EDU 549: Issues and Applications in Secondary BIO & EES
Course Syllabus
Course Meets Tuesday, 4:00-6:45 PM, TBD
Course Instructor: Dr. Jeanelle Day
Office: Webb Hall Rm. 151
Office Hours: M & W 1-3 pm; Th. 11 am-noon
Phone Number: 860-465-4532
Email: [email protected]
I. Catalog Description:
Development of a philosophy of teaching biology and environmental earth science within
the framework of a secondary science program. Selection and organization of materials.
Guidance for student growth in developing scientific attitudes. Field experiences required for
certification students.
II. Course Prerequisites: Admission to the Teacher Education Program.
III. Purpose of Course: To provide an understanding of reforms and innovations in science
education and an opportunity to enhance professional skills in analyzing, applying, and
performing effective science teaching and curriculum development at the secondary level, with
emphasis on the biological and environmental earth sciences. This will be done through using a
diversity of approaches, contexts, and knowledge integrated with the psychological, historical,
and philosophical bases for science education.
IV. Course Texts: (as found on bookstore website)
Author(s)
BYBEE
Title
LEARNING SCIENCE+SCIENCE OF LEARNING
ISBN
9780873552080
Author(s)
Texley, Kwan, Summers
Title
Investigating safely
ISBN
0873552024
National Research Council (1996). National Science Education Standards. Online at:
http://www.nap.edu/books/0309053269/html/index.html
V. American’s With Disabilities Act (ADA) Policy:
If you are a student with a disability and believe you will need accommodations for this
class, it is your responsibility to contact the Office of AccessAbility Services at (860) 465-5573.
To avoid any delay in the receipt of accommodations, you should contact the Office of
AccessAbility Services as soon as possible. Please understand that I cannot provide
accommodations based upon disability until I have received an accommodation letter from the
Office of AccessAbility Services. Your cooperation is appreciated.
VI. Course Objectives and Expectations:
Course Objective
1.
2.
Demonstrate knowledge
of their content field and
how it applies to the
National Science
Education Standards,
and the Connecticut
Science Standards and
how they relate to the
Next Generation Science
Standards.
Demonstrate knowledge
of the concept of inquiry
by determining how
inquiry is used in the
schools and developing
safe, appropriate inquiry
lessons to address naive
conceptions.
3.
Demonstrate student
knowledge of science
concepts, principles,
theories and laws and
how these have changed
as a result of instruction.
4.
Demonstrate knowledge
of how to use formative
and summative
assessment in the
science classroom.
Performance Expectations (NSTA/NCATE) and CCCT Domains
1a) Understand the major concepts, principles, theories, laws, and interrelationships of
their fields of licensure and supporting fields as recommended by the National Science
Teachers Association.
1b) Understand the central concepts of the supporting disciplines and the supporting
role of science-specific technology.
1c) Show an understanding of state and national curriculum standards and their impact
on the content knowledge necessary for teaching P-12 students.
AND CCCT Domains 1, 3
2a) Plan multiple lessons using a variety of inquiry approaches that demonstrate their
knowledge and understanding of how all students learn science.
2b) Include active inquiry lessons where students collect and interpret data in order to
develop and communicate concepts and understand scientific processes, relationships
and natural patterns from empirical experiences. Applications of science-specific
technology are included in the lessons when appropriate.
2c) Design instruction and assessment strategies that confront and address naïve
concepts/preconceptions.
3a) Use a variety of strategies that demonstrate the candidates’ knowledge and
understanding of how to select the appropriate teaching and learning activities –
including laboratory or field settings and applicable instruments and/or technology- to
allow access so that all students learn. These strategies are inclusive and motivating for
all students.
3b) Develop lesson plans that include active inquiry lessons where students collect and
interpret data using applicable science-specific technology in order to develop concepts,
understand scientific processes, relationships and natural patterns from empirical
experiences. These plans provide for equitable achievement of science literacy for all
students.
3d) Plan a learning environment and learning experiences for all students that
demonstrate chemical safety, safety procedures, and the ethical treatment of living
organisms within their licensure area.
AND CCCT Domains 1, 2, 3
5b) Provide data to show that P-12 students are able to distinguish science from
nonscience, understand the evolution and practice of science as a human endeavor, and
critically analyze assertions made in the name of science.
5c) Engage students in developmentally appropriate inquiries that require them to develop
concepts and relationships from their observations, data, and inferences in a scientific
manner. AND CCCT Domains 1, 3
3c) Plan fair and equitable assessment strategies to analyze student learning and to evaluate
if the learning goals are met. Assessment strategies are designed to continuously evaluate
preconceptions and ideas that students hold and the understandings that students have
formulated.
5a) Collect, organize, analyze, and reflect on diagnostic, formative and summative
evidence of a change in mental functioning demonstrating that scientific knowledge is
gained and/or corrected.
AND CCCT Domain 5
Products
Development of unit plan.
Written response paper on
CAPT
assessment
assignment.
Disposition
reflection.
Development of unit plan
with
specific
inquiry
components. Observation
reflection papers from field
experience/classroom.
Evidence of a lesson
designed for and taught to
students that positively
changes conceptions that
scientific knowledge is
gained and/or corrected.
Development of unit plan.
Completion
of
CAPT
assessment assignment.
5.
Develop experiences that
create a community of
diverse learners who
construct meaning from
their science experiences
in biological and/or
environmental earth
science and possess a
disposition for further
exploration and learning.
6.
Demonstrate knowledge of
safety and welfare in the
science classroom.
7.
Demonstrate competency
in knowledge and skills of
technology in
instructional design in
secondary science
classrooms and
laboratories.
Demonstrate familiarity
with professional
organizations and the
resources they provide
teachers’ professional
growth.
8.
5.a. Candidates/Graduates vary their teaching actions, strategies, and
methods to promote the development of multiple student skills and levels
of understanding.
5.b. Candidates/Graduates successfully promote the learning of science by
students with different abilities, needs, interests, and backgrounds.
5.c. Candidates/Graduates successfully organize and engage students in
collaborative learning using different group learning strategies appropriate
for lesson goals and objectives.
5. e. Candidates understand and build effectively upon the prior beliefs,
knowledge, experiences, and interests of students.
7.a. Candidates identify ways to relate science to the community, involve
stakeholders, and use community resources to promote the learning of
science.
7.b. Candidates involve students in activities that relate science to
resources and stakeholders in the community or to the resolution of issues
important to the community.
AND CCCT Domains 2, 3, 4, 6
9.a. Candidates understand the legal and ethical responsibilities of science
teachers for the welfare of their students, the proper treatment of animals,
and the maintenance and disposal of materials.
