Title of Presentation:
Effects of Particle Concentration on Sedimentation of Fine-grained dredged Sediments Used in Coastal
Restoration Projects
Authors:
Gregory Mattson, II, EI
Graduate Research Assistant
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering
The University of New Orleans, 2000 Lakeshore Drive, New Orleans, Louisiana 70148
[email protected]u (email)
and
Malay Ghose Hajra, Ph.D., P.E., ENV SP
Assistant Professor
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering
Engineering Building, Room #813
The University of New Orleans, 2000 Lakeshore Drive, New Orleans, Louisiana 70148
504-280-7062 (office) [email protected] (email)
Presenter:
Gregory Mattson, II, EI
Graduate Research Assistant
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering
The University of New Orleans, 2000 Lakeshore Drive, New Orleans, Louisiana 70148
[email protected] (email)
Abstract:
The state of Louisiana’s coastline has been studied since the Coastal Wetlands Planning, Protection and
Restoration Act was enacted in 1990. Some projects were completed, but it wasn’t until the recent
development of the Louisiana Coastal Master Plan that large-scale restoration efforts were made possible.
Restoring the marshes through deposition of dredged material from the Gulf, navigation canals and river
beds and subsequent reestablishment of emergent wetland vegetation will help to protect the coastal
properties and infrastructure systems from accumulated damage due to elevated water levels and storm
surge forces. Engineering properties and material characteristics of the dredged material and foundation
soils are input parameters in several mathematical models used to predict the long term behavior of the
dredged material and foundation soil. Therefore, proper characterization of the dredged material and
foundation soils is of utmost importance in the correct design of a coastal restoration and land reclamation
project. The sedimentation characteristics of the dredged material as well as their effects on the time rate
of settlement of the suspended solid particles and underlying foundation soil depend, among other factors,
on the (a) grain size distribution of the dredged material, (b) salinity (fresh, brackish, or saltwater
environment) of the composite slurry, and (c) concentration of the solid particles in the slurry. This
presentation will describe a laboratory testing procedure to evaluate the effects of initial particle
concentration on sedimentation characteristics of dredged material obtained from actual coastal
restoration projects. Results from multiple tests will be discussed in the presentation.
Presenter’s Short Bio:
Education and Research
B.S., Civil Engineering May 2012.
University of New Orleans, Louisiana
Masters in Engineering (expected graduation: May 2014)
University of New Orleans, Louisiana
Work Experience
Research Assistant– Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of New Orleans,
New Orleans, Louisiana (May 2012 through Present)
Intern- Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority (CPRA) (July 2013 – Present)
Field Technician/Intern- Professional Service Industries, Inc. (PSI), New Orleans, LA (June 2012October 2011)
Professional Registration
Registered Engineering Intern (E.I.) – Louisiana