PARAPROFESSIONAL
HANDBOOK
Geary County Unified
School District #475
123 N Eisenhower
PO Box 370
Junction City, Kansas 66441
#785-717-4093
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Section 1: Paraprofessional Work Days/Staff Development Requirements
Professional Development Record Form (DUE MAY 1st)
Paraprofessional Work Days Memo
Professional Development Hours Pyramid
ESEA Assessment Requirements
Provenance Learning Solutions Compliance Assessments
Important Assessment Information
Obtaining Professional Development Hours
Infinitec-http://www.myinfinitec.org
IMC Video List
Evaluation of Materials Form
CPI Tidbits
CPI Dates
Section 2: Roles and Responsibilities
Information from KSDE Concerning Paraprofessionals Kansas Regulations
Cell Phone, Computer & Email Usage
Paraprofessional Competencies
Appreciating Diversity
Different Abilities
Confidentiality
Importance of teamwork
Use “I messages” instead of “You messages”
A Law to Protect the Privacy of Student records
Ethical Guidelines for Paraprofessionals
Teacher and Para Roles in Managing Behavior
The ABC’s of Behavior
Principals of Motivation/Reinforcements
When using Praise as a Reinforcent
How to manage behavior when it occurs
Ethical Considerations in Behavior Management
The Individual Education Plan (IEP)
Supporting Teachers’ Instruction
Assessing Student Performance
Supporting Instruction in Content Area Classes
Checklist for Preparing for Small Group Instruction
Accommodations and Modifications
Providing Direct Instruction with Guidance from the Teacher
General Guidelines for Providing Personal Care
Working with Non-Verbal Students
Guidelines for Lifting Students
Guidelines for Toileting, Diapering, & Hygiene
Guidelines For Feeding
Universal Precautions
Creating an Effective Special Education Team
Section 3: Job Descriptions & Procedures
Paraprofessional Job Descriptions:
Instructional Elementary, Middle, High School, ARC, FLS & TLC
Classified Handbook
Classified Personnel Evaluation(form)
Section 4: Appendix
Section 1:
Paraprofessional Work Days/Staff
Development Requirements
*** DUE TO NICOLE NUTTER NO LATER THAN APRIL 17TH ***
GEARY COUNTY SCHOOLS #475
123 North Eisenhower, P.O. Box 370, Junction City, KS 66441
Phone: (785) 717-4000 Fax: (785) 717-4002
SCHOOL YEAR 2013-14 STAFF DEVELOPMENT RECORD FORM
Name: __________________________
Hours per day: __________________
School: _________________________
Date Started: ________________________
Date Left: ________________________________
Supervising Teacher: _________________
Name of Staff
Development
District Orientation
Topic
Date
Position
Requirements
Presenter
Degree: YES NO From: _______________
Qualifying college hours: ___ x 20 = ______
Total Inservice Hours: __________________
Time
Started
Time
Ended
Actual
Hours
ESS Department Staff
2 Hrs.
TOTALS
The total hours listed is correct: _____________________________________________ Signature of Paraprofessional
_____________________________________________ Signature of Facilitator
Verify/
Signature
PARAPROFESSIONAL WORK DAY
To:
From:
Re:
Date:
Building Principals, Special Education Coordinators,
Special Education Teachers, Paras and Payroll Dept.
Ricardo Vieyra, Director of Special Education
Katina Brenn, Assist. Director of Special Education
Paraprofessional Work Days
August 2, 2010
Paras first full day of work will be August 12. They should follow the schedule for the
day which includes attending the District Opening Session at the high school in the AM.
Principals should notify the minimum number of paras that are needed based on
enrollment. If Principals have any paras not needed because of enrollment, please
contact me.
Paras who have worked for USD 475 as a para for 3 yrs. or less are required to have 20
hours of inservice (or 2 hours for every month of employment). Paras who have worked
for USD 475 as a para for 4 consecutive years or more are required to have 10 hours of
staff development (or 1 hour for every month of employment). This is regardless of the
number of hours per day that they work). District salary reimbursement is dependant
on their ability to complete the required amount of professional development hours
required. Two of the hours each year must be Orientation which is:
August 12 - 1:00-3:00- Para Orientation. For paras working on Ft. Riley, orientation
will be at Ft. Riley Middle School. For paras working in Junction City, Milford and
Grandview, orientation will be at the new Junction City Middle School Commons Area
(Paras who can’t attend or are hired later must watch the video of this orientation
or attend a later district level para orientation. Copies will be given to each
building.)
Kansas Department of Education is asking that Paraprofessionals participate in staff
development with their supervising teachers. Staff development days should be building
days if possible, determined by their building level administrator. The para handbook
offers paras multiple opportunities for obtaining staff development hours to include but
are not limited to 1 college credit = 20 hours, Provenances module = 1 hour, Infinitec
modules = the amount of time of the module, and a book review evaluation process.
Please consult the para handbook for additional options.
Once paras attain their 10 or 20 hours of staff development, they will not be paid to
work any further staff dev. days unless principals request paras to work for specific
reasons. Requests should be made to the Special Education office.
ELEMENTARY PARAS: Can work the K-5 Plan days
PARAS DO NOT WORK: Flexible Professional Development days or Parent/Teacher
Conf. Days
Obtaining Professional Development
Hours
LEA Determined – In-service Requirement
Hold a current Kansas teaching license
Related Service license – eligible for Categorical
Aid
OTA, PTA, and LPN
10 Hours – In-service Requirement
Special education para for USD 475 for more than
3 years – years must be consecutive and recent
(as archived in the Personnel Database)
20 Hours- In-service Required
3 consecutive years or less & recent years
experience as a special education para in Kansas
Note: Taking the ESEA test does not accrue
professional Development hours
To:
From:
Re:
Date:
Special Education Paraprofessionals and Administrators
Ricardo Vieyra, Director of Special Education
Katina Brenn, Assist. Director of Special Education
The Elementary and Secondary Education Act Requirements
August 2, 2010
The Elementary and Secondary Education Act - includes requirements for teaching
aides which includes special education paraprofessionals who assist with instruction
in reading, math and writing. This law applies to Title I buildings. Our district is
choosing to apply this law district wide (EC-12).
Paraprofessionals must:
1) Obtain college hours equivalent to an Associate’s degree – (48 hours) OR
2) Obtain an Associate’s or higher degree.
The alternative to taking college hours is:
 Paraprofessionals must pass an assessment in reading, writing and math.