9.b. Candidates know and practice safe and proper techniques for the
preparation, storage, dispensing, supervision, and disposal of all materials
used in science instruction.
9.c. Candidates know and follow emergency procedures, maintain safety
equipment, and ensure safety procedures appropriate for the activities and
the abilities of students.
AND CCCT Domains 1, 2, 4, 6
5.d. Candidates successfully use technological tools, including but not
limited to computer technology, to access resources, collect and process
data, and facilitate the learning of science.
AND CCCT Domains 2, 4
Development of unit plan. CAPT
assessment. Field experience evaluation.
10.b. Candidates reflect constantly upon their teaching and identify ways
and means through which they may grow professionally.
10.d. Candidates interact effectively with colleagues, parents, and students;
mentor new colleagues; and foster positive relationships with the
community
AND CCCT Domain 6
Written
reflection
of
professional
organization
websites/materials
and
membership in one such organization.
Research Project.
Safety assessment.
Technology integration.
Creation of unit plan.
VII. Methods of Evaluation:
Components
Value
Attendance and participation (instructor & self- 2
evaluated; includes activities such as discussions,
activities, presentations)
Technology Integration & Professionalism
Safety Assignment
1
2
Learning Cycle lesson on history and nature of 2
science
Grading
A = 4.0
A- = 3.7
B+ = 3.3
B = 3.0
B- = 2.7
C+ = 2.3
C = 2.0
C- = 1.7
D+ = 1.3
D = 1.0
F = 0.0
You must attain a 2.0
Curriculum Evaluation
1
to remain in the
Unit Plan
5
program.
Clinical Report
4
Number of Grades
18
To figure out your grade, simply multiply the grade received on a four point scale, multiply
by the value and divide your total points by the number of grades (17 for this class).
On-Ground Course Meetings will be held on: Sept. 3, Oct. 1, Nov. 12, Dec. 3
VIII. Assignment Descriptions:
The students will create work documenting (1) an advanced set of newly developed competencies
and skills, and (2) an expanded knowledge base involving the production of professional level products
and activities related to science education locally and regionally. Final grades will be determined through
written assignments meeting a professional criterion level. All activities should be posted on the course
Bb Learn site.
CERTIFICATION STUDENT ASSIGNMENTS:
1. Participation self-reflection. See rubric on Learn in Assignments Section. Due Dec. 3
2. Technology Integration & Professionalism: Technology is a natural part of science teachers’ lives.
You are expected to integrate technology into the various assignments in this course. Due Nov. 12.
a. As a part of the online portion of this course, you will be evaluating electronic media
resources to use in your biology or environmental earth science courses. You should find
a minimum of 10 websites that contain virtual labs, dissections, demonstrations, video
clips, or other unique materials that you would find useful in your own classroom. For
each of the websites, please give the web address with a description of the site content
and ideas for incorporation into your specific content area. Be sure to align with the CT
Science Frameworks.
b. Review two science education organization websites (i.e. the Association for the
Education of Teachers of Science (AETS), the National Association for Research in
Science Teaching (NARST), the National Science Teachers Association (NSTA), the
National Association of Biology Teachers (NABT), or the National Association of
Geoscience Teachers (NAGT)). Write a 1-page reflection paper on the type of materials
that are included on the websites and how they may be incorporated into your courses.
You are also required to become a member of ONE organization.
c. You are required to become a member of ONE organization. Include your membership
information (print out your membership information as proof). You should join NSTA,
complete one Science Object (a two-hour online content course) on the subject of your
choice, preferably an area in which you need additional content knowledge or have a
particular interest (2003, 10a; 2011, 6a).
d. Practice using the graphing calculators/CBL’s/probeware, smartboards or similar
technology available in your school. Plan one activity to teach a simple concept to the
rest of the class using this technology. Arrange presentation with Dr. Day.
e. Write a one page description of a scientific talk, symposium, research project, or
other opportunity completed within the community in the time you have been in
the education program. Arts & Sciences has symposia on a regular basis that may
be attended to complete this part of the assignment (6a).
f. Write a one page description and submit the cover and stamped attendance sheets
(usually for CEU's for practicing teachers, but you can get one, too) from the fall
annual Connecticut Science Teachers Association meeting, or other appropriate
conference you attend as a potential professional educator (6b).
3. Safety Assignment: Due Dec. 3
2011 NSTA Standards Addressed: 4a-c
1. Knowledge of Safety: Complete Flinn Safety Module. Turn in certificate of completion.
http://labsafety.flinnsci.com/CreateAccount.aspx
2. Complete clinical safety assignment-this may be completed in clinical experiences and/or
pre-student teaching or student teaching (to be turned in with student teaching portfolio). This
includes completion of the School Science Safety Checklist.
3. Candidate works with school safety officer to become a leader in the area of safety in the
schools. Offer PD to department faculty during a department meeting on safety procedures –
work with department chair or school safety officer to create PD opportunity to refresh safety
procedures within the department. This includes helping to organize the storage area in
accordance with Flinn guidelines. Copy of PD handouts and signatures of those in attendance
must be turned in to get credit for this assignment.
Clinical Safety Assignment (Addendum to Clinical/Student Teaching Rubric)
Activity Description
Candidate designs activities and demonstrates safe and proper
techniques for the preparation, storage, dispensing, supervision,
and disposal of all materials used within their subject area
instruction (4a).
All MSDS sheets are attached to lesson plans (if applicable).
Candidate designs activities and demonstrates an ability to
implement emergency procedures and maintenance of safety
equipment, policies and procedures that comply with established
state and/or national guidelines (4b).
Candidate ensures safe science activities appropriate for all
abilities of students (4b).
Candidate designs activities that demonstrate ethical decisionmaking with respect to the treatment of all living organisms in
and out of the classroom (4c).
Candidate emphasizes safe, humane, and ethical treatment of
animals and comply with the legal restrictions on the collection,
keeping, and use of living organisms (4c).
A refresher PD is offered by the candidate to the faculty in the
department.
School Science Safety Checklist is completed.
Candidate takes responsibility for safety in the classroom and
storage area and helps to organize materials in the teaching area.
Date
Completed
Signature of Clinical
Faculty/Cooperating
Teacher
Science School Safety Checklist
Use this checklist in your clinical experience. Each section should either have a Yes or No in each
column according to whether the element is met. If NOT MET, please comment in column 3. If
unclear if elements are met, interview science departments to find out. Checklist modified from
www.cssa-science.org/safety.shtml
Safety Elements
Element
Met? YES or
NO
If NO, please explain.
