Sumner School District Scope and Sequence for Year-long 9th Grade Lab Science
Course Enduring
Understandings
Students will understand that
...
1. Matter and energy,
regardless of scale,
behave as a system
Time Line / Instructional Benchmarks
BHS pacing guide
(36 weeks w/ ISP)
2 weeks: Nature of science, laws, theories, evidence, pseudo-science,
history of rational thought (introduce nature of science as thread that runs
through ALL topics)
2 weeks: Metrics and measurement / scientific process review (introduce
metric and measurements/scientific method as threads that run through ALL
topics)
2. Changes in one part of
the system can impact the
3 weeks: Energy
whole
3. Changes to systems
come from both internal
and external factors
4. These factors are
determined by chemical,
mechanical, and thermal
forces
Course Essential
Questions
Students will be able to
answer. . .
1. What is energy?
2. How what governs the
behavior of energy?
3. Where did matter come
from?
4. How do we know?
(36 weeks w/out ISP)
2 weeks: Nature of science, laws, theories,
evidence, pseudo-science, history of rational
thought (introduce nature of science as thread that
runs through ALL topics)
2 weeks: Metrics and measurement / scientific
process review (introduce metric and
measurements/scientific method as threads that
run through ALL topics)
7 weeks: Start chemistry (7 weeks total)
3 weeks: Energy
(BHS only) 4 weeks science process & Independent science project (one
day a week Nov to Jan in preparation for district science fair, about 25 days.
Done in 10th grade @ SHS
7 weeks: Chemistry
3 weeks: Formation and distribution of matter (Big Bang)
3 weeks: Formation and distribution of matter (Big
Bang)
4 weeks: Space Systems
3 weeks: Space Systems
4 weeks: Earth Systems
4 weeks: Earth Systems
5. Many of these forces can
be observed, measured,
and manipulated by
humans
Time Line / Instructional
Benchmarks SHS Pacing Guide
11 weeks: Bio concepts (cells, ecology, evolution)
8 weeks: Bio concepts (cells, ecology, evolution)
Course Description for Registration Materials
Standards-based Gradebook
Components
1
1. Transfer (intentionally
apply past learning to
new situations)
2. Think about your own
thinking (metacognition)
3. Listen with empathy and
understanding
4. Respond with
wonderment and awe
5. Gather data through all
the senses
6. Strive for accuracy and
precision
7. Question and pose
problems
8. Communicate with
clarity
9. Create-imagine-innovate
10. Take Responsible Risks
11. Think interdependently
12. Learn Continuously
13. Manage Impulses
14. Think Flexibly
15. Find humor
16. Persist
District Adopted
Materials
Conceptual Physical Science Explorations
(Hewitt et al, 2003, Addison Wesley) and
Lab Manual
9th – Lab Science*
Grade Level: 9th
Prerequisite: None
Teacher Permission: No
Dual Credit: No
Grad Requirement: Science
A combination of physical and life science will be studied in this algebra-based class. Students will
become familiar with laboratory equipment, perform various laboratory skills, understand scientific
concepts and terminology, and participate in group activities and labs. The concepts to be studied are
measurement, matter, energy, cellular biology, ecosystems and chemistry. This class is based on the
state grade level expectations to prepare students for the Biology End of Course Exam (attempted at
end of Biology course).
Habits of Mind
Earth Science (Red book, 2005, Pearson)
Not Applicable
Earth Science (Blue book, Tarbuck &
Lutgens, 2006, Pearson)
The Universe, season 1 (The History
Channel, 2007)
5. How does matter change?
6. What determines how
matter behaves?
7. How does energy move
through living systems?
Ron Thompson’s 8 volume Life Science
curriculum supplement
Page Keeley, Uncovering Student Ideas in
Life Sciences
National Science Digital Library Atlas of
Science Literacy
Nature of Science Unit Sequence: 2 weeks
“What do we want the students to know or be able to do?”
(Power Standard Addressed--could be from State GLEs,
National, or Program Certification Standards)
9-12 INQA
Question
Scientists generate and evaluate questions to
investigate the natural world.
