drug interactions; Kinetics of
pharmacological response; Quantitative structure –pharmacokinetic relationships; Assessment of rate and
extent of drug absorption; Effects of disease on clinical pharmacokinetics; Non-linear kinetics and drug
elimination; Therapeutic drug monitoring.
PHM 5021
RADIOPHARMACOLOGY
Atoms, nuclides and the nature of radioactive decay; interaction of radiation with matter, radiation detection,
health physics and some basic principles in radioisotope utilization; isotopic and non-isotopic labeling;
Biochemical and pharmacological rationales in radiotracer design; Tissue preparation for liquid scintillation
and gamma counting; In-vivo measurement of transport and metabolic processes using radioisotopes;
Techniques to study transport of radiotracers; Effect of transport in distribution of radio-ions and radio-labeled
metabolites; Effect of solute structure in the transport of radiotracers; Renal secretion and filtration studies
using radiotracers; Thyroid cell kinetics: studies using radiotracers; Study of hepatocyte function by 14CO2
breath analysis; Kinetic analysis of bone imaging agents; Mechanisms of localization of free radio-ions; role of
phagocytosis and pinocytosis; Radiotracer techniques to study fibrin deposition and lyses.
PHM 5031:
CARDIOVASCULAR PHARMACOLOGY
Cardiac cell membrane pharmacology; Factors that influence the rate of calcium ion transport in the
sarcoplasmic reticulum; Blockers of ionic channels; Ionic basis for spontaneous phase 4 depolarization; factors
that modify cardiac automaticity; cardiovascular effect of ions; regulatory factors for normal cardiac function;
Hypertension; Drug therapy of hypertension; Cardiac glycosides and congestive heart failure; Antiarrhythmic
agents; Angina pectoris; Seminars/Term papers.
PHM 5052:
TOXICOLOGY
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General principles and evaluation of safety; Absorption, distribution and excretion of toxicants; Metabolism of
toxic substances; Factors influencing toxicity; Mutagenicity, carcinogenicity and teratogenicity; Toxicology of
metals; Solvents, vapors and plastics; Toxicology of pesticides; Contemporary issues in toxicology.
PHM 5062:
ADVANCED CHEMOTHERAPY
General considerations in chemotherapeutic drug action and applications; Pharmacologic and biochemical
basis of chemotherapeutics; Drug resistance phenomena; Drug interactions in chemotherapy; Modification of
host immune responses in chemotherapy; Implications of host-parasite interactions for chemotherapy;
Pharmacokinetic alterations in diseases caused by microorganisms: implications for chemotherapy; New
approaches to chemotherapeutic drug design.
PHM 5072
NEUROENDOCRINE PHARMACOLOGY
Organization and control of endocrine systems; Inter-relation of nervous and endocrine systems; Theories of
hormonal control of membrane, enzyme and organelle integration/regulation; Hormane regulation of
metabolism; Genetics and endocrine functions; Shared characteristics of hormones; Research methods in
hormone action; Hormones and clinical medicine; special topics and seminars.
PHM 6012
BIOCHEMICAL PHARMACOLOGY
Concept of biochemical lesion; Sub-cellular structures in pharmacology; Cardiac cell membrane; Nucleic acids
and proteins; Biotransformation of drugs; Pharmacogenetics; Structure-activity relationships; Enzyme
inhibition and its significance for clinical medicine.
COURSE CONTENT AND DESCRIPTION FOR PH.D. DEGREE
IN PHARMACOLOGY
PHM 6011
ADVANCED NEUROPHARMACOLOGY
Pharmacology and biochemistry of the peripheral nervous system; Physiology of nerve impulse generation and
synaptic function; Developmental biochemistry; Pharmacological action of drugs on nervous system; Neurohumoral transmission in autonomic nervous system; Cholinergic and adrenergic mechanisms; biochemical
basis of receptor classifications in the CNS; Neuromuscular junction physiology and pharmacology of EndPlate membrane potentials; Neuromuscular and ganglionic blockers; Synaptic transmission and putative
neurotransmitters in the CNS; Differential distribution of neurotransmitters and methods of study; Interactions
of sex hormones with brain and pituitary; Neuro-hormonal control of reproduction; Brain monoamines and
amino acids biosynthesis; Theory of depression; Affective disorders, psychoses and schizophrenias; Morphine
receptor in the brain; Endorphins and Enkephalins; Sites of action of phenothiazines, benzodiazepines and CNS
stimulant drugs; the barbiturate action.
PHM 6021
ADVANCED IMMUNOPHARMACOLOGY
Autacoids, 5-HT, polypeptides, kinins, etc; The immune system and inflammation; Hypersensitivity reactions;
immune tolerance; autoimmune diseases; immunosuppressant and anti-inflammatory drugs; HIV/AIDS and
drugs used in the therapy and prophylaxis of disorders of the immune system; Allergic reactions to drugs;
prostaglandins, prostacyclins and thromboxanes; Cancer inducers and promoters; Classes of anti-cancer agents;
Specific anticancer drug effects; Cell-cycle specific drug action; Immunotherapy of cancer; Neoplastic cell
biochemistry, structure and function.
PHM 6031
ADVANCED PHARMACOLOGY OF NATURAL PRODUCTS
Plant biochemistry-cells organelles, structure; Microscopic study of plant cells and tissues; Medicinal plantsproperties, chemistry, identification and classification; Extraction techniques; Isolation and purification of
biologically active plant metabolites; phytochemistry; Measurements of biological activities of plant extracts;
Orthodox drugs of medicinal plant origin; prospects for use of natural products in health care delivery systems.
PHM 6041:
SYSTEMATIC TOXICOLOGY, ADVERSE DRUG REACTIONS/INTERACTIONS
Adverse drug reactions; Biological factors that influence toxicity; Chemical factors that influence toxicity;
Influence of route of administration on toxicity; genetic factors that influence toxicity; Classification of
harmful effects of chemicals; Normal toxic effects of chemicals; Abnormal responses to chemicals;
Toxicological testing methods; Genetic toxicology; Formation of chemically reactive metabolites from drugs;
Behavioural toxicology; Toxicology of the pre-synaptic aspect of neuromuscular junction; Toxicology of
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exocrine sweat glands and melanocytes; Toxic responses of organ systems (CNS, liver, kidney, respiratory
system, the eye, blood and gonads).
PHM 6052:
PHARMACOKINETICS AND BIOPHARMACEUTICS
Chemical assay of drugs and drug metabolites; Compartmental analysis of drug distribution; Drug absorption
and bioavailability; Effects of renal disease on pharmacokinetics; Pharmacokinetics in patients requiring renal
replacement therapy; Non-compartmental vs. compartmental approaches to PK analysis; Effects of liver
disease on pharmacokinetics; Population pharmacokinetics; Pathways of drug metabolism; Drug Interactions;
Pharmacogenomics;
PHM 6062: INSTRUMENTATION AND RESEARCH METHODS IN PHARMACOLOGY
Instrument arrangement for various experimental designs in pharmacology; Extraction, separation and drying
techniques; Isolation of pure substances and chemical identification; Cell, isolated tissue and whole animal
techniques; Analytical procedures for therapeutic drug monitoring; Computer data analysis;
Radioimmunoassay, ELISA; Atomic Absorption spectroscopy; Flame photometry; High pressure liquid
chromatography (HPLC); Gas chromatography (GC); and Thin layer chromatography (TLC); Physiological
solutions and culture media preparation; Functional analysis; Tissue perfusion and cell perfusion techniques.