GENERAL SAFETY
Have hazardous or potentially hazardous conditions,
such as lack of Ground-Fault Interrupters (GFIs)
near sinks, inadequate ventilation, or potential
hazards, e.g., study halls scheduled in laboratories or
tile floors not waxed with nonskid wax.
Science department member checks the fume hood
regularly for efficiency and never use the hood as a
storage area.
Ensure that the hood is vented properly through the
roof.
Use only equipment in good condition (not broken)
and efficient working order.
Have a goggle sanitation plan for goggles used by
multiple classes per day.
Have separate disposal containers for broken
glassware or flammables.
Discuss and post emergency/escape and notification
plans/numbers in each room/laboratory. Clearly
mark fire exits, and keep exits (preferably two from
laboratories) unobstructed.
Have and enforce a safety contract with students and
parents.
Identify medical and allergy problems for each
student to foresee potential hazards.
Model, post, and enforce all safety procedures.
Display safety posters.
Keep laboratory uncluttered and locked when not in
use or when a teacher is not present.
Know district and state policies concerning
administering first aid and have an adequately
stocked first-aid kit accessible at all times.
Know and follow district and state
policies/guidelines for use of hazardous chemicals,
live animals, and animal and plant specimens in the
classroom/laboratory.
Report all injuries, including animal scratches, bites,
and allergic reactions, immediately to appropriate
supervisors.
Keep records on safety training and laboratory
incidents.
Provide the number of accessible lab stations having
sufficient workspace (60 square feet or 5.6 square
meters) workspace per student; 5 foot or 1.5 meters
Dr. Day
EDU 549-Fall 2013 - 7
wide aisles and low lab table sections for wheelchair
accessibility that can be supervised by the number of
qualifie teachers/aides present (maximum 24:1).
Have master cut-off switches/valves within each
laboratory (preferably in one secure location); know
how to use them; and keep water, gas, and electricity
turned off when not in use.
CHEMICAL STORAGE AND MAINTENANCE
Maintain up-to-date chemical and equipment
inventories, including Material Safety Data Sheet
(MSDS) files.
Label equipment and chemicals adequately with
respect to hazards and other needed information.
Post the National Fire Protection Association
(NFPA) "diamond" at all chemical storeroom
entrances denoting the most hazardous chemical in
each category within. Regularly send an updated
copy of the inventory to the local fire department.
Organize chemical storerooms properly. Arrange
chemicals by National Institute for Occupational
Safety and Health (NIOSH)/ Occupational Safety
and Health Administration (OSHA) compatibility
classes, with special storage available for oxidizers,
non-flammable compressed gases, acids, and
flammables.
Store chemicals in appropriate places—e.g., below
eye level, large containers no higher than 2 feet (.6
meters) above floor, acids in corrosives cabinets, and
solvents in OSHA/NFPA approved flammables
cabinets—with acids physically separated frombases
and oxidizers physically separated from organics
within secure, limited access, adequately ventilated
storerooms. Chemicalshelving should be wooden,
with a front lip and without metal supports.
Provide in a readily accessible location appropriate
materials and procedures forclean-up of hazardous
spills and accidents, e.g., aspirator or kit for mercury
spills, vermiculite and baking soda for acids, and
10% Clorox bleach solution or 5% Lysol solution for
body fluids, and appropriate procedures for disposal
of chemo- and bio-hazardous materials.
Prohibit the use of pathogens or any procedures or
materials in any school laboratory above Biosafety
Level 1 as outlined by Centers for Disease
Control/National Institutes of Health protocols.
Keep live animals and students adequately protected
from one another
A Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) should be
kept on file and be easily accessible for ALL
chemicals. MSDS sheets should be referenced for
proper storage and for appropriate personal
protective equipment (PPE). Refer to your school
district and state policies for local storage
requirements and mandates.
Dr. Day
EDU 549-Fall 2013 - 8
Labeling Chemicals Include the following
minimum essential information on chemical labels:
• Chemical manufacturer or supplier (including
address and telephone number). • Chemical name
and/or trade name of the product (same as MSDS
when applicable). • Date received or date placed in
the container. • Strength of the chemical. •
Precautions to be observed in handling or mixing the
chemical. • Appropriate hazard symbol National Fire
Protection Association (NFPA) rating.
Chemical Storage Store chemicals according to the
following minimum storage requirements: • Separate
storage area from the classroom area. Use
appropriate warning symbols to mark storage areas. •
Make certain that storage area is properly ventilated.
• Make certain that fire door or adequate exits are
provided. • Provide appropriate fire extinguisher(s)
or extinguishing systems. • Make certain that storage
shelves are securely attached to wall (each shelf with
a front one-inch or 2.5 centimeters lip to prevent
bottles from sliding off shelves). • Separate inorganic
chemicals from organic chemicals. • Use a reputable
guide, e.g., National Institute for Occupational
Safety and Health/Occupational Safety and Health
Administration (NIOSH/OSHA), to help you
properly separate incompatible chemical families. •
Do not store chemicals past the manufacturer’s
suggested shelf life. • Make certain that chemicals
are labeled and stored in appropriate containers. •
Store flammables and corrosives separately in
appropriate cabinets
Development of a statement that includes clearly
defined responsibilities of the superintendent,
principals, department chairs, classroom teachers,
students, and parents.
Inclusion of a laboratory safety program as part of
the curriculum and instruction.
Regular training for all staff on safety policies,
record keeping, and other procedures.
Evaluation of laboratory facilities and procurement
of equipment needed.
Development and enforcement of a plan for
monitoring safety equipment and storage areas.
Preparation and storage of safety records, i.e.,
inventories, Materials Safety Data Sheets (MSDS),
accident/incident reports, hazard notification reports.
Identification of hazardous chemicals and
minimizing exposure to students and teachers, e.g.,
computerized/written inventory.
Development of safety policies and procedures for
procurement, distribution, storage, and disposal of
chemicals, e.g., using MSDS file.
Development of a written emergency plan and
practiced procedures for spills or accidents involving
Dr. Day
EDU 549-Fall 2013 - 9
chemicals.
Implementation of a plan for posting signs and
labels.
PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT
Master shut-off valves/switches should be located
within each laboratory, preferably in one secure
location accessible only to the instructor. Water, gas,
and electricity should be turned off when not in use.
Adequate numbers of tri-class ABC fire
extinguishers should be strategically placed within
30 steps or 15 seconds of any location in the room.
These should be checked and certified as fully
charged and in working order at least every six
months.
Forearm or foot-operated face/body sprayers, with
adequate flexible hoses and water pressure, should
be strategically placed within 30 steps or 15 seconds
of any location in the room. If a standard plumbed
safety shower unit is used, it should provide potable
water at a flow rate of 30–60 gallons/minute (113.6–
227.2 liters/minute) at a pressure of 20–50 p.s.i.
