PBIS Vision: Creating a positive culture that supports success for all.
R.O.A.R. – Respectful, Orderly, Accountable, Responsible
PBIS Lesson Plan to Teach Lowell Expectations
ROAR Expectation
Orderly, Responsible, Accountable: Showing ROAR on the Playground
Area: Playground
Time Frame: 30-45 minutes
Step 1: Identify & Provide Rationale/Purpose for teaching the stated behavior
The playground is a place to have fun and let loose. So that everyone has a good time, we need to
ROAR. Can anyone tell me what that means? (Respect, Orderly, Accountable, Responsible). Today we
are going to learn about some behaviors we expect to see on the playground. These behaviors will help
us to make new friends, get exercise, have fun, and remain safe during recess. Making sure we are
Orderly, Responsible and Accountable will
Step 2: Lesson Objective(s) (desired behavior both observable & measureable)
Orderly, Accountable, and Responsible behavior on the playground: Students will use appropriate
playground behavior to solve conflicts in multiple scenarios. Students will be able to explain why it is
important to demonstrate orderly, accountable and responsible playground behavior and how they can
promote orderly, accountable and responsible playground behavior by (1) creating and analyzing
scenarios and explaining why ROAR is important on the playground and (2) completing sentence frame.
Step 3: Examples and Non-examples of the desired behavior
*Choose students to model examples and non-examples, asking students how they felt in each simulation
Examples (look/sound like)
Non-examples (not look/sound like)
 Walk on blacktop
 Running on the blacktop
 Follow rules (Runck’s Rules)
 Not taking turns, skipping turns, having a second
turn
 Line up when directed (AM Bell/PM lunch
whistle)
 Not following playground rules
 Keep body and objects to yourself
 Still playing on the playground when the whistle
blew
 Use equipment appropriately
 Jumping off swings, running on the blue
 Report problems to staff
playground equipment, hanging upside down on
 Play safe
the monkey bars, climbing up the slides, kicking
 Practice the Golden Rule
four square balls on the roof,
 Wait your turn in line, no cutting or “saving
 Not telling a teacher if a major problem arises
spots”
 Throwing sand, yelling, using unkind words,
 Share equipment with others
pushing or physically fighting
 Be a good sport- win or lose
 Leaving equipment out
 Follow the rules of all games
 Return all equipment to the designated
location
 Listen to the instructions of All adults
Step 4: Practice/Role Play Activities
Model expected behavior (I do):
Teacher(s) model or read following scenarios. The teacher discusses why second scenario is an example
of orderly, accountable, and responsible behavior.
Orderly
Tina was in line to play foursquare. Kristin got out and started to argue why she does not agree about
getting out. Tina got angry and told Kristin she was a cry baby and stupid. The girls continued to argue.
The whistle blew and they ran to line up.
Tina was in line to play foursquare. Kristin got out and started to argue why she does not agree about
getting out. Kristin realized that the majority of the players agreed she was out and she went to the end
of the line. The duty teacher gave both students a “ROAR card” for resolving the conflict orderly.
Accountable:
Jose was going the wrong way up the slide. Katie who was waiting to go down the slide was yelling at
Jose to move. Jose yelled back at Katie and continued up the slide in correctly until the teacher had to
intervene.
Jose was going the wrong way up the slide. Katie who was waiting to go down the slide asked politely
for Jose to move and reminded him of the rules of the slide. Jose remembered and went to the end of the
line. The duty teacher gave both students a “ROAR card” for resolving the conflict of accountable.
Responsible:
Lisa, Jacob, Caleb, and Max were playing with the soccer ball at recess. The whistle blew to line and
they ran to line up with their class leaving the soccer ball on the soccer field.
Lisa, Jacob, Caleb and Max were playing with the soccer ball at recess. The whistle blew to line up and
Lisa grabbed the soccer ball and placed it in the basket and got in line with her class. The duty teacher
gave Lisa a “ROAR card” for demonstrating responsibility.
Lead students through behavior (We do/Practice):
Students will discuss why second scenario is an example of orderly, accountable and responsible
behavior
Orderly:
After several students bussed their trays and were released to the playground for recess. Kim and Lisa
were running on the black top holding hands. Kim’s shoelaces were untied and she tripped and scrapped
her elbow and knee. Kim was embarrassed and with tears in her eyes. The duty teacher sent Kim to the
nurse.
After several students bussed their trays and were released to the playground for recess. All the other
students were running on the black top to the playground. Kim and Lisa were walking together to the
playground. The duty teacher gave both students a “ROAR card” for resolving the conflict of orderly.
Accountable:
Luke and several other students were playing four square. Luke got out but did not feel that it was fair.
The other students were yelling and not listening to Luke. This caused Luke to get upset and he then ran
off with the four square ball and kicked it on top of the roof. The other students ran and told the teacher
on duty.
Luke and several other students were playing four square. Luke got out but did not feel that it was fair.
The other students were yelling and not listening to Luke. Luke then walked away and decided to play
somewhere else. The duty teacher gave Luke a “ROAR card” for demonstrating accountability.
Responsible:
Jose and Jacob were swinging on the swings. Jose dared Jacob to jump off the swing. Jacob listened to
Jose and jumped off the swing landing on another student. The other student was embarrassed and upset.
The duty teacher came over and sent Jacob to the wall for time out and the other student to the nurse.
Jose and Jacob were swinging on the swings. Jose dared Jacob to jump off the swing. Jacob ignored
Jose and told him that is not safe and against the playground rules. The duty teacher game Jacob a
“Roar card” for demonstrating responsibility.
Brainstorm
• What do you like best about the playground?
• What do you like the least about the playground?
• Which adults have the right to remind you to be Orderly, Responsible, and Accountable on the
playground?
• Who is available to assist if you need help while on the playground?
• Do you know how to report a playground problem?
• When can you leave the playground?
Tie into scenarios
Practice/Check for Understanding (You do):
With a peer or independently, students are asked to come up with their own scenario. For younger
students you can come up with several scenarios and have them choose one. Student groups will act out
appropriate, respectful behavior for their scenario. Teacher(s) and other students will provide feedback
to peer groups. (Feedback must be specific to the expectation)
Review Questions:
 Why is it important to show orderly, accountable and responsible playground behavior?
 How can you help promote orderly, accountable and responsible playground behavior?
Assessment (aligned to Objective):
Students can complete the following sentence stem: Being orderly on the playground means I will
________, ______, and ______. Being accountable on the playground means I will _______. Being
responsible on the playground means_______ and ______. I can show being orderly, accountable and
responsible by___________.
Additional Opportunities for Practice/Reteach:
 Set aside a few minutes a week to practice the rules/ scenarios
 Publicly recognizing students who display respectful behavior
 Teacher regularly models respectful behavior with examples and non-examples
 Have students role-play examples and non-examples.
 Tell students about the consequences for following or not following the rules.
Vocabulary Practice:
 Responsible
 Orderly
 Accountable
 Golden Rule
Materials:
 Copies of scenarios
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pbis-lp_playground_reyes