EASTERN CONNECTICUT STATE UNIVERSITY
EDUCATION DERPARTMENT
COURSE SYLLABUS
EDU 413: Methods in Elementary Science
Goddard 102 MW 9-11:45 AM
Dr. Jeanelle Day, Webb Hall Rm. 151
Office Phone: 465-4532 Email: [email protected]
Office Hours:Tue 1-3; W 1-3; Th 11-12:00
1. REQUIRED TEXT AND/OR REFERENCES:

Goldston, M. J. & Downey, L. (2013). Your science classroom: Becoming an elementary/middle
school teacher. Washington, DC: Sage. ISBN: 978-1-4129-7522-3.

Fritzer, P. & Bristor, V.J. (2004). Science content for elementary and middle school teachers.
Boston, MA: Pearson. ISBN: 0-205-46453-X.

Project Learning Tree Training – will pay $35 for training and receive resource book.

National Research Council (1995). National Science Education Standards. (e-standards
found at http://www.nsta.org under teacher resources or at
http://www.nap.edu/books/0309053269/html/index.html).

New standards for science- Common Core Standards in Science AKA Next Generation
Science Standards are now released. For more information, please go to:
http://www.nap.edu/catalog.php?record_id=13165)

State Frameworks in Science. May be downloaded from
http://www.state.ct.us/sde/dtl/curriculum/index.htm . Look for the GLE pages and print
those or bring on laptop or tablet. Please bring to class each week.

Other articles as required by Dr. Day – will be posted on Learn.
II. REQUIRED TECHNOLOGY: An important part of this class will be the activities that involve
work with technology. This includes submitting many assignments electronically and participating in
blogs and threaded discussions. To enable this to occur, you must have an E-mail address & access to a
computer with E-mail capability. You may arrange with the data center for a campus E-mail address, and
use computers in the labs. The only email that will be accessed and used by faculty and students is the
campus email system (and the online Learn email).
III. COURSE PURPOSE: In this course you will have the opportunity to experience an integrated
approach to the teaching of science (This course is also integrated with EDU 306, 411 and 412.). Both
the theoretical and the practical aspects of teaching will be explored and curriculum materials developed
based upon common concepts. Curricular materials, teaching strategies and classroom procedures will be
examined and the skills required for teaching science will be developed. You will be engaging in a field
experience for a three hour block each week and will be assigned a variety of lessons and experiences for
each course component of Core II. The field experience will be in grades 4, 5, or 6, and while we will
focus on these grades in class, much of what we do will also be adaptable to the primary grades. One
EDU 413 – Fall 2013 pg. 1
week of your clinical will be with Science in the Woods. This is a program where you will be trained on
the lessons on Monday, shadow an experienced teacher on Tuesday, and teach on Wednesday, Thursday
and Friday. More will be discussed in class.
IV. COURSE OBJECTIVES: By the end of the course, students will:
Alignment of Activities with Assessments in EDU 413
Course Objectives
Develop a knowledge base, which
includes current research in
science education and practical
classroom applications, including
the National Science Education
Standards.
Demonstrate the ability to design
and implement a plan for the
inquiry-based teaching of specific
science concepts based on
learner’s developmental
characteristics.
EDU 413 – Fall 2013 pg. 2
Performance Expectations (Conceptual
Framework and Connecticut Competencies)
1.1 Candidates/Graduates demonstrate in-depth
understanding of content knowledge including
central concepts, principles, skills, tools of inquiry,
and structure of the discipline(s) by engaging
students through meaningful questions and
learning experiences.
2.1 Candidates/Graduates are able to formulate
developmentally appropriate learning goals and
objectives for students based upon knowledge of
subject matter, students, the community,
curriculum goals (both state and national), and
theories of human development, and to plan and
implement instructional activities which foster
individual and collective inquiry, critical thinking,
and problem solving to facilitate learning for all
students in a safe and nurturing environment.
CT Domains: 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4
2.1 Candidates/Graduates are able to formulate
developmentally appropriate learning goals and
objectives for students based upon knowledge of
subject matter, students, the community,
curriculum goals (both state and national), and
theories of human development, and to plan and
implement instructional activities which foster
individual and collective inquiry, critical thinking,
and problem solving to facilitate learning for all
students in a safe and nurturing environment.
2.2 Candidates/Graduates use methods, activities,
and grouping arrangements appropriate for lesson
goals and objectives in an environment that is
conducive to learning.