An appropriate fume hood, vented through the roof
to at least 8 feet (2.4 meters) above the roof line,
should have a face velocity of 60–100 feet/minute
(18.3–30.5 meters/minute) of air through the hood.
The hood should not be within 10 feet (3.1meters) of
an exit or on a main aisle.
All electrical outlets within 5 feet (1.5 meters) of
sinks and serving delicate electricalequipment should
be fitted with Ground-Fault Interrupters (GFI).
Where thunderstorm activity is a regular
meteorological phenomenon, it is essential that
outlets be equipped with GFIs. Outlets should be
capped when not in use and placed along walls or
counters at intervals of 6–8 feet (1.8–2.4 meters).
Retardant-treated wool fire blankets, free of friable
asbestos, should be prominently labeled and
strategically placed within 30 steps or 15 seconds of
any location in the room.
A bucket of dry, organics-free sand should be
available for alkali metals fires.
American National Standards Institute (ANSI) coded
Z87 or Z87.1 approved safety goggles should be
provided for each student when there is danger of
chemical or projectile hazard. Specially marked,
non-vented goggles should be available for contact
lens wearers.
Sanitizing and/or sterilizing equipment or materials,
e.g., ultraviolet cabinets or alcohol swabs, should be
available and used between classes to clean safety
cover goggles.
Non-absorbent, chemical-resistant aprons should be
provided for each student during laboratory activities
where there is a danger of spillage or spattering of
Dr. Day
EDU 549-Fall 2013 - 10
chemicals or hot liquids.
Heavy-gauge metal storage cans with an internal
flame arrester (heat sump) should be used for storage
and dispensing of flammable chemicals by the
teacher only.
A container should be provided and clearly marked
for the disposal of broken glass only.
Containers of diatomaceous earth should be kept
available for general chemical spills. Vinegar and
sodium hydrogen carbonate (sodium
bicarbonate/baking soda) are needed for
neutralization of bases and acids respectively. An
aspirator and a mercury spill kit should be available
for mercuryspills. Disinfectants and 10% Clorox
bleach solutions should be used to sterilize
equipment and wash down counter tops.
An adequately stocked first-aid kit for teacher use
should be easily accessible in an emergency.
Emergency procedures and telephone numbers
should be prominently posted in the room.
PHYSICAL LAYOUT AND SPECS
The room should not be overcrowded, with 45–60
square feet (4.2–5.6 square meters) of working
space/student, depending upon the type of activities
to be performed. It should be designed for no more
than 24 students/teacher.
There should be no less than 6 linear feet (1.8
meters) of workspace per student in the
classroom/laboratory.
•In order to meet Americans with Disabilities Act
(ADA) requirements for handicapped and disabled
students, there should be at least an additional 20
square feet (1.9 square meters) of working space per
student.
Approximately 15 square feet (1.4 square meters)
per computer station, 10 square feet (.9 square
meters) for a TV with VCR or laser
disc player, and 12 square feet (1.1 square meters)
for a projector should be added to total lab area to
accommodate minimum technological equipment.
The room should have no blind spots where students
cannot be observed and supervised.
General light level should be between 538.2–1076.4
lumens per square meter with diffuse lighting
preferred.
Aisle width should be adequate (4–5 feet or 1.2–1.5
meters) to accommodate handicapped students and
equipment needs.
The room should have two exits, both opening
outward and at least 5 feet wide (1.5 meters) to
accommodate handicapped students and facilitate
equipment carts and emergency exit. Doors should
have reinforced glass viewing windows or
peepholes.
Dr. Day
EDU 549-Fall 2013 - 11
During labs, air in the room should be regularly
recycled and mixed with outside air at a rate of 4–12
complete laboratory air changes per hour, depending
on the chemicals used.
The exhaust ventilation system should be separate
from that of the chemical fume hood and should
meet the American National Standards Institute
(ANSI) Z9.5 Standard.
For high school labs where chemicals of low to
moderate toxicity are used, at least one functioning
exhaust hood (portable or permanent)
that meets American Society of Heating,
Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers
(ASHRAE) 110 testing standard, with a face velocity
of approximately 80–120 linear feet/minute (24.4–
36.6 meters/minute), should be provided. Exhaust
should be vented to the outside through the roof or
outside wall. A common through-the-wall hood may
serve the laboratory and preparation room. Exhaust
hood(s) should be located away (10 feet or 3.1
meters) from entrances/exits, windows, intake ducts,
and high traffic areas.
There should be a telephone or an intercom available
for notifying the office and others of emergencies.
Tile floors should be covered with a nonskid wax.
There should be lockable storage for certain items.
Emergency/master shut-off controls for water, gas,
and electricity should be in a securable location near
the teacher’s station.
There should be sufficient electrical outlets located
at intervals of 6–8 feet (1.8–2.4 meters) that make
extension cords unnecessary. They should be capped
when not in use. Those outlets within 5 feet (1.5
meters) of water should be equipped with GroundFault Interrupters (GFIs).
Goose-necked faucets should be used on sinks to
allow attachment of portable eyewashesand shower
hoses.
Lab surfaces should be made of material unaffected
by acids, alkal is, solvents, and temperate heat.
4. Creation of a learning cycle lesson on the history and nature of science. The historical aspect should
include scientists of diverse ethnic background and/or female scientists. The learning cycle lesson
should also include activities that engage students in learning more about the nature of science. These
learning cycle lessons will be presented in class. Please plan to include these lessons in your unit plan
but present these lessons on Nov. 12.
5. Curriculum Evaluation: In the classroom in which you are placed or where you teach, review a
commercial science kit and write a reflection that addresses the points below. The paper should be no
more than two pages in length. Paper Due Oct. 12-online. BRING A KIT TO CLASS ON
OCTOBER 12!
Dr. Day
EDU 549-Fall 2013 - 12
a. Find common curricula materials (FOSS, SCIS, SEPUP, etc.) and evaluate them. The
following questions should be answered completely:
i. Is the kit complete?
ii. Would teachers be able to easily integrate the kit into their classroom teaching?
iii. Does the kit address any of the National or State Science Standards? If so, which
ones?
iv. Is it plausible that teachers could use the kit without additional training (could
they purchase it and use it with ease)?
v. Are the written materials constructivist in nature? Explain.
vi. How would you improve the kit?
vii. How is the Nature of Science addressed in this kit? Explain.
viii. How is the engineering process integrated into the kit? Could it be integrated?