9-12 INQC
Explain
Conclusions must be logical, based on evidence,
and consistent with prior established
knowledge.
“What questions does the work in this unit
answer?”
(Unit Guiding Questions)
1.
2.
9-12 INQE
Model
9-12 INQF
Communicate
9-12 INQG
Intellectual
Honesty
9-12 INQH
Intellectual
Honesty
3.
The essence of scientific investigation involves
the development of a theory or conceptual
model that can generate testable predictions.
Science is a human endeavor that involves
logical reasoning and creativity and entails the
testing, revision, and occasional discarding of
theories as new evidence comes to light.
4.
5.
Scientists carefully evaluate sources of
information for reliability before using that
information. When referring to the ideas or
findings of others, they cite their sources of
information.
What is the Nature of Science? (True
science vs. Pseudo-science)
What are the differences between laws,
facts, theories, and hypotheses? What is
a theory and how does it change in
relationship to new evidence?
How do we ensure validity in science?
How do we know that what we are
testing is what we want to be testing (e.g.
appropriate use of experimental groups
to increase accuracy)?
How do we enhance reliability in science?
How do we know that our results are
reliable (repeated and consistent trials to
increase precision)?
How do we support conclusions with
specific and reliable experimental
evidence?
Public communication among scientists is an
essential aspect of research. Scientists evaluate
the validity of one another’s investigations,
check the reliability of results, and explain
inconsistencies in findings.
2
“How will we know if
they have learned
it?”
(Assessment Tasks-evidence of learning
will come from . . .)
Assessments:
*Making Conclusions
based on Evidence
vs. Inference
*Evidence vs.
Inference Quiz
*Nature of Science
Assessment
“What will we have
them do to learn
and practice it?”
(Instructional
Activities)
*Is it a Theory?
probe
(Keely, Vol. 3, pg
83)
*Doing Science
(Keely, Vol. 3, pg.93
*What is a
Hypothesis? (Keely,
Vol. 3, pg 101)
*Nature of ScienceT or F PowerPoint
probe
*Nature of Science
and Pesudo-science
Worksheet
*Vocab Carouselrotate around room
practicing vocab
*Pair and Share Bad
Science Scenarios
“What learning and practice materials are
needed?”
(Materials)
Physical Science and Nature of Science Assessment
Probes, Page Keely, Volume 3
Nature of Science PowerPoint Probe
Nature of Science Common Assessment
Physical Science Explorations, Hewitt 2003 Chapter 1
pages 4-12
References:
Pseudosciencehttp://www.chem1.com/acad/sci/pseudosci.html
Measurement Unit Sequence: 2 weeks
“What do we want the students to know or be able to do?”
(Power Standard Addressed--could be from State GLEs, National, or Program
Certification Standards)
9-12 INQB
Scientific progress requires the use of various methods appropriate for
answering different kinds of research questions, a thoughtful plan for
gathering data needed to answer the question, and care in collecting,
analyzing, and displaying the data.
9-12 INQD
The methods and procedures that scientists use to obtain evidence must
Communicate be clearly reported to enhance opportunities for further investigation.
Clearly
9-12 APPD
The ability to solve problems is greatly enhanced by use of mathematics
and information technologies.
“What questions does the work
in this unit answer?”
(Unit Guiding Questions)
1. What are the standard
units of measurement in
the metric system?
2. How do we convert within
and between units?
3. How do we collect
applicable, accurate, and
reliable data?
4. How do we analyze and
display experimental data?
5. What tools do we use to
measure scientific data?
“How will we know if they
have learned it?”
(Assessment Tasks-evidence of learning will
come from . . .)
Metric Common
Assessment
“What will we have them do to learn
and practice it?”
(Instructional Activities)
“What learning and
practice materials
are needed?”
(Materials)
scale / comparison to objects
unit conversion
review most common metric
measurement units
work measurement into all
assessments
Thompson’s Inquiry Series: The
Metric System, Interpreting
Graphs and Graphing Data (probe)
Energy Unit Sequence: 3 weeks
“What do we want the students to know or be able to do?”