2.3 Candidates/Graduates conduct learning
activities in a logical sequence and respond to the
developmental needs, interests, ability, and
background of students to promote their
development of critical thinking, independent
problem-solving, and collaborative inquiry.
2.4 Candidates/Graduates use multiple forms of
assessment to evaluate student learning and
modify instruction as appropriate to ensure the
continuous intellectual, social, ethical, and
physical development of the learner.
CT Domains: 3.1, 3.2, 3.3, 3.5, 3.6, 3.8, 3.9, 4.3
Products
Creation of lesson
portfolio, moon
journal.
Creation of lesson
portfolio.
Demonstrate the ability to design
and implement a plan for
alternative assessment of student
learning in an inquiry-based
classroom.
Develop strategies for helping all
students develop scientific
concepts through the use of
manipulatives, technology, and
laboratory work.
Develop strategies for increasing
awareness of historical and
current contributions made in the
field of science by diverse
peoples.
Apply theoretical knowledge and
skills in a practicum setting (Core
II placement).
Demonstrate appropriate
dispositions in the EDU 413
classroom and in the field.
Demonstrate an understanding of
curricula in science that exist in
the schools.
2.4 Candidates/Graduates use multiple forms of
assessment to evaluate student learning and
modify instruction as appropriate to ensure the
continuous intellectual, social, ethical, and
physical development of the learner.
CT Domains: 3.4, 5.2
3.1. Candidates/Graduates demonstrate how
different concepts, themes, and principles are
interconnected within and across the discipline(s)
and promote connections between content
knowledge and pedagogical knowledge to help
students learn concepts, principles, skills, tools of
inquiry, and structure of the discipline(s) they
teach.
3.2. Candidates/Graduates demonstrate an ability
to integrate learning theories and other
pedagogical knowledge in their clinical
experiences and student teaching.
4.1. Candidates/Graduates integrate appropriate
digital and non-digital technology throughout their
courses and clinical experiences to support student
learning.
CT Domains: 1.3, 1.4, 3.2, 3.5, 3.6, 3.7, 3.8
5.1. Candidates/Graduates demonstrate their
ability to support the diverse needs of students in
terms of exceptionalities, race, ethnicity, gender,
culture, and socioeconomic status.
CT Domains: 3.6
3.2. Candidates/Graduates demonstrate an ability
to integrate learning theories and other
pedagogical knowledge in their clinical
experiences and student teaching. CT Domains:
3.9
6.1. Candidates/Graduates collaborate with
cooperating teachers, other teachers, school
administrators and other school professionals,
parents, families, and communities in a
professional and ethical manner to help students
reach their maximum potential. CT Domains: 6.1,
6.2, 6.3, 6.4, 6.5, 6.6, 6.7, 6.8, 6.9, 6.10, 6.11
3.1. Candidates/Graduates demonstrate how
different concepts, themes, and principles are
interconnected within and across the discipline(s)
and promote connections between content
knowledge and pedagogical knowledge to help
students learn concepts, principles, skills, tools of
inquiry, and structure of the discipline(s) they
teach. CT Domains: 6.4
Creation of lesson
portfolio.
Creation of lesson
portfolio, consumer
science project
Assessment through
lesson portfolio.
Assessment through
clinical report and
field analysis.
Clinical report and
field analysis.
Clinical report and
field analysis.
V.
METHODS OF INSTRUCTION: Reading; writing; discussion; simulations; observations; kid
watching; practice; practicum experiences; technology applications; lecture
VI.
ACCESSABILITY STATEMENT:
If you are a student with a disability and believe you will need accommodations for this class, it is
your responsibility to contact the Office of AccessAbility Services at 465-0189. To avoid any delay
in the receipt of accommodations, you should contact the Office of AccessAbility Services as soon
as possible. Please note that we cannot provide accommodations based upon disability until we
have received an accommodation letter from the Office of AccessAbility Services. Your cooperation
is appreciated.
EDU 413 – Fall 2013 pg. 3
VII. METHODS OF EVALUATION:
Components
Class Attendance/Participation
(Attendance/Participation includes participating in such
activities as the following: class discussions, technology
blog participation (30% of class attendance/participation),
reading circles, threaded discussion participation)
Consumer Science Project
Percent of
Total Grade
20%
10%
Science Field Analysis and Clinical Report
20%
Science Lesson Plan Portfolio
Moon Journal
25%
10%
Science Microteaching
15%
Grading
A = 4.0 or 95%
A- = 3.7 or 90-94%
B+ = 3.3 or 87-89%
B = 3.0 or 84-86%
B- = 2.7 or 80-83%
C+ = 2.3 or 77-79%
C = 2.0 or 74-76%
C- = 1.7 or 70-73%
D+ = 1.3 or 67-69%
D = 1.0 or 60-66%
F = 0.0 or 59%
and below
You must attain a
2.0 to remain in
program
VIII. COURSE ASSIGNMENTS: Each of the required assignments is briefly described below. A more
detailed description will be covered in class.