6. Clinical Report: Investigating Students’ Understanding of Science
This assignment is directly related to your clinical experience in a secondary classroom. While in
school, you are expected to investigate students’ understanding of mathematics. You can
accomplish this task by implementing the following steps:
Design a pre-test and post-test to assess students’ scientific content you will be teaching
in your clinical classroom. Administer the pre-test prior to teaching your lesson.
ii)
Teach a science lesson and take careful notes related to the following questions: What
was the science content and what national and common core state standards did this fit
into? What kinds of technology or other teaching resources were used by you (the
teacher) and students? What kinds of teaching/learning strategies were used? Who was
more engaged; students or the teacher? How frequently did the students ask questions?
Was this primarily a traditional/behaviorist or a progressive/constructivist classroom?
iii)
Administer the post-test after teaching your lesson. This will help you to decide whether
or not your teaching made a positive impact on student learning.
iv)
Select two students (one at a higher science level and one at a lower science level) based
on your pre- and post-tests and also with coordination from your clinical experience
teacher and interview them to investigate their mathematical understanding. Collect
student work and take interview notes. If it is hard to take notes during the interview you
can tape record the interviews and transcribe them later in your convenience.
v)
Analyze pretest, posttest, and other student work and determine their understanding of
science. Do you think that these students achieved the lesson objectives? If so, what is the
evidence? If not, what went wrong?
Write a report. In your report you must cite at least five readings, including both the Connecticut and
NGSS standards. You also need to provide a reference page using the APA formatting. Your report
must include the following:
i) Describe the context and science levels of students that you taught. Describe the lesson
(content and standards).
ii) Discuss the pretest, posttest, problem and interview questions that you asked the two
students.
iii) Analyze student work and interviews and report your findings. Discuss with evidence
whether or not the lesson objectives were met.
iv) Finally provide your reflection on how you would change the lesson to better suit the
students’ needs.
v) Attach your lesson plan, pre- and post-tests, and some work samples from the two students
you selected.
i)
Your report should be no more than 5 pages in length (double-spaced), excluding the
attachments.
Dr. Day
EDU 549-Fall 2013 - 13
You will also need to give a 10 minute presentation to the EDU 549 class about your lesson. Your
oral presentation in class should include the following steps:
a) Bring the lesson materials/resources used in the school classroom. If no resources were used,
you must prepare similar resources to demonstrate to the class during your presentation.
b) Describe the lesson (content and standards) you observed and the science levels of students
(1-2 minutes).
c) Carry out a
portion of the lesson in EDU 549 class, including an
activity with the materials/resources that you bring to the class (5-6 minutes). During your
activity make sure that EDU 549 class is engaged. Your job is not to lecture what you did but
to engage the class in a meaningful way.
d) Ask a question and lead the discussion (1-2 minutes). Make sure that the question is related to
the topic of your presentation.
CLINICAL REPORT and PRESENTATION RUBRIC
Analysis of
teaching,
student work
and
interviews
Comparison
of analysis to
course
readings
The analysis of teaching, student
work, and interviews is clear,
meaningful, and insightful.
Acceptable (2)
The description of student
background, classroom
context, and lesson presented
to the students is generally
clear.
The analysis of teaching,
student work, and interviews
is clear.
The analysis is compared to
course readings including the
CCT, Connecticut standards and
NGSS in a meaningful way.
The analysis is compared to
course readings or the CCT,
Connecticut standards and
NGSS standards.
The analysis is not
compared to course
readings or the standards.
Impact on
student
learning
The analysis and reflection
clearly indicate that the teacher
(candidate) is making a highly
positive impact on student
learning.
Appropriate grade level
manipulatives or other audiovisual aids are used and the EDU
549 class is actively engaged in
The analysis and reflection
provide some indication that
the teacher (candidate) is
making a positive impact on
student learning.
Manipulatives or other audiovisual aids are used and the
EDU 549 class is engaged in
the presentation
The analysis and reflection
do not indicate that the
teacher (candidate) is
making a positive impact on
student learning.
Appropriate grade level
manipulatives or other
audio-visual aids are not
used or the EDU 549 class
is not engaged in the
presentation.
Reflection is not focused on
lesson objectives, does not
provide future directions, or
is not compared with the
PTC or CCT. Sometimes
these elements may be
unclear.
Classroom
and interview
context
Activity and
engagement in
presentation
Target (3)
The description of student
background, classroom context,
and lesson presented to the
students is clear and coherent.
the presentation
Reflection
Use of
Research
Dr. Day
.
Reflection is focused on lesson
objectives and it clearly
articulates future directions on
how the lesson should be
changed. The reflection is
meaningful and compared with
the standard documents
including the preservice teacher
competencies (PTC) and the
Common Core of Teaching
(CCT).
The report consists of at least
five relevant science education
research articles and consistently
Reflection is focused on
lesson objectives and it
provides future directions on
how the lesson should be
changed. The reflection is
compared with the standard
documents including the
preservice teacher
competencies (PTC) and the
Common Core of Teaching
(CCT).
The report contains references
to fewer than five relevant
science education research
Unacceptable (1)
The description of student
background, classroom
context, and lesson
presented to the students is
unclear.
The analysis of teaching,
student work, and
interviews is unclear or a
component is missing.
The report does not contain
references to relevant
science education research
EDU 549-Fall 2013 - 14
uses the APA formatting style.
The report does not have
grammatical and spelling errors.
articles. The report has few
grammatical and spelling
errors.
articles and contains many
grammatical and spelling
errors.
Note: Incomprehensible and missing responses will result in a score of 0.
7. Unit Plan. Due Dec. 3
UNIT PLAN
2011 NSTA STANDARDS ADDRESSED: 1c, 2a, 2b, 2c, 3a, 3b, 3c, 3d, 4a, 4b, 4c
The unit plan is a major component of the EDU 549: Issues and Applications in Biology and
Environmental Earth Science course. The unit plan must contain the following components:




Develop a unit with a minimum of one unit of complete lessons (5);
A concept map that depicts the content integration;
Citation and analysis of at least 5 research articles, including both the Connecticut and
NGSS standards, related to the unit; (Note that inservice teachers are required to analyze
and cite at least 10 readings in this assignment.)
A unifying theme and assumptions for the unit;
This unit plan should demonstrate your use of current science knowledge, knowledge of the
Nature of Science, and address any misconceptions that are common for the particular topic
you cover in the plan. At least one lesson should include components of the Nature of
Science. At least one lesson should be based on an issue relevant to the local community with
a description of resources to be used. These resources may include field trips to area locales,
or community members coming into the classroom as content experts. The issue should lead
students to discuss the risks/benefits/costs and relate these to their knowledge, goals, and
personal values. Topics in biology to consider for this unit plan that would easily incorporate
all of the above requirements include evolution, DNA, genetics, and human population
growth. Connecticut has many biological corporations with available resources that make it
easy to link to community resources, particularly for any of the above topics. In earth science,
topics might include evolution, historical geology/life through time, Connecticut landforms,
or geological hazards.