(Power Standard Addressed--could be from State GLEs, National,
or Program Certification Standards)
9-11 PS3A Although energy can be transferred from one object to
another and can be transformed from one form of energy to
another form, the total energy in a closed system remains the
same. The concept of conservation of energy, applies to all physical
and chemical changes.
9-11 PS3B Kinetic energy is the energy of motion. The kinetic
energy of an object is defined by the equation: Ek = 1/2 mv2
9-11 PS3C Gravitational potential energy is due to the separation
of mutually attracting masses. Transformations can occur between
gravitational potential energy and kinetic energy, but the total
amount of energy remains constant.
“How will we know if
they have learned it?”
(Assessment Tasks-evidence of learning
will come from . . .)
“What questions does the work in
this unit answer?”
(Unit Guiding Questions)
Transfer
Transformation
Conservation
1. What are the 5 main forms of
energy? (chemical, thermal,
mechanical, nuclear,
electromagnetic)
2. What is the definition of
energy? (the ability to do work)
3. What is the difference between
an energy transfer and an
energy transformation?
4. What are the two states of
energy? (Kinetic or Potential)
3
Pre-assessment (8th
grade energy common
assessments)
“What will we have them do to
learn and practice it?”
(Instructional Activities)
Qualitative observation of practical
physics labs to understand /
emphasize concept of energy transfers
(do include mass and distance
calculations)
Student designed experiments with
individual questions (CPO materials at
BHS)
“What learning and practice materials are
needed?”
(Materials)
Pruett’s energy category activity--NEED
project
For example of energy transformation:
http://www.inhabitots.com/energy-generatingsoccer-ball-brings-power-to-developingnations/
Physical science text, chapter 6,
introduction to energy
chapter 9, heat / thermal energy
Keeley,USI in Physical Science,
probe #12 , p. 59
5. How does energy transform
from one type to another?
6. What is the conservation of
energy?
8th:
energy in / out
Newton’s laws
radiation (personalizing science-impacts of nuclear energy)
survey of renewable & non-renewable
energy sources--fracking (pro-con)
4
Chemistry Unit Sequence (7 weeks)
“What do we want the students to know or be able to do?”
(Power Standard Addressed--could be from State GLEs, National,
or Program Certification Standards)
“What questions does the
work in this unit answer?”
(Unit Guiding Questions)
“How will we know if
they have learned it?”
(Assessment Tasks-evidence of learning
will come from . . .)
“What will we have them do to learn and
practice it?”
(Instructional Activities)
1.
PS2B Atoms of the same element have the same number of protons. The number and
arrangement of electrons determines how the atom interacts with other atoms to
form molecules and ionic crystals.
What is matter?
Atomic Structure Probe
What are the properties of matter?
Atomic Structure and Periodic Table
Practice Quiz (open note)
2.
3.
What governs the behavior of matter?
PS2A Atoms are composed of protons, neutrons, and electrons. The nucleus of an
atom takes up very little of the atom's volume but makes up almost all of the mass.
The nucleus contains protons and neutrons, which are much more massive than the
electrons surrounding the nucleus. Protons have a positive charge, electrons are
negative in charge, and neutrons have no net charge.
PS2C When elements are listed in order according to the number of protons,
repeating patterns of physical and chemical properties identify families of elements
with similar properties. This Periodic Table is a consequence of the repeating pattern
of outermost electrons.
Bio Teacher Requests: add LS1F Food molecules
PS2F All forms of life are composed of large molecules that contain carbon. Carbon
atoms bond to one another and other elements by sharing electrons, forming
covalent bonds. Stable molecules of carbon have four covalent bonds per carbon
atom. (most likely fit Bio uint)
PS2G Error! Hyperlink reference not valid.Error! Hyperlink reference not valid.Error!
Hyperlink reference not valid.s change the arrangement of atoms in the molecules of
substances. Chemical reactions release or acquire Error! Hyperlink reference not
valid. from their surroundings and result in the formation of new substances (most
likely fit Chem unit with potential review in Bio unit)
Atomic structure & Periodic Table
quiz
What is the periodic table and how is it
organized and used?
4.
5.
How has our knowledge of matter
developed over time?