1. Attendance/Participation:
The Core II faculty expects that you will attend and participate fully in all classes as well as demonstrate
the dispositions that the Education Department has determined to be those appropriate for professionals in
the field of teaching and learning. Please read the section below carefully so that you understand the
faculty expectations and the evaluation of your attendance/participation behaviors.
One component of your final grade in the Core II courses is that of attendance & participation. The grade
you earn in this category will be affected by a number of factors: the times you are absent, tardy, lacking
in participation, or engaged in behaviors that detract from the class discussion and/or activities, as well as
your dispositions within the core classes.
Because these classes are highly interactive, it is essential that you be in class, be on time and not leave
early. Attendance, however, should not be confused with active participation. Active participation
includes being prepared for class activities by reading assigned text materials, participating in class
activities, such as book club discussions and professional reading groups and being prepared for and
participating in presentations.
For the attendance portion for the technology blog, you should find at least two interactive software
applications (think all of the great apps on phones/tablets) and share a short description and list of
standards/appropriate grade level for each application. This should be related to your unit plan area. Also,
find at least two websites to be used for additional information and at least two paper sources (reference
or children's books related to the topic).
Please see the appropriate faculty member to negotiate make up work for unavoidable absences.
2. Clinical Report and Science Field Analysis (Due 12/4):
Your clinical experiences will be on each Friday including Monday and Wednesday from October 28November 8. You will be expected to participate in the following observation/participation sessions in a
EDU 413 – Fall 2013 pg. 4
4th, 5th, or 6th grade classroom. While the clinical time supports all four courses within Core II, you will
be focusing on science specific observations for EDU 413. The schedule and criteria for scoring these is
listed on the Learn course site.
In addition to logging time in your placement classroom, you will complete a Science Field Journal
Paper. For this assignment, you need to investigate student’s understanding of science. You will not
receive any credit in if you do not observe a science lesson in an elementary school. If science is not
taught during the semester you’re in your clinical placement in your school, then you must find another
classroom in your school to observe. For all students, you must observe science at two different grade
levels.
There are three steps you need to follow to complete this assignment.
i)
Observe a science classroom at two grade levels and take careful notes related to the
following questions:
 What was the science content and what national and state standards did this fit into?
 What kinds of manipulatives/lab materials or other teaching resources were used by
the teacher and students?
 What kinds of teaching/learning strategies were used?
 Who was more engaged; students or the teacher?
 How frequently did the students ask questions?
 Was this primarily a traditional/behaviorist or a progressive/constructivist
classroom?
 Compare the two classrooms/grade levels. How do
ii)
Interview two students (one at a higher level and one at a lower level) about a science
concept (related to lesson objectives) that will be taught in this grade level. You may want to
pick these students before the initial topic is taught (please coordinate this with your
teacher.). Collect their work and also interview them to investigate their scientific
understanding. Make sure to take good interview notes. If it is hard to take notes during the
interview you can record the interviews and transcribe them later at your convenience.
iii)
Analyze the student work and determine their understanding of science. Do you think that
these students achieved the lesson objectives? If so, what is the evidence? If not, what went
wrong?
This paper should be 4-6 pages in length (double-spaced). In your journal you must cite the text and
both the Connecticut and NSES standards. You also need to provide a reference page using the APA
formatting. Your journal must include the following:
i)
Describe the context and level of understanding of scientific concepts of students that you
observed. Describe the lesson (content and standards).
ii)
Discuss the problem and interview questions that you asked the two students.
iii)
Analyze student work and interviews and report your findings. Discuss with evidence
whether or not the lesson objectives were met.
iv)
Finally provide your reflection on how you would change the lesson to better suit the
students’ needs.
Context and Student
Background
Rubric for Science Clinical Paper
Target (4)
Acceptable (3)
The classroom context, The classroom context,
levels of students, and
levels of students, and
the lesson (content and the lesson (content and
standards) are clear and standards) are generally
thorough.
clear.
Scientific Content and The problem is clearly
described and
Student Interviews
EDU 413 – Fall 2013 pg. 5
The problem is
described and interview
Unacceptable (2-0)
The classroom context,
levels of students, and the
lesson (content and
standards) are provided in
the report, parts of which
may be unclear.