Unit goal(s) should be described.
Each lesson should include Connecticut standards and Common Core Standard (Next
Generation Science Standard) to be addressed.
The lesson plans should follow the learning cycle format (3E or 5E).
Please include in your individual lesson assessments at least five different types of
assessments to use with students across the unit plan. At least one assessment should be a
pre-assessment addressing naïve conceptions and the other assessments should assess how
these conceptions have evolved throughout the unit.
Safety concerns and descriptions should be included for every activity. If chemicals are used,
MSDS’s should be included. Demonstrate safe and proper techniques for dispensing,
supervision and disposal of all materials used in the biology or environmental earth science
classroom. Alert students of safety/emergency procedures and emphasize the safe, humane,
ethical treatment of animals used within the classroom.
The unit should include a bibliography.
Dr. Day
EDU 549-Fall 2013 - 15







RUBRIC for Unit Plan
Points
0 – No Credit
Theme
&
Grade Level
Theme
is
inappropriate to
grade level.
Unit Goals &
Standards
1c
Organization
Concept
Maps
Dr. Day
1
–
Not
Acceptable
Theme
is
appropriate
to
grade level.
2 – Acceptable
3 - Proficient
4 - Target
Materials
are
connected
to
curriculum. Theme
is well developed.
Theme allows for
enrichment
and
remediation.
Unit plan is not
turned in or
goals do not
show
connections to
the national and
state standards.
Lessons to not
follow
a
reasonable
sequence.
The plan is not
sequenced.
Unit
goals
demonstrate few
connections
to
the
national
and/or
state
standards.
Unit
goals
demonstrate some
connections to the
national
and/or
state standards.
Multiple
intelligences
strategies
are
represented
in
theme.
Unit
goals
demonstrate
many
connections
to
the national and
state standards.
The unit pattern
of organization
lacks clarity.
The plan is not
easy to follow or
the
plan
is
presented poorly
or unattractively.
The map shows
limited
direct
hierarchical
relationships
(with arrows) to
the theme.
The unit has less
clear pattern of
organization than
required for a 4.
Majority
of
lessons follow a
reasonable
sequence
that
should result in
maximum
student learning.
The unit plan is
easy to follow
and has attractive
presentation.
The unit has a clear
pattern
of
organization.
The plan is not
easy to follow
and presentation
is
poor
and
unattractive.
The map shows
no
direct
hierarchical
relationships to
the theme.
The unit has a less
clear pattern of
organization than
required for a 3.
At least half of the
lessons follow a
reasonable
sequence
that
should result in
maximum student
learning.
The
plan
is
relatively easy to
follow but has a
poor or unattractive
presentation.
The map shows
some hierarchical
relationships (with
arrows) to the
theme.
Few
or
no
appropriate
linking
words
are used.
Very few correct
linking words are
used.
Lesson sequence
has
some
problems
that
might
detract
from maximum
student learning.
Cross-links
are
used but accuracy
is limited.
The map clearly
shows
direct
hierarchical
relationships
(with arrows) to
the theme with
only
minor
problems.
Most
linking
words
are
accurate.
Unit
goals
demonstrate clear
connections to the
national and state
standards.
All lessons follow
a
reasonable
sequence
that
should result in
maximum student
learning.
The unit plan is
easy to follow and
has exceptionally
attractive
presentation.
The map clearly
shows
direct
hierarchical
relationships (with
arrows) to the
theme.
Appropriate linking
words are used and
map is accurate.
EDU 549-Fall 2013 - 16
Activities
Contains
no
activities
and
doesn’t reflect
integrated
/inquiry-based
learning.
Contains
few
developmentally
appropriate
activities
that
support inquiry
learning.
Contains
some
developmentally
appropriate
activities
that
support some parts
of integrated/
inquiry-based
learning.
Contains variety
of
developmentally
appropriate
activities
that
support
an
integrated/
inquiry-based
learning.
Contains
wide
variety
of
developmentally
appropriate
activities, aligned
with National/State
Standards,
that
support
inquiry
learning.
Lesson
Planning
The unit plan is
not turned in or
does not contain
evidence of use
of the inquirybased planning.
The
learning
cycle phases of
the entire unit are
weak and/or the
learning
cycle
approach within
individual
lessons
is
lacking.
Few
different inquiry
approaches are
used.
The unit plan as a
whole contains all
phases
of
the
learning cycle as an
overall
organizational tool.
Few,
if
any,
individual lesson
plans or groups of
lesson plans are
also
organized
according to the
learning cycle and
a moderate number
of different inquiry
approaches
are
used.
The unit plan as a
whole
clearly
contains all phases
of the learning
cycle as an overall
organizational tool.
All
individual
lesson plans or
groups of lesson
plans are also
organized
according to the
learning cycle. All
lessons include a
different approach
to inquiry that
demonstrates
a
clear understanding
of inquiry and a
clear knowledge of
the understanding
of how all students
learn.
There is no
evidence that the
active
inquiry
component exists
and students are
not expected to
collect
and
interpret data in
order to develop
and
communicate
concepts, science
processes,
relationships and
natural patterns
from empirical
experiences.
There is limited
inquiry
and
limited
opportunities for
students
to
collect
and
interpret data in
order to develop
and communicate
concepts,
scientific
processes,
relationships and
natural patterns
from empirical
experiences.
Students
are
engaged in inquiry
but are not afforded
the opportunity to
interpret data in
order to develop
and communicate
concepts, scientific
processes,
relationships and
natural
patterns
from
empirical
experiences.
The unit plan as a
whole contains
all phases of the
learning cycle as
an
overall
organizational
tool. Only some
individual lesson
plans or groups
of lesson plans
are
also
organized
according to the
learning cycle.
Most
lessons
include
a
different
approach
to
inquiry
that
demonstrates
building
knowledge of the
understanding of
how all students
learn.
Students
are
engaged
in
inquiry and are
afforded
the
opportunity
to
interpret data in
order to develop
and communicate
concepts,
scientific
processes,
relationships and
natural patterns
from empirical
experiences.
2a
3b
Dr. Day
The lesson plans
include
active
inquiry
lessons
where
students
collect
and
interpret data in
order to develop
and communicate
concepts, science
processes,
relationships and
natural
patterns
from
empirical
experiences.