PHM 6072: ADVANCED THERAPEUTICS AND RECENT ADVANCES IN PHARMACOLOGY
General concept of therapeutic agents; Classification of therapeutic agents e.g. drug therapy of diseases,
chemotherapy of infections (such as fungal, bacterial and related infections, protozoa, multicellular organisms,
neoplastic diseases); Antimicrobials; Microbial resistance to therapeutic agents; Drug combinations; Factors
affecting microorganism response to drugs; Factors influencing drug therapy.
PHM 6081 ADVANCED NEUROCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR PHARMACOLOGY
Chemistry and biochemistry of peripheral and central nervous systems; The biochemistry of nerve impulses
generated and synaptic function; Adaptation of nervous system to environmental factors; Developmental
neurochemistry and biochemistry, structural and functional factors in neurochemistry; Biochemical action of
drugs on nervous system; Biochemical aspects of mental and neurologic illness; Biochemistry of sleep; Recent
advances in neurochemistry; Concept of biochemical lesion; Sub-cellular structures in pharmacology; Synaptic
vesicles; The cardiac cell membrane; Nucleic acids and proteins; Biotransformation of drugs; Pharmacogenetic
implications of G-proteins, second messenger systems and calcium signaling; Mechanisms of drug action in
relation to regulatory kinases and phosphatases.
PHM 6091:
CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN DRUG RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT
Drug monitoring and its requirement for responsible drug use; Problems of chronic diseases; Clinical
evaluations of therapy;; Receptors and messengers; Drug design; Mechanistic biochemistry and analytical
pathophysiology; The patient as a subject to medical research.
PHM 6101:
CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY
Basics of pharmacology; clinical pharmacokinetics; monitoring drug therapy; adverse drug reactions; drug
interactions; pharmacogenetics; prescribing for pediatric patients; prescribing for the elderly; principles for
prescribing for pregnant and breast-feeding women; prescribing for patients with renal disease; prescribing for
patients with hepatic disease; regulations affecting prescribing; the process of new drug development, testing
and approval; patients adherence to therapy,
PHM 7001
RESEARCH SEMINAR IN AUTONOMIC NERVOUS SYSTEM
Seminars are to involve review and presentation of current concepts in Autonomic Nervous System
PHM 7002
RESEARCH SEMINAR IN CHEMOTHERAPY
Seminars are to involve review and presentation of current concepts in Chemotherapy
PHM 7003
RESEARCH SEMINAR IN CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY
Seminars are to involve review and presentation of current concepts in Clinical Pharmacology
PHM 7004
RESEARCH SEMINAR IN TOXICOLOGY
Seminars are to involve review and presentation of current concepts in Toxicology
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PHM 7005
RESEARCH
SEMINAR
IN
RENAL
AND
ELECTROLYTE
PHARMACOLOGY
Seminars are to involve review and presentation of current concepts in and Electrolyte
Pharmacology
PHM 7006
RESEARCH SEMINAR IN ENDOCRINE PHARMACOLOGY
Seminars are to involve review and presentation of current concepts in Endocrine Pharmacology
PHM 7007 RESEARCH SEMINAR IN CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM PHARMACOLOGY
Seminars are to involve review and presentation of current concepts in Central Nervous System
Pharmacology
PHM 7008
RESEARCH SEMINAR IN SMOOTH MUSCLE PHARMACOLOGY
Seminars are to involve review and presentation of current concepts in Smooth Muscle
pharmacology
PHM 7009
RESEARCH SEMINAR IN PHARMACOEPIDEMIOLOGY
Seminars are to involve review and presentation of current concepts in Pharmacoepidemiology
PHM 7010
RESEARCH SEMINAR IN CARDIOPULMONARY PHARMACOLOGY
Seminars are to involve review and presentation of current concepts in Cardiopulmonary
Pharmacology
PHM 7011
RESEARCH PROJECT DISSERTATION/THESIS
Research project execution, documentation and defense
DEPARTMENT OF PHYSIOLOGY
History
The Physiology Department commenced its activities in July 1978 with the head of department as Professor K.
M. Etta (1978-1985). The department started with its first batch of medical students in 1978/79 session. In
1979/80 session, B.Sc. Physiology programme was added to its curriculum. In 1987 the department introduced
a new B.Sc. Physiology programme (B.Sc. intercalated in the MBBCh programme) in the college. This
programme allows outstanding medical students after their part 1 MBBCh examinations to spend extra three
semesters for a B.Sc. degree in Physiology, Biochemistry or Anatomy before continuing with their MBBCh
programme. The department has finally granted full accreditation by the Nigerian University Commission
(NUC).
Admission requirement for B.Sc. (Hon) Physiology
The entry for four-year B.Sc. degree programme are as follows:
West African School Certificate or its equivalent qualification with credits in the following subjects:
 English language, mathematics, Physics, chemistry, Biology and other subjects.
 The candidate must also take and pass the competitive National J.M.E. for entry into Nigerian
Universities and the University aptitude test.
Admission Requirement for Postgraduate Diploma in Physiology
In addition to having O’Level requirement for admission into University of Calabar, the candidates for
admission into post graduate diploma in physiology must have any of the following qualifications:
(a) NIST Final Certificate or equivalent in Physiology/Pharmacology (at credit level or above).
(b) B.Sc. 2nd Class Hons. Degree in any related Sciences discipline (e.g. Biology).
(c) Pass Degree 3rd Class Hons. Degree or Second Class Hons. Lower division with a low G.P.A. in
Physiology.
Admission Requirement for M.Sc. Programme in Physiology
Admission into the programme is open to graduates of the University of Calabar or other universities
recognised by the senate who holds at lease 2nd Class Hons. Degree in Physiology with 3.25 GPA or related
339
discipline. It is also open to holders of MBBCh, DVM or BVM or a pass at Credit level in postgraduate
diploma in Physiology.
Admission Requirement for Ph.D Programme in Physiology
The programme is open to any candidate who has the following:
i.
ii.
Master’s Degree in Physiology with a minimum of 3.0 grade point average.
Outstanding performance during the M.Sc. Physiology programme. Such a candidate may be allowed
to advance from M.Sc. to Ph.D. on the recommendation of the departmental and graduate committees
to the Graduate School Board and after approval by the Senate of the University.