The problem is described
and interview questions
Analysis and Findings
Reflection
Professional
appearance
interview questions and
notes (or transcripts)
are well integrated into
the paper.
The student interviews
and their work are
thoroughly analyzed
and findings are clearly
reported.
Reflection is focused
on lesson objectives
and it clearly
articulates future
directions on how the
lesson should be
changed. The reflection
is compared with the
course text and the
standard documents.
Report is free of
editing errors and
consistently follows the
APA formatting.
questions and notes (or
transcripts) are
integrated into the
paper.
The student interviews
and their work are
analyzed and findings
are reported.
and notes (or transcripts)
are provided into the
paper. At times they may
be unclear.
The analysis of student
interviews and their work
may be unclear or findings
may be missing or unclear.
Reflection is focused
on lesson objectives
and it provides future
directions on how the
lesson should be
changed. The reflection
is compared with the
course text.
Reflection is not focused
on lesson objectives, does
not provide future
directions, or is not
compared with the course
text. Sometimes these
elements may be unclear.
Report has few editing
errors and generally
follows the APA
formatting.
Report has many editing
errors or does not follow
the APA formatting.
3. Lesson Portfolio (due Mon. 11/25). By the end of the semester, each student will be expected to
produce a lesson portfolio containing 3 complete lesson plans for grades K-6. See guidelines below for
more specific information.
2013 EDU 413 Lesson Portfolio Guidelines
Candidates in the CORE II experience must develop 4 unit plans, one in each content area methods
course. Using the CT and national professional discipline standards, candidates identify relevant
standards as the basis for the objectives for each lesson. Candidates will need to integrate standards from
reading and language arts in all areas. Unit must include:
 Concept map that includes all the major concepts covered in the unit.
 A brief paragraph describing your grounding theory of learning that relates to the development of
children and young adolescents to construct learning opportunities that support individual
students’ development, acquisition of knowledge, and motivation.
 3 full lesson plans, one in each grade band K-2, 3-4, 5-6. Each lesson will have a reading and
writing component integrated into the lessons. Candidates need to consider the skills and abilities
of the students in a particular grade level before choosing and/or planning lessons.
 Of the lessons: all lessons must
o Use the lesson format provided and must be aligned, appropriately documented.
o Establish the necessary prior knowledge and integrate a form of pre-assessment to
determine the students’ prior knowledge and they need to learn.
o Have content learning objectives that support the standards.
o Have an alternative assessment. There should be at least 5 different types of assessments
across the nine (9) lessons.
o Include relevant children’s literature and content area reading/writing strategies
appropriate for each grade level and appropriate for the learning objectives.
o Include appropriate use of technology to further the content covered in the lessons.
o Include appropriate differentiated instruction for more able and less able students.
Core II Undergraduate Elementary
Lesson Plan Format
EDU 413 – Fall 2013 pg. 6
Teacher ________________________ Grade Level______ Title of Lesson
______________________
Content Standards: Identify one or two primary local, state or national curricular standards this lesson is designed to
help students attain. How will the learning tasks lead students to attain the identified standards?
Student Background/Key Question: Describe the students’ prior knowledge, misconceptions to be addressed or
skill related to the learning objective(s) and the content of this lesson, using data from pre-assessment as appropriate. How did the
students’ previous performance or prior knowledge in this content area or skill impact your planning for this lesson? What is
your key question?
Student Learning Objective(s): Identify specific and measurable learning objectives for this lesson (i.e. what you
expect students to learn).
Materials/Resources: List the materials you will use in each learning activity including any technological resources
including web sites, children’s literature, and community resources.
Technology:
List all of the technology resources used in this lesson. You may link to other area in individual lesson plan,
for example, just note “Use wiki – see Engagement/Exploration section.
Language Arts:
What are the specific language arts elements in your lesson plan? What books are used and how are you
using the books? What ELA strategies are used?
Learning Activities: Identify the instructional grouping (whole class, small groups, pairs, individuals) you will use in
each phase of instruction.
Engagement/Exploration: Briefly describe how to engage the students for learning in the lesson. (Set
expectations for learning; articulate to learners what they will be doing and learning in this lesson, how they will
demonstrate learning, and why this is important)
Concept Introduction/Explanation/Lesson Development: Describe how the lesson is developed,
how practice is guided or modeled, and how students will be engaged in the learning activities in order to gain the key
knowledge and skills identified in the student learning objective(s). Include concepts to be covered in enough detail for
a determination to be made about the accuracy of the content included.