EDU 549-Fall 2013 - 17
3a
Lessons will not
engage students
and
are
completely
teacher-centered
and not inquirybased.
Lessons will not
engage students
in active learning
and are mostly
teacher-centered
and not inquirybased.
Lessons do not
fully
engage
students and are a
mixture of studentand
teachercentered/inquirybased lessons.
Lessons engage
students in active
learning and are
mostly studentcentered/inquirybased.
Lessons
fully
engage
students
and are studentcentered/inquirybased.
2b
There is no
evidence
that
active inquiry .
Learning strategies
are limited but
shows that the
candidate
knows
and
understands
how
to
select
limited
learning
activities to help
most students learn
science.
Learning
strategies
are
varied
and
appropriate
to
help
most
students
learn
science.
Varied
learning
strategies clearly
demonstrate
candidate
knowledge
and
understanding of
how
to
select
appropriate
learning activities
to help all students
learn science.
Adaptations
Special
needs
students are not
well provided for
in this unit and
lesson
adaptations for
all are missing or
inappropriate.
Learning
strategies
are
limited to lecture,
some technology
use,
and
confirming lab
experiences and
do not show that
the
candidate
knows
and
understands how
to select learning
activities to help
all students learn
science.
Special
needs
students are not
as well provided
for in this unit or
lesson
adaptations for
all
needing
additional help
are not adequate.
Special
needs
students
are
adequately
provided for in
this unit. Lesson
adaptations for
gifted as well as
students needing
additional help
are included.
Special
needs
students are well
provided for in this
unit. Appropriate
lesson adaptations
for gifted as well as
students
are
included.
NOS
Nature
of
Science is not
addressed.
Special
needs
students
are
adequately
provided for in this
unit.
Lesson
adaptations
for
gifted as well as
students
needing
additional help are
included but not all
are appropriate.
Nature of Science
is
adequately
addressed in the
lessons and the
lessons
conceptually
fit
within the scope of
the unit.
Nature
of
Science
is
addressed well in
the lessons and
the
lessons
conceptually fit
well within the
scope of the unit.
Nature of Science
is covered very
well
within
multiple
lessons
and
the
NOS
concepts covered
are well integrated
into the unit.
Issue
and
Community
Focus
Issue
and
Community
focus is not
addressed.
Issue
and
community focus is
addressed.
Issue
and
community focus
is addressed and
relevant for the
broader
community
or
state in which the
candidate
is
placed.
Issue
and
community focus is
addressed, relevant,
and solely focused
on the community
in
which
the
candidate is placed.
Dr. Day
Nature
of
Science
is
included in the
unit
plan
superficially and
the lessons do
not conceptually
fit well within
the scope of the
unit.
Issue is included
but community
focus
is
not
implicit.
EDU 549-Fall 2013 - 18
Safety
4a
3d
4b
4c
Dr. Day
No
safety
precautions for
the
classroom
are given.
Safety
precautions are
given for few
lessons/activities.
Safety
precautions/guideli
nes
for
the
dispensing,
supervision,
and
disposal of all
materials used in
biology or earth
science classrooms
are given for half of
the
lessons/activities.
Plans do not
demonsrate
a
clear plan for the
learning
environment
where
safety
within
the
licensure area is
practiced.
Plans for the
learning
environment and
learning
experiences for
all
students
include
few
elements
that
demonstrate
chemical safety,
safety
procedures, and
the
ethical
treatment
of
living organisms.
MSDS’s are not
included.
Emergency
procedures
are
missing at the
beginning
of
most
lab
activities and/or
the labs are not
appropriate for
the abilities of
the students in
the class
Plans
for
the
learning
environment
and
learning
experiences for all
students
include
some elements that
demonstrate
chemical
safety,
safety procedures,
and the ethical
treatment of living
organisms.
MSDS’s may be
included.
No
demonstration of
emergency
procedures.
No notations in
lesson
plans
regarding
the
ethical treatment
of organisms in
or out of the
classroom.
Most
of the
lessons do not
contain notations
in the lesson
plans regarding
the
ethical
treatment
of
organisms in or
out
of
the
classroom
(appropriate
setting).
Emergency
procedures
are
reviewed at the
beginning of at
least half of the lab
activities
and
activities
are
somewhat
appropriate for the
abilities of the
students in the
class.
At least half of the
lessons
contain
notations in the
lesson
plans
regarding
the
ethical treatment of
organisms in or out
of the classroom
(appropriate
setting).
Safety
precautions/guide
lines for the
dispensing,
supervision, and
disposal of all
materials used in
biology or earth
science
classrooms are
complete
and
given for most of
the
lessons/activities.
Plans for the
learning
environment and
learning
experiences for
all
students
include elements
that demonstrate
chemical safety,
safety
procedures, and
the
ethical
treatment
of
living organisms.
Most
MSDS’s
are included.
Safety
precautions/guideli
nes
for
the
dispensing,
supervision,
and
disposal of all
materials used in
biology or earth
science classrooms
are complete and
included for all
lessons/activities.
Emergency
procedures
are
reviewed at the
beginning
of
most
lab
activities. Most
activities
are
appropriate for
the abilities of
the students in
the class.
Emergency
procedures
are
reviewed at the
beginning of the
lab.
Activities
chosen
are
appropriate for the
abilities of the
students in this
class.
Most
lessons
contain notations
in the lesson
plans regarding
the
ethical
treatment
of
organisms in or
out
of
the
classroom
(appropriate
setting).
Notations
are
explicit in the
lesson
plans
regarding
the
ethical treatment of
organisms in or out
of the classroom
(appropriate
setting).
Plans
for
the
learning
environment and
learning
experiences for all
students
include
clear and precise
elements
that
demonstrate
chemical
safety,
safety procedures,
and the ethical
treatment of living
organisms.
All MSDS’s are
included.
EDU 549-Fall 2013 - 19
The unit contains
no variety in
assessment
methods.
The unit contains
little variety in
assessment
methods.
The unit contains at
least three different
types of assessment
methods.
A sample rubric
is not included.
The rubric(s) are
not
clearly
developed
and
have
some
unclear
or
missing criteria.
Pre-Assessment
does not address
preconceptions
or
naïve
conceptions.
The rubric(s) have
criteria for grading.
None of the
assessment
methods
are
appropriate for
the objective or
goal
being
assessed.
Few
of
the
assessment
methods
are
appropriate for
the objective or
goal
being
assessed
and
evaluate
prior
conceptions.
Some
of
the
assessment
methods
are
appropriate for the
objective or goal
being assessed and
evaluate
prior
conceptions
and
ideas that students
hold and the new
understandings that
students
have
formulated.
Technology
2b
Science-specific
technology use is
missing from the
unit plan.
