Workshop Safety
Guide
All guides are intended to give further details to information contained in a particular piece of legislation, policy,
code, agreement or procedure and must therefore be read in conjunction with them.
INTRODUCTION
This Workshop Safety Guide is provided to assist staff working in such areas, to meet the requirements of
the NT Workplace Health & Safety (National Uniform Legislation) Act 2011 and Regulations and the CDU
Work Health & Safety (WHS) Policy.
PURPOSE
The purpose of this document is to assist University employees and the users of workshop facilities to
eliminate or minimise risks to health and safety of individual/persons working within a workshop.
It is to be used in addition to, and not as a substitute for, general safety principles applicable to all types of
workshops, eg. fire precautions, correct use of personal protective equipment (PPE), hygiene standards, risk
management, workshop noise and hazardous manual tasks.
Workshop Safety Guide
Contact Officer: WHS Consultant
Version 1
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1.
Abbreviations................................................................................................................................... 2
2.
Relevant Definitions ........................................................................................................................ 2
3.
Health and Safety Responsibilities ................................................................................................. 3
3.1
How to manage work health and safety risks ......................................................................... 3
3.2
Duty of Care ............................................................................................................................ 3
4.
General Workshop Management .................................................................................................... 4
5.
Induction, information, training and supervision .............................................................................. 4
6.
First Aid ........................................................................................................................................... 4
7.
Person Protective Equipment (PPE) ............................................................................................... 5
8.
Chemical Management ................................................................................................................... 5
9.
Noise ............................................................................................................................................... 5
10.
Hazardous manual tasks............................................................................................................. 6
11.
General electrical safety in workplaces ....................................................................................... 6
12.
Plant and structures .................................................................................................................... 6
13.
Signage and placarding .............................................................................................................. 8
14.
Essential Supporting Information ................................................................................................ 8
1. Abbreviations
AS/NZS
CDU
dB (A)
ECO
NUL
PCBU
PPE
SDS
SOP
WHS
Australian/New Zealand Standard
Charles Darwin University
decibel at weighted
Emergency Control Organisation
National Uniform Legislation
Persons Conducting a Business or Undertaking
Personal Protective Equipment
Safety Data Sheet
Safe Operating Procedure
Work Health and Safety
2. Relevant Definitions
In the context of this document:
Authorised Person means a person who has permission, qualified, licensed or competent for the
task at hand.
Chemical is defined as any element, chemical compound or mixture of elements and/or compounds
where chemical(s) are distributed. Chemicals may be in solid, liquid, gas or plasma.
Hazard means a situation or thing that has the potential to harm people, property or the environment.
Hazardous chemicals are pure chemicals, or chemical mixtures that present an immediate or long
term risk of injury or illness. The risk can be associated with health hazards or physiochemical
hazards (e.g. flammable, corrosive, reactive, radioactive etc.). A hazardous substance can also be a
dangerous good and/or a drug, poison or controlled substance.
PCBU is the legal entity operating a business or undertaking. A PCBU may be an individual person or
an organisation conducting a business or undertaking. It is not an individual, unless they are
conducting the business in their own name as a sole trader or partner. Persons engaged solely as a
worker or officer of the business or undertaking are excluded from the definition of PCBU.
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Plant relates to and includes any machinery, equipment, appliance, container, implement or tool,
including any component or anything fitted or connected to any of those items. Plant includes items as
diverse as hoists, cranes, computers, machinery, vehicles, power tools, etc. (as per Code of Practice
– Managing risks of plant in the workplace).
Risk is the possibility that death, injury or illness might occur when exposed to a hazard.
Safety Data Sheet (SDS) is a document prepared by the vendor (manufacturer/importer/supplier) of a
chemical which describes uses, chemical and physical properties, health hazard information,
precautions for use, safe handling and emergency information. It is a legislative requirement for the
vendor to supply a copy of the SDS for each chemical to the end user.
Worker means any person carries out work in any capacity for the University, including but not limited to,
University’s staff member, contractor, subcontractor and their employee, apprentice or trainee, student
gaining work experience, and volunteer;
Workplace means a place where work is carried out for the University and includes any place where a
worker goes, or is likely to be, while at work. This may include, but is not limited to, laboratories,
workshops, training rooms, on-site recreational facilities, vehicles or vessels, on field trips, in teaching
facilities, in offices, in rural environments and any area of industry operations.
3. Health and Safety Responsibilities
3.1
How to manage work health and safety risks
It is the responsibility of all workers to identify any hazards and ensure they are reported to
supervisors or management so that effective controls can be implemented. Employees are
encouraged to attend WHS Risk Management Training and to read the CDU Risk Management
Policy. http://www.cdu.edu.au/governance/policies/pol-036.pdf
This document will provide information relating to:
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3.2
Duty of Care
Duty to identify hazards
Managing risks to health and safety
Hierarchy of control measures
Maintenance of control measures
Review of control measures
Duty of Care
Primary duty of care – Persons conducting a business or undertaking (PCBU) must ensure, so far
as reasonably practicable the health and safety of all persons engaged or influenced by the persons
activities, by eliminating or minimising the exposure to hazards and risks.
Workers and others – while at work, a worker must take reasonable care for their own health and
safety whilst also taking all reasonable measures to ensure that their acts or omissions do not
adversely affect the health and safety of other persons. The worker must comply and cooperate with
any reasonable policy or procedure relating to health or safety at the workplace.
Work Health and Safety Policy http://www.cdu.edu.au/governance/policies/pol-044.pdf
Risk management is about exercising responsibility to ensure workers and the public are properly
protected. The Risk Assessment Form allows you to identify the hazard, then identify and control
the associated risk.
Risk Assessment Form
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4. General Workshop Management
The following principals apply to all individuals working within University workshops:

