Medical Center Hour programs on diversity, disability, and access: 2006-2015
20 September 2006
The Vivian Pinn Award Lecture
CLOSING THE DIVERSITY GAP IN MEDICINE
Jordan J. Cohen, M.D., Past President, Association of American Medical Colleges, Washington
DC
Vivian W. Pinn, M.D., Director, Office of Research on Women’s Health, National Institutes of
Health, Bethesda MD
Diversifying America’s physician workforce and preparing doctors to practice with cultural sensitivity
became major goals of the Association of American Medicine Colleges during Dr. Jordan Cohen’s 12 yeas
as AAMC president. Have we made much progress? What are the greatest challenges to closing the
diversity gap? What are individual medical schools doing to promote diversity?
Co-presented with the Center on Health Disparities
11 October 2006
END-OF-LIFE CARE FOR THE POOR
Gregory Gramelspacher, M.D., Center for Bioethics, Indiana University, Indianapolis IN
Rebecca Dillingham, M.D., Department of Internal Medicine and Center for Global Health, UVA
For patients with means and access, care at the end of life often involves withdrawal of aggressive
interventions in favor of more modest measures controlling symptoms and assuring comfort. What about
care for dying persons who are impoverished and have never enjoyed access even to basic health services?
What should end-of-life care look like for the poor in U.S. inner cities or third-world countries?
Co-presented with the Center for Global Health and the Institute for Practical Ethics and Public Life
24 January 2007
RACE-BASED THERAPEUTICS
M. Gregg Bloche, J.D., M.D., Georgetown University School of Law
M. Norman Oliver, M.D., Family Medicine and Center on Health Disparities, UVA
A new generation of pharmaceuticals seeks to take account of biologic variations that distinguish
subpopulations crudely denoted as racial groups. For example, in 2005, the FDA approved BiDil to treat
heart failure in black patients. While identifying genetic variations and developing targeted therapies are
laudable research goals, it is crucial to consider the risks—social as well as medical—of using racial
categories when thinking about disease and creating and marketing drugs.
Co-presented with the Department of Public Health Sciences, the Institute for Practical Ethics, and the
Center on Health Disparities, UVA
14 February 2007
REFRAMING DISABILITY: NEW WAYS OF SEEING AND REPRESENTING
DISABILITY
Rosemarie Garland-Thomson, Ph.D., Women's Studies, Emory University, Atlanta GA
Walt S. Davis, M.D., Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation and Center for
Biomedical Ethics, UVA
How we view, define, and represent persons with disabilities says a lot about our social and cultural
values, including our ideas of what's "normal." How might new portraits of disability help to reframe our
understanding of ourselves, our institutions, and our views of, among other things, what constitutes
health?
Co-presented with the Department of English and the Bioethics Program, College of Arts & Sciences
3 October 2007
History of the Health Sciences Lecture
ROOT SHOCK: THE IMPACT OF URBAN RENEWAL ON HEALTH
Mindy Thompson Fullilove, M.D., Psychiatry, Columbia University, New York NY
M. Norman Oliver, M.D., M.A., Family Medicine and Center on Health Disparities, UVA
Maurice D. Cox, B.Arch., School of Architecture, UVA, and Charlottesville City Council
Urban renewal projects in the U.S. in the 1950s-1970s bulldozed entire districts and traumatically
displaced hundreds of African American communities, whose residents experienced "root shock" with
destruction of their physical and emotional ecosystems. With this perspective on urban renewal, including
projects like Charlottesville's Vinegar Hill, how might we understand better and approach differently the
health status of urban African Americans and the health of our cities and neighborhoods?
Co-presented with the History of the Health Sciences Lecture Series, Center on Health Disparities,
Student National Medical Association—UVA Chapter, and the UVA Symposium on Race and Society
17 October 2007
CROSS-CULTURAL COMPETENCE IN CLINICAL CARE
Farhat Moazam, M.D., Ph.D., Centre of Biomedical Ethics & Culture, Sindh Institute of Urology
and Transplantation, Karachi, Pakistan, and Center for Biomedical Ethics and Humanities, UVA
Fern R. Hauck, M.D., M.S., Family Medicine and International Family Medicine Clinic, UVA
Pediatric surgeon and bioethicist Farhat Moazam is at home in two worlds—Pakistan, where she was born,
studied medicine, and enjoyed much of her career; and the U.S., where she trained and practiced as a
surgeon, then took degrees in bioethics. What qualities and skills do clinicians require to practice
effectively at home—wherever home is—and to traverse cultural divides with patients, peers, and
policymakers?