Physical versus chemical properties &
changes
Pure substances (Elements) compounds,
molecules (only non metals can be a
compound), mixtures
Atomic structure and the behavior &
properties of subatomic particles, history
of the atom
Definition & relevance of isotopes
(exposure / intro level)
Atomic number / atomic mass / mass
number
Ions
Bonding (intro level—electrons shared,
lost, gained. Leave covalent and ionic
bonding and polarity for Bio)
Periodic table—, groups & valence
numbers, periods, families (1, 2, 16, 17,
18), metals, metalloids, non-metals,
memorize first 20 elements
Chemical reactions—products and
reactants (law of conservation of matter)
(include questions / concepts from
previous tests on subsequent ones)
6.
9th Chem Common Assessment #1
7.
9th Chem Common Assessment #2
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
5
1st 20 Elements Flash Cards: Name on one side, symbol
and atomic # on the back
Reading text supplement 17.1 Visualizing the Invisible (20
min)
Oobleck Demo: Observation/Inferences, Imagine the
invisible, States of Matter review (40 min)
*Pop-Can implosion: Observe/Inference – imagine
molecular movement, states of matter (gas) (40 min)
Mixtures Lab: Markers separating (quick lab after
substances vs. mixtures notes) (60 min)
OR 22.3 Activity CPS Elements vs. Compounds discussion
(flow chart)
Physical and Chemical Properties/Changes – demos on 8
physical properties and changes; notes + you tube glass
blowing; tie back to Ziploc bag (observing chemical
reactions)
Do the demo -- students brainstorm what the phy
property is (60 min)
Shape – wood cube vs wad of paper
Color – penny vs. dime
State of Matter – solid, liquid, gas –
Density – penny vs cork in water
Solubility – beaker, penny in there, food color (penny
insoluble, food coloring soluble)
Boiling Pt /Condensation/Freezing Pt/Melting Pt. -- beaker
with ice, hold over burner, boils
Conductivity/Electrical Conductivity – Bruce light bulb
with 2 prongs with sugar and salt in water
Conductivity of Heat – scoopula to hand or side of face,
get it red hot, ask if willing to still touch hand/face
Reading p. 356 CPS text; internet assignment about
chemical and physical changes and states of matter (60
min)
Lesson on how to read chemical formulas (Activity 21.2
Minds On Activity CPS) and Sage – practice and follow up
opener; includes 5 rules to read aloud and put in their
own words (60 min)
Chemical Reactions (Changes) – Measuring Mass in a
chemical reaction (CPS book Activity 21.3) plus
Conservation of Mass (60 min) or Steel Wool Lab
*Solutions Activity 22.2 CPS (talk again about physical
properties)
Research scientists for a day – Atomic Theory as bridge to
atomic structure (60 min)
Probe: Atomic structure
2-D draw of historical atomic models as homework after
notes
History of Chemistry video: has study guide with it (60
min)
“What learning and
practice materials are
needed?”
(Materials)
Chemistry DVDs (23 min each, 1
5-DVD set with teacher’s guide
purchased for each high school,
Nov 2011)
Atomic Structure
History of the Periodic Table
Compounds
Elements
Using the Periodic Table
20. 3-D models of 3 different atoms to show different sizes,
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.
33.
34.
35.
etc. plus placement of atomic subparticles – can show
gauge
Intro notes on atomic structure… base on pretest/probe
5-2 Structure of an Atom reading with questions (if
necessary), atomic numbers worksheet
Structure of Atoms Activity with gluing beans
Isotopes (if not already introduced)
Pick an element and create Pop-Up Ad to “Sell an
Element”
Alien Activity… (2 60 min. classes)
History of Periodic Table DVD response sheet
Set-up and Families of the Periodic Table Powerpoint with
links (Notes on different families/structure of periodic
table)
Properties of Elements DVD (Compounds, groups,
families, etc.)
Alkali Metals Demo
Properties of Elements Lab: Metals, Non-metals,
Metalloids lab
Alkaline Earth Metal Lab
Bonding and Chemical Reactions (basics)
Bohr Model Lab with boards and poker chips as review
Also, density oil food coloring in grad cylinder demo (Rina)
Formation of Matter Unit Sequence: 3 weeks
“What do we want the students to
know or be able to do?”
