Translating the NGSS for Classroom Instruction and the Common Core Standards (CCSS)
Unit Lesson or Title
Finding Solutions to Food Waste: Persuasion in a Digital World
Age/Grade/Subject
Grade 7; Language Arts, Math, Technology and Science
NGSS Performance
Expectations
MS-LS2-5. Evaluate competing design solutions for maintaining biodiversity and ecosystem services.*
Clarification: Examples of ecosystem services could include water purification, nutrient recycling, and
prevention of soil erosion. Examples of design solution constraints could include scientific, economic, and
social considerations.
Common Core State
Standards Connections
ELA/Literacy –
RST.6-8.8 Distinguish among facts, reasoned judgment based on research findings, and speculation in a text.
(MS-LS2-5)
RI.8.8 Trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is sound
and the evidence is relevant and sufficient to support the claims. (MS-LS2-5)
WHST.6-8.2 Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and
information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content. (MS-LS2-2)
WHST.6-8.9 Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.
(MS-LS2-2)
SL.8.1 Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with
diverse partners on grade 8 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.
(MS-LS2-2)
Lesson length:
Background
Information:
Mathematics –
MP.4 Model with mathematics. (MS-LS2-5)
6.RP.A.3 Use ratio and rate reasoning to solve real-world and mathematical problems. (MS-LS2-5)
Three or more 45-minute sessions, at least several with internet access
Students explore the problem of food waste using electronic and traditional modalities. They begin by tracking
food waste in the school cafeteria. Then they examine the waste on a larger scale, using multimodal resources
and applying metacognitive reading strategies. Considering radical and basic solutions to the problem, students
plan persuasive arguments and create blog posts appropriate to their purpose and audience. By interacting
with videos, blogs, and online articles, students become more flexible and confident in this emerging area of
literacy, learning not only to access and analyze, but also to produce and publish persuasive text in a
1
multimodal environment. http://www.readwritethink.org/classroom-resources/lesson-plans/findingsolutions-food-waste-30950.html (Perdomo, 2014)
Disciplinary Core Ideas
LS2.C: Ecosystem Dynamics, Functioning, and Resilience
Biodiversity describes the variety of species found in Earth’s terrestrial and oceanic ecosystems. The
completeness or integrity of an ecosystem’s biodiversity is often used as a measure of its health. (MS-LS2-5)
LS4.D: Biodiversity and Humans
Changes in biodiversity can influence humans’ resources, such as food, energy, and medicines, as well as
ecosystem services that humans rely on—for example, water purification and recycling. (secondary to MS-LS25)
ETS1.B: Developing Possible Solutions
There are systematic processes for evaluating solutions with respect to how well they meet the criteria and
constraints of a problem. (secondary to MS-LS2-5)
Science and
Engineering Practice
Cross Cutting Concepts
Engaging in Argument from Evidence
Engaging in argument from evidence in 6–8 builds on K–5 experiences and progresses to constructing a
convincing argument that supports or refutes claims for either explanations or solutions about the natural
and designed world(s).
Evaluate competing design solutions based on jointly developed and agreed-upon design criteria. (MS-LS2-5)
Influence of Science, Engineering, and Technology on Society and the Natural World
The use of technologies and any limitations on their use are driven by individual or societal needs, desires, and
values; by the findings of scientific research; and by differences in such factors as climate, natural resources,
and economic conditions. Thus technology use varies from region to region and over time. (MSLS2-5)
Science Addresses Questions About the Natural and Material World
Scientific knowledge can describe the consequences of actions but does not
necessarily prescribe the decisions that society takes. (MS-LS2-5)
5E Stage
Science/Engineering
Practice or Crosscutting
What the Teacher Does…
What the Students Do….
What Are Students Learning?
What is the Evidence of
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Engage
Lesson 1: Engaging in
Argument from Evidence
Engaging in argument
from evidence in 6–8
builds on K–5 experiences
and progresses to
constructing a convincing
argument that supports or
refutes claims for either
explanations or solutions
about the natural
and designed world(s).
Evaluate competing
design solutions based on
jointly developed and
greed-upon design
criteria. (MS-LS2-5)
MP.4 Model with
mathematics. (MS-LS2-5)
6.RP.A.3 Use ratio and
rate reasoning to solve
real-world and
mathematical problems.
(MS-LS2-5)
Lesson 2:
RST.6-8.8 Distinguish
among facts, reasoned
judgment based on
research findings, and
speculation in a text. (MSLS2-5)
Lesson 1: Have students
to conduct a personal
survey of the amount of
food they throw away
each day at lunch using
the Cafeteria Waste
Activity Sheet
Lesson 1: Students will
conduct the survey; then
gather information in group
of three to five, placing in
their science logs. Students
will create a pie chart of the
ratios.
Place students in groups
of three to five.
Lesson 2: Students will take
notes in pairs on the art of
“Persuasive Writing”
Lesson 2: Teach
persuasion basics using
The Art of Persuasive
Writing PowerPoint
presentation, having
students take notes. [
This can be completed
independently for some
students].
Learning?
Building schemas between
prior knowledge and
experiences and new
knowledge.
Lesson 1 and 2: Chart with
ratios and percentages, surveys
and notes.
Students will discuss their
experiences with slides: 3-8.
On slide 16, students will
form think-pair-share groups
and share their personal
meaning of the vocabulary.
Stop frequently to allow