 The exam through that website –
www.provenancesolutions.com/provenance/ksjunctioncity
 To schedule the assessment contact Nicole Nutter at 717-4093
USD #475 has purchased the Master Teacher site which is accessible from any
computer and will assist you in:
 preparing for the academic assessment (which is mentioned above)
 creating a “transcript” of courses which can be used for in-service hours
AND
 the option of obtaining college credit (information about this is on their web
page)
Information about accessing this network is on the attached page.
Completion of one course will equate to one hour of staff development if you
choose to do this. You will be asked to print a “transcript” of the modules you have
completed by May 1, 2010.
ProVenance Learning Solutions Compliance Assessments
Welcome to www.provenancesolutions.com/provenance/ksjunctioncity
The home of ProVenance Solutions!
You are about to embark on a fabulous learning opportunity that we believe
you will find both meaningful and easy to use!
ABOUT THE WEBSITE
ProVenance Learning Soultions is an Internet based professional development website. The site
provides relevant information to help you learn the various facets of the supportive role you
perform in the classroom and our school. This website also maintains a personalized transcript
to help you and your supervisor track the courses you have successfully completed.
INSTRUCTIONS
The purpose of this document is to provide instructions for how to register and access
ProVenance Learning Soultions. If you have any questions about this information, please
contact Nicole Nutter at (785) 717-4093.
STEP 1 – SIGN ON THE INTERNET:
To access ProVenance Learning Soultions you must always logon to the Internet and open the
www.provenancesolutions.com/provenance/ksjunctioncity website.
STEP 2 – REGISTRATION…FOR FIRST TIME USERS:
To become registered for the ProVenance Learning Soultions you must call the Special
Education Secretary (Nicole Nutter at 717-4093). She will authorize your registration and create
your username and password.
NOTE: If you have already registered, skip to STEP 3 – LOGIN.
STEP 3 – LOGIN:
 Enter your username in the “username:” box.
 Enter your password in the “password:” box.
 Click the login button.
How to Use PLN in ProVenance: For Organizational Users (PDF) offers comprehensive, stepby-step instructions for paraeducators (users) on how to log in, claim a license, access courses,
view transcripts, and so on.
Important Assessment Information
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This test consists of two assessments:
Assessment 1:Title I, Section 1119 Compliance: Reading, Writing & Math - Instructional
Support
This assessment evaluates the ability to support reading, writing, and mathematics
instruction. There are three concept areas with 30 total questions. The recommended
courses are 118, 119, and 120.
Assessment 2: Title I, Section 1119 Compliance: Reading, Writing & Math - Knowledge
and Application
This assessment evaluates the knowledge and skills to solve problems in reading, writing,
and math. The recommended courses are 130, 131, 132, 133, 134, 135, 136, 137, 138
and 139.
This test is NOT timed. You will need to schedule a time to administer the test so
someone can be present in the room at all times while the para takes the test. Keep in
mind that the Assessment 1 will require up to one hour and Assessment 2 will require up
to 3 hours. Most paraeducators will be able to complete both tests consecutively in 3
hours.
Call Nicole Nutter at 717-4093 to “assign” the test for the individual.
A supervisor needs to stay in the testing area and observe the paraeducator while they
complete the assessment.
As each para completes the assessment you can call Nicole at 717-4093 and she can give
you the results of the test instantly. They need 65% to pass the instruction and support
assessment and 70% to pass the knowledge and application assessment.
Nicole will then send a copy of the assessment results for the para and supervisor that
observed the test to sign and date the sheet. Return these to Nicole at DC and she will get
copies to Katina Brenn and Human Resource department.
SUGGESTED RULES AND RELEVANT INFORMATION
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Accommodations for person with disabilities, visual difficulties, physical handicaps, etc.
should be arranged for paraeducators, provided the accommodations do not include
assistance in answering the questions or a change in the assessment.
Breaks should be permitted for emergencies only. If a break is necessary, the para must
show the supervisor the portion of the test completed and log off. The para will then
resume the assessment up on return.
Access to ProVenance Learning Soultions coursework is blocked during the assessment.
Only the internet window with the assessment should be open. The supervisor should
monitor each screen to make certain the para follows this rule.
The supervisor will answer only questions about assessing and using the assessment
program.
There should be no talking among the paras during the assessment.
Calculators/cell phones/notes are not permitted. Scratch paper should be provided.
Obtaining Staff Development Hours
College Hours – One or more credit
hours = 20 hours of in-service
Read a book – 150 pages = 3 hours
(Books must be education based and approved
by supervisor)
Watch a video – In-service time =
time of video
You must have permission from
administrator to work more than the
required Staff Development hours.
http://www.ed.gov/teacherinitiative
1.
2.
3.
4.
Click on “Get Professional Development Now”
23 free e-Learning sessions available concerning
math, English, language arts, or science sessions
Print the “video note taking guide”, take notes to
verify completion – test is not required.
Staff Development time = time you watched the
session.
My http://www.myinfinitec.org
Infinitec Website on line modules
Please check with your Administrator if
you are unsure or do not want to work
on that day.
IMC VIDEO LIBRARY FOR PARAPROFESSIONALS
Videos: The Length of the video equals the amount of time you receive for staff
development.
VIDEO NUMBER
107
1275
675
1049
1053
1047
250-251
48
1326
999
1048
502
217
936
90
723
909
922
1133
1746
1763
1761
1762
1052
TITLE
A Regular Kid, That’s Me! (44 min.)
ADHD: What Can We Do? (37 minutes)
Appreciating Differences (10 min.)
Art of Setting Limits: How to Defuse Verbal Exchanges Before They
Become…(38 min.)
Assaultive Student, Vol. III (30 min.) (1994 Ed.)
Assaultive Student, Vol. III (30 min.) (1989 Ed.)
Assertive Discipline for Paraprofessionals, Part I&II (30 min.)
Attitudes: Positive Judgments To Influence Learning (M.O.S.T. Program)
(3o min.)
Big Lies, The (1 hr. 20 min.)
Brain Compatible Learning, 2 vc, (34 min. each)
Breaking Up Fights: How to Safely Defuse Explosive Conflicts (40 min.)
Building Self Esteem In Young Children (17 min.)
Cipher in the Snow (20 min.)
Communicating with People on the Job (15 min.)
