Teaching Resources for First settlers Unit
Anderson’s Bay Cemetery and community
The resources in this pack are for use in the Anderson’s Bay Cemetery and relate to first settlers in
the local community. Andersons Bay is a suburb of Dunedin.
Contents
Fact sheet: A History of the Anderson’s Bay Cemetery ………………………………………………..2
Fact Sheet: James Anderson First European Settler……………………………………………………3
Fact Sheet: Archibald MacDonald & Andrew Ross – ‘The Bay’s’ first schoolteachers…………..….4
Fact sheet: William Cutten – Big Landowner, businessman and politician…..……………………… 5
Student cards ………………………………………………………………………………………………. 6
Teacher notes about Student cards …………………………………………………………………….. 16
Maps of the Anderson’s Bay Cemetery ………………………………………………………….…23 - 24
First Settlers Study – Anderson’s Bay Cemetery
The Anderson’s Bay Cemetery
Fact Sheet – A brief history of the Anderson’s Bay Cemetery
The cemetery was first surveyed by Charles Kettle. The first recorded burial was
on the 1st May 1867 though it is likely there were earlier unrecorded burials as
Henry Duckworth (1923 p 31) mentions the burial of James Kelly aged 10 months
on 21st November 1857. He was buried amongst the flax bushes with a post and
rail grave being put around the grave to keep off stray cattle.
In 1862 three acres was fenced and the ground cleared and burial sections laid
out ready for sale. In 1890 12 additional acres were secured alongside and then
in 1894 the remainder of the block was applied for making 60 acres altogether.
The first Sexton was Mr Campbell. He was succeeded by Mr Daniel Weir. A
management committee oversaw the cemetery. A plain hearse and set of harness
were obtained for subscriptions of £1.00 each. Non-subscribers paid a small sum
for the use of them and needed to supply their own horse and driver. (Duckworth
1923 p 31) In 1903 the managers called a public meeting with a proposal to hand
over the cemetery to the Dunedin Corporation which had agreed to bring the
electric train up to Samuels Store near the junction of Tomahawk and Highcliff
Roads. The trams were never to come to the cemetery gates. Cemetery became
almost the only operating cemetery from about the time of the First World War. A
crematorium was built, with the first cremation occurring in 1927. All the plots in
the burial section were sold by April 1978, although some sections were being
sold for returned servicemen beyond that date. Ashes beams are still being
created.
From Duckworth H. (1923). Anderson’s Bay in the Early Days. Dunedin. Otago Heritage Books 1982. Also previously published by
Coulls Somerville Wilkie 1923 from the type used in the Otago Daily Times and titled Early Otago: History of Anderson’s Bay from 1844
to December 1921 and Tomahawk from 1857 to March 1923
First Settlers Study – Early Identities not buried in the Anderson’s Bay Cemetery
Fact Sheet – James Anderson first European Settler
Anderson’s Bay was named after the first European settlers to
arrive there. They were James Anderson, his son John and John’s
wife Isabella. They arrived from Nelson on the 30th December
1844 having heard that a Scottish settlement was to be
established in the area. The settlement plans for Otago were
postponed however the trio built a ‘whare’ near the inlet close to
Ross’ corner – the junction of Somerville and Silverton Streets.
They lived there for two years and were able to ‘live well enough’
supplementing their flour supply with fish, pigs, and birds as well
as trading with Otakou and Waikouaiti Maori. John Anderson
joined Charles Kettle’s party in 1846 to assist with the first survey
The Anderson’s then left the inlet and settled in Pelichet Bay
on the other side of the harbour. John and Isabella were to
have their first son born there. He was the first European child
born in Dunedin.
John Anderson died in 1848, and was buried in the York Pace
Cemetery, Dunedin’s first cemetery. In 1880 the graves at the
cemetery were removed and the obelisk you see today was
erected. James Anderson’s name is one of those listed on the
plaques.
of Dunedin. (Duckworth p.10)
John and Isabella took up land in
South Otago. Their descendents did
return to Anderson’s Bay and there is
a memorial headstone that
commemorates the Anderson’s
in the Anderson’s Bay Cemetery.