Elaboration/Expansion/Closure: Briefly describe the expansion activities and how your students will
understand the purpose of the lesson in your closure. (Interact with learners to elicit evidence of student understanding
of purpose(s) for learning and mastery of objectives)
Evaluation/Assessment: How will you ask students to demonstrate mastery of the student learning
objective(s)? Attach a copy of any assessment materials you will use, along with assessment criteria. Assessments
should be included where appropriate within the learning activities.
Individuals Needing Differentiated Instruction: Describe strategies to differentiate instruction of students
with learning differences. These students may be special or general education students and need not be the same students for each
lesson. Students may represent a range of ability and/or achievement levels, including students with IEPs, gifted and talented
students, struggling learners, and English language learners.
Note: Differentiated instruction may not be necessary in every lesson. However, over the course of a unit, it is expected that the
teacher will demonstrate the ability to differentiate instruction in order to meet the needs of students with learning differences.
Which students do you anticipate may struggle with the content/learning objectives of this lesson?
Evidence that the student needs differentiated
How will you differentiate instruction in this lesson to support student
instruction
learning?
Which students will need opportunities for enrichment/higher level of challenge?
Evidence that the student needs differentiated
How will you differentiate instruction in this lesson to support student
instruction
learning?
EDU 413 – Fall 2013 pg. 7
Elementary Core II Lesson Portfolio Rubric
Points
Concept Maps
Content
Standards
Student
Background
and Key
Question
ACEI 3.4
Student
Learning
Objectives
Materials &
Resources
Technology
and Fostering
Collaboration
ACEI 3.5
Language Arts
Links
ACEI 2.1
Teaching
Strategies
ACEI 3.3
Learner
Activities:
Initiation/
Exploration
Target (3)
Acceptable (2)
Unacceptable (1)
The unit map clearly
shows direct hierarchical
relationships (with arrows)
to the theme. Appropriate
linking words are used and
map is accurate.
The unit map shows direct
hierarchical relationships
(with arrows) to the theme.
Most linking words are
appropriate and map is
accurate.
The unit map shows limited direct
hierarchical relationships (with
arrows) to the theme. Cross-links are
used but accuracy is limited or very
few correct linking words are used.
The content standards
selected are clearly
aligned to the lessons for
each subject area. Both
National and State
Standards and
expectations are included.
Student prior
knowledge/misconception
are described. Key
question succinctly
describes the main point in
the lesson plan and serves
as an engagement point
for the students.
Objectives are clear,
specific, and measurable.
The content standards selected
are aligned to the lessons for
each subject area. National
and State Standards and
expectations are included but
do not adhere to the two item
limit.
Student prior
knowledge/misconception is
not described completely. Key
question describes the main
point in the lesson plan but
does not serve as a potential
engagement point for the
students.
Objectives are clear and
measurable.
National and State Standards or
expectations may not be clearly
aligned or may be missing for some
lessons.
Materials and resources are
comprehensive and list the
items beyond regular
classroom items (i.e. paper,
pencils, overhead
projector).
Most materials and resources
are listed.
Some materials and resources are
listed.
Every lesson contains
technology application(s)
that enhance(s) the learning
outcome and increases the
active inquiry,
collaboration and
interactions in the
classroom.
Lessons utilize language
arts and strategies that
teach ELA concepts to help
students apply their skills to
different situations,
materials and ideas.
Clearly describes how
candidates use a variety of
teaching strategies to
encourage development of
critical thinking and
problem solving.
Most lessons contain
technology applications that
enhance the learning
experience for the students
but do not necessarily
increase the active inquiry,
collaboration and/or the
interactions in the classroom.
Lessons utilize limited
strategies that teach ELA
concepts to help students
apply their skills to different
situations, materials and
ideas.
Describes how to engage the
students for learning in the
lesson. Expectations for
learning, articulation to
learners what they will be
doing and learning in this
lesson are included.
Description of how they will
demonstrate learning, and
why this is important is
included.
Describes how to engage the
students for learning in the
lesson. Expectations for
learning, articulation to
learners what they will be
Technology applications are missing
from the majority of the lessons.
Clearly describes how
students are grouped to
engage the students for
learning in the lesson.
Clear expectations for
EDU 413 – Fall 2013 pg. 8
Discussion of prior
knowledge/misconception is
missing. Key question is not
potentially motivating.
Objectives are unclear, or not
measurable.
Lessons have no apparent ELA
strategies or strategies used are
inappropriate for the grade level of
the lessons
Does not describe how to engage the
students for learning in the lesson.