Does not
describes how
technological
instructional
tools enhance the
teaching of
science content
in this unit.
Bibliography
The bibliography
is missing.
The bibliography
does not contain
all
items
referenced in the
unit plan.
Minimally
describes how
technological
instructional tools
such as
simulations, virtual
labs, and sciencespecific technology
such as
calculators/CBL,
spreadsheets,
and/or interactive
software packages
enhance the
teaching of science
content in this unit.
The bibliography
contains all items
referenced in the
unit plan but lacks
additional
resources
that
might be helpful in
the future.
Assessment
2c
3c
Dr. Day
Pre-Assessment
does not exist.
Pre-Assessment
addresses minimal
naïve conceptions
and not clearly
enough
to
potentially use data
to design unit plan.
The unit contains
at least four
different types of
assessment
methods.
The rubric(s) are
well developed
with clear criteria
for grading.
The unit contains at
least five different
types of assessment
methods.
Pre-Assessment
addresses naïve
conceptions but
provides
marginal
potential data to
be used to design
the unit plan.
Many of the
assessment
methods
are
appropriate for
the objective or
goal
being
assessed
and
evaluate
prior
conceptions and
ideas
that
students hold and
the
new
understandings
that
students
have formulated.
Describes how
technological
instructional as
simulations,
virtual labs, and
science- specific
technology
calculators/CBL,
spreadsheets,
and/or interactive
software
packages
enhance the
teaching of
science content
in this unit.
The bibliography
contains all items
in the unit plan
but lists only a
few
additional
resources
that
might be helpful
in the future.
Pre-Assessment
clearly addresses
naïve conceptions
and potential naïve
conceptions
are
used to design
lessons in the unit
plan.
All
of
the
assessment
methods
are
appropriate for the
objective or goal
being assessed and
evaluate
prior
conceptions
and
ideas that students
hold and the new
understandings that
students
have
formulated.
The rubric(s) are
fully
developed
with clear criteria
for grading.
Thoroughly
describes
how
instructional tools
such
as
simulations, virtual
labs, and sciencespecific technology
such
as
calculators/CBL,
spreadsheets,
and/or interactive
software packages
enhance
the
teaching of science
content in this unit.
The bibliography
contains all items
in the unit plan as
well as additional
resources
that
might be helpful in
the future.
EDU 549-Fall 2013 - 20
Professional
Appearance
No entries exist.
Entries are not
properly
referenced.
Report is not
turned in or has
substantial
editing
errors
and
lacks
professional
appearance.
Report has many
editing
errors
and/or
lacks
professional
appearance.
Entries for the most
part are referenced
acceptably
following
a
recognizable
bibliographic
format.
Report has few
editing errors and is
generally
professional
in
experience.
Most entries are
properly
referenced
following
a
recognizable
bibliographic
format.
Unit plan has
minimal editing
errors and is
professional
overall.
All entries are
properly referenced
following
a
recognizable
bibliographic
format.
Unit plan is free of
editing errors and
professional in all
aspects.
IN-SERVICE TEACHER (and cross-endorsement) ASSIGNMENTS:
1. Participation self-reflection. See rubric on Learn in Assignments Section. Due
2. Safety Assignment: See assignment description with web links in Learn. Rubrics are included in
each assignment description on Learn. Due
3. Technology Integration: A common question for many in-service teachers is how do I integrate
more technology into my classroom? For this assignment, please think of one unit that you
regularly teach and make a plan for technology integration. Make sure to add in video clips, web
page links, use of smartboards, probeware use or anything you think might make your unit more
technology rich. Develop an annotated web-liography or bibliography of technology resources to
enhance the teaching and learning of this science topic or unit. Submit the annotated webliography in file format. Include such things as instructional software, blogs, wikis, podcasts,
digital images, web sites, videos, and virtual field trips. You will need to use materials from at
least 5 different categories of technology resources.
4. Curriculum Evaluation (to be posted within Learn discussion area): In the classroom in which
you are placed or where you teach, review your curriculum for the following areas: find the
commercial science kits available and write a reflection that addresses the points below. The
paper should be no more than four pages in length. Paper Due -online. BRING A KIT TO
CLASS ON!
a. Find common curricula materials (FOSS, AIMS, SCIS, SEPUP, etc.) and evaluate them.
The following questions should be answered completely:
i. Is the kit complete?
ii. Would teachers be able to easily integrate the kit into their classroom teaching?
iii. Does the kit address any of the National or State Science Standards? If so, which
ones?
iv. Is it plausible that teachers could use the kit without additional training (could
they purchase it and use it with ease)?
v. Are the written materials constructivist in nature? Explain.
vi. How would you improve the kit?
vii. How is the Nature of Science addressed in this kit? Explain.
b. Also address the common curriculum issues:
i. How are the resources divided among the various sciences in your school?
ii. What is the per pupil expenditure on science consumables/materials (dept.
chair)?
iii. How often are materials reviewed and replaced?
iv. Is there a committee that reviews materials? If so, what is the structure?
Dr. Day
EDU 549-Fall 2013 - 21
v. Is the science space adequate? Do teachers teach on carts in multiple spaces? If
so, are they teaching general or specific courses? Discuss.
5. Creation of a learning cycle lesson on the history and nature of science. The historical aspect
should include scientists of diverse ethnic background and/or female scientists. The learning
cycle lesson should also include activities that engage students in learning more about the nature
of science. This learning cycle lesson will be presented in class. Due Be prepared to share this
lesson in class and post on the course website for sharing.
a. Classroom Instruction: In-service teachers assess student work constantly on a daily, weekly,
and monthly basis as well as at end of term. Gaining more in depth knowledge and locating
instructional resources for a science topic or unit that has relevance to one’s classroom
situation would have immediate benefit to one’s teaching effectiveness. For this assignment
then, each in-service teacher will select a topic in science education and research it. Due
b. Create a Science Exhibit to explain or demonstrate how you will transfer your research into
practice in your classroom. Options could include writing a paper or you could do a ‘bare
bones’ unit plan with the resources plugged into appropriate places. Consider taking an
existing unit that needs beefing up or one that you’re just unhappy with and use it as your
base. If you have another idea, discuss it with your instructor. Make sure you can document
student gains as a result of changing the instruction (take last year’s scores and compare to
this year’s scores).
c. Identify resources that students would use as well as teaching resources. Include materials for
all levels learners including those needing modification, enrichment, and multicultural/ELL
adjustments.
d. Provide full citations including URL.
Dr. Day
EDU 549-Fall 2013 - 22
EDU549-Fall 2006 - 23
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EDU 549 - Eastern Connecticut State University

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