Science21 2010
Sample work program
r1943 Rebranded July 2014
August 2015
Science21 2010
Sample work program
Compiled by the Queensland Curriculum and Assessment Authority
August 2015
A work program is the school’s plan of a course of study based on the relevant syllabus. Work
programs allow for the characteristics of a school and its students to be considered when
implementing the syllabus. School work programs must demonstrate that syllabus dimensions
and objectives inform student learning.
Work programs provide information about the school’s plan for course organisation, an outline of
intended student learning and the assessment plan as outlined in the work program requirements
for that syllabus.
Science21 2010
Sample work program
Queensland Curriculum & Assessment Authority
August 2015
Page 2 of 13
1. Course organisation
1
2
3
4
30 hours
Earth, wind and fire
Verification
Catalysts for discovery
Environment
2
25 hours
*Mythconceptions
Open guided
Health & wellbeing
Technology
1, 2
1
25 hours
Energy alternatives
Open guided
Environment
Catalysts for discovery
3
2
1, 2
30 hours
Our local creek
Open
Environment
2
3
20 hours
Water, water
everywhere
Open
Catalysts for discovery
Health & wellbeing
1, 2
3
25 hours
Driving in my car
Open guided
Technology
10 hours
*Who wants to live
forever?
Open
Health & wellbeing
Catalysts for discovery
25 hours
Who wants to live
forever?
Open guided
Health & wellbeing
Catalysts for discovery
30 hours
Space, the final
frontier
Open guided
Technology
Environment
1, 2, 3 1, 2
Assessment
1
Technique
General
objectives
Assessed
Information &
communication
Energy
Structure &
properties of
matter
Focus areas and key concepts
Earth & space
Scientific priorities
Living systems
Inquiry type
Time allocation
Semester
Context name
Collection of work
KCU, IP,I&I
1
Extended
experimental
investigation
KCU, IP,I&I
1
Supervised written
assessment
KCU, II
2
Extended response
task
KCU, IP, I&I
2
Extended
experimental
investigation
KCU, IP, I&I
Collection of work
KCU, IP, I&I
Extended response
task
KCU, IP, I&I
1
1, 2
1, 3
1, 2
1
1,3
1, 2
1
1
Supervised written
assessment
KCU, IP, I&I
1, 2
1
Supervised written
assessment
KCU, IP, I&I
2,3
Science21 2010
Sample work program
2, 3
1
Queensland Curriculum & Assessment Authority
August 2015
Page 3 of 13
2. Outline of intended student learning
2.1 Unit description — Earth, wind and fire
Unit name
Earth, wind and fire
Semester
1
Time
30 hours
Overview
Students will investigate the underlying science behind a range of human and natural disasters, the impact on people and the environment,
and the application of technology to predict or protect against disasters.
Scientific
priorities
Technology
Focus areas
Structure and
properties of matter
Living systems
Earth and space
Energy
Information and
communication
Key concepts
SPI
LS1 The cell as
the
basis
of life
ES1
Structure and
properties of the
earth
EN1
IC1
SP2 Gases,
liquids,
solutions,
solids
LS2
ES2
Global cycles and
the atmosphere
EN2 Forces
and
motion
SP3
Radioactivity
LS3
Ecosystems
ES3
Solar systems and
the universe
 Solutes, solvents,
 Bushfire
 Plate tectonics — folding,
 Energy generated in
 Methods of detecting
faulting, subduction, earthquake
formation
 Weather patterns and cyclone
formation
 Layers and composition of the
atmosphere and the earth
 Impact of particulate matter in
the earth’s crust due
to tectonic
movement
 Wave motion (Pwaves, S- waves &
L- waves) in
earthquakes
and transmitting
information (satellite
imagery, seismographs)
 Transmission of
analogue and digital
signals (radio, television,
satellites etc.)