Expectations for learning,
articulation to learners what they
will be doing and learning in this
lesson are not clear.
Does not describe how to engage the
students for learning in the lesson.
Expectations for learning,
articulation to learners what they
will be doing and learning in this
ACEI 3.4
Learner
Activities:
Lesson
Development/
Invention/
Concept
Introduction
Development
of Critical
Thinking and
Problem
Solving
ACEI 3.3
Learner
Activities:
Expansion/
Closure
Assessment
ACEI 4.0
Adaptations
or
Differentiate
d Instruction
ACEI 3.2
learning, articulation to
learners what they will be
doing and learning in this
lesson are included.
Description of how they
will demonstrate learning,
and why this is important
is included.
Clearly describes how the
lesson is developed, how
practice is guided or
modeled, and how
students will be engaged
in the learning activities
in order to gain the key
knowledge and skills
identified in the student
learning objective(s).
Teaching strategies are
varied and encourage
elementary students’
development of critical
thinking and problem
solving.
Clearly describes the
expansion activities and
how your students will
understand the purpose of
the lesson in your closure.
This includes the
interaction with learners to
elicit evidence of student
understanding of
purpose(s) for learning
and mastery of objectives.
The portfolio contains at
least five different types
of assessment methods
(formal and informal).
All of the assessment
methods are appropriate
for the objective or goal
being assessed. The
rubric(s) are fully
developed with clear
criteria for grading.
Candidates show
understanding of varying
development and
approaches to learning to
effectively choose
differentiation strategies
to create instructional
opportunities adapted to
diverse students.
Appropriate lesson
adaptations for gifted as
well as students needing
additional help are clearly
described with specific
examples.
EDU 413 – Fall 2013 pg. 9
doing and learning in this
lesson are included.
Description of how they will
demonstrate learning, and
why this is important is
included.
Describes how the lesson is
developed, how practice is
guided or modeled, and how
students will be engaged in
the learning activities in
order to gain the key
knowledge and skills
identified in the student
learning objective(s).
Teaching strategies are
somewhat varied, but
primarily use lecture as the
main mode of instruction.
lesson are not clear.
Does not describe how the lesson is
developed, how practice is guided
or modeled, and how students will
be engaged in the learning
activities in order to gain the key
knowledge and skills identified in
the student learning objective(s).
Does not include concepts to be
covered in enough detail for a
determination to be made about the
accuracy of the content included.
Content in each subject area is
either inappropriate for the grade
level or inaccurate.
Describes the expansion
activities and how your
students will understand the
purpose of the lesson in your
closure. This includes the
interaction with learners to
elicit evidence of student
understanding of purpose(s)
for learning and mastery of
objectives.
Does not describe the expansion
activities and how your students will
understand the purpose of the lesson
in your closure. Does not include the
interaction with learners to elicit
evidence of student understanding of
purpose(s) for learning and mastery
of objectives.
The portfolio contains at
least four different types of
assessment methods. The
rubric(s) have criteria for
grading. Most of the
assessment methods are
appropriate for the objective
or goal being assessed.
The portfolio contains little variety
in assessment methods. Few of the
assessment methods are appropriate
for the objective or goal being
assessed. The rubric(s) are not
clearly developed and have some
unclear or missing criteria.
Lesson adaptations for gifted
as well as students needing
additional help are described
but lack specificity to help all
students learn.
Special needs students are not as
well provided for in this portfolio or
lesson adaptations for all needing
additional help are not adequate.
Safety
Bibliography
Professional
Appearance
Safety concerns are
thoroughly addressed or
noted not to be an issue in
all the lessons.
The bibliography
contains all items in the
portfolio as well as
additional resources,
including electronic
resources that might be
helpful in the future. All
entries are properly
referenced following
APA bibliographic
format.
Lesson plans have
obviously been edited for
complete adherence to
writing conventions
(spelling, sentence
construction, word choice,
etc.) and is professional in
all aspects.
Safety concerns are
addressed in at least 70% of
the lessons.
Safety concerns are not addressed or
noted in most of the lessons.
The bibliography contains all
items in the portfolio but lists
only some additional
resources that might be
helpful in the future. Most
entries are properly
referenced following APA
bibliographic format.
The bibliography does not contain
all items referenced in the portfolio
and/or lacks additional resources for
future help. Entries are not properly
referenced.
Lesson plans have been edited
for adherence to writing
conventions (spelling,
sentence construction, word
choice, etc.) and is
professional overall. The
organizational pattern of the
portfolio is clear and easy to
follow as well as attractively
presented.