COURSE OUTLINE
B.Sc. Course In Physiology
YEAR ONE
Course
Code
GSS1101
GSS 1131
PHY 1101
CHM1011
MTH1111
BIO 1011
ZEB 2031
Course
Code
ANA2011
ANA2031
ANA2021
BCM2031
PHS2011
PHS2021
PHS2031
GSS2111
FIRST SEMESTER
Course title
Use of English I
History and Philosophy of
Science
Introductory Physics 1
Introduction Chemistry 1
General Mathematics
Introduction Biology 1
Plant and Animal
Physiology
Total Credit Hours
FIRST SEMESTER
Course title
Course
Code
PHY 1102
CHM1012
Introductory Physics II
Organic Chemistry
3
3
3
3
2
2
3
BIO 1012
GSS1102
GSS1112
GSS1122
Introductory Biology
Use of English II
Citizenship Education
Philosophy and Logic
3
2
2
2
Total Credit Hours
19
19
YEAR TWO
Credit
Hr
3
Course
Code
ANA2012
3
BCM2042
General
Histology,
Cytology, Histology of the
G.I. Tract, Cell Biology
Carbohydrate Chemistry &
Metabolism
Introductory Physiology
3
BCM2052
3
PHS2032
3
PHS2042
Blood Physiology
Cardiovascular Physiology
Introduction to Computer
Total Credit Hours
3
3
2
23
Gross Anatomy of Upper
&
Lower Limbs
General
Embryology,
Systemic Embryology
SECOND SEMESTER
Course title
Credit
Hr
3
3
PHS2052
GSS2112
SECOND SEMESTER
Course title
Credit Hr
Credit Hr
Gross Anatomy of Thorax and
Abdomen
Chemistry and Metabolism of
Lipid, Steroid & Biological
Pigment
Chemistry and Met. of
Proteins & Amino Acid
3
Neurophsyiology I (Sensory
System)
Renal Physiology, Body
Fluids & Temperature
Regulation
Respiratory System
Introduction to Computer II
3
Total Credit Hours
20
3
3
3
3
2
YEAR THREE
Course
Code
ANA3011
FIRST SEMESTER
Course title
BCM3011
Gross Anatomy of the
Head & Neck
Nutritional Biochemistry
BCM3021
Clinical Biochemistry
Credit
Hr
3
Course
Code
PHS 3032
3
PHS 3042
3
PHS 3052
340
SECOND SEMESTER
Course title
Selected Topics in
Neurophysiology
Blood, regulation of
Electrolytes and Fluids
Selected Topics in GastroIntestinal Physiology
Credit Hr
3
3
3
PHS3011
PHS3021
PHS3031
GSS3101
Gastrointestinal
Physiology
Endocrinology and
Reproduction
Motor System, Higher
Cortical Function And
ANS
Entrepreneurship I
Total Credit Hours
3
PHS 3062
Special Senses
3
3
PHM3022
Pharmacology
3
3
PHS 3072
Reproduction/Maternal Fetal
Endocrinology
3
2
20
GSS 3102
Entrepreneurship II
Total Credit Hours
2
20
YEAR FOUR
Course
Code
PHS 4011
PHS 4021
PHS 4031
PHS 4041
PHS 4061
FIRST SEMESTER
Course title
Neuroendocrinology
Cardiopulmonary
Physiology
Environmental Physiology
and Metabolism
Laboratory Teaching &
Instrumentation
Biostatistics
Total Credit Hours
SECOND SEMESTER
Course title
Credit
Hr
3
3
Course
Code
PHS 4032
PHS 4072
Credit Hr
Project
Research Methods
9
3
3
PHS 4052
Oral Defence
3
Total Credit Hours
15
3
3
15
DESCRIPTION AND CONTENT OF COURSES IN B.SC. PHYSIOLOGY
PHS 2011:
INTRODUCTORY PHYSIOLOGY
Introduction to Physiology and its place in medicine. The composition cell, cell membrane and transport
mechanism, membrane potentials. Physiology of excitable tissues. Types of ionic channels. Cell signalling,
Introduction to patch clamp technique.
PHS 2021:
BLOOD PHYSIOLOGY
General characteristics and functions of blood. Properties and functions of plasma, Red blood cells; factors
involved erythropoiesis, blood groups. White blood cells, origin, types, properties, functions, antigenicity and
immunities. Platelets and hemostatic mechanism. Reticulo endothelial system. Clotting and fibrinolytic
system.
PHS 2031:
CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM
Overall plan and functions of the cardiovascular system, physiological anatomy of the heart, mechanical events
of cardiac cycle, cardiac output and its estimation, Electrocardiogram. The vascular system; gross sectional
area of different vascular groups, systolic diastolic pulse and mean arterial pressures, Exchange of fluids across
the capillaries, venous and central venous pressures. Integration of cardiovascular functions; central control
centers, regulation of systemic blood pressure. Cardio vascular adaptations in health and disease. Circulation
through special areas.
PHS 2032:
NEUROPHYSIOLOGY I SENSORY SYSTEM
Development and general plan of the central nervous system. Classification of receptors. Properties of
receptors. Physiological classification of nerve fibers. Dual system for transmission of somatosensory
sensation. Coding for characteristics of a stimulus. Somatosensory cortex. Pain special sense organs. Ear
(hearing). Vestibular Apparatus and Equilibrium. Taste, smell. The Eye. Spectrum of movements. Motor
system hierarchy. Motor function of the spinal cord and lower brain stem. Monosynaptic reflexes, Bisynaptic
reflexes. Polysynaptic reflexes. The effects of surgical removal of the higher nervous centers.
Electrophysiological study of cord reflexes.
PHS 2042: RENAL PHYSIOLOGY, BODY FLUIDS AND TEMPERATURE REGULATION
The skin: Functional anatomy, temperature regulations; abnormalities of temperature regulation, Metabolism;
factors regulating metabolism, conditions for measuring basal metabolic rate. Compartmentalization and
composition of body fluid Physiologica anatomy of the kidney, renal circulation and autoregulation.
341
Glomerular filtration. Tubular Transport. Urine formation, counter-current system. Water, volume and ionic
regulation. Acid-base balance. Micturition, Abnormalities of renal function.
PHS 2052:
RESPIRATORY SYSTEM
Physiologic anatomy of respiratory apparatus, brief review of relevant gas laws, lung volumes, mechanics of
breathing, gas diffusion through alveoli capillary membrane, pulmonary circulation, ventilation perfusion ratio
oxygen and carbondioxide transport, control of respiration, hypoxias, oxygen treatment, abnormal types of
breathing, attitude and depth, acclimatization. Respiratory adjustments in health and disease.
PHS 3011:
GASTROINTESTINAL PHYSIOLOGY
Physiologic anatomy of the gastrointestinal tract. Review of smooth muscle function. Secretions in the G.I.T.
and their control. movements of the gastrointestinal tract. Digestion and absorption of various food
substances. Liver and its functions. Disorders of the gastrointestinal tract.
PHS 3021:
ENDOCRINOLOGY AND RESPRODUCTION
Endocrine system. Introduction and neuroendocrine relationship. Hypothalamo-pituitary axis, endocrine
glands; normal, hypo and hyper-functions. Other hormones of some clinical importance. Physiologic anatomy
of male and female reproductive system. Male and female sex hormones. Cyclicity of hormone secretion in
females. Physiology of contraception.
PHS 3031:
MOTOR SYSTEM, HIGHER CORTICAL FUNCTION & ANS
Cortical control of motor function. The role of the Brain stem in control of motor function. The basal ganglia.