Molecular
nature of
Health & wellbeing
Catalysts for discovery
Environment
Forms of
energy
matter
Specification of
key concepts
solutions and
emulsions
 Physical and
chemical properties
of crude oil
 Properties of
materials that make
Genes,
genetics and
evolution
regeneration and
succession —
primary and
secondary
Science21 2010
Sample work program
Storage,
transfer
and
interpretation
Queensland Curriculum & Assessment Authority
August 2015
Page 4 of 13
them suitable for
mopping up oil spills
the atmosphere on global
temperatures
 Location of asteroid belt in our
solar system
 Behaviour and composition of
meteors, comets and asteroids
 How waves travel
 Impact of solar activity
through different
media
on transmission of
signals
Learning experiences
 Construct models of tectonic plates and investigate forces to link to




folding, faulting and earthquakes
Construct and operate a seismometer to gather data
Interpret a seismogram to plot the epicentre of an earthquake
Conduct investigations in wave motion
Analyse weather patterns to identify trends in cyclone formation
Unit
outcomes
Knowledge and conceptual
understanding
 Critically evaluate disaster management strategies through discussions with SES
 Conduct investigations into ways to mop up oil spills
 Conduct a field study of sand dunes to observe succession and bushfire
regeneration sites
 Make links between the effects of meteorite impact and the demise of dinosaurs
 Investigate the technology used to track asteroids
 Evaluate the effects of sunspot and solar flare activity on communication and
technology
Investigative processes
Issues and impacts
By the conclusion of the unit, students should be able to:
Assessment
overview
 State, describe (including modelling) and
 Conduct scientific investigations, such as field
 Identify and explain the issues underpinning
explain biology, chemistry, earth science
and physics concepts that underpin
disasters.
 Explain interrelationships between the
scientific ideas, concepts and processes
observed during the investigations.
 Interpret and apply the gathered
information and generate reasoned
explanations.
study of sand dunes to observe succession or
bushfire regeneration sites and oil spill cleanup. Students will formulate questions and
hypotheses, experiment and evaluate data.
 Use scientific and technological equipment
such weather monitoring devices to gather
data and information during practical
investigations and research.
 Process, analyse, evaluate and interpret data
from sources such as seismometers and
synoptic charts, as well as anecdotal evidence
and secondary data from case studies.
disasters and disaster management and
evaluate the impacts.
 Draw conclusions and express positions
supported by scientific argument and
evidence.
 Analyse a range of factors that influence the
development of scientific knowledge and
technologies.
Supervised written
assessment
Extended experimental
investigation
Science21 2010
Sample work program

Collection of work
Extended response task
Queensland Curriculum & Assessment Authority
August 2015
Page 5 of 13
Students will construct a portfolio of documents relating to investigations into earthquake, oil spill, cyclone and meteorite impact disasters and the
potential for disasters from predictions of sunspot activity in 2012. The portfolio will contain:
 scientific report on a short laboratory activity investigating properties of materials for cleaning up oil spills
 mapping exercise to predict the pathway of a cyclone from synoptic charts and data analysis to locate the epicentre of an earthquake including
graphs
 multimodal presentation on succession and regeneration based on primary data from fieldwork
 scientific report on a short laboratory activity investigating the impact of atmospheric composition on temperature as a cause for dinosaur
extinction
 report evaluating the impact of solar activity on technology used to transmit information.
Science21 2010
Sample work program
Queensland Curriculum & Assessment Authority
August 2015
Page 6 of 13
2.2 Unit description — Space, the final frontier
Unit name
Space, the final frontier
Semester
4
Time
30 hours
Overview
Students will explore space travel and the possibility of living in space or terra-forming another planet for human habitation. This unit explores
the theories of force and motion needed to travel into space, and designs for space travel vehicles and space stations. Inquiries will include:
the impacts of space travel on the human body; the requirements and processes needed to set up a space colony on another planet;
technology for investigating our universe and beyond; and communicating information across great distances.