(Power Standard Addressed--could be
from State GLEs, National, or
Program Certification Standards)
“What questions does the
work in this unit answer?”
(Unit Guiding Questions)
Evolution of the universe
ES1B—Big Bang, Red/Blue shifts,
spreading of matter, element
formation (fusion / fission)
Bridging question from
Chemistry:
Where did matter come from?
How did it get located /
distributed the way it is?
Unit questions:
What evidence do we have for
the Big Bang?
How did the elements form?
How do we know about what
we can’t see?
To what extent have scientists
accounted for all the matter in
the universe?
“How will we know if they
have learned it?”
(Assessment Tasks-evidence of learning will
come from . . .)
Beyond the Big Bang Quiz
“What will we have them do to
learn and practice it?”
(Instructional Activities)
1. View video and answer advance
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
organizer questions
Make observations of distribution
of matter from expanding and
popping balloons
Read and discuss articles
View picture reveal / demo of
visual vs. entire light spectrum
Take an instruction survey (pretest)
Complete a wave length worksheet
Generate and observe
characteristics of waves in lab
setting
Experiment with how waves are
either blocked by, or can
penetrate, different materials
6
“What learning and practice materials are needed?”
(Materials)
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
Beyond the Big Bang video w/ question guide (History Channel--Brian),
Big Bang balloon labs—1st expansion (dots on outside), 2nd explosion (balloon w/
contents proportional to elements exploded--pop for distribution of matter)
Cosmic Times articles
Demo--covered picture / reveal to show how we only see a portion of what’s
available if we don’t use all areas of the spectrum
“Lighten-up” survey
Wave length activity worksheet / Electro-magnetic spectrum (Brian)
EM spectrum lab “Check out these waves” (tapping center of a pan of water at
different rates—circular waves, slinkies—linear horizontal waves, defraction grating
glasses) refraction (bending) vs. reflection (bouncing back)
Invisible light sources and detectors lab (filter lab) remote control under document
camera exposes the IR, wrap cell phone lab in different materials. (Include red shift /
blue shift concept using slinkies and YouTube video red / blue shift as post-lab
discussion)
Flame lab (demo)--colors of elements as signature, Invisible Universe book
(Lawrence Hall of Science, 2002, ISBN 0-924886-69-2), spectrum tubes, defraction
grating glasses, spectroscopes
Keeley, USI in Astronomy, probes #38-45 (NOT 42), pp. 203-
7
SPACE SYSTEMS UNIT SEQUENCE (universe, galaxy, star, solar system, planets, meteorites, comets): 4 weeks
“What do we want the
students to know or be able to
do?”
(Power Standard Addressed-could be from State GLEs,
National, or Program
Certification Standards)
PS2A, B, C—Periodic Table,
Structure of an atom
ES1A—star formation (big idea
of gravity of attractive force),
planet formation
“What questions does the work in this unit answer?”
(Unit Guiding Questions)
“How will we know if they
have learned it?”
(Assessment Tasks-evidence of learning will
come from . . .)
Scale of the universe Formative Assessment probe:
1. Probe--List of universe structures, define (what is it?) and rank order by size.
2. Scale of Systems: Galaxies, Solar System/Stars, Planets “Tops Scale the
Universe #44” ?, pp. 32-38 (activities),
3. Imax Cosmic Voyage (uses powers of 10 and is good for teaching scale)
What was formed as the result of the Big Bang?
Where do the first elements come from?
How are galaxies and solar systems and formed? (adv: How does
the combination of gravity and angular momentum affect
matter?)
How are stars formed and what happens inside of stars? (fusion /
fission—bridge to chemistry, law of conservation of mass, mass is
lost and must be accounted for—lost mass is converted to energy,
matter is converted into energy, stellar evolution and matter
formation)
“What will we have them do to learn and practice it?”