Consulting with Regular Classroom Teachers: A Skill Training Program
for Special Educators
Control Theory in the Quality School and Responsibility Training 2 vc (25
min. ea.)
Creating the Total Quality Effective School, 2 vc (2 hours ea.)
Crossing the Line: Sexual Harassment Among Students(40 min.)
Crossing the Line: The Truth About Gangs (18 min.)
Dr. Temple Gradin Speaks on “Careers-Oportunity for Growth” (30min.)
Dr. Temple Gradin Speaks on “Visual Thinking of a Person with Autism”
(30 min.)
Dr. Temple Gradin Speaks on “Sensory Challenges and Answers”
(30.min)
Dr. Temple Gradin Speaks on Visual Thinking of a Person with Autism
(30 min.)
Disruptive Adolescent, Vol. II (37 min.)
1046
1051
1045
1002
216
1025
1019
728
807
VIDEO NUMBER
996
871
722
721
877
1256 A-B
972
819
942
653
654
504
1003
879
1302
1303
875
1170
1325
704
929
1756
1757
Disruptive Adolescent, The Vol. II (40 min.)
Disruptive Child Vol. I (40 min.)
Disruptive Children, The Vol. I (32 min.)
Diversity in the Classroom, 2 vc, (35 min. ea.)
Dr. Larry Lezotte Presents An Overview of Effective Schools, 2 vc, I (2
hours), II (1:27)
Dr. William Glasser: CPSI (3 hrs)
Educating Peter (30 min.)
Effective Teacher Teaming, 2 vc, (27 min. ea.)
Fat City (70 min.)
TITLE
Fresh Look at Cooperative Learning, 2 vc, (29 min. ea.)
From Fantasy to Reality-That-Potentially All Children Are Gifted and
Talented (90 min.)
Glasser’s The Quality School: Establishing A Paradigm For Quality and
Self Eval, 2 vc (25 min. ea.)
Glasser’s The Quality School: Introduction and the Removal of Coercion,
2 vc (26 min. ea.)
Helping Disruptive and Unresponsive Students, 2 vc (28 min. ea.)
Heterogeneous Classroom, The (A 39 min; B 40 min.)
High Risk Youth: At The Crossroads (22 min.)
How to Use Reality Therapy in the Classroom (38 min.)
Hyperactive Children (12 min.)
Implementing Effective Schools at the Elementary Level (56 min.)
Implementing Effective Schools at the Secondary Level (50 min.)
Improving Decision-Making Skills in Pre-Teens (17 min.)
Inclusion, 2vc (33 min. ea.)
Integrating The Curriculum, 2vc (27 min. ea.)
Learning Disabilities and Social Skills with Richard Lavoie t/g (68 min)
Learning Disabilities and Social Skills with Richard Lavoie Parents Guide
(Last One Picked….First One Picked On) (62 min.)
Managing Change (1 hr.)
Managing the Disruptive Classroom (59 min.)
Masquerade (30min.)
Math Matters: Kids are Counting on You (7 min.)
Misunderstood Minds: Understanding Kids Who Struggle To Learn (90
min.)
Paraprofessional’s guide to Assisting Classroom Instruction, The (25 min.)
Paraprofessional Guide to Managing Student Behavior, The (23 min.)
1001
584
587
588
589
590
VIDEO NUMBER
591
585
586
490
850
724
1135
1134
278
50
1088
1087
108
109
472
923
1027
1029
663
1769
1023
Perspectives on Quality Education (33 min.)
Positive Classroom Discipline: Tape 1 Introduction (2 hr.)
Positive Classroom Discipline: Tape 4 Back Talk (2 hr.)
Positive Classroom Discipline: Tape 5 Responsibility Training (2 hr.)
Positive Classroom Discipline: Tape 6 Mechanics of Responsibility
Training (2 hrs.)
Positive Classroom Discipline: Tape 7 Omission Training (2 hrs.)
TITLE
Positive Classroom Discipline: Tape 8 First Day of School (2 hrs.)
Positive Classroom Discipline: Tape 2 Introduction to Limit Setting (2
hrs.)
Positive Classroom Discipline: Tape 3 More Limit Setting (2 hrs.)
Positive Discipline, 2 vc (1 hr. ea.)
Prejudice: Answering Children’s Questions (75 min.)
Restructuring for Quality Schools and Quality Districts, 2 vc (29 min. ea.)
Second Step: A Violence Prevention Curriculum Grades 4-5 (17 min.)
Second Step: A Violence Prevention Curriculum Grades 6-8 (30 min)
Severe Behavior Problems (Assertive Discipline) (77 min.)
Stimulation: Continuing Worthwhile Learning (M.O.S.T.) Program (30
min)
Strategies for Co-Planning and Co-teaching (34 min)
Strategies for Making Curriculum Modification (52 min.)
“Talking About Tourette Syndrome” (45 min.)
Teaching Children with Tourette Syndrome: A Resource for Educators (15
min.)
Technology in Education: Implications for Teaching (20 min.)
Teen Awareness/Sexual Harassment (23 min.)
Toddlerhood: Emotional Development (29 min.
Toddlerhood: Physical and Cognitive Development (26 min)
Tools for Teaching and Learning (2 hrs.)
Training Paraprofessionals and the Teachers that Work with Them, 2vc
(Program 1 - 32 min.) Program 2 – 34 min.)
Transforming the Difficult Child: The Nurtured Heart Approach (120
min.)
Evaluation of Material
Name: _______________________________Date: ______________
My “need” or area of interest in working with our student is:
______________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________
Type of material to preview or read (circle one):
Video
Book
Curriculum
Testing Material
Other: ___________________________________________
Title: ___________________________________________________
Author or Publishing Company: ______________________________
Video Length/Pages/etc.: ___________________________________
Material is from: __________________________________________
Material is targeted towards ______________________ __________
Subject
Grade level
This information will be used for: _____________________________
______________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________
I recommend this material to be used by/for: ____________________
I would rank this resource as (circle one):
Very Good
Good
Fair
Not relevant to my situation
Staff Development Credit
Videos: The length of the video equals the amount of time you receive for staff development.
Books: If you read a book with over 150 pages and give a thorough report you could earn as much as 3
hours of staff development.
Please attach a one page written summary of your material evaluation to this form.