The cerebellum. Neurotransmitters related to motor control and other functions. Maintenance of upright
animal. Wakefulness, Sleep, Learning, memory, control of speech. Hypothalamus and limbic system. The
Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF). Functional organization of Autonomic Nervous system, Basic characteristics of
sympathetic and parasympathetic division.
PHS 3032:
SELECTED TOPICS IN NEUROPHYSIOLOGY
Pathophysiology of pain. The association areas of the cortex.Physiological basis of motivated behaviours.
Muscle spindle, function in motor control. maintenance of posture. Mechanism of locomotion.
PHS 3042:
BLOOD, REGULATION OF BODY ELECTROLYTES AND FLUIDS
A review of the central properties and functions of blood. Functions and life cycle of various blood cells.
Abnormalities of blood. Brief recapitulation of the functionality of the kidney. Renal handling of electrolytes.
Current concepts of concentration and dilution or urine. The rennin-angiotensin system. Regulation of
volumes/fluid derangements, Renal disorders.
PHS 3052:
SELECTED TOPICS IN GASTRO-INTESTINAL PHYSIOLOGY
General review of gastro-intestinal functionality. Physiologic anatomy of a typical section of the gastrointestinal tract. General principles of the mechanism of gastrointestinal secretion. Animal experimental
techniques for gastric acid analysis and measurement of gastric acidity. Movement of the gastrointestinal tract.
Liver and liver functions tests. Basic principles of gastrointestinal absorption and methods of its investigation.
Gastrointestinal disorders. Gastrointestinal hormones.
PHS 3062:
SPECIAL SENSES
Physical principles optics. This optics of the eye. Optical instruments, Anatomy and structural/neural functions
of the retina. Photo chemistry of vision. Function of the lateral Geniculate body. Primary visual cortex
perimetry. Movements and their control. The tympanic membrane and the ossicular system. The cochlear
control of auditory mechanisms. Hearing abnormalities. The sense of taste; sense of smell.
PHS 3072:
REPRODUCTION, MATERNAL/FETAL PHYSIOLOGY
Male and female reproductive systems. Male and female sexual acts. Puberty and menachie. Seminal
vesicles, prostate gland; semen. The ovary, menstrual cycle, ovulation; fertilization, menopause. Pregnancy,
test of pregnancy. Parturition, placenta, mammary glands and lactation. Contraceptive technology, infertility.
Assisted fertilization technology, cloning. Maternal adjustments to pregnancy. Special features of fetal and
neonatal physiology.
342
PHS 4011:
NEUROENDOCRINOLOGY
Historical origins of a Neuro-endocrine connection. A review of the physiologic anatomy of hypothalamopituitary link. Current concepts of channels of communication between hypothalamus and the pituitary.
Hypothalamic neurosecretions. The “master glands of the endocrine system. Pituitary secretions and their
current concepts on the servo-mechanisms between the hypothalamus. The pituitary and other endocrine
organs.
PHS 4021:
CARDIO-PULMONARY PHYSIOLOGY
Developmental milestones in cardiovascular and respiratory physiology. Cardio-pulmonary function in the
foetus and in old age. Cardio-pulmonary responses at rest and in moderate to severe stress physiological basis
of hypertension. Principles of servomechanism as applied to cardio-pulmonary physiology. Aviation, space
and deep sea physiology.
PHS 4031:
ENVIRONMENTAL PHYSIOLOGY AND METABOLISM
Current concepts on the control of energy balance. Brief review of intermediary metabolism; interrelationships
between metabolism of major food substrates, metabolism of specific organs; brain, renal, pulmonary and
cardiac metabolism.
Abnormal metabolism; diabetes mellitus some in-born errors of metabolism
Physiological basis of topical environmental problems; Family planning, malnutrition.
PHS 4041:
LABORATORY TEACHING AND INSTRUMENTATION
Opportunity for students to review the physiological concept of systems taught and understand them
thoroughly so as to enable them demonstrate the concepts using available equipment to medical or more junior
physiology students. Review of the various physiological concept of systems. Demonstration, using various
equipment in the laboratory of practical methods to medical and paramedical students. Physiological solutions,
buffers, hypotonic, isotonic, and hypertonic solutions. Laboratory animals, care and handling; isolated tissues
and handling techniques, organ bath temperature and gases; drug administration and routes, basic
pharmacological calculations. SI units; volumetric analysis, molarity normality. Interpretations of
experimental records.
PHS 4061:
BIOSTATISTICS
Orientation to statistics, definition and examples of basic statistic terminology. Descriptive statistics; Tabular
and Graphical presentations. Populations, samples and the Normal Distribution. Design of experiments.
Introduction to Demography in medicine. Procedures for hypothesis testing. Analysis of variance.
Correlation and Regression. Chi square. Nonarametric techniques, relative risk and measures of strength of
association. Computer and overview.
PHS 4072:
RESEARCH METHODS
Author index, general subject index, current contents, index medicus, chemical/biological abstracts, reprint
requests/personal communications, electronic bibliographical index (assignment/test). Data Handling;
summary methods. Illustration of data. Writing scientific papers; Research proposals. Reviews and books,
journal papers; common errors in the preparation of text, illustrations, references, units, symbols and
abbreviations etc. Critical analysis and seminar presentation; critiques of published papers in local and
international journals, oral presentation and seminar skills.
PHS 4082:
EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY
Anatomical review of associated muscles of exercise. Exercise; definition and types Cardiopulmonary
adaptation during exercise in trained and untrained athletes. Cardiac failure and exercise. Specific organs
metabolism during exercise.
PHS 4032:
PROJECT.
MASTER DEGREE IN PHYSIOLOGY
Course Work
Candidates are required to register for, attend and pass a total of 24 credits hours of prescribed courses with at
least 15 credits obtained from the department. Each candidate is also required to carry out a research project,
which carries 6 credit research may be undertaken in the following fields:
343
Neuroendocrinology, neurophysiology, Respiratory Physiology, Cardiovascular Physiology Blood, Gastrointestinal
Physiology/Nutrition,
Renal
Physiology,
Endocrinology,
Pharmacology,
Toxicology/Pharmacokinetics.
M.Sc. Courses in Physiology
Course
Code
PHS 5011
PHS 5021
PHS 5031
BCM5041
FIRST SEMESTER
Course title
Haematology
Cardiopulmonary
Physiology
Renal Physiology
Body fluids
Research Methods
Advanced Biometry
SECOND SEMESTER
Course title
Credit
Hr
3
3
Course
Code
PHS 5032
PHS 5042
and
3
PHS 5052
Gastro-internal Physiology
Endocrinology/Neuroendocrinol
ogy
Motor Control
and
3
PHS 5062
Special Senses
3
PHS 5000
Project
6
Total Credit Hours
18
Total Credit Hours
12
Credit
Hr
3
3
3
PH.D. COURSES IN PHYSIOLOGY
Course Code
PHS 6011
PHS 6021
PHS 6031
PHS 6041
PHS 6051
PHS 6000
Course title
Ion channels of excitable tissues
Selected topics in Physiology
Research Seminar I, II, III
Cell Signalling in health and disease
Advanced Neurochemistry and Biochemistry
Ph.D. Thesis
Total Credit Hours
Credit
Hr
3
3
3
3
3
15
FACULTY OF CLINICAL SCIENCES.