students to share their
own examples of
persuasive speech.
[Use the presentation
notes included at the
bottom of some of the
slides to guide your
discussion.]
3
Explore
Explain
SL.8.1 Engage effectively
in a range of collaborative
discussions (one-on-one,
in groups, and teacherled) with diverse partners
on grade 8 topics, texts,
and issues,
building on others’ ideas
and expressing their own
clearly. (MS-LS2-2)
Lessons 1 and 2 : ETS1.B:
Developing Possible
Solutions
There are systematic
processes for evaluating
solutions with respect to
how well they meet the
criteria and constraints of
a problem. (secondary to
MS-LS2-5)
Teacher will check on
prior knowledge of
vocabulary: persuasive
vocabulary like logos,
pathos, ethos, and
counterarguments.
Lesson 1: Every day for
five days, have each
group record their
wasted trash in their
science journals
Lesson 2: Help students
to perfect their thesis
statement on slide 13.
On slide 16, after the
think-pair-share groups,
the class will come to a
consensus of each word’s
meaning placing them on
the board or chart in
front .
Lesson 1: 6.RP.A.3 Use
Lesson 1: Teacher will list
ratio and rate reasoning to percentages on a chart at
solve real-world and
the front of the room as
mathematical problems.
well as ratios so students
(MS-LS2-5)
may refer to it as they
Lesson 1: After five days,
compile and analyze the
information they have
collected.
Lesson 2: Each student will
create a rough thesis
statement of his or her
choice using slide 13 in their
writing journals.
Lesson 1: Each group
determines the overall
percentage of food wasted
over the last five days.
Building connections between
prior knowledge and new
knowledge through the senses-kinesthetic (Using Gardnerlearning styles and metacognition—to build schemas).
Lesson 1: Science log
Lesson 2: Rough thesis in
journal and chart.
Students interact in a way that
supports conceptual
advancement and assimilation
of knowledge.
4
work.
Lesson 2: SL.8.1 Engage
effectively in a range of
collaborative discussions
(one-on-one, in groups,
and teacher-led) with
diverse partners on grade
8 topics, texts, and issues,
building on others’ ideas
and expressing their own
clearly. (MS-LS2-2)
Elaborate
Lesson 1: Evaluate
competing design
solutions based on jointly
developed and agreedupon design criteria. (MSLS2-5)
Lesson 2:
WHST.6-8.2 Write
informative/explanatory
texts to examine a topic
and convey ideas,
concepts, and information
through the selection,
organization, and analysis
of relevant content. (MSLS2-2)
Evaluate
Lesson 1 and 2: LS4.D:
Lesson 2: Slide 13: Have
students create an
arguable thesis
statement based on their
knowledge [this can be
changed later].
Slide 16: Teacher will
then show slides 17-21
and ask the students how
close the class’s
meanings were to the
slides?
Lesson 1: Teacher will
facilitate understanding
for each group by asking
the students to
summarize their findings.
Lesson 2: Class will
choose one student
thesis and develop it in
outline format: three
topics, a conclusion and
organization in an
argument.
Lesson 1: Have the class
Lesson 2: Students will
engage in a discussion over
their meaning; how word
meaning develops, and its
importance in an argument
(emotional words) and group
consensus.
Lesson 1: Each group will
synthesize their findings into
a pie chart that can be
displayed.
Lesson 2: Students will think
and elaborate on their thesis
statements with three
examples from prior
knowledge. Partner check.
Lesson 1: This activity proceeds
the time for sharing responses
with the whole class and
synthesis of information.
Lesson 2: An arguable thesis
statement and chart of word
meanings.
Students integrate expert and
go beyond given information to
generate and improve their
ideas as is evidenced by the
chart that lists the three
examples of a persuasive essay
Lesson 1: outline or graphic
organizers.
Lesson 2: Three examples to
integrate in the body of the
student’s essay found in
journals and on chart.
Lesson 1: As a whole group,
Lesson 1: Science logs and
5
Biodiversity and Humans
Changes in biodiversity
can influence humans’
resources, such as food,
energy, and medicines, as
well as ecosystem services
that humans rely on—for
example, water
purification and recycling.
(secondary to MS-LS2-5)
Lesson 2: RI.8.8 Trace and
evaluate the argument
and specific claims in a
text, assessing whether
the reasoning is sound
and the evidence is
relevant and sufficient to
support the claims. (MSLS2-5)
draw conclusions about
the pie graphs, ratios,
and percentages by
compiling the results as a
class in relation to
recycling excess trash.
Lesson 2: Have students
review the components
of an argument and
arrange their thesis and
support in the correct
main divisions.
the class will draw
conclusions about all of the
findings as they examine the
charts.
Lesson 2: Students will place
their example essay and
original thesis in their
journals.
students’ activity sheets for
assessment.
Lesson 2: Chart, sample essay,
thesis statements and selfreflection of process and notes
in journal writing.
Students will self-reflect on
the process so far in their
journals
Grouping Strategies
Think-pair-share
Whole Discourse group
Book Partners (reading)
Individual
Materials and
Equipment
Chart paper and markers, the Cafeteria Waste Activity Sheet, The Art of Persuasive Writing PowerPoint
presentation (click on link), Internet Access and screen, TED Talk: Marcel Dicke: Why Not Eat Insects? Film (can
download at home), Why Not Eat Insects? Notes Organizer, the ReadWriteThink Persuasion Map (Interactive),
articles : Food Facts: Your Scraps Add Up, Food Waste Basics, and the Waste Not, Want Not (click on hyperlinks),
the Metacognitive Strategies Chart, the Research Guide, example of blog: Waste Not, Want Not ,
ReadWriteThink Persuasion Map and writing tools.
Lesson 1: Waste in the Cafeteria Survey
Description of
Performance Tasks
6
Note: The
performance tasks
should include
elements from the
three dimensions from
the NGSS – knowing
and doing