(Instructional Activities)
Star Formation: captioned
comic strip using 5 steps of star Star Formation: Fusion / Fission
formation (use personification)
1. Interstellar nebula clumping due to gravity (Aspire Star life cycle site
Space unit end common
assessment
How did the left over matter become different types of planets?
How can the motion of planets be explained?
http://aspire.cosmic-ray.org/labs/star_life/starlife_proto.html
protostar web tour. Complete questions on protostar handout Students
develop 6 panel comic strip with captions to explain sequence (answers to
first 4 questions can be found by scrolling below the table of contents)
2. “Star bucks” Probe --Fusion / fission activity: using “element trading” cards
3. Galaxy Formation: Red book (chpt. 21)
4. Conceptual Physics book (chpt. 40) Reading pg. 725-731
5. Universe DVD series “Life cycle of a star”
6. (Townley) “Cosmic Chemistry” powerpoint including law of conservation of
mass
7. Use Chandra posters and “Star life Guided Web Tour” webquest
http://aspire.cosmic-ray.org/labs/star_life/starlife_main.html to teach life
cycles of different sized stars (giant, huge, sun-like, brown dwarf)
8. Black hole gravitational pull demonstration: Pie pan, kyro syrup (1/2’) with
food color, hole punches, and different sized balls, place in the center, turn in
one direction, note changes as ball is turned
9. Star formation flow chart handout & power points
10. Students diagram out a large star cycle and small/ medium star cycle
Solar system Formation:
1. Distance to the planets (Tacoma Astronomical Society)—requires a meter
long strip of adding tape or 4” wide strip of paper towel per for students to
write on.
Planetary formation—angular momentum, tie to proto-star formation and
remaining material and energy. Use student active demos to show attraction and
spinning between objects
1. Have several students stand in places throughout the room.
2. Have one student start slowly spinning.
3. The student closest to them get draw to the spinning student.
4. Explain that as you gain more mass you increase gravity.
5. Then a student a little farther away is drawn in, repeat the steps
Magnetic stir plate spinning demo. Use a beaker/Flask and stir plate.
1. Put water, spinner, and paper hole punches in the beaker/Flask.
2. Start to spin the spinner in the Beaker/Flask slowly.
3. Slowly increase the speed of the spinner.
8
“What learning
and practice
materials are
needed?”
(Materials)
As you increase the speed of the spinner the dots will be drawn toward the
middle
Earth Science Red book reading 712-729
4.
9
EARTH SYSTEMS UNIT SEQUENCE: 4 weeks
“What do we want the students to know or be
able to do?”
(Power Standard Addressed--could be from State GLEs,
National, or Program Certification Standards)
“What questions does the work in this
unit answer?”
(Unit Guiding Questions)
9-11 ES2A Global climate differences result from the
uneven heating of Earth's surface by the Sun. Seasonal
climate variations are due to the tilt of Earth's axis with
respect to the plane of Earth's nearly circular orbit
around the Sun
Bridge from space:
1. How did our Earth form? Why is it round?
2. What is the structure of the earth?
3. What creates an atmosphere? What created the
atmosphere on Earth?
4. What is the structure of the atmosphere?
5. What is the function of the atmosphere?
9-11 ES2B Climate is determined by energy transfer from
the sun at and near Earth's surface. This energy transfer
is influenced by dynamic processes such as cloud cover
and Earth's rotation, as well as static conditions such as
proximity to mountain ranges and the ocean. Human
activities, such as burning of fossil fuels, also affect the
global climate.
External structures and processes (solar energy):
6. Why are there seasons?
7. How are clouds formed?
8. What causes global climate? (rainforest, desert,
plate boundary, basalt layers, glaciers, Puget
Sound, erosion, flooding, rain shadow effect)
9. What is the effect of water on the planet?
10. What is heat capacity?
9-11 ES2C Earth is a system that contains essentially a
fixed amount of each stable chemical element existing in
different chemical forms. Each element on Earth moves
among reservoirs in the solid Earth, oceans, atmosphere,
and organisms as part of biogeochemical cycles driven
by energy from Earth's interior and from the Sun.
“How will we
know if they
have learned
it?”