CPI Tidbits
The CPI Supportive Stance:
1. Standing outside the personal space bubble
2. Turned at a 90º angle
3. Stay a leg length away from the person you are working with.
Keys to setting limits
1. Be clear and Concise
 Give 2 choices and 2 consequences
2. Be reasonable and fair
3. Make sure your consequences are enforceable
Rational Detachment:
The ability to stay in control of ones own behavior and not take the acting
out behavior personally
DO
Remain Calm
Be aware of the environment
Isolate the situation
Enforce Limits
Respect personal Space
Listen
Be supportive
Don’t
Over react
Issue Ultimatums
Freeze
Be threatening
Enter into a power struggle
Involve an audience
Take it personally
2010-11 CPI Classes
Register for classes by contacting Nicole Nutter at (785)717-4093.
Class size is limited.
August 5 8am-5pm lunch on own
September 9, 14, 16
October 5, 7, 12
October 26-Refresher
November 9, 11, 16
March 8, 10, 15
March 31-Refresher
April 19, 21, 25
If more classes are needed we can add these dates
January 5, 10, 12
February 2, 7, 9
Dates may need to change depending on what may come up during the school
year. The 3 day classes will be 8 hours and the refresher will be 3 hours. All
classes will be held at Junction City Middle School in room 126A.
Section 2: Roles and Responsibilities
Kansas Regulations Regarding Paraprofessionals
The following statements are from the Kansas Special
Education Regulations. They say that at
paraprofessional……
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Cannot be solely responsible for special education instruction or related services.
Cannot select or give formal, standardized tests or interpret any results
Cannot select, program, or prescribe educational activities or materials without
supervision* and guidance of a teacher. Teachers do all initial planning and
introduction of new material.
Cannot be solely responsible for preparing lesson plans or initiating original
instruction.
Must have direct supervision* & involvement from a professional to implement a
student’s IEP.
Cannot be employed in place of a certified special education professional.
Cannot be a substitute teacher unless the paraprofessional has the appropriate
certification.
Cannot be enrolled as an elementary or secondary student.
Cannot perform nursing procedures or give medications without appropriate
supervision* from an approved health care professional.
*Supervision- The professional the paraprofessional is assigned to must meet
Kansas’s certification requirements. When the assigned teacher is not present, a
designated principal or teacher may supervise the paraprofessional. Supervision
time for instructional paraprofessionals shall be determined by the supervising
teacher and paraprofessional and based on the students’ needs.
Cell Phone, Computer & E-mail Usage
 Cell phones cannot be used when on duty. Please read
your buildings rules on handheld devices.
 School computers are not to be used for personal
business.
 You should not be on the computer unless it is for school
business.
 USD 475 provides e-mail addresses for paraprofessionals.
 Only use USD 475 e-mails for school related business.
 Paraprofessionals are not to e-mail parents without being
directed to do so by their supervising teacher.
Paraprofessional Competencies:
General Knowledge and Values
 Awareness of the legal rights of children and youth with exceptional learning
needs and their parents in educational settings.
 Understanding of individual learning styles and environmental factors that impact
teaching and learning processes.
 Understanding of the differences among the roles and responsibilities of
professionals, paraprofessionals, and other support personnel.
 Basic knowledge of special education processes, procedures, and regulations.
 Awareness of and respect for social, cultural, linguistic, religious, economic, and
ability differences in students and their families.
 Understanding of the similarities and differences among the cognitive,
communicative, physical, social, emotional, and behavioral needs of children and
youth with and without exceptional learning needs.
Maintaining Safe and Supportive Instructional Environments
 Follow and use prescribed district or agency policies and procedures to ensure
the safety, health, and general well being of learners and school personnel,
including school emergency procedures.
 Implement strategies and procedures developed by teachers to maintain safe,
supportive, and inclusive learning environments.
 Establish and maintain rapport with all learners.
 Model and encourage interactions among children, youth, and adults that respect
and value individual differences.
 Implement strategies that promote the learner's independence across all relevant
educational settings.
 Provide opportunities for individuals to make choices across settings and
activities.
 Based on program and learner needs, assist teachers and related service
professional in carrying out feeding and other health related procedures required
by learners who have special health care needs, and maintain appropriate
records of these activities.
Assisting with Instructional Practices
 Under the guidance and supervision of a teacher, effectively implement learning
strategies, prompting procedures, and other systematic instructional procedures
in school and nonschool settings using a variety of instructional grouping
arrangements.
 Under the direction of a professional, use developmentally and age-appropriate
strategies, equipment, materials, and technologies in a manner that facilitates
student learning and accomplishes instructional goals.
 Assist teachers and other professionals with adapting learning materials and
equipment to meet the needs of individuals with different ability levels, learning
styles, or language backgrounds.
 Implement teacher-developed plans or strategies that enhance the fluency,
maintenance, and generalization of academic skills.
 Based on program and learner needs, assist teachers with community-based
instruction.
 Perform routine clerical duties such as preparation of instructional classroom
materials; setting up student work areas; and operating office, video , computer,
adaptive devices, and other materials.
Assisting in Assessment and Evaluation Procedures
 Assist teachers in monitoring student progress regarding academic performance,
social development, and behavior. (For paraprofessionals working with early
childhood populations, substitute cognitive development for academic
performance).
 Using various teacher-developed assessment tools, assist teachers in
documenting information about learners’ strengths, needs, and performance.
 Under the direction of a professional educator, systematically collect
observational and performance data of students with exceptional needs across
various settings.
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Assist teachers and other professionals in maintaining learner records required
by district, agency, or state mandates.
Managing Behaviors and Enhancing Social Interactions of Student
 Use age-appropriate language, tone of voice, and reinforcement procedures.
 Implement teacher-developed behavior plans and techniques that adhere to the
laws, regulations, and procedural safeguards concerning the management of
student behaviors.
 Demonstrate effective strategies for the management of student behaviors.
 Implement teacher-developed strategies and techniques that enhance social skill
development in children and youth.
 Assist teachers and other professionals in modifying the learning environment to
manage behavior.
 Facilitate the development of peer interactions and friendships for students with
disabilities in classroom, school, and community settings.
 Monitor and assist children and youth in non-academic learning environments
(i.e., lunchrooms, study halls, playgrounds, and buses).
Communicating and Collaborating with Teachers, Parents, and Other
Professionals
 Follow teacher instructions and implement team decisions.
 Interact effectively with and demonstrate respect for the views, rights, and
contributions of parents, teachers, and other school personnel.
 Contribute relevant, objective information to teachers and other school
professionals to facilitate planning, problem solving, and decision-making
processes across all relevant settings.