Scientific
priorities
Technology
Focus areas
Structure and properties
of matter
Living systems
Earth and space
Energy
Information and
communication
Key concepts
SPI
LS1 The cell as
the basis of life
ES1
EN1
IC1 Storage,
transfer
and
Molecular
nature of
Health & wellbeing
Catalysts for discovery
matter
Structure and
properties of the
earth
Environment
Forms of
energy
interpretation
SP2
Gases, liquids,
solutions,
solids
SP3
Specification of
key concepts
LS2
Genes,
genetics
and
evolution
Radioactivity
LS3
Ecosystems
ES2 Global cycles
and
the
atmosphere
ES3
and
EN2
Forces and
motion
Solar systems
the universe
 Requirements of
 Features of the planets &
 Generating artificial
carbon-based life
forms
 Biological effects of
gravity on the human
body: metabolism;
heart & circulation;
inner ear; immune
system; kidneys;
moons of our solar system
 Einstein’s theory of
Relativity, black holes &
worm holes
 Astronomic distance &
time scales
 Composition of gases in
‘air’ and creating an
gravity in a space
station
 Kepler’s Laws
 Newton’s Laws
 Overcoming gravity for
shuttle launch: action &
reaction; momentum;
inertia; circular &
Science21 2010
Sample work program
 Communication
systems —
transmission of sound
e.g. analogue to digital
signal; fibre optics &
digital superhighway;
am/fm radio signals;
LCD displays; networks
to link computers
Queensland Curriculum & Assessment Authority
August 2015
Page 7 of 13
muscles & bones.
artificial atmosphere
elliptical motion
 Interactions required
 Astronomic distance &
 Light and lenses
 Electromagnetic
to make a functional
biosphere — biotic
and abiotic factors
 Effects of cosmic
radiation on living
things
time scales
spectrum
 Red shift
 Doppler effect
 Applications of types of
energy -lasers,
holograms, radiotelescopes
Learning experiences
 Construct a telescope and modify the design to improve its function
 Conduct investigations to find the link between composition of gases in the
air with plant growth
 Conduct investigations into linear, circular and elliptical motion and analyse
data using appropriate mathematical techniques
 Evaluate the features needed to make a planet suitable for habitation
 Describe the features of the planets and moons in our solar system (e.g.
distance from the sun, atmosphere, size, composition) and extrapolate to
determine the likelihood of finding other habitable planets
Unit
outcomes
Knowledge and conceptual understanding
 Design, construct and investigate rockets
 Analyse the impact of drying foods for preservation and nutritional content
 Measure forces generated through circular motion, inertia, acceleration, etc.
using theme park rides and evaluate their impact on the human body systems
 Link the methods of transmission of signals to the quantity and quality of
information that can be communicated
 Investigate issues with communicating across space e.g. sound doesn’t travel
in a vacuum
Investigative processes
Issues and impacts
By the conclusion of the unit, students should be able to:
 State, describe and explain scientific
 Conduct research regarding factors that
 Analyse the range of factors that have
information including facts, definitions,
formulas, terminology, concepts and
theories of forces and motion, and
communication technology as they apply to
space exploration.
 Explain interrelationships between the
scientific ideas and processes in the
development of an artificial ecosystem or
space station.
 Use scientific knowledge and information to
generate explanations of the effects of
affect planetary motion and the function of
space vehicles. Students will formulate
questions and hypotheses, experiment and
evaluate data.
 Select and present scientific ideas relating to
space exploration to make meaning
accessible to a general audience.
 Generate, process, analyse and evaluate
data using appropriate qualitative and
quantitative techniques to identify trends and
interrelationships.
influenced the development of theories
involving space travel and colonisation,
including the role of developing technology.
 Draw conclusions and express positions about
the prospect of future human space
exploration and life in space.
 Analyse a range of issues regarding living in
space and developing colonies, and evaluate
scientific impacts on the body and host planet.
Science21 2010
Sample work program
Queensland Curriculum & Assessment Authority
August 2015
Page 8 of 13
gravity (or lack thereof) on the human body.
Assessment
overview
Supervised written
assessment
Extended experimental
investigation
Collection of work
Extended response task
Short response prose (50 – 250 words per item) including stimulus response, calculations and secondary data interpretation.
2hr closed book, no notes allowed, stimulus seen.
Science21 2010
Sample work program
Queensland Curriculum & Assessment Authority
August 2015
Page 9 of 13
3. Assessment plan
3.1 Overview
Sem
Inst
Unit title
Assessment
technique
Dimensions
assessed
Conditions
1
1
Earth, wind and fire
Collection of work
(Formative)
KCU, IP, I&I
Collection of a series of investigations about disaster case studies. The
portfolio will contain:
 2 scientific reports
 a mapping and graphing exercise with data analysis
 a multimodal presentation based on fieldwork
 a short research report .