Lesson plans have many editing
errors and/or lacks professional
appearance. The organizational
pattern of the portfolio lacks clarity
and/or is not attractive in its
presentation.
Science-Specific Rubric Elements
Elementary Core II Lesson Portfolio Rubric
Points
Target (3)
Content Accuracy
ACEI 2.2
Content in all lesson plans is
accurate. No mistakes in
content.
Nature of Science
ACEI 2.2
Nature of Science theme is
used in at least one lesson.
Content is accurate and
explicit in teaching concept
related to nature of science.
Personal/Social
Applications in
Science
ACEI 2.2
Personal/Social Applications
in Science theme is used in at
least one lesson. Content is
accurate and explicit in
teaching the concept related
to Personal/Social
Applications in Science.
Health Education
ACEI 2.6
Health as a theme is used in
at least one lesson. Content is
reflective of major concepts
in health education and
students are encouraged to
practice skills that contribute
to good health.
EDU 413 – Fall 2013 pg. 10
Acceptable (2)
Unacceptable (1)
Content in two of three
lessons is accurate. Mistakes
are due to commonly held
misconceptions/lack of
research.
Nature of Science theme is
used in at least one lesson.
Content has minimal errors
and the Nature of Science
link is weak so that students
will have difficulty knowing
the purpose of the lesson.
Personal/Social Applications
in Science theme is used in at
least one lesson. Content has
minimal errors and the
Personal/Social Applications
in Science theme is weak so
that students will have
difficulty knowing the
purpose of the lesson.
Health as a theme is used in
at least one lesson. Content is
weak so that students will
have difficulty knowing that
personal health is a purpose
of the portion of the lesson.
Content in one or none of the
lessons is accurate. Mistakes
are due to commonly held
misconceptions/lack of
research.
Nature of Science theme is
absent from any lesson in the
unit plan.
Personal/Social Applications
in Science theme is absent
from any lesson in the unit
plan.
Health as a theme is absent
from any lesson in the unit
plan.
4. Consumer Science Project (Due 10/23): This assignment is intended to assist you in experiencing
the excitement and power associated with asking questions about the physical world and seeking answers
to the questions. Rubric that closely matches the checklist, below, is on Bb Learn. The two parts of this
task are described below.
Part 1: Written Proposal
Five parts should be included in your proposal. They are:
1. A copy or description of the advertisement that you wish to question. If it is a TV or
radio advertisement, a description of the ad will do.
2. The question you have about the ad.
3. The possible effects or answers you may get to your question in 2.
4. Using a T diagram (as shown below), identify the causes that could contribute to the
effects in 3.
5. Sketch a graph that shows how you will present your data concerning the causes
(independent variable) and the effect (dependent variable).
Experimental T Example:
Question: Which Peanut Butter is Best? Jif or Peter Pan
Causes
Personal choice
Texture
Spreadability
|
|
|
|
Effect
either like it or they don’t
runny/dry smooth/grainy
tears bread vs. no tears
Part 2: Report and Poster/Power Point: Here you will need to prepare a report that answers the
questions below and construct a poster (OR A PROFESSIONAL ALTERNATIVE) that presents the
same information. The report should be word-processed and be no more than two pages in length. The
components listed below should appear in your report and on your poster.
Your report should be a detailed explanation of your experiment; the poster is a way to show what you
did and it should highlight the important aspects of your experiment and serve as a guide for your
presentation.
 Question Asked: What you wanted to know about the ad.
 Hypotheses: Statements about your question that can be tested for rejection or acceptance.
 Variables: Independent variable: The variable you select to test which may cause a difference in the
results. Dependent variable: The variable that is influenced by the change in the independent variable
 Control variable: Those variables that you attempt to keep the same or constant.
 Procedure: What you did such that the experiment can be replicated. Remember to operationalize, or
completely describe/define pertinent terms.
 Results: Data collected and graphed.
 Conclusions: The explanation or answer you have for your question. Should include the acceptance
or rejection of the hypothesis/hypotheses.
 Evaluation: Any problems or improvements that should be addressed in your design if done again.