 Participate as a member of an instructional team (which may include special and
general educators, related service staff, family members, and students) to plan
and organize learning experiences for students.
 Participate in team meetings to assist in the development of Individual Education
(IEPs) for students.
Participating in Professional and Ethical Practices
 Maintain confidentiality of individual students and their families.
 Perform assigned responsibilities under the supervision of teachers in a manner
consistent with professional and ethical guidelines established by the district,
agency, state, or professional organization.
 Assist teachers and other professionals in protecting the civil, legal, and human
rights of children, youth, and their parents.
 Perform tasks that are within an appropriate range of responsibilities for
paraprofessionals.
 Participate in on-going staff development and self-evaluation activities, and
apply constructive feedback to practices within the educational setting.
 Participate with administrators, consultants, and/or other professionals in
designing and implementing comprehensive professional development activities
for paraprofessionals.
Appreciating Diversity
One aspect of interpersonal skills, or knowing how to get along with others, has to do with how
we view and treat people who are different from us. Today’s public schools are made up of a
diverse group of people. Students and staff are different from each other in many ways: age,
gender, ethnicity, economic background, religion, lifestyle, values, etc. School personnel are
expected to have an attitude of acceptance and appreciation of diversity. This is because it has
become well recognized that it is important for students’ healthy development that they be
aware of and proud of their own unique identities. In order for this to happen, they need to be
around adults who model a positive attitude toward diversity. In addition, teachers and
paraprofessionals who take an active interest in understanding the ways their students are
different will be better able to understand those students’ behavior and, thus, interact with
them in ways that will help them learn.
Having a positive attitude toward diversity means not ignoring differences and not holding
negative attitudes about differences. Negative attitudes can be expressed in many ways, two of
which are stereotyping and labeling. Stereotyping is assuming that all people within a group are
the same in some way. Examples of stereotypes are things like “blondes have more fun,” or “all
fat people have a great sense of humor,” or “people with mental retardation cannot learn.” Not
only are stereotypes incorrect, they are also harmful. Another way prejudices are perpetuated
is through labeling, which means referring to an individual by some characteristic, instead of
referring to the person first, then to the disability (i.e., “Person First Language” – for example,
“person with a disability”). Watch for stereotyping or labeling in the way you think and talk
about people who are different from you, and work at correcting it.
Different Abilities
One way people are different is that they have different physical, mental, and academic
abilities. People with significant problems in these domains are said to have
“disabilities,” A number of negative attitudes toward people with disabilities are
prevalent in our society. These may include ideas that people with disabilities are:
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Emotionally unstable
Not as competent as other students
Unmotivated
Less sociable than other students
Non-assertive
Less likeable than other students
Unhappy
Less sensitive than typical students
Individual students do have some of these problems, but that is true regardless of
whether they have a disability. Furthermore, just knowing that a student has a disability
is not enough information to know whether they also have any of these additional sorts
of problems. In other words, don’t slip into the trap of stereotyping students with
disabilities. Like all students, they are unique, and we should take the time to get to
know each one before coming to any conclusions about them.
Students with disabilities are people first. They have the same general needs for
physical, emotional, social, and intellectual nurturing as do non-disabled students.
There are several tips for helping paraprofessionals treat students with disabilities with
respect. The first tip is: whenever possible, treat the person with a disability as you
would anyone else. For example, consider how you would introduce Jane Smith, who
doesn’t have a disability. You would give her name, where she lives, what she does or
what she is interested in—such as, she likes swimming, or eating Mexican food, or
watching Robert Redford movies. Why should you do it any differently for a person with
disabilities?
Other ways of treating a person with a disability as similar to others as possible is to
remember that independence and autonomy are important. Allow the person choices
whenever possible, and allow him or her to do and speak for him/herself as much as
possible. Emphasize abilities, not limitations. Seek to develop with them the same types
of warm, friendly relationships you seek with other students. However, remember not to
give excessive praise or attention, as this is patronizing. Use the same system of fair
guidance and discipline with students with disabilities as you use with students without
disabilities. Finally, as you would with all students, encourage students with disabilities
to participate to the maximum degree possible in activities with their peers without
disabilities. Another way to be respectful is to use “Person First Language” and to use
the most current, preferred terminology to describe disabilities. Here is a short list of
some of the preferred terms, and their less desirable counterparts.
Confidentiality is extremely important when working
with students with disabilities.
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 Keep student information private.
 Don’t speak about students to friends, family, or to or in front of other
students.
 Don’t speak about students to other teachers except on a need-toknow basis.
 If anyone in the school or community asks you for specific information
about a student’s disability, refer them to the supervising teacher.
 Don’t point our or label children in public.
 Be careful not to distort, exaggerate or confuse information.
 Never use student information as gossip or a joke.
 Focus comments on student strengths and be positive.
Importance of Teamwork
Paraprofessional knowledge & skills + Supportive working environment =
Satisfied, effective paraprofessional & improved student learning
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Teamwork is required for paraprofessionals to be as effective as possible
Administrators’ teamwork responsibilities:
 Support & guidance for the paraprofessionals role at the school and district level
 Conduct Needs Assessments
 Hire & train employees based on Needs Assessments
 Provide a job orientation, including a written job description, introductions to key
personnel, & a handbook with school policy information
 Set & enforce “best practice” guidelines for teacher supervision of
paraprofessionals
 Evaluate teachers’ supervision of paraprofessionals
Teachers’ teamwork responsibilities
 Classroom-level supervision of paraprofessionals
 Provide a personalized job orientation
 Assess & address paraprofessionals’ strengths & weaknesses
 Use effective teaching techniques during on-the-job training
 Conduct frequent, formal meetings with the paraprofessionals
Paraprofessionals’ teamwork responsibilities
 Take an active role in your success
 Show a positive, cooperative attitude about assigned tasks
 Seek out training and supervision in conducting new tasks
 Participate in frequent meetings with the supervising teacher
 Seek information about students and instruction
 Provide the teacher with information about students
Use “I Messages” Instead of “You Messages”
“You Messages” are statements about others that tend to cause problems in
communication.
“You Messages” are comments that begin like this:
“You make me so angry when _______”
OR: “You are not being fair when _______.”
There are three problems with “You Messages”:
1. The speaker is denying responsibility for the feeling.
2. The speaker is giving control of his/her feelings to someone else.
3. “You Messages” that express negative emotions can elicit anger, resistance, or other
negative responses from the other person (instead of a caring, cooperative, problem
solving response).