(Assessment
Tasks--evidence of
learning will come
from . . . )
Individual
summative
assessment:
Climate and
seasons needs
energy transfer
questions
“What will we have them do to learn
and practice it?”
(Instructional Activities)
“What learning and practice materials are
needed?”
(Materials)
Earth Structure Probe
External structures and processes (solar radiation
and the warming of the Earth):
Seasons (solar radiation, terrestrial radiation): Intro
to insulation lab—world map plot 3 countries at 0, 30,
60 degrees latitude north and south, assumptions about
angle (latitude) and temperature
Insulation lab (probe taped to ruler and placed at
different angles to light source)
demo Flash light on globe to measure angle of sunlight
Weather & Climate probe
Probe on the difference between weather and
climate
Climate and Weather (air pressure, air density, air
temperature, difference between green house effect
(natural process has always occurred) & global
warming / change / destabilization (human
effect/impact of additional carbon production) ozone
layer)
Key Terms: transfer of energy, saturation, heating
capacity, temperature variation, geologic time, water
cycle, glaciation, rain shadow, air pressure, air density,
air temperature, difference between green house effect
& global warming (change, destabilization), ozone layer,
solar radiation, terrestrial radiation
Convection in air currents: Coriolis Effect on
atmosphere and ocean currents (from earth’s rotation),
Oversimplified cells (vertical convection movement
motion of air masses rising at equator when heated,
rises and moving North or South toward poles, cold air
circles and returns underneath it)
Ocean’s Impact on Global Climate: Heat Capacity,
Graphing coastal vs. inner cities, El Nino and La Nina,
10
Atmospheric Layers and Water Cycle Powerpoint (LINK)
Air mass demonstrations with balloons (weigh empty, fill and
weigh again), heated aluminum can placed in ice water
(crushes)
You tube video on the coriolis effect:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wda7azMvabE
Biology Unit Sequence: 11 weeks (SHS), 8 weeks (BHS)
“What do we want the students to know or be able to do?” (Power Standard
Addressed--could be from State GLEs, National, or Program Certification Standards)
Mastery of these Biology standards expected for
science students.
9th
grade lab
Ecology (both BHS & LHS):
9-11 LS2E Interrelationships of organisms may generate ecosystems
that are stable for hundreds or thousands of years. Biodiversity refers
to the different kinds of organisms in specific ecosystems or on the
planet as a whole.
(BHS will also do 9-11 LS2A, test spec #1-3, and LS2C)
Cells (SHS only):
9-11 LS1C Cells contain specialized parts for determining essential
functions such as regulation of cellular activities, energy capture and
release, formation of proteins, waste disposal, the transfer of
information, and movement.
Evolution (SHS to start 2012-13):
9-11 LS3A Biological evolution is due to: (1) genetic variability of
offspring due to mutations and genetic recombination, (2) the
potential for a species to increase its numbers, (3) a finite supply of
resources, and (4) natural selection by the environment for those
offspring better able to survive and produce offspring.
“What questions does the work
in this unit answer?” (Unit
Guiding Questions)
“How will we know if
they have learned
it?” (Assessment
Tasks)
“What will we have them
do to learn and practice
it?” (Instructional
Activities)
“What learning and practice materials are needed?”
(Materials)
Ron Thompson Materials: Green = Content ‘Guiding Questions’, Red = Curriculum Resource
Guide Book, Black = Section and Pages Numbers from Curriculum Resource Guide Book
Bridge from Earth Systems:
How does the sun’s energy
transfer to living organisms?
3 EOC formatted Field
Studies: Pathway Proximity,
Rainfall Worm Number,
Sunlight Leaf Number
Ecology
1. How does the sun’s energy
move between living
organisms?
2. What is the carbon cycle?
Why is it important to living
things?
3. What makes something
alive? What do all living
things have in common?
4. How do we classify the
diverse types of life? What is
the classification system?
5. What is an ecosystem? What
are the levels of organization
in an ecosystem?
6. How does the environment
impact the organisms in a
particular ecosystem?