6 weeks in class and own time
300–500 words per item
Access to library and internet
2
Mythconceptions
Extended
experimental
investigation
(Formative)
KCU, IP, I&I
Students will use the scientific method to investigate the validity of a common
‘scientific’ claim.
Journal submitted
Pairs/small groups, individual reports
6 weeks
800 words for the analysis, discussion, recommendations and conclusions
3
Energy alternatives
Supervised written
assessment
(Formative)
KCU, I&I
Sentence answers, short response prose (50–100 words per item) including
stimulus response, calculations and secondary data interpretation.
1 ½ hr closed book
No notes allowed
Stimulus unseen
4
Our local creek
Extended response
task
(Formative)
KCU, IP, I&I
Students choose an aspect of the Healthy Waterways report for their local
creek, gather primary data to evaluate, and compare their findings to the EPA
report. Based on their findings, students will make recommendations to
improve the health of the creek.
Report format
2
Science21 2010
Sample work program
Queensland Curriculum & Assessment Authority
August 2015
Page 10 of 13
Sem
Inst
Unit title
Assessment
technique
Dimensions
assessed
Conditions
Small groups, individual reports
6 weeks including field work and laboratory time
800–1000 words for the analysis, discussion, recommendations and
conclusions
3
4
5
Water, water
everywhere
Extended
experimental
investigation
(Summative)
6
Driving in my car
7
Who wants to live
forever?
KCU, IP, I&I
Investigation of a water-related concept (e.g. osmosis, wetting agents,
transpiration, solubility etc.) and its application/impacts.
Journal submitted
Pairs or individual, with individual reports
5 weeks
1200–1500 words for the analysis, discussion, recommendations and
conclusions
Collection of work
(Summative)
KCU, IP, I&I
Collection of a series of investigations into vehicle design (engines, fuel,
efficiency and pollution), forces, road surface and stopping distances, reaction
time and alcohol.
The portfolio will contain:
 2 scientific reports based on field work
 a secondary research task
 data analysis task.
Individual and group work. Individual responses
5 weeks
400–600 words per item
Access to library and internet
Extended response
task
(Summative)
KCU, IP, I&I
PowerPoint and oral presentation on a technology that can be used to treat a
human condition. Students will evaluate the issues and impacts from the
application of the technology as well as outline the scientific concepts
underpinning its development and application.
4 weeks research
5–-8 minute oral presentation including PowerPoint and handout
Science21 2010
Sample work program
Queensland Curriculum & Assessment Authority
August 2015
Page 11 of 13
Sem
Inst
Unit title
Assessment
technique
Dimensions
assessed
Conditions
8
Who wants to live
forever?
Supervised written
assessment
(Summative)
KCU, IP, I&I
Short response prose (50–250 words per item), data analysis and problem
solving.
1.5 hr closed book
No notes allowed
9
Space, the final
frontier
Supervised written
assessment
(Post-verification)
KCU, IP, I&I
Short response prose (50–250 words per item) including stimulus response,
calculations and secondary data interpretation.
2 hr closed book
No notes allowed
Stimulus seen
Science21 2010
Sample work program
Queensland Curriculum & Assessment Authority
August 2015
Page 12 of 13
3.2 Student profile
SEM
UNIT
TASK
Dimension
KCU
1
Earth, wind and fire
1. Collection of work
Mythconceptions
2. Extended experimental investigation
IP
I&I
INTERNAL REPORTING
2
Energy alternatives
3. Supervised written assessment
Our local creek
4. Extended response task
MONITORING
3
Water, water everywhere
5. Extended experimental investigation*
Driving in my car
6. Collection of work*
INTERNAL REPORTING
4
Who wants to live forever?
7. Extended response task*
Who wants to live forever?
8. Supervised written assessment*
VERIFICATION
Space, the final frontier
9. Supervised written assessment
EXIT
*intended to be submitted at verification
Science21 2010
Sample work program
Queensland Curriculum & Assessment Authority
August 2015
Page 13 of 13
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Science 21 2010 Sample work program