“I Messages” promote ownership and control of our emotions and behaviors; they can
be used to express all emotions; and, in most circumstances, they can be used to
express our feelings and attitudes without seeming to threaten the other person.
“I Messages” have three parts:
1. A feeling/emotion
2. A situation
3. A reason
An “I Message” is stated like this:
“I feel [emotion] when [situation] because [reason].”
A Law To Protect the Privacy of Student Records
The Family Educational Rights & Privacy Act (FERPA):
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 Protects the privacy of parents & students
 Requires that every school district have a written policy, explaining
standards for keeping educational records confidential
 A school district receiving federal funds may lose those funds if it
discloses personally identifiable information in a student’s education
records without the proper consent
The following rights are automatically granted to parents through FERPA:
 The right to inspect and review school records
 Opportunity for a hearing to challenge records
 Information that could identify the student is strictly control
 Parents’ written consent is required for the release of information
 Rights are transferred to students after the age of 18
Those who may access records without explicit written consent of parents:
 Teachers or other personnel responsible for the design, preparation,
and delivery of education and related services
 Personnel who are responsible for the health, safety, and welfare of a
student
 Paraprofessionals may access educational records through the
classroom teacher and administration, as the local school district
permits
Ethical Guidelines for Paraprofessionals
“Ethics” – showing a high regard for the right of others
Important Ethical Principles for the Paraprofessional Role:
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Maintain a respectful demeanor
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Behave professionally by remaining calm, using appropriate language, not acting
sarcastic, etc.
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Do this even if the other person (parent, student, teacher) is not!
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Maintain confidentiality -Keep student information private! Don’t speak about it to
other professionals (except on a need-to-know basis), to your friends or family, or
to (or in front of) students. This principle is easy to violate – be careful!
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Contribute to positive school-community relations –Convey to community
members a positive attitude about your school by focusing on its strengths and
positive characteristics.
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Show a good work ethic, that will reflect positively on you and your school.
Teacher and Paraprofessional Roles in Managing Behavior
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Both the teacher and paraprofessional are important in managing student behavior.
Teachers are responsible for making major decisions, creating a positive classroom environment,
writing behavior plans, carrying out interventions, and establishing classroom rules and
procedures.
Paraprofessional roles include demonstrating, explaining, modeling, and reinforcing appropriate
behavior. Additional responsibilities often include observing, monitoring, and recording student
behaviors in carrying out a particular behavior management plan.
Paraprofessional may observe behaviors that the supervising teacher doesn’t see—in the
classroom, the lunchroom, the playground, and the halls. It’s the paraprofessional’s responsibility
to bring any concerns about student behavior to the teacher.
Paraprofessional also complement the role of the teacher because they can respond immediately
to students, assist in working with smaller groups and individuals, increase monitoring, provide
frequent attention, and help prevent problems and deal with them quickly when they arise.
The table below illustrates teacher and paraprofessional roles in behavior management.
Roles in Planning and Implementation
Paraprofessional Teacher
Establish classroom rules
Establishes class schedules & activities
Observe student behavior
Designs behavior management plans
Establishes objectives for student behavior
Selects appropriate reinforcers
Records and charts student behavior
Provides consequences according to behavior plan
Provides praise to student
Evaluates intervention effectiveness
Provides feedback regarding appropriate behavior
The main thing to remember is that the teacher always makes the decisions regarding which strategies to
use with an individual student. Paraprofessionals should be trained by the teacher on how to use a variety
of behavior management strategies including the ones which should be used for students with behavior
management plans.
Reasons for Misbehavior
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Students don’t know teacher expectations.
Students are unaware of when/how often they’re behaving inappropriately.
They don’t know what appropriate behavior is.
Student may need attention.
Students may feel powerless, so they create their own power
Categories of Misbehavior
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Rule violation
Early stage
Chronic
About Correcting
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Be prepared to know how you’ll respond
Have rules
Know how/when to implement interventions
Have a repertoire of procedures to deal with misbehavior
Remember corrections for specific misbehavior are more effective if they address
theunderlying problems causing the misbehavior
To Be Successful…
 Plan
 Teach expectations
 Be consistent
 Monitor and review
The ABC’s of Behavior
A = Antecedent—What preceded or triggered the behavior?
(Develop an understanding of why the behavior occurs.)
B = Behavior—What happened?
C = Consequences—What does the student get out of the behavior?
Examples:
A = Student leans back in chair.
B = Student falls over backward.
C = Peers laugh and student gains attention, or student is injured.
A = Student is having difficulty reading fluently.
B = Student refuses to read and gets angry and throws book.
C = Staff assist and encourage student, provide alternative reading strategies, or
student is sent to the office for discipline.
Principles of Motivation/Reinforcement
Intrinsic motivation:
Engaging in a behavior and the pleasant consequence that occur during and/or after the
behavior are related to the essential nature of behavior. They like “it” (the behavior).
Extrinsic motivation:
Engaging in a behavior due to pleasant consequences occurring during and/or after the
behavior that are not related to the essential nature of the behavior. They like (the
reward) for the behavior.
Things to remember:
 Reward the desired behavior immediately or as soon as possible after
occurrence.
 Tell the student what was done well.
 Be aware of the child’s behavior to determine if the motivation/reinforcer
increased the desired behavior or not.
 Educators need to know the child with whom they are working to appropriately
choose a motivator or positive reinforcer.
 Behavior that brings rewards will be repeated.
 Behavior that is repeated becomes habitual.
Definition of reinforcement:
An action or event that will increase the chances of the future recurrence of the behavior
it follows.
Positive reinforcement—increases or encourages behavior
Negative reinforcement—decreases a behavior
Shaping reinforcement—rewards each successive approximation of the behavior
desired. A behavior is set up in small steps and the accomplishment of each step is
rewarded rather than waiting until the entire task is completed correctly.
Types of Reinforcers:
Tangible or material reinforcers
 Food
 Sports cards
 Posters
 Performing a class job
Token reinforcers (can be traded in later for tangible reinforcers)
 Tokens
 Points
 Checkmarks
Social reinforcers
 Praise
 A pat on the back
 Thumbs up
Always pair other reinforcers with social reinforcers. Eventually, when the behavior is
stable you will fade the other reinforcer and keep the social reinforcer. This may
increase the intrinsic reinforcement.