DEPARTMENT OF INTERNAL MEDICINE
DETAILS OF THE TRAINING CURRICULUM
Academic Programmes, Admission Requirements, Course Description And Codes
The Department of Medicine does not admit students on its own, nor does it award degree, diplomas or
certificates. The degree obtained MB, BCh is awarded by the College, on successful completion of the
required programme which involves many departments and faculties within the College.
Scope Of Training/Academic Programme And Student Catered For:
The Department accepts students in their 4th year, who have successfully undergone the pre-clinical years and
passed Anatomy, Physiology and Biochemistry at the 2 MB examination. During their remaining 3 years, they
will rotate through the department 4 Times (M1, M2, M3, and M4). The first rotation focuses mainly on
History taking and Physical examination in Clinic and Ward bedside teaching. There is also 2 hours per week
structured classroom lectures that go on simultaneously. This is phase 1 or Clinical Year 1 (year 4 of Medical
School).
Awards
Two lecturers in the department of Internal Medicine, Professor Clement O. Odigwe and Dr Victor O. Ansa a
Reader, were elected Fellows of the American College of Physicians. The conferment took place in San Diego,
California, U. S. A. in April 2011.
344
Research
The department is currently collaborating with the following foreign institutions as a centre in two large
multicentre studies: population as Healith Research Institute
1.
Mc Master University
Research : RELY –Atrial Fibrillation study.
(PHN) Ontario, Canada.
2.
University of Cape Town, South Africa.
Research: I. M. P. I. – investigation of the Management of Pericarsition trial
In the 2nd Clinical year (5/6). Phase II), the third medical posting exposes the students to undergraduate
psychiatry, and they rotate through the infectious Disease Hospital They also get more grounding in Clinical
Medicine by way of further bedside teaching and regular seminars tutorials.
In the final year a(6/6) Phase III, they consolidate all they have acquired in the curriculum by further tutorials,
seminars and review lectures in Clinical Medicine and Therapeutics. The average total number of students per
class 150.
CURRICULUM
This has undergone a major revision with a view to increasing its relevance to national and international needs.
The average total number of students per class is 150. The curriculum in Internal Medicine encompasses:
(a)
Class Lectures
3 Phase of Clinical Clerkships (Posting) namely:
Phase 1 M1 & M2, lasting 15 weeks, Phase II – M2 (12 weeks), and II M4, Lasting 8 weeks, Phase 2,
(M2), comprises 4 weeks of Psychiatry, weeks of Infectious Diseases IDH Posting) and 4 weeks of
General Medicine emphasizing Dermatology, Venereology and Rheumatology.
(b)
Regular Departmental Clinical meetings on Monday Afternoon 2.00-3.00 p.m.
©
Seminars and Tutorials form an integral part of Departmental programme of teaching, rotated
through the various Specialties in the Department.
During M1 & M2 postings students are introduced to the art of history taking and physical examination. This
continues in M3 and is consolidated in M4. There is also a series of Seminars and Tutorials in Clinical
Therapeutics organized by the Department of Internal Medicine and Pharmacology. The Department of
Psychiatry takes care of Medical Jurisprudence.
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS AND CODES
LEVEL
MED 4001
MED 4002
PHASE 1
MED 403
MED 404
MED 405
MED 406
MED 407
MED 408
MED 409
MED 400
MED 501
MED 502
MED 503
MED 504
NO. OF UNITS
2
2
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
COURSES
Introduction to Clinical Medicine 1
Introduction to Clinical Medicine II
Cardiology I
Respiratory Medicine I
Haematology (Clinical)
Metabolic and Endocrine Medicine
Neurology
Nephrology I
Application of Computer in Medicine
Cardiology II
Respiratory Medicine II
Gastroenterology II
Nephrology II
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MED 505
MED 506
MED 507
MED 601
MED 602
MED 603
MED 604
MED 605
MED 606
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
1
1
2
2
2
2
2
1
1
Total Credit Hours
Rheumatology
Clinical Immunology
Tropical Medicine
Special Topics
Psychiatry
Dermatovenerology
Medical Ethics & Jurisprudence
Traditional Medicine
Rural Posting
Outline of the clinical curriculum in internal medicine is as follows:
Introduction to Clinical Medicine 401, 402
4 units
Medicine Phase 1-403-409
10 units
Medicine Phase II -410-506
8 units
Medicine Phase III – (including other specialties)
14 units
Rural posting 606, 507-605
4 units
Total
=
40 units
ACHIEVEMENTS/COMMUNITY SERVICE OF THE DEPARTMEBNT
OVER THE YEARS
The primary objective of the Department is to produce graduate physicians who would be good problemsolvers and life long learners, able to work productively in multidisciplinary teams and to communicate
effectively both with their patients as well as their colleagues.
The department also conducts relevant research, and is in fact the anchor of an active malaria research,
surveillance team headed by Professor E N U Ezedinachi. Most of the projects are sponsored by the World
Health Organization (WHO), Centre for the Communicable Diseases (CCCD) in the USA and Pharmaceutical
companies. The department also provide professional expertise to the Cross River Chapter of the Diabetes
Association of Nigeria – (DAN) whose current president is Professor C. O. Odigwe, Professor of Internal
Medicine.
Professor C. O. Odigwe also serves as a UNICEF Micronutirent Consultant to the National PHC Zone A
comprising Cross River State, Akwa Ibom, Abia, Imo, Rivers, Anambra, Enugu and Benue States.
In this capacity, he is actively involved with UNICEF assisted programmes on Universal Salt Iodization as the
long-term strategy to control Iodine deficiency disorders (IDD) in Nigeria, and Vitamin A Supplement
administration as a strategy to improve childhood survival and the nutritional status of mother and children in
Nigeria.
Dr E. J. Peters is the current Chairman, Health Management Board of the Akwa Ibom State Government, Uyo.
Over the last 5 years, the department has successfully trained 3 consultants who have joined the staff list.
Another 3 are in the final stages of their Fellowship examination.
THE DEPARTMENT OF SURGERY
Background
The Department of Surgery is a clinical, hospital-based, department. Its functions are, teaching of medical
students and training of post-graduate resident doctors, research into the health problems of and service to the
community. Although primarily a university department, in discharging these functions, it has obligations to
the University of /Calabar Teaching Hospital and the professional postgraduate colleges (National postgraduate
Medical College of Nigeria and West African College of Surgeons.)
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Undergraduate Training: Medical students who have successfully completed their preclinical training, are
taught the art and science of Surgery through a well-structured programme of postings the postings range from
Surgery I (S1) in their first clinical year, to surgery 4 (S4) in the third and final clinical year. During this
period, they are taught through didactic lectures, seminars and other instructional techniques, a wide range of
topics covering all, the requirements to undergraduate surgical training. They also participate fully in all the
clinical activities of the units to which they are posted.