First Settlers Study – Early Identities not buried in the Anderson’s Bay Cemetery
Fact Sheet – Archibald MacDonald & Andrew Russell - “The Bay’s first school-teachers
The settlers in Anderson’s Bay initially paid for the education
required for their children when no immediate assistance was
forthcoming from the education committee. Archibald
MacDonald had been a schoolmaster in Scotland. He came
to Dunedin as a passenger on the Philip Laing. He started the
primary school in Mr Duff’s house located at Ross’ Corner in
1851. He was the first private teacher in Anderson’s Bay. In
time, a second school was kept in Mr Law’s House, by Mr
William Somerville. (Duckworth, 1923). The tombstone
pictured here commemorates Mr Archibald MacDonald and
his family and is located in Dunedin’s Southern Cemetery in
Block 2P Plot 44.
Map shows location of the
MacDonald family grave in
Dunedin’s Southern Cemetery. It is
in the Anglican section of the
cemetery
Map portion of Dunedins Southern Cemetery sourced from Dunedin
City Council: Location of Dunedin’s cemeteries
http://www.dunedin.govt.nz/facilities/cemeteries/location-pdfs
Andrew Russell was the
first Education Board
school teacher to the
district (appointed in
1857). According to
Duckworth (p.16 ) he
was a very strict teacher
and did not “spare the
rod” on his pupils.
Andrew Russell
moved on and
taught
elsewhere in
Dunedin and even
in the Chatham
Islands. He died in
Melbourne. His
wife Elizabeth is
buried in the
Anderson’s Bay
Cemetery and he
is mentioned on
the memorial
located in
Block 6 Plot
18.
(Duckworth.
p16)
First Settlers Study – Early Identities not buried in the Anderson’s Bay Cemetery
Fact Sheet – William Cutten: Landowner, businessman and politician
William Cutten was 26 when he arrived in Dunedin on the John Wickliffe. He had accompanied Captain
William Cargill as a cabin passenger, becoming Cargill’s son in law when he married Cargill’s eldest
daughter, Christina in 1850.
He was an early Dunedin businessman and entrepreneur. He first set up in Dunedin as an auctioneer.
He was a talented writer. He was presented with the property and running of the Otago Witness
newspaper in October 1851. He set up the printing press in his auction rooms on the foreshore. Then
he and Julius Vogel launched the first daily
paper in New Zealand, the Otago Daily
Times, on 15 November 1861.
Map shows location of the
Cutten family grave in
Dunedin’s Northern Cemetery.
Also in 1861 he bought a property from
James Adam that included a farm that
extended almost to Lawyers Head and built
a large house called Belmont on the area
that was called Goat Hill (now called
Sunshine).
He became involved in local and national
politics and held several important offices in
his political career. He was also a member
of the University Council. Although a settler
in the Anderson’s Bay area he is buried in
Dunedin’s Northern Cemetery. His memorial
can be found in Block 3 Plot 7.
Map portion of Dunedin’s Southern Cemetery sourced from
Dunedin City Council: Location of Dunedin’s cemeteries
http://www.dunedin.govt.nz/facilities/cemeteries/location-pdfs
Student cards
The following pages are the templates for the student
cards. Print onto light card, cut out, and fold along each
card along the dotted line. Put in a box and take to the
cemetery. Student groups “dig” for a grave, which will be
their ’first settler’ family to investigate.
There are 18 families available for investigation. There are
12 families from the first ships and 6 families of later
identities. Choose the number of cards you think your
class can manage.