When Using Praise as a Reinforcer
Praise needs to be specific.
 Specific praise allows students to know what they did well so they can repeat the
behavior, i.e. “You did a good job of waiting your turn to talk. You did not interrupt
anyone during the discussion.”
 Specific praise sounds more genuine rather than a pattern—“Your paper is very
neat and easy to read” versus “good job.”
 Specific praise lends itself to generalization from one learning environment to
another.
Smart Start Interactions
Positive/Descriptive Messages Negative, Cloudy Messages
“In your seat, with quiet feet.” “Don’t get out of your seat.”
“Keep hands and feet to yourself.” “No hitting or kicking.”
“Your assignment is due before you go to recess.”
“You need to hurry up and do better.
“Use kind, encouraging words.” “You aren’t supposed to be doing that now!”
“Be in your seat, ready to work, when the bell rings.”
“What is it you need to be doing right now?”
“Raise your hand and wait to be called on.” “No talking without raising your hand.”
“Use walking feet when you are in the building.”
“Don’t run!”
How To Manage Behavior When It Occurs
Ignore behaviors
Criteria for ignoring behaviors: Ask yourself
 Can you teach?
 Can the student learn?
 Can his/her classmates learn?
 Is the behavior not likely to escalate?
Use nonverbal communication
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Proximity (standing near a student)
Eye contact
Gestures (i.e., fingers to lips, nods
Move your attention away from student
Use verbal communication
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Tell the entire class/group what you expect.
Give private, quiet redirective to student
talk to the student privately or create an “illusion of privacy”
quietly tell student what you expect
say, “thank you”
If necessary, give a choice involving a consequence-Consequences must be
discussed and sanctioned by the supervising teacher ahead of time.
Be non-intrusive—do not interfere with instruction.
To insure student’s understanding of teacher directions:
Ethical Considerations in Behavior Management
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Behavior management should be viewed as an opportunity for teaching and not
an opportunity for punishment.
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Avoid embarrassing students and offer suggestions in private in the form of
constructive criticism.
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Never engage in a power struggle. Strive for win/win.
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Don’t touch students who are upset, and don’t hesitate to get help from another
teacher if you need it.
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Keep your supervising teacher informed about students’ behavior, and make
sure your records are objective and free of emotion. If a student does not appear
to respond to a particular strategy, share this information with the teacher so that
the behavior management plan may be modified.
The Individual Education Program (IEP)
Federal and state laws require that each student who receives special education
services must have an IEP. The purpose of an IEP is to ensure that a student is
provided with the educational programming and supports that he or she needs in order
to learn to live, work, and play in the community. The key goal is integration with
appropriate support. This means that planned activities should take place in the same
settings that are used by other students of the same chronological age. At the same
time, students with disabilities may need special assistance and modified activities.
Therefore, planned support for educational activities should be provided so that the
individual may have a successful experience in general education classrooms and
programs.
IEPs should clearly state the following:
1) Personal information about the student (name, birthday, parents’ names, primary
language, etc.)
2) Results of the evaluation that led to the Special Education placement (standardized
test scores and testing dates)
3) A statement of the student’s present level of educational performance and how his or
her disability affects involvement and progress in the general curriculum
4) Strengths of the student and his or her environment
5) Areas in which the student needs special assistance
6) Major, long-term educational and other goals in the student’s life
7) Measurable short-term objectives that will help the student reach the long-term goals
8) Individuals in the school or family who are responsible for assisting the student in
successfully completing the objectives
9) Special services (instructional resources, materials, and/or equipment) that the
student needs
10) Exactly how the student will take part in the general school program, and an
explanation of the extent of non-participation with peers without disabilities
11) Beginning and ending dates for special education services
12) How, when, and by whom the plan will be re-evaluated
Supporting Teachers’ Instruction
There are probably many times when the teacher will need to be the primary person
providing the direct instruction to students. During these times, there is much that the
paraprofessional can do to assist or facilitate the teacher’s instruction.
Paraprofessionals can support teacher’s instruction by:
1. Reviewing the lesson plan. The format of a lesson plan may vary from teacher to
teacher, but most effective lesson plans include the following general components:
a) A statement of the objective
b) An outline of the activities and a description of specific instructional
procedures to be used
c) A list of materials and equipment needed
d) A plan for reinforcement
e) Procedures for evaluating student performance and record keeping
2. Preparing materials
The teacher may ask you to help by preparing materials for the lesson. This may
include adapted materials for students with disabilities.
These are the things you can do to directly facilitate the students in learning the material
the teacher is presenting:
3. Modeling appropriate behavior
Model the behaviors that will help make it easier for the student to learn:
a) Stand at the side of the class, facing the teacher
b) Show attentiveness to the teacher and the lesson
c) Assist the teacher by modeling appropriate responses, if asked.
4. Assist with behavior management
5. Plan for follow-up instruction
If your role in a given lesson is simply to observe, you may want to take notes so that
you can use the same words and strategies if you’re asked to do any follow-up
instruction on that lesson later
Assessing Student Performance
“Assessing student performance” means gathering information about a student and
making a determination about him or her. There should always be a specific reason that
an assessment is done, and the reasons should be directly related to the individual’s life
and educational goals. As you can see, then, assessment is very important to the
educational process. Let’s look at the main types of assessment that paraeducators
may be involved in.
Standardized Tests
Standardized tests are always given in the same way, using the same instructions, and
materials, and the same scoring methods. Formal standardized tests, such as IQ tests,
are done by someone who is highly trained and experienced with the test, such as the
school psychologist. For less formal testing situations, for example teacher-developed
standardized tests they give repeatedly, paraprofessionals can be primarily responsible
for the activity, as long as the teacher shows them exactly how to give the test and the
paraprofessional appreciates the importance of keeping the method of administering the
test as consistent as possible.
Behavioral Checklists
Behavioral checklists categorize and list specific behaviors, often in specific
developmental areas, such as fine motor, cognitive, language, gross motor, etc. Specific
behaviors are listed in the sequence in which they occur in a typical development
pattern. The person completing the checklist simply checks off whether or not the
student is able to perform that specific behavior.
Other professionals who work with a student, such as psychologists and physicians,
may request a behavioral checklist be completed on a student so that they may
understand the student better and determine the best course of treatment. If a teacher
is asked to complete a behavioral checklist, he or she may consult with the
paraprofessional who works closely with the student.