Organization of Life
Characteristics of Life (3 days)--What do all living things have in common? Biology: As Scientific
Inquiry—Unit One Introduction: 1-3 Characteristics of Life (pp. 5-6) (All living things…Are made of
cells, Reproduce as a species, Metabolize, Grow and Develop, Respond to their environment)
Classification/Diversity of Life
What is the classification system to organize all living things? Classification and Evolution—Unit
VII: 39-3 Introduction to Biological Classification (pp. 6-7) DROP???
Ecology Plan--Basic Ecology (4 weeks)--species, populations, communities, ecosystem
(levels),Trophic Levels – producers, consumers, food webs, energy, field study) GOULD FOOD WEB
web resource (insert link)
Abiotic vs Biotic--How is the carbon cycle relevant to living things? Cells and Cell Processes—Unit
II: 7-6 (p. 118) What is the difference between a biotic and abiotic environment? Use biotic and
abiotic resources from the 10th grade team (content not in the Curriculum Resource Guides)-What are the levels of organization of an ecosystem? (ecosystem → communities → populations
→ organism) Ecology—Unit VIII: 49-2 Population Dynamics: An Introduction (p. 37)
SHS ONLY
Macromolecules & Cells
1. What are macromolecules?
2. What are the monomers that
make up macromolecules?
3. What are the functions of
each macromolecule?
4. What is the function of an
enzyme?
5. What is a cell?
6. How does a cell function as
a system?
7. What different kinds of cells
exist?
8. How do plant and animal
cells differ?
9. What are the steps for
photosynthesis and
respiration?
10. How do sex cells differ from
other body cells?
11. What role do adaptations
play in species’ survival?
Cells (3 weeks)
Basic Organelles
Identify and label cell parts in diagrams of plant and animal cells. Cells and Cell Processes—
Unit II: 4-3 Cell Structure
Describe characteristics that distinguish plant cells from animal cells. Complete a cell model.
Basic Cell Reproduction (Mitosis/Meiosis)
What is the difference between mitosis and meiosis? Reproduction and Development—Unit
V: 30-2 Cell Division—Mitosis
(pp. 78-80),
Connection between cell division and cancer, 30-5 Cell Division—Meiosis (pp. 83-85)
What is the purpose of mitosis and meiosis? Same as above.
What different kinds of cells exist? Same as above.
Macromolecules
Identify the monomers that create each macromolecule? Cells and Cell Processes—Unit II:
6-2 Carbohydrates (pp. 86-87),
6-3 Proteins, Fats (pp. 88-90)
What is the function of an enzyme? Cells and Cell Processes—Unit II: 9-3 Enzyme Structure
and Function
Plants vs Animals (*Note: 9th is not addressing prokaryotic vs. eukaryotic cell differences (or
domains)
Basic Photosynthesis/Respiration
11
What are the steps for the photosynthesis and respiration reactions? Cells and Cell Processes—
Unit II: 7-4 Respiration (p. 112), 7-6 Photosynthesis (p. 117) DROP???
Basic Genetics
Adaptation
What role do adaptations play in species survival (mutations, environment)? Genetics—Unit
VI: 32-1 Introduction to
Genetics
(p. 2) Classification and Evolution—Unit VII: 44-3 Mutation and Natural Selection (pp. 51-52)
Basic Evolution
What is meant by ‘survival of the fittest’? Classification and Evolution—Unit VII: 44-2
Natural Selection & Evolution ( 49-50)
Independent Science Project (BHS Only): 4 weeks
“What do we want the students to know or be able to do?”
(Power Standard Addressed--could be from State GLEs, National, or Program Certification
Standards)
“What questions does the
work in this unit answer?”
(Unit Guiding Questions)
INQB Scientific progress requires the use of various methods appropriate for answering different kinds of
research questions, a thoughtful plan for gathering data needed to answer the question, and care in
collecting, analyzing, and displaying the data.
INQC
Conclusions must be logical, based on evidence, and consistent with prior established knowledge.
12
“How will we know if they
“What will we have them do
have learned it?”
to learn and practice it?”
(Assessment Tasks--evidence
(Instructional Activities)
of learning will come from . . .)
“What learning and
practice materials are
needed?”
(Materials)
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Sumner School District Scope and Sequence for Year