Co-presented with the Institute for Practical Ethics and Public Life
8 October 2008
OVERCOMING LITERACY-RELATED BARRIERS TO HEALTH
Michael P. Pignone, M.D., M.P.H., Departments of Internal Medicine and Public Health,
University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill NC
Susan Erno, M.A., Charlottesville Adult Education, Charlottesville VA
Co-presented with the Claude Moore Health Sciences Library's Health Literacy Working Group
15 October 2008
CULTURE AS DISABILITY? THERAPEUTIC ITINERARIES AND THE QUESTION
OF KNOWLEDGE
Ato Quayson, Ph.D., Department of English and Centre for Diaspora and Transnational Studies,
University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada
John D. Arras, Ph.D., Department of Philosophy and Program in Bioethics, UVA
Co-presented with the Department of English
7 October 2009
QUEER HEALTH CARE: LGBTI PATIENTS AND PROFESSIONALS
Speakers to be announced
Co-presented with UVA School of Medicine student organization qMD
11 November 2009
History of the Health Sciences Lecture
OPENING DOORS: THE MAKING OF AN AFRICAN AMERICAN SURGEON
Dorian J. Wilson MD, Department of Surgery and Healthcare Foundation of New Jersey Center
for Humanism in Medicine, New Jersey Medical School, University of Medicine and Dentistry of
New Jersey, Newark NJ
Wendi El Amin MD, Family Medicine and Assistant Dean for Medical Education, UVA
Co-presented with the History of the Health Sciences Lecture Series, Medical School Admissions, and
Student National Medical Association, and in conjunction with “Opening Doors: Contemporary African
American Academic Surgeons," National Library of Medicine exhibit in the Claude Moore Health
Sciences Library
3 February 2010
REDUCING HEALTH DISPARITIES: THE ROLE OF CULTURAL AND LINGUISTIC
COMPETENCE
Tawara Goode MA, National Center for Cultural Competence, Georgetown University,
Wsahington DC
P. Preston Reynolds MD PhD, Department of Internal Medicine, UVA
M. Norman Oliver MD MA, Department of Family Medicine and Center on Health Disparities,
UVA
Jonathon D. Truwit MD MBA, Senior Associate Dean for Clinical Affairs, UVA
22 September 2010
The Koppaka Family Foundation Lecture in Medical Humanities
MEDICINE IN TRANSLATION: BRIDGING THE CULTURAL GAP BETWEEN
DOCTOR AND PATIENT
Danielle Ofri MD, PhD, Department of Medicine, New York University School of Medicine and
Editor-in-Chief, Bellevue Literary Review, New York NY
27 October 2010
History of the Health Sciences and John F. Anderson Memorial Lecture
SUFFERING IN SILENCE: 100 YEARS OF SICKLE CELL DISEASE IN THE UNITED
STATES
Carlton Haywood PhD MA, Berman Institute of Bioethics, Bloomberg School of Public Health,
Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore MD
Co-presented with the Institute for Practical Ethics and Public Life and the History of the Health
Sciences Lecture Series
14 September 2011
John F. Anderson Memorial Lecture
STRETCHING TO SERVE: HEALTH PROFESSIONALS' ALTRUISM AND
VULNERABILITY WHEN MEETING COMMUNITY NEEDS
S. Hughes Melton MD FAAFP, President, C-Health PC, Lebanon, Virginia, and the American
Academy of Family Physicians’ 2011 Family Physician of the Year
Co-presented with the Department of Family Medicine
28 September 2011
John F. Anderson Memorial Lecture
OUT OF THEIR WAY: SEEKING HEALTH IN AMERICA, WISE COUNTY 2009
Tim Cunningham MSN, author and actor, Charlottesville VA
5 October 2011
John F. Anderson Memorial Lecture
THE SHAPE OF THE EYE: STORIES ABOUT DOWN SYNDROME
George Estreich MFA, author, The Shape of the Eye: Down Syndrome, Family, and the Stories
We Inherit, Corvallis OR
Ann L. Kellams MD, Department of Pediatrics, UVA
Special Medical Center Hour:
Monday, 12 March 2012, 12:30 pm, Jordan Conference Center Auditorium
VETERANS’ PORTRAITS, VETERANS’ STORIES: BEARING WITNESS, GIVING
CARE
Daniel Heyman, artist, Philadelphia PA
Richard J. Bonnie LLB, School of Law, UVA
Co-presented with the Institute for Practical Ethics and Public Life, Department of Studio Art, and the
Human Rights Program of the School of Law
28 March 2012
The Kenneth R. Crispell Memorial Lecture in the History of the Health Sciences
WHEN YOU'RE STRANGE: STIGMA AND THE STRUGGLE TO END
HOMELESSNESS IN THE U.S.
Marian Moser Jones PhD, University of Maryland School of Public Health, College Park MD
Colleen Kelly, PACEM, Charlottesville VA
Co-presented with the History of the Health Sciences Lecture Series
13 February 2013
History of the Health Sciences Lecture
DEAFNESS AND COMMUNITY: REPRESENTATIONS OF CULTURAL
RESISTANCE
Christopher Krentz PhD, Department of English and American Sign Language Program, UVA
Rebecca Garden PhD, Center for Bioethics and Humanities, Upstate Medical University,
Syracuse NY
Co-presented with the History of the Health Sciences Lecture Series and the Department of English, UVA
11 September 2013
A John F. Anderson Memorial Lecture
CREATING HEALTHY COMMUNITIES
Cynthia C. Romero MD, Commissioner, Virginia Department of Health, Richmond VA
Co-presented with the Generalist Scholars Program and the Department of Public Health Sciences, UVA
School of Medicine, in observance at UVA of Primary Care Week
16 October 2013
A John F. Anderson Memorial Lecture
IN THE NAME OF PAIN: PAIN AND THE STIGMA OF DISABILITY
Tobin Siebers PhD, Department of Literature, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor MI
Lois Shepherd JD, Center for Biomedical Ethics and Humanities and School of Law, UVA
David B. Morris PhD, University Professor emeritus, Charlottesville VA
Co-presented with the Institute for Practical Ethics and Public Life, UVA
12 February 2014
A John F. Anderson Memorial Lecture
TAKING GOOD CARE OF OUR LGBT ELDERS
Nancy Knauer JD, I. Beasley School of Law, Temple University, Philadelphia PA
Chadrick Lane, SMD14, UVA
Co-presented with qMD
12 November 2014
A John F. Anderson Memorial Lecture
TAKING GOOD CARE OF TRANSGENDER TEENS
Christine Burt Solorzano MD, Department of Pediatrics, UVA
Nancy McLaren MD, Department of Pediatrics, UVA
Brock Libby MD, Department of Pediatrics, UVA
Co-presented with the Department of Pediatrics and QMD
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The Medical Center Hour (Medicine and Society in Conversation)