At the Anderson’s Bay Cemetery – First settlers from first ships
Student work cards – Cut out fold in half and give one to each group
Block 1 Plot 16 (Duckworth)
Block 1 Plot 34 (Begg)
Fold
2
1
Fold
At the Anderson’s Bay Cemetery – First settlers from first ships
Student work cards – Cut out fold in half and give one to each group
Block 11 Plot 15 (Grainger)
Block 12 Plot 17 (Brown)
Fold
3
4
Fold
At the Anderson’s Bay Cemetery – First settlers from first ships
Student work cards – Cut out fold in half and give one to each group
Block 1 Plot 23
(Sanderson)
Block 14 Plot 22 (Robertson)
Fold
6
5
Fold
At the Anderson’s Bay Cemetery – First settlers from first ships
Student work cards – Cut out fold in half and give one to each group
Block 1 Plot 27 (Somerville)
Block 7 Plot 13 (Somerville)
Fold
8
7
Fold
At the Anderson’s Bay Cemetery – First settlers from first ships
Student work cards – Cut out fold in half and give one to each group
Block 1 Plot 40 (Weir)
Block 1 Plot 43 (Weir)
Fold
10
9
Fold
At the Anderson’s Bay Cemetery – First settlers from first ships
Student work cards – Cut out fold in half and give one to each group
Block 105 Plot 63 (Anderson)
Block 4 Plot 31 (Patrick)
Fold
12
11
Fold
At the Anderson’s Bay Cemetery – Later settlers to Anderson’s Bay
Student work cards – Cut out fold in half and give one to each group
Block 4 Plot 37 & 39 (Every)
Block 7 Plot 22 (Jeffery)
Fold
14
13
Fold
At the Anderson’s Bay Cemetery – Later Settlers to Anderson’s Bay
Student work cards – Cut out fold in half and give one to each group
Block 11 Plot 26 (Ross)
Block 11 Plot 53 (Smaill)
Fold
16
15
Fold
At the Anderson’s Bay Cemetery – Later Settlers to Anderson’s Bay
Student work cards – Cut out fold in half and give one to each group
Block 11 Plot 26 (Russell)
Block 11 Plot 53 (Samuel)
Fold
18
17
Fold
Brief Notes for teachers on the Headstones
The following pages provide some brief notes for
teachers about the cemetery headstones that feature
on the cards issued to students. You may wish to use
a lesser number of headstones than are provided here.
There are 12 families who arrived on the first ships
that left Britain before the end of 1850.
There are an additional 6 families who arrived in the
district a little later who in various was left their mark
on the community. Two of these, Andrew L Russell
and James Jeffrey were teachers and headmasters of
Anderson’s Bay School. Andrew L Russell was the
first Education Board appointed teacher in 1847.
At the Anderson’s Bay Cemetery – First settlers from first ships (12 families)
Brief notes for teachers about cemetery headstones for study
Block 1 Plot 16
1
2 1 Plot 34
Block
This tombstone commemorates
Robert and Margaret
Duckworth and their son Henry.
This tombstone commemorates
Adam and Isabella Begg and
their son Charles.
Robert and Margaret Duckworth
emigrated from Scotland and
arrived with four children on the
Mary in April 1849. Henry
Duckworth was born in Dunedin
but spent his life in Anderson’s
Bay.
Adam and Isabella Begg
emigrated from Scotland and
arrived with four children on the
Blundell in September 1848.
4
3
Block 11 Plot 15
This tombstone commemorates
Thomas and Margaret Grainger who
emigrated from Scotland. They in
arrived in Dunedin on the Larkins in
September 1849.
There is also James Elder
Brown who settled in
Anderson’s Bay. He
arrived on the Ajax in
1849 and is mentioned by
Henry Duckworth. He
cannot be located in the
Anderson’s Bay
Cemetery with any
certainty.
Block 11 Plot 15
This nameplate commemorates James
and Hannah Brown who emigrated
from Scotland. They in arrived in
Dunedin with one child on the Philip
Laing in April 1848.
The headstone is a surname only. The
students who investigate this family will
need to use the Cemeteries database
for information.
At the Anderson’s Bay Cemetery – First settlers from first ships (12 families)
Brief notes for teachers about cemetery headstones for study
5
Block 14 Plot 22
6
This tombstone commemorates Thomas Robertson.
He in arrived in Dunedin with his second wife
Elizabeth and six children (5 to his first wife) on the
Philip Laing in April 1848.
Block 1 Plot 22 and 23
This tombstone commemorates
William and Helen Sanderson.
William and Helen Sanderson
emigrated from Scotland on the
Cornwall arriving in September
1849.
Elizabeth Robertson died in April 1865. Thomas
Robertson married Margaret Napier in October
1865.
Block 17Plot 27
This tombstone commemorates John
and Janet Somerville who emigrated
from Scotland.
They in arrived in Port Chalmers on the
Blundell in September 1848 with their
nine children.