Specialist Training: Resident doctors in the Residency Training programme of the postgraduate college are
taught during the three years of junior residency by intensive, in depth lectures in the various surgical
specialties. /as ‘apprentices’ in their chosen fields of specialization, they are taught the requisite-skills and are
guided through the art of decision making in clinical practice. In the /senior Residency years that follow (also
3 years), having passed their part 1 Fellowship examination, the gains of the junior Residency years are
consolidated, while further training is achieved by phase transfer of responsibility from consultant (Master) to
Resident (Apprentice or indeed disciple as they were often referred to in times past, who is now on the way to
becoming a master on passing the part 2 fellowship examination. During this period also, the senior resident is
guided through choice of a subject, presentation of al proposal and preparation of a dissertation on that subject,
as part of the requirements for the part 2 Fellowship of the NPMCN Research. Research is undertaken in the
department by consultant and residents (guided by consultant) into different aspect of surgery and surgical
care. The results of such research efforts are seen as publications in various reputable peer reviewed journals
and dissertations presented to the postgraduate surgical college.
Services: The department serves as a referral unit for surgical patients within the Cross River State and its
environs. Consultants in the department offer highly specialized surgical services to such referred patients.
Aims/Objectives
The aims of the department of surgery are:
1.
To train medical students to become doctors with a sound knowledge of common surgical diseases,
their pattern and natural history and to develop sufficient acumen to practice effectively in Nigeria,
the sub region and the world at large, with the capacity to pursue higher training anywhere in the
world.
2.
To train in conjunction with the post graduate surgical colleges, specialist surgeons who are well
versed I the art and science of surgery, its progress and development who can serve as trainers,
leaders and shapers of policy in their chosen specialties.
3.
To help find solutions to the myriad of surgical problems besetting our populace by relentless
pursuit of excellence in research andnservice.
Objectives/Course Structure For Undergraduate Training.
Upon successful completion of all the postings in surgery, the student should have a broad theoretical
knowledge and understanding of common surgical conditions in our environment, develop adequate abilities
and attitudes to enable him/her.
1. Take a proper history, write up the note, perform clinical examination and elicit clinical signs that
enable him/her make a reasonable diagnosis.
2. Suspect from patient data and clinical findings the presence of emergency situation requiring urgent
remedy.
3. Select appropriate and relevant laboratory/radiological investigations that would enable him/her
confirm or review diagnosis.
4. Perform simple side Lab. Microbiological, Biochemical and Haematological examinations on
specimens such as urine, sputum, blood, CSF, etc.
5. Initiate a satisfactory course of treatment on a provisional diagnosis.
6. Recognize correctly the need to refer a case of specialist evaluation as it arises.
7. Perform certain basic procedures that they would have been taught during the clinical postings as
outlined below.
These objectives are achieved by putting the students through various postings namely, the introductory course
to clinical medicine, junior clinical postings (S1& S2) specialty postings (S3) and senior clinical posting (S4).
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During the junior postings in the first clinical year, fresh entrans into clinical class are introduced to basic
clinical skills in surgical practice and the foundation for the appreciation of surgical diagnosis is laid. This
lasts for 4 months. The second clinical year introduces the students to the sub-specialties of surgery namely,
orthopaedics and traumatology, otohinolaryngology, ophthalmology and Allied specialties to surgery
(Anaesthesiology and Radiology). This takes 6 months. The third and final clinical year consolidates the gains
of the previous two clinical years, the students are further taught patterns of surgical diseases, their natural
history, diagnosis, investigations and treatment options. The durations for this is again 6 months.
Clinical postings
During the clinical postings the students are expected to:a) Be in attendance at the surgical outpatients department, examine patients
participate fully in scientific discussions of patients care.
b) Clerk inpatients, present such patients and take part in discussions during ward
c) rounds. Each students is expected to have clearked and presented 20 patients in S1, S2, & S3.
d) Be in attendance at operating sessions and assist whenever possible). They are
taught: i.
Methods of sterilization of themselves, the theatre, the gowns and the patients
ii.
Operative techniques and different operative procedures.
iii.
Application of dressing after operation
iv.
Methods of transportation of patients to the wards
v.
Writing of post operative notes.
and
d. Attend the accident and emergency department in the evenings where they are taught by casualty staff and
consultants. They are expected to know how to:
i.
sterilize their hands and patient’s injured area
ii.
give injections – subcutaneous, intramuscular, and intravenous,
iii. put up an intravenous infusion line,
iv. pass a urethral catheter
v.
pass a nasogastric tube
vi. splint a fracture and supervise transfer of the patient to the ward
vii. incise and drain an abscess
viii. suture simple lacerations
ix. aspirate a cyst
x.
remove drains, clips and sutures
xi. have knowledge of wound care generally, the various dressing agents, when and how to use them, hoe
to dress and bandage wounds.
Orthopaedics and Traumatology
Students spend two weeks in this unit for practical experience. They are given lecture beyond this period to
cover the subject theoretically. While in the units, they are taught to:
1.
diagnose injuries of the bone and limbs whether open or closed.
2.
Determine appropriate radiological investigations for diagnosis and management,
3.
reduce and split fractures,
4.
put up POP casts.
Otorhinolaryngology
While in this unit, students are expected to study and examine the three main regions of this specialty well
enough to enable them recognize and diagnose simple ailments like epistaxis, laryngeal obstruction, infections
of the ear, foreign bodies in the ear, nose and throat.
Logbook
A record of participation/attendance at clinics wards rounds, theatre sessions, conferences, seminars etc and
procedure observed or performed by each student is kept in logbook form.
Each entry of participation, observation or performance of procedure in the logbook is endorsed by the
supervising consultant at the point of such entry. Broad outline of lecture topics in surgery.
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Throughout their three years of clinical posting, undergraduate medical students are exposed to extensive
theoretical study of the subject. The following is in broad outline and list of topic by which they are taught:
1. General principles in Surgery
 Body fluid compartments
 Composition o the body fluid
 Water and electrolyte metabolism acid base balance
 surgical disturbance and correction
 inflammation
 Surgical wound infection and common causative organism
 incision and drainage
 wound excision and debridement
 Body responses to trauma: metabolic, endocrine & immunological
 Ebb, catabolic and anabolic phase
 The immune response
 Immunity to infection, bacterial fungal, viral and parasitic
2. Wound Healing





Surgical wound management
Healing in normal tissues
Healing in specialized tissues
Complicated wound healing
Factors affecting wound healing
3. Tumour Biology
 Natural history of malignant growth
 General presentation and management of surgical tumours
4. Haemorhage
 Primary, reactionary, secondary
 Estimation and management of blood loss
 Consumption coagulopathy and its management
 D/C and its management.
5.Transfusion of blood and blood products
 Indications, methods complications
 Autologous blood transfusion
 Blood substitutes
6.Sepsis, Asepsis & Antisepsis
 Disinfection and sterilization
 Asepsis in theatre
7. Shock
 Definition and classification
 Aetiology
 Effect of shock on various organ
 Multiple organ failure
 Management of shock
8.Surgical Microbiology and Use of Antibiotics in Surgery
 Bactereamia, septicaemia, endotoxemia
 Gas gangrene and other forms of gangrene
9.Pain Relief in Surgery: Method of Management of Pain
 Medical
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 Surgical
10. General Surgery – HERNIAS
 Classification, presentation, complications and management
11.The breast
 Surgical Anatomy
 Infective/Inflammatory conditions – Benign lesions
12, Cancer of the Breast
 General principles of management.