Keep the workshop clean, organised and tidy at all times.

Report all hazards, unsafe conditions and work practices to the workshop supervisor.

The last person leaving the workshop at any time must ensure that the workshop is
locked to prevent unauthorized entry. No staff member or other unauthorized persons
are to enter the workshops out of hours, unless access has been approved by the
relevant Supervisor, and Security is advised of the out of hours work.
Emergency Management Plan
CDU has an Emergency Management Plan in place to ensure the safety of the University community
http://www.cdu.edu.au/governance/Plans/emergencymanagementplan.pdf. The plan provides the
framework for the effective response to emergencies and/or disasters, and management of the return to
normality.
As a result, Team Leaders, Building Wardens, Wardens should ensure:

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That an Evacuation Diagram/s for the building is displayed in a prominent position/s
throughout the building.
Ensure a level of preparedness within the building by having a sufficient number of Wardens
(ECO members).
Participate in Emergency Evacuation Exercise training and drills
Develop an area specific “Action Plan” relevant to the risks, taking into account assistance to
mobility impaired, students and visitors.
Ensure clear access and egress to emergency exits at all times
5. Induction, information, training and supervision
For the application of safe practices involved in workshop activities, Supervisors, workers and others
should be formally trained and have the required knowledge and authorisation to use the workshop
machinery. This is particularly important for new employees or inexperienced people.
Information, training and instructions provided, must be suitable and relevant to the nature of the work
carried out by the worker, and the nature of risks and control measures associated with the work.
Information or instructions should be delivered in a way that is readily understandable by any person to
whom it is provided.
Induction, training and instruction should include:
•
workshop safety procedures
•
emergency procedures and location of emergency equipment
•
correct and safe operating of machinery
•
risk management
•
wearing and care of PPE
•
good housekeeping
•
other statutory requirements
6. First Aid
All workshops are to have appropriate first aid equipment available and accessible during the hours of
operation. The number of first aid kits and their content is to be based on a risk assessment of the
workshop activities, and will be maintained by the designated First Aid Officer.
Further information can be obtained from:
First Aid Procedures http://www.cdu.edu.au/governance/procedures/pro-018.pdf
Workshop Safety Guide
Contact Officer: WHS Consultant
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First Person on Scene (Accident /Incident) Procedure
http://www.cdu.edu.au/governance/procedures/pro-019.pdf
Code of Practice – First Aid in the Workplace.
As part of a person’s induction to the workshop they should be advised of:
 The location of the First Aid equipment.
 The designated First Aid Officers
Where fixed or portable eye wash and shower equipment is provided, it is to be serviced and
maintained in accordance with AS 4775.2007 – Emergency eyewash and shower equipment.
7. Person Protective Equipment (PPE)
The use of personal protective equipment should only be considered when there are no other practical
control measures available (as a last resort).
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Normally PPE is used in combination with other control measures to provide the best solution.
PPE may be used as an interim measure until a more effective way of controlling the risk can be
established.
When PPE is used, ensure the PPE is appropriate for the task and that it is clean and in good
repair before and after use.
8. Chemical Management
Classification of hazardous substances is based upon identifying and evaluating the physical properties
of the chemical, along with its health effects. It is the classification which determines what information is
communicated through SDSs and labels, on how it should be used, storage, transported and other
relevant advice.
Workshops should ensure:
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Safety Data Sheets (SDS) are available and displayed in a prominent location/s
Recorded hazardous substance inventory is available
Suitable and appropriate storage cabinets
Appropriate containers are used and correctly labelled
Appropriate spill kits are available and maintained
Adequate ventilation/extractor systems are available and used
Correct signage and placarding
For further information, employees should refer to the CDU Guide to Chemical Management (under
review) which addresses the use, handling and storage of hazardous substances at the workplace.
9. Noise
Exposure to noise, vibration and certain substances can either cause gradual hearing loss over a period
of time or a noise can be so loud that it causes immediate hearing loss. High noise levels can destroy
the ability to hear clearly and can also make it more difficult to hear sounds necessary for working
safely, such as instructions and warning signals. Preventative measures may include:

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Identify sources of noise, vibration or substances that may cause or contribute to hearing loss
Minimise periods of exposure to noise levels exceeding 85dB(A) or impact noise exceeding
140dB(C)
Using correct PPE (hearing protectors) to reduce impact of sharp, sudden and continuous
noises, especially those exceeding 85dB(A) and 140dB(C).
Eliminate or isolate activities and machinery associated to high noise outputs if possible
Workshop Safety Guide
Contact Officer: WHS Consultant
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10.
Hazardous manual tasks
A hazardous manual task, as defined in the WHS Regulations, means a task that requires a person to
lift, lower, push, pull, carry or otherwise move, hold or restrain any person, animal or thing involving
one or more of the following:
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Repetitive or sustained force
High or sudden force
Repetitive movement
Sustained or awkward posture
Exposure to vibration
Workshop design and layout, correct working positions and techniques, and mechanical aids should be
considered to eliminate or minimise risks (conduct a risk assessment) prior to performing manual
hazardous tasks.
11.
General electrical safety in workplaces
All equipment must comply with the relevant requirements of AS 60204.1-2005 - Safety of machinery.
Staff should implement a safe system of work to deal with potentially unsafe electrical equipment at the
workplace. Workers should:

Undertake a check of the physical condition of the electrical equipment, including lead and plug
connections prior to use
Do not use electrical equipment if in doubt of its safety.
If taking a piece of electrical equipment out of service due to damage, defects or safety
concerns, tag the item with the appropriate signage and notify the Supervisor so that it is
reported, documented, serviced or decommissioned.
Testing and tagging of electrical equipment within the workshop should be conducted at regular
intervals in accordance with AS/NZS 3760:2010. Electrical equipment Class I (protectively
earthed) shall be checked by a qualified electrician at 6 monthly intervals and Class II (double
insulated inspection only) on a yearly basis.
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12.
Plant and structures
Only trained, competent and authorised personnel shall operate the workshop machinery, and each
tradesperson is to be familiar with the use of tools specific to their trade. Staff members are not to use
tools other than those provided by Charles Darwin University.
Workers must ensure that all tools and machines within the workshop are regularly inspected and in
good working order at all times.

Provision of safe plant - Purchasing and hiring plant
When considering change, relocation, hiring or provision of new machinery (refer to the
University Purchasing Procedures).

Machinery Installation
Machinery, plant and equipment should be inspected upon delivery by the Supervisor, to
ensure that the safety features comply with the standards and purpose of use.
Machinery should be installed by competent or qualified persons only.
Machinery, plant and equipment should be installed so as to ensure that sufficient space
is allowed during normal operation, adjustment or maintenance repairs.

Hazard identification, risk assessments and controls
The need for hazard identification and risk control has been discussed early in this document.
In regard to the use of machinery some examples are provided below:
Tie back long hair, roll up long sleeves and avoid loose-fitting clothes. Remove rings and
other jewellery that can be caught in moving parts
At all times seek instruction before using an unfamiliar piece of equipment.
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Read the manufacturer’s instruction manual or SOP carefully before operating any
machine for the first time.
Use tools and machines only for their intended purpose.
Do not distract the attention of the operator whilst they operating the equipment and
never indulge in ‘horseplay’.
Turn machine off if it produces an unfamiliar vibration or noise.
Ensure that lighting, extraction and ventilation is adequate.
Apply safe/standard working practices.
Consider the interaction between people and machine, taking into account possible
ergonomic factors in the hazard assessment.

High Risk Work (Licensing)
The licensing of workers ensures that high risk work is performed safely, reducing health and
safety risks to the workers and other persons in the workplace.
Workers should ensure their licence/s is current, valid and of the correct class type.
For further information refer to NT WorkSafe – Applicants Guide to High risk work licensing.

Guarding
Machine guards are fitted to protect both the operator and passing traffic. Each machine
should be inspected by the operator prior to commencement of work, to ensure that all guards
are fitted and correctly positioned.
Machine guards must be positioned as to assure the operator’s vision is not impeded or
obstructed during the operation of the machine.
Guards should be made of unperforated material but designed so as to allow access for
inspection and maintenance. They should not make the operation of the machine more
difficult.
Start-stop controls of the push button type are to be easily visible, readily accessible and
incorporating both no-volt and overload release. These should be readily and safely
accessible to the operator from the normal operating position.
Emergency stop buttons of the mushroom-head type should be installed at selected positions
throughout the workshop. They are to be prominent and suitably labelled, so that pressing
any one of the buttons will immediately operate the circuit breaker and disconnect the power
supply from the machines. A lock and key should be provided and be arranged that once
isolated, only authorized persons or contactor may reset the circuit breaker.
Guard also applies to inter locks where the machine cannot be started or operated unless the
guard is in position.
All machinery/equipment which has the potential to harm must be adequately guarded
according to AS 4024.1:2006.