Assign students to conduct a personal survey of the amount of food they throw away each day at lunch
using the Cafeteria Waste Activity Sheet
After five days of data collection, divide students into groups of three to five. Have them compile and
analyze the information they have collected by determining the overall percentage of food wasted over
the last five days.
Have each group of students synthesize their findings into a pie chart that can be displayed. Have the
class draw conclusions about the findings as they examine the charts. Collect students’ activity sheets
for assessment.
Lesson 2: Power point Presentation (Scaffolding Information)


Teach persuasion basics using The Art of Persuasive Writing PowerPoint presentation, having students
take notes. Use the presentation notes included at the bottom of some of the slides to guide your
discussion.
Stop frequently to allow students to share their own examples of persuasive speech. Presentation
highlights include types of persuasive speech, elements of the persuasive essay, and persuasive
vocabulary like logos, pathos, ethos, and counterarguments.
Lesson 3: Watch TED Talk: Marcel Dicke: Why Not Eat Insects? as a class.



As they watch the video, have students take notes using the Why Not Eat Insects? Notes Organizer
After watching the video, discuss the presenter’s purpose and intended audience with students
Have students use their notes to fill in the ReadWriteThink Persuasion Map, identifying the thesis and
major supporting arguments. Collect their notes organizers for assessment
Lesson 4-5:



Set a purpose for reading the following articles: Food Facts: Your Scraps Add Up, Food Waste Basics, and
the Waste Not, Want Not blog. Review what students know about food waste.
Partners: Review the four metacognitive strategies in the Metacognitive Strategies Chart: connect,
question, infer, and evaluate. Remind students to preview the articles by reading the titles, examining
the graphics, and reading the captions.
Have students explore the online articles for answers to the food waste problem. Briefly model the
7

process of collecting information from the online articles
Have students record their findings on the Research Guide
Lesson 5




Briefly model the process of developing a single, focused thesis and arguments from the Research
Guide. Some students may want to tackle all of the issues discovered in their research, so you should
provide the necessary scaffolding as students work to narrow their focus. (Please note that the focus
of Waste Not, Want Not is reducing food waste at home; however, students should be free to choose
any food waste topic from their research when writing their own blogs.)
Have students develop a thesis and arguments for their own blog post, offering persuasive solutions to
the waste problem. Students should refer to facts from the Research Guide to craft their arguments.
Have students consider the appropriate tone for their electronic audience. Since students are
addressing their own academic community about a social issue, the tone should be thoughtful and
insightful. Caution students to avoid informal or flippant remarks.
Students may use the ReadWriteThink Persuasion Map to plan their blog. If a computer lab is not
available, students use a hard-copy: See hyperlink under “Background” for the rest of the lesson plans.
Supporting English
Learners
Reading or Writing
Activity
Listed in Learning and
Instructional Sequence
Support for Emerging learners
Support for Expanding learners Support for Bridging learners
Supporting Struggling
Learners
Activity
Support for Students who Need Minor Support
Supports for Students who Need Intensive
Support
8
Write the word or draw a
picture on a sheet of chart
paper
Internet interactive
Reflection, science log
writing, group discussions
Grouping
Adult supervision
Cooperative pairing with more advanced learner
Partners and labor divisions
Adult supervision
Adult supervision
Research in groups of 3-5
Cooperative groups: division of jobs
Internet aids via IRA (International Reading
Association)
Supporting Advanced Learners
Activity
Listed in Learning and Instructional Sequence
Extension for Advanced Students
Find and deconstruct another TED Talk video about reducing waste or
recycling.
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Download

Grade 7 - Finding solutions to food waste