13.Thyroid and parathyroid glands
 Surgical anatomy and embryology
 Biochemistry
 Goitre and iodine metabolism
 Hypo and hyper function
 Thyroid functions tests
 Hashimoto’s thyroiditis
 Carcinoma of the thyroid gland
14.Thyroidectomy
 Indications and preparation for
 Complication
15.The Peritoneum
 Peritoneal reflection and their significance
 Peritonitis-cause and management
 Abdominal tuberculosis
 Non surgical acute abdomen
16.Thyphoid enteritis and small bowel perforations
17.The Colon and rectum
 Large bowel obstruction
 Colorectal neoplasms
 Colostomy: indications types
 Rectal prolapse
 Haemorrhoide
 Ineffective processes of the ano-retum: rectal abscess, fissurein ano, fistula in ano, proctitis.
18.Veriform appendix
 Acute appendicitis
 Appendix mass
 Liver abscess
19.




The Liver
Surgical anatomy
Infections and parasitic conditions
Liver abscess
Subphrenic abscess
20.Heptoma
 General principles of management
21.The Spleen
 Splenic rupture. Cause
350
 Indications for splenectomy
 Splenorrhaphy
22.The stomach and duodenoun
 Surgical anatomy
 Gastric function tests
 Gastritis
 Haematemesis
 Oesophageal
23.Peptic Ulcer Disease
 Modern concepts of aetiology & management
24.
Carcinoma of the stomach
25.
Blunt and penetrating abdominal injuries
26.
The gall bladder
Surgical anatomy and physiology
Cholecystitis
Cholecystectomy
Choledochotomy




Urology
27.
i.
Ii
Iii
Anatomy and congenital anomalies of the GU tract
Urolithiasis
Hydronephrosis
28. The Kedney
 Acute and chronic renal failure, end stage renal stage disease
 Dialysis and renal transplantation.
29.
i.
Genito urinary tract injuries
Ii
Urethral structures
30. Renal neoplasms
 Wilm’s tumour
 Renal cell carcinoma
31. Bladder outlet obstruction
 Benign prostatic hypertrophy
 Carcinoma of the prostate gland
32. Disorders of microneutrion
 Enuresis and urinary incontinence
 Vesico-uretic reflux
33. The testis: Maldescent and ectopic
 Torsion
 Epididymo-orchitis
 Testicular tumours
34. Uninary tract infection
 In children
 In adult
35. i Phimosis, paraphimosis, circumcision
ii Mechanism of erection; priapism
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36 i
ii
Disturbances of fertility
Testicular varicocele
Paediatric surgery
37. Congenital anomalies of the abdominal wall of intestines
 Gastroschisis and managementy in the neonate
 Exomphalos
 Hirschprung;s disease
38.
i
ii
Infantile hypertrophy pyloric stenosis
Anorectal anomalies
39. Plastid and reconstructive surgery
i
The skin and its protective function
ii
Skin cover
 free graft, pedicle graft, other types of skin cover
 Biological dressings.
40.
i
Cancrumoris
ii
tropical ulcers, Buruli ulcer-causes and management
iii
Fournier’s gangrene & other forms of necrotising fascitis
41. Here lip, cleft lip, and other forms of facial defects
42. Burns Cardiothoracic surgery
43. The Oesophagus surgical anatomy
 Oesophageal atresia
 Tracheo oesophageal fistula
44.
i
ii
iii
Oesophagitis, Oesophageal stricture
Carcinoma of the Oesophagus
Oesophageal varices
45.
i
ii
iii
iv
The diaphragm and its openings
Dysphagia causes and its openings
Hiatus hernia
Achalasia
46
47
The Chest and lungs
Periphery vascular disease
 varicose veins, DVT, and pulmonary embolism
 lymphoedems
48.
i
ii
Congenital heart disease
Diseases of the great vessels
49.
i
ii
The heart and the great vessels
Aoetic aneurisms
50.
Chest injuries, blast injuries, gunshot injuries
ORTHOPAEDIS AND TRAUMATOLOGY
51.
52.
Congenitalanomalies
Fractures
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



53.
54.
classification
mechanisms of injury
complications
management
Bone tumours
Osteomyelitie
 Acute
 Chronic
 Causative organisms, presentation and management
55.



Infective conditions of the hand, presentation and management
pupal space, nail bed infections
paimar space infections
tensoynovitis
Neurosurgery
56.



Congenital anomalies of the ;CNS
Hydrocephalus
Meningocele, meningocele, meningomyelocele
Spinal bifida
57. Brain tumours
58. Spinal injury, complications and management
59. i
Pheripheral nerve injuries
ii
Neurofibromatosis
iii
Otorhinolaryngology
60.



The ear
Congenital anomalies
Trauma, foreign bodies
Otitis, external, labyrinthitis
61. i
ii
iii
iv
Meniere’s disease
Presbyacusis
Acoustic tumour
Hearing Loss
62





The nose and para-nasal sinuses
Choanal atresia
Encephaloceles
Gliomas
Trauma
Ineffective conditions rhinitis, sinusitis and complications
63.



Epistaxis, causes and management
foreign body in the nose
nasal allergy
nasal polyps
64. Neoplasm
 tumours of the nasal cavity and sinuses
353
65.




The Pharynx
congenital masses in the naso pharynx
adenoids tumour of the nasopharynx
foreign bodies in the nasopharynx
tumours of the nasopharynx
66.





Larynx/Trachea
congenital anomalies
speech disorders
Hoarseness and stridor in children and adults
Laryngeal trauma, upper airway obstruction
Tracheostomy
DEPARTMENT OF PAEDIATRICS
COURSE CONTENTS AND OBJECTIVES
The course is designed to equip students to deal with common Paediatric problems and consolidate on the basic
aspects of paediatrics and child health in the community. The course is given for a period of continuous 4
months. Emphasis is laid on paediatric history taking and approach to paediatric physical examination in
addition to theoretical knowledge. This will include clerking of patients in the various units of paediatric care,
physical examination and to arrive at a reasonable diagnosis or differential diagnoses and to learn the basic
management of the case. The course is composed of two basic parts: a lecture in the morning at 8.30, 9.30, and
another one hour lecture or tutorial from 2.00-3.00 p.m.
BESIDE TEACHING
Students are divided into 4 groups each which rotates through the Paediatric outpatient clinic, Children
Emergency Room/Diarrhoea Training Unit, General paediatric ward and the neonatal unit. Consultants conduct
the teaching ward rounds. In these clinical areas each student must clerk and present 3-4 cases (total 12 cases).
The cases are presented to the consultants who award marks which count as part of the student Continuous
Assessment scores. Each bedsides teaching round lasts for three hours (9.30 a.m, 12.30 p.m, Monday-Friday.)
