Communications Studies C-ID Descriptors
Proposed C-ID Number: COMM- 110 Suffix:
Title: Public Speaking
Discipline: Communication Studies Date Posted: 11/17/2009
Review Period Ends: 05/17/2011
General Course Description:
Theory and techniques of public speaking in democratic society. Discovery, development, and criticism of ideas
in public discourse through research, reasoning, organization, composition, presentation, and evaluation of
various types of speeches including informative and persuasive speeches.
Any rationale or comment:
Prerequisite(s):
None Specified
Advisories/Recommendations:
None Specified
Course Content:
1.
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3.
4.
5.
6.
Principles of human communication
Theory and techniques of public speaking in society
Critical analysis of public discourse
Types of public speaking
Listening skills
Elements of effective public speaking, including analysis of communication situation, ethics and
diversity, audience, occasion, purpose, selection of subject matter, research, evidence evaluation,
organization, presentation skills, and evaluation of communication effectiveness
Laboratory Activities (if applicable):
(none)
Course Objectives:
Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:
1. Explain the basic principles of human communication;
2. Analyze their communication situation, audience, occasion, and purpose; and selection of subject
matter;
3. Formulate through research, analysis, and organization of material; presentation of the message; and
evaluation of the effectiveness of their communication;
4. Demonstrate that they are careful and critical thinkers and communicators, both as speakers and as
listeners;
5. Explain their relationship and ethical responsibilities to others involved in the communication
transaction.
Methods of Evaluation:
Speech presentations in front of a live audience; speech outlines and bibliographies; critiques of speeches;
quizzes and tests.
Sample Textbooks or Other Support Materials:
Kearney, P. Public Speaking in a Diverse Society. (latest edition). McGraw-Hill
Lucas, S. The Art of Public Speaking. (latest edition). McGraw-Hill.
O’Hair, D. A Pocket Guide to Public Speaking. (latest edition). Bedford/St. Martin’s
Weaver, C. Essentials of Public Speaking. (latest edition). Thomson
Proposed C-ID Number: COMM- 120 Suffix:
Title: Argumentation or Argumentation and Debate
Discipline: Communication Studies Date Posted: 11/17/2009
Review Period Ends: 05/17/2011
General Course Description:
Methods of critical inquiry and advocacy. Identifying fallacies in reasoning and language, testing evidence and
evidence sources, advancing a reasoned position, and defending and refuting arguments. Analysis, presentation,
and evaluation of oral and written arguments.
Any rationale or comment:
Prerequisite(s):
None Specified
Advisories/Recommendations:
(none)
Course Content:
1.
2.
3.
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6.
Methods of critical inquiry, reasoning, and
Advocacy and argumentation techniques
Logical fallacies
Research skills, analysis and evaluation of evidence and sources
Critical analysis of discourse
Analysis, presentation, and evaluation of oral and written arguments
Laboratory Activities (if applicable):
(none)
Course Objectives:
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6.
Learn to critically evaluate reasoning and evidence.
Develop an understanding of the reasoning process and skill in utilizing various methods of reasoning.
Learn how to analyze, advocate, and criticize ideas, especially through the process of debate.
Learn to recognize fallacies of reasoning.
Develop research skills.
Foster the use of critical thinking skills in oral and written communication.
Methods of Evaluation:
Oral presentation of arguments; examinations; evaluation of the oral arguments of others; written analysis of
reasoning and arguments; use of appropriate evidence from research.
Sample Textbooks or Other Support Materials:
Rybacki, D. & Rybacki, K. Advocacy and Opposition. (latest edition). Allyn & Bacon.
Crossman, M. Burden of Proof: An Introduction to Argumentation and Guide to
Parliamentary Debate. (latest edition). Custom Publishing.
Proposed C-ID Number: COMM- 160 Suffix: B
Title: Forensics (Speech & Debate)
Discipline: Communication Studies Date Posted: 03/24/2009
Review Period Ends: 05/31/2011
General Course Description:
Preparation, including research and writing; practice; and participation in intercollegiate speech and debate
tournaments and/or community events.
Any rationale or comment:
The course is both lecture and lab.
Prerequisite(s):
(none)
Advisories/Recommendations:
(none)
Course Content:
1. Overview of forensics (debate formats; platform; limited preparation; oral interpretation; readers’
theater) and/or community events
2. The application of theory and principles of communication to forensics and/or community events
3. Information Competency as it pertains to the research, analysis and writing for at least one event
4. Practicing advocacy and presentational skills for at least one event
5. Participation in at least one competitive forensics and/or community event
6. Ethics and etiquette for event participation
Laboratory Activities (if applicable):
1. The application of Information Competency as it pertains to preparing for event participation
2. Practicing under the guidance of coaches and with peers in preparation for competitive forensics and/or
community events
3. Participation in competitive forensics and/or community events
4. Post-event participation evaluation and self-reflection under the guidance of coaches and peers
Course Objectives:
1. Distinguish major types of competitive speeches.
2. Employ the tools of Information Competency including but not limited to logical thinking, effective
advocacy, appropriate use of forms of support, and critical deliberation for event preparation.