Registered Plant
Certain items of plant and types of plant designs are required to be registered.
A list of such items can be found in Appendix A of the Code of Practice – Managing Risks of
Plant in the Workplace.

Maintenance and servicing
Team Leaders/ Supervisors should ensure that a program of regular inspections and
maintenance by an authorized person is in place and is carried out on all machines in
addition to routine daily surveillance.
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Contact Officer: WHS Consultant
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Plant should be isolated or shut down before maintenance, repair, cleaning and
modification commences. It is recommended that the relevant controls and facilities be
lockable and, as such, can only be operated by keys.
All forms of safeguards should be replaced prior to start-up of plant. ‘Tag’ and report all
damaged equipment to ensure it is not used until a qualified person has repaired it.
Use of lock out and tagging system during maintenance or adjustments to machines to
avoid accidental start up.
As a minimum, maintenance should be carried out at the level and frequency
documented in the servicing schedule by the manufacturers.

Record keeping
Records should be kept current and retained for the life of the plant. Records should
show date/s of purchase and servicing, service person and type of service conducted. If
plant is sold, copies of these records should form part of the sale. Records must be
accessible for examination if requested by an Inspector from the Work Health Authority.
For further information refer to relevant Code of Practice – Managing risks of plant in the
workplace or Australian Standards.
13.
Signage and placarding
Equipment, activities and materials of a hazardous nature should be identified with legible messages,
appropriate signage, labelling and placarding displayed in prominent locations to alert persons of the
dangers. Examples being:
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Mandatory signs – indicate that an instruction must be carried out (eg. Use of PPE)
Warning signs – warning of a non-life threatening hazard (eg. Flammable substance)
Prohibition signs - indicate restricted areas, actions or activities are not permitted.
Danger signs – warning of a particular hazard or hazardous condition that is likely to be life
threatening.
Display signs in locations to attract the attention of all concerned.
The signs should be placed as close as practicable to the observer’s line of sight and should be so
sighted in relation to the particular hazard as to allow the worker ample time, after first viewing the sign,
to heed the warning.
All persons (including visitors) must comply with the requirements of the workshop signage.
14.
Essential Supporting Information
CDU Policies, Guides or Procedures
Work Health and Safety Policy
Emergency Management Plan
Induction, information, training and supervision
Risk Assessment Form
Plant, Machinery and Equipment
Risk Management Policy
First Aid Procedures http://www.cdu.edu.au/governance/procedures/pro-018.pdf
First Person on Scene (Accident /Incident) Procedure http://www.cdu.edu.au/governance/procedures/pro019.pdf
Gas Cylinders
Hazardous Chemicals
Hazardous Manual Tasks
Induction, information, training and supervision
Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) Guide
Plant, Machinery and Equipment
Safety Signage Guide
Safe Work Procedures (SOPs)
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Smoke-free Policy http://www.cdu.edu.au/governance/policies/pol-038.pdf
Acts & Regulations
Work Health and Safety (National Uniform Legislation) Act 2011
Work Health and Safety (National Uniform Legislation) Regulations
Codes of Practice
How to Manage Work Health and Safety Risks
Hazardous manual tasks
Managing noise and preventing hearing loss at work
Managing the risks of falls at workplaces
Managing the Work Environment and Facilities
Australian and New Zealand Standards
•
AS1319.1994 – Safety signs for the occupational environment
•
AS/NZS 1680.2.3:2008 - Interior and workplace lighting – Specific applications –
Educational and training facilities
•
AS/NZS 1892.5:2000 – Portable ladders – Selection, safe use and care
•
AS 3190:2011 – Approval and test Specifications – Residual current devices (current operated earth-leakage devices)
•
AS 3760:2010 – In-service safety inspection and testing of electrical equipment.
•
AS 4024.1:2006 – Safeguarding of Machinery
•
AS 4775.2007 - Emergency Eyewash and shower equipment
•
AS 4839.2001 – The safe use of portable and mobile oxy-fuel gas systems for welding,
cutting, heating and allied process
•
AS/NZS 31000.2009 – Risk Management – Principals and guidelines
Document History and Version Control
Version
Date Approved
Approved by
Brief Description
1
14/07/2014
WHS Manager
Created document
Workshop Safety Guide
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Workshop Safety Guide - Charles Darwin University