SOCIAL PAEDIATRIC VISITS
Students are taken out in small groups of 4-5 to visit home of patient in the wards in company with the mother.
The aim is to relate the patient’s problems to his home circumstances. Visits are also paid to Primary Health
Care Centre so that the students can appreciate the practical details of Child survival strategies e.g,
immunization, breast feeding, growth monitoring etc.
SPECIFIC OBJECTIVES
At the conclusion of the course, students should be able to:
a) Have a broad theoretical knowledge and understanding of the common paediatric diseases in the
community.
b) The student would have consolidate his clinical skills in taking history, clinical examination, make
subjective clinical differential diagnose, make sure of the pertinent laboratory and radiological
investigations to confirm his diagnosis.
c) The student would have observed and participated in the common procedures such as blood taking,
lumbar puncture etc, and record them in his logbook.
d) The student would be able to manage the common childhood diseases in his community.
SPECIFIC TOPICS
CARDIOLOGY
 Cyanotic Heart Disease (TOF, TGA)
 Acyanotic Heart Disease (VSD/PDA)
 Rheumatic fever/Heart disease
ONCOLOGY
Burkitis Lymphom
Neuroblastoma
Leuaemia
NEUROLOGY
SOCIOLOGY
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





Convulsions/Epilepses
Cerebral Palsy
Neuromuscular Disorders
Neural Tube Defect
Hydrocephalus/Microcephaly
Development Milestone
NEPHROLOGY
 Acute Nephritis
1
 Nephritic Syndrome
2
 UTI
3
PULMONOLOGY
4
 Asthma
5
 Bronchiolitis
 Pneumonia
1
 Gastroenteritis
NEONATOOGY
3
 Prematurity
4
 Neonatal Sepsis
5
 Neonatal Jaundice
 Birth Trauma
 Birth Asphyxia
1
 Neonatal Tetanus
2
 Infant Feeding
 Congenital infections (TORCH)
 Coma
The abandoned Baby
Home visiting
Sickle Cell Counselling
Adopting/Fostering
Child Survival Strategies
Accidents & Poisoning
MISCELLANEOUS
Chromosoma Disorders
Failure to Thrive
Growth/Anthropometry
DiabetesMellitus
Enuresis
Nutrition/Gastroenterology
Protein calorieMalnutrition
Fluid Electrolyte Requirement
Infant Feeding
Rickets
HAEMATOLOGY
Sickle Cell Disease
Anaemia in childhood
TUTORIAL
DEPARTMENT OF FAMILY MEDICINE
Brief Description of each Proramme Objective
a. The MB,BCh Programme – the objective of this training programme is to help the student doctors to
develop proper orientation to the rendering of medical care in rural as well as urban settings without
prejudice, as doctors of first contact, or front-line doctors.
b. FMCGP and FWACP (GP) Programme:- The main objective of this training programme is to enable
resident doctors in the specialty to acquire knowledge, attitude and skills needed to enamour them in
the practice as front-line doctors who would not only be able to attend to patients presenting to them
largely as undifferentiated cases, but will be able to carry out meaningful research into intriguing
areas for the furtherance of knowledge in the discipline, Such doctors thus be able to serve
competently in General hospital, military, voluntary agency, company Hospital, as the General outpatient Department of Teaching and Specialist Hospitals and General and private hospitals to
mention but a few.
List Of Courses Offered And Duration In Respect Of Each Programme
a.
MB.BCh Programme
Two classes of medical students (first year clinical and final year) pass through the department each
academic year. The department delivers courses (Phase 1) on general medical practice, and medical ethics
and jurisprudence, in a regular calendar year from September to December to first year clinical class. It
also offers clinical postings from January to February to April, three hours per day, four days per week,
(phase II) to the same class.
The final year class receives lectures and in rotations, takes on rural postings (including leprology), as well
as, private practice clinical experiences in accredited private clinics from September to December. Each
posting ends with a continuous assessment examination.
b.
FMCGPAND FWACP (GP):
The training is spread into three parts Primary, part I, and Part II (final). Candidates are expected to meet
the primary requirements which consist mainly of passing postgraduate examinations in the Basic Sciences
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anatomy, Biochemistry and Physiology, before commencement of the Part I rotations. The Part I rotations
as well as the Part II training, last two (2) year each , and are crowned by examinations.
DETAILED COURSE OUTLAY FOR THE UNDERGRAUDATE (MB.BCH) TRAINING
PROGRAMME IN THE DEPARTMENT OF GENERAL PRACTICE.
1st Year Clinical Lecturers/Clinical Postings 400 exposure is spread over a period of thirty (30) weeks of
lecture shared with Medicine, Surgery, Pharmacology, and Laboratory Medicine Departments;
superimposed on eighteen (18) weeks Clinical Postings shared with Medicine and Surgery Departments.
GP 401: Lecturers on Principles of General Practice:
 Introduction to general practice, The family as a unit of care
 General Practice in Developed countries of the World
 The Scope of General Practice in Nigeria
 Development and Organization of Health Care System in Nigeria
 The Health Care System in Nigeria Primary in Relation to Secondary and Tertiary care
 Traditional Healers and Alternative Medical practitioners
 Paramedical Personnel
 Health Communications (Interview techniques and Exposition)
 The Concepts of illness, Sickness, Disease and Health
 The General practice Clinic and Armamentarium
 The Laboratory in General Practice.
 Financial Health Care
 Prescribing/The Essential drugs List
 Continuity of care (Referral and Follow up)
FIRST CONTINUOUS ASSESSMENT ONE HOUR PAPER:- DEPARTMENTAL GP 402:
OUTPUT CLINCAL SKILLS IN GOVERNMENT HEALTH INSTITUTIONS
At this level, students care posted to government owned health institutions like General Hospital,
University medical centre, outpatient Department, Accident and emergency Unit of hospital, University
Medical Centre, Outpatient Department, Accident and emergency Unit of the Teaching Hospital. Six (6)
weeks of exposure is offered to each students in two (2) weeks rotation through the facilities, skills to
acquired include:
 Fast/Emergency doctor- patient communication techniques
 Primary Assessment
 Management of undefrentiated minor health problems
 Concept of whole patients (Hostilic) treatment
 Health promotion and prevention
GP 403: Lectures on Medical Ethics and Jurisprudence
a. Medical Ethics
 Ethics relating to the Doctor and Society
 The Medical and Dental Council of Nigeria
 Ethical issues involved in contraception, sterilization, infertility and sex change
 Medical ethics in Primary care
 Ethical Dilemmas in Practice and Research
b.





1.
2.
Medical Jurisprudence
Legal duties and Liabilities of the doctor in Nigeria
Medicine and the law the doctor and the court
Professional misconduct (case report)
Professional Negligence I (case report)
Professional Negligence II (case report)
Second Continuous Assessments (2-Hour Essay questions):- Departmental
Clinical Skill Examination in General Practice (Long Case, Short): College based.
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NO OF COURSES ARE OFFERED AT THE 500 LEVEL
3rd/Final Year Clinical Lectures/Clinical Postings 600 Level:
The 600 level training covers a period of sixteen weeks of lectures and Clinical postings in urban a