3. Exhibit the ability to write for the ear in addition to writing for the eye.
4. Integrate coach, peer, and self-critique for the purpose of speech and delivery improvements.
5. Increase speaking effectiveness and confidence by managing communication apprehension.
6. Demonstrate improvement in delivery skills
7. Foster personal growth as a result of the competitive forensics experience.
Methods of Evaluation:
Class and laboratory participation.
Written assignments.
Participation in forensics tournaments and/or community events.
Sample Textbooks or Other Support Materials:
The nature of this class allows for the use of a variety of materials identified by the instructor such as: Current
Event Publications, Sample Speeches, Instructor-Created Resources.
Proposed C-ID Number: COMM- 170 Suffix:
Title: Oral Interpretation of Literature
Discipline: Communication Studies Date Posted: 03/24/2009
Review Period Ends: 05/31/2011
General Course Description:
Introduction to performance studies; analysis, appreciation, and application of theories of interpretive
performance of various forms of literature including poetry, prose, and drama (plays, scripts and screenplays).
Any rationale or comment:
Prerequisite(s):
(none)
Advisories/Recommendations:
(none)
Course Content:
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9.
Nature, importance and ethics of oral interpretation
Distinctions among reading, speaking, acting and interpretation
Structure of dramatic action
Methods of literary selection, analysis and cutting/editing
Nature of and distinction between interpretation of prose, poetry and drama
Verbal and nonverbal elements of performance
Analysis of audience
Performance of literature
Critical listening and analysis of performance
Laboratory Activities (if applicable):
(none)
Course Objectives:
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Demonstrate knowledge of what constitutes good literature.
Distinguish between the various forms of literature
Analyze and critique literature for the purpose of interpretation.
Research and construct individual and/or group oral presentations for various audiences.
Edit literature using techniques that focus on unity of time, place, action, mood and character
Perform a variety of verbal and nonverbal skills to bring the literature to life and heighten the
effectiveness of the performer's message
Methods of Evaluation:
Evaluation of performances, written work, and peer performances
Examinations
Participation in class activities
Sample Textbooks or Other Support Materials:
Latest versions of
Lewis, Todd V.. Communicating Literature: An Introduction to Oral Interpretation. 4 ed. any:Kendall Hunt
Publishing Company, 2008.
Yordon, Judy E.. Roles in Interpretation. 5 ed. any: McGraw Hill, 2002.
Gura, T. & Lee, C. Oral Interpretation. 11th or 12th edition. Houghton-Mifflin
Proposed C-ID Number: COMM- 180 Suffix:
Title: Introduction to Communication Studies or Introduction to Communication Theory
Discipline: Communication Studies Date Posted: 03/24/2009
Review Period Ends: 05/31/2011
General Course Description:
A survey of the discipline of communication studies with emphasis on multiple epistemological, theoretical, and
methodological issues relevant to the systematic inquiry and pursuit of knowledge about human
communication. This course explores the basic history, assumptions, principles, processes, variables, methods,
and specializations of human communication as an academic field of study.
Any rationale or comment:
Prerequisite(s):
(none)
Advisories/Recommendations:
(none)
Course Content:
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Foundations – Definitions and Context
History of Communication Study
Verbal and Nonverbal Communication
Basic Communication Theory
Basic Communication Research Methods
Specializations May Include:
a. Rhetoric
b. Forensics
c. Argumentation
d. Persuasion
e. Public Communication
f. Mass Communication
g. Interpersonal Communication
h. Group Communication
i. Intercultural Communication
j. Gender Communication
k. Organizational Communication
l. Oral Interpretation/Performance Studies
m. Communication Ethics
n. Emerging Specializations
1. Health Communication
2. New Technologies
3. Computer Mediated Communication
Laboratory Activities (if applicable):
(none)
Course Objectives:
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Explain and apply the basic concepts of the field of communication.
Discuss the history of the study of human communication.
Critically discuss and write about human communication theories and events.
Compare and contrast the basic research methods for the evaluation of human communication
phenomena.
Explain the contextual, cultural, and social foundations of human communication.
Demonstrate a basic knowledge of the specializations comprising the communication discipline.
Demonstrate an understanding of ethical perspectives in communication.
Summarize and explain an expanded world perspective that demonstrates an appreciation of the diverse
range of individuals, communities, and viewpoints.
Methods of Evaluation:
Quizzes and examinations, projects, oral and written assignments, class participation, and other outside
assignments.
Sample Textbooks or Other Support Materials:
Sarah Trenholm, Thinking Through Communication (latest edition).
Boston: Pearson/AB, 2008.
Julia Wood, Communication Mosaics (latest edition), Wadsworth.
Tubbs and Moss, Human Communication, Principles and Contexts (latest edition). McGraw-Hill.
Bourhis, J. Adams, C., Titsworth, S. & Hunter, L. Style Manual for Communication Studies. (latest edition).
McGraw-Hill.
Dues, M. & Brown, M. (latest edition). Boxing Plato’s Shadow: The study of human communication. McGrawHill.
Griffin, M. (latest edition). A First Look at Communication Theory. McGraw-Hill Higher Education
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Communications Studies Descriptors