8
Block 7 Plot 13
This tombstone commemorates William
Somerville who emigrated from Scotland
with his parents Janet and John. He left
Scotland when he was 15 years of age.
At the Anderson’s Bay Cemetery – First settlers from first ships (12 families)
Brief notes for teachers about cemetery headstones for study
9
Block 1 Plot 40
This tombstone commemorates Daniel and
Catherine Weir who emigrated from Scotland
with 3 children.
They arrived on the Blundell in September
1848.
11
10
Block 1 Plot 43
This tombstone
commemorates Cochrane and
Alison Weir.
Cochrane Weir emigrated from
Scotland on the Blundell with his
parents Daniel and Catherine
arriving in September 1849. He
was aged six when he left
Scotland.
Block 105 Plot 63
This tombstone commemorates
John and Isabella Anderson,
first settlers at Anderson’s Bay.
John and Isabella left the
Andersons Bay area and are
buried elsewhere. This stone
has been erected by their
children who are buried here
and who have included their
parents’ names on this
memorial.
12
Block 4 Plot 31
This stone commemorates James
and Isabella Patrick who emigrated
from Scotland aboard the Philip Laing.
James and Isabella were the first
settlers at Tomahawk.
At the Anderson’s Bay Cemetery – Later settlers to Anderson’s Bay (6 families)
Brief notes for teachers about cemetery headstones for study
13
Block 4 Plot 39
Block 7
14
This tombstone commemorates Simon
Frederick Every and his wife Mary who
arrived in New Zealand about 1858.
Simon originated from England, and was
the fourth son of an English Baronet.
15
Block 11 Plot 26
This tombstone commemorates
Hugh Ross and his wife Margaret
and family. He arrived in Dunedin
about 1863 and was a long term
resident of Anderson’s Bay.
Plot 22
This tombstone
commemorates James Jeffery
and his wife Annie. James
Jeffery was born in Victoria
Australia and was a long-term
principal of the Andersons Bay
School.
16
Block 11 Plot 53
This tombstone
commemorates Charles Smaill
and his wife Isabella as well as a
daughter and a son.
The Smaill family settled at
Tomahawk soon after the Patrick
Family settled there.
At the Anderson’s Bay Cemetery – Later settlers to Anderson’s Bay (6 families)
Brief notes for teachers about cemetery headstones for study
Block 6 Plot 18
17
This tombstone commemorates Andrew
L Russell and his wife Elizabeth who
arrived in New Zealand about 1857 from
Scotland. Andrew Russell was the first
education board appointed schoolteacher
to the school in 1857.
Note this Andrew Russell was the second
schoolteacher by this name to come to
Dunedin in the early days. The first
Andrew Russell arrived on the Lady
Nugent and opened an academy for boys
in North East Valley.
18
Block 6 Plot 26
This tombstone commemorates
James and Mary Samuel who
arrived in Dunedin aboard the
Pladda on the 18th August 1860.
They were also long tern
residents of the Anderson’s Bay
community.
Cemetery Maps
The following pages provide maps of the Andersons
Bay cemetery.
The first is a large overall map of the cemetery.
The second is a map detail showing the historic area of
the cemetery. The only memorial that students will
need to visit outside of the compact historic area
located by the bus shelter on Tomahawk Road is the
Anderson Family Memorial commemorating the Bay’s
first settlers, John and Isabella Anderson.
Both maps show Block numbers only. Students will
have to look carefully for the headstones by shape and
by inscription.
Anderson’s Bay Cemetery Tomahawk Road Dunedin.
Map of Dunedin’s Andersons Bay Cemetery sourced from :
http://www.dunedin.govt.nz/__data/assets/pdf_file/0020/25454/cemplot_andybay1photo.pdf
Detailed Map of Historic Area Anderson’s Bay Cemetery
Map showing the location of the blocks in the cemetery
1
1
N
Bus shelter
20
Location of all headstones
except for the Anderson plot
in Block 105
Map of Dunedin’s Andersons Bay Cemetery sourced from :
http://www.dunedin.govt.nz/__data/assets/pdf_file/0020/25454/cemplot_andybay1photo.pdf
Block location shape and number. Blocks are labelled on
the ends of blocks
Sealed roads
Download

Resources - Historic Cemeteries Conservation Trust of New