EDU 413 – Fall 2013 pg. 11
Consumer Science Project – Experimental Design Checklist
Check if completed successfully
Problem or Question
Clearly stated
Complete and appropriate
Creative, unique or innovative
Hypotheses
Stated in such a way that it is testable
Multiple hypotheses identified
Appropriate and clear
Variables: Identified
Independent
Dependent
Controls
Operational definitions
Clearly identified
All must be identified
Appropriate
Measurable
Procedures
Stated clearly, succinctly and in appropriate sequence
Show a depth and rational of strategies needed
to conduct a fair test
Shows creative or unique strategies
Can be followed and repeated
Appropriate for the question and hypotheses
Results
Data is organized in charts, graphs, or other suitable forms
Data collected is appropriate for the operationalized definitions & the
question
Explanations & interpretations are accurate and complete
Explanations make exceptional connections
Trial number is adequate
Appropriate sampling
Conclusions
Clear statement of acceptance/rejection of hypotheses
Explanation of acceptance/rejection
No extraneous statements or information
Show deeper understanding of how the results could be skewed
Self Reflective Check
Discusses critical flaws in the design (operational definitions, or
procedures etc,)
Makes thoughtful science concept connections to findings
Provides suggestions for improvement in the design and further
experimentation
Generates thought provoking questions
Presentation-Organization
Prepared and well-organized
Uses appropriate language
All components are presented and explained
Presentation-Oral
Power point is well thought out and addresses
the main elements of the design
Visual materials used are easy for all to view
If partners: show shared roles
Voice, tone, and pace appropriate
Knowledgably responds to questions from audience
EDU 413 – Fall 2013 pg. 12
6. Moon Journal and Measurement Activity: The purpose of the moon journal is to make
observations and determine how much you really know about the earth/sun/moon spatial relationship.
This activity will be given a pass or fail which will be used in your participation grade. On the Learn site
are files of block calendars on which you may record observations of the moon that you make during four
weeks of the semester.
On as many days as you can, make two observations of the moon. Try to make the two observations at the
same time each day! In each square you should record at least five things for each observation:
 On each circle in the square make a careful sketch of how the moon looks when you make your
observation. Pay special attention to the shape of the moon. Also note whether it is tilted at all (its
orientation with respect to the horizon). Record this on the circle.
 For each observation write down the date and the time (a.m. or p.m.) at which you made your
observation.
 Write down the direction in which you looked in order to see the moon (relative direction such as
east, west, etc.).
 Write down the weather conditions (in case it’s cloudy—you’ll have a record).
 Make a special effort to make a couple of observations around noon EDT or EST.
 If there are other things that you notice about the moon that you think are interesting or relevant,
record those also. Continue filling in squares every day (that you can see the moon). If the moon
is not visible when you look for it, indicate that (and the time of day you looked) in your square.
7. Science Microteaching Experience: Because many of you have limited experiences in science
courses, you will be paired with a group during the first class and be expected to find ONE activity
appropriate for grades K-2 and one for grades 3-6 that you will teach to the EDU 413 class. The standard
you will address and who you will work with will be assigned on the first day of class. At the beginning
of the class, you should meet with your classmates to make group assignments and your presentation
should include the following in addition to the lessons mentioned above: 1) technology application that is
appropriate for each activity (one K-2 and one 3-6) and 2) at least four books (nonfiction) that are
appropriate for teaching your concept (at least two at K-2 and two at 3-6 levels). Your classmates will
participate in the activity and offer suggestions about how to improve your delivery/teaching of the
lesson. Content here is important, and your classmates will ask questions about the content related to the
lesson since everyone will know the content to be covered each week. You should have a one page
handout about your activity with the links for the technology applications and the citations for the books
for everyone in the class (please send to me NLT 3:00 pm on the day before your presentation if you want
copies). This activity will count 15% toward your grade in this class.
Rubric for Microteaching Presentation
Context and
Question
Activity and
Engagement
Target (5)
Acceptable (3-4)
Unacceptable (0-2)
The description of context,
lesson, and student
background is thorough and
meaningful. The question
asked to the class is well
related to the lesson
objectives and inviting to the
class. Content is appropriate
and correct.
Appropriate grade level
manipulatives or other
audio-visual aids are used
and the college audience is
actively engaged in the
presentation.
The description of context,
lesson, and student
background is clear. The
question asked to the class is
related to the lesson
objectives. Minor issues in
content and/or
appropriateness for grade
level/standards.
Manipulatives or other
audio-visual aids are used
and the college audience is
engaged in the presentation
There is some description of
context, lesson, and student
background, a part of which
may be unclear. A question is
asked to the class, which may
be general or unclear. Content
has errors or is inappropriate
for grade level/standards.
EDU 413 – Fall 2013 pg. 13
Appropriate grade level
manipulatives or other audiovisual aids are not used or the
college audience is not
engaged in the presentation.
EDU 413 – Fall 2013 pg. 14
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EDU 413 - Eastern Connecticut State University