Direct Observation
Another way to gather information about students is to observe them and record
information about your observations in a systematic fashion. The written information that
reflects what you observed is called “data,” and it can be used to assist with
instructional decisions about the student. Often, this type of observational data provides
important information that other tests don’t measure.
Teachers determine what behavior is to be observed, and what method of recording will
be used. Paraprofessionals are often involved in the process of actually gathering the
data.
There are three main characteristics of good observation data:
First, the observations need to be reliable. In order to gather reliable data, you must
keep your observations objective. Object observation means watching and recording:
a) Events without being affected by person biases/prejudices
b) What is happening without guessing at the reasons that cause the action
c) Without judging whether it is good or bad
d) Only behaviors that are observable and measurable.
–Example of behavior that IS observable and measurable: “Frank hit John on the arm
twice within five minutes.”
–Example of behavior that IS NOT observable and measurable: “Annie was being her
usual schizophrenic self this morning.”
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Second, good observation data is data that has been collected across different times
and different settings. For example, it is more helpful to know how often Frank is
physically aggressive in different classes over the course of several days or weeks, than
it is to know how often he hit others in one class on any one given day.
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Third, it is important that the data observation system be a manageable addition to the
paraprofessional’s general workload. The data observation sheet should be as simple
as possible, and the observations must not interfere with the normal classroom
activities.
Methods of Recording Direct Observational Data
Narrative form
This is also called an “anecdotal” record. It means writing your observations in the form
of sentences. It is appropriate for behavior that is unusual. For example, it could be
appropriate to make a narrative or anecdotal record of an incident involving extreme
anger and physical aggression from a student who is usually calm and agreeable.
Frequency count
This means keeping track of the number of times a specific behavior occurs within a
specific period of time. Frequency counts are useful for recording behaviors that have a
clear beginning and end that last about the same amount of time each time they occur.
You simply tally the number of times the target behavior occurred during the
observation period.
Duration
This method gives information about how long a given behavior lasts. You record the
starting and ending time of the behavior, then compute the length of time taken for the
behavior. Duration recording is more appropriate for behaviors that vary in time, as
opposed to ones which last the same amount of time each time they occur. An example
of duration recording could be for a student who has crying episodes in class. Every
time the student cries in class, you would record the beginning and ending times, and
then calculate the duration of the crying episode.
Curriculum-Based Assessment
Curriculum-based assessment means administering “mini-tests” to a student on a
regular basis to gather information about the student’s progress with the curriculum.
This information is used to monitor how well the student is learning the content of the
curriculum, to identify particular problems the student may be having with the material,
and to design interventions to help the student with those difficulties. It is time
consuming because it is individualized and on-going, but
it is a critical part of good instruction for students with disabilities (especially those with
learning problems).
The mini-tests used for curriculum-based assessment must require the student to
produce original responses (as opposed to true/false or multiple choice). This enables
the teacher to not only calculate the percent of items the student got correct, but also to
examine the student’s thinking processes as he or she worked through the test. These
assessments identify patterns that can help the teacher know what to re-teach, and give
the teacher insight into the types of strategies to use when re-teaching.
It is often very motivating for a student if you involve him or her in charting and
monitoring his or her progress. The teacher is responsible for establishing a system of
curriculum-based assessment, but the paraprofessional may be trained in how to
administer and score the mini-tests.
Supporting Instruction in Content-Area Classes
Paraprofessionals can help carry out and support interventions the teacher designs.
Examples include:
– highlighting textbooks
– being or training a class note taker
– maintaining a class notebook with assignments, handouts, materials, etc.
– preparing adapted materials for students
– prompting students to make correct responses
– training a peer partner to assist the student
– providing follow-up instruction
During follow-up instruction, the paraprofessionals can:
– Provide additional instruction
– Follow the basic format of effective instruction: 1) I Do It. 2) We Do It. 3) You Do It.
During small group instruction, the paraprofessionals can:
– Use effective instruction.
– Gain students’ attention
– Review necessary pre-skills
– State goal of the lesson
– “I Do It. We Do It. You Do It.”
– Review the critical lesson content
– State the content of the next less
– Assign independent work.
Checklist for Preparing for Small Group Instruction
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Have I reviewed the lesson plan?
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Do I feel adequately prepared to use the instructional techniques?
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Do I know how to begin the lesson?
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Do I know what to do when the students respond appropriately?
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Do I know how to handle inappropriate responses?
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Am I prepared for off-task student behavior?\
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Do I understand the recording procedure?
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Do I have the materials ready?
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Do I know how to use the materials?
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Do I have the teaching area arranged efficiently?
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Is the teaching area comfortable for the students and myself?
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Do I know how to conclude the lesson?
It is important for the paraprofessional to consult the teacher about the anything they do
not thoroughly understand.
After the lesson:
Have I recorded behavioral observations about the student(s)?
Have I completed the record of the students’ performance?
Am I ready to evaluate the session with my teacher/supervisor?
Accommodations and Modifications
Accommodations do not alter the curriculum.
They are supports or services provided to help a student access the curriculum and
validly demonstrate learning.
What are accommodations?
An accommodation is an adaptation that results in the student with a disability
accomplishing the same goals and objectives as the non-disabled students, and does
not fundamentally alter the general education program.
An accommodation…
changes the conditions by which a student with a disability accomplishes the same task
as the non-disabled student.
Accommodations…
are used to minimize the impact of a disability and circumvent deficiencies in specific
academic areas.
Examples:
Oral testing
Hearing aids
Using a calculator
Preferential seating
Modifications alter the curriculum.
Modifications change the content and performance expectations for what a student
should learn.
What are modifications?
A modification is an adaptation that results in the student with a disability accomplishing
different goals and objectives as non-disabled students and fundamentally alters the
general education program.
A modification…
alters the task in a way that the student is able to accomplish a different, perhaps
related task assigned to the non-disabled peers.
Modifications…
are used to remediate deficiencies in specific academic areas by bringing the goals and
objectives of the curriculum in closer alignment with a student’s present levels of
educational performance.
Examples:
Using an alternative set of spelling words
Reading with instructional level materials rather than grade level materials
Learning addition with manipulatives rather than long division with peers
Paraprofessional’s role with modifications and accommodations:
Participate in on-going communication with teacher before making any changes in
student’s instruction
Clarify modifications with teacher before class, not in front of students or peers
Communicate modifications or accommodations to the student in private
Establish on-going modifications or accommodations (e.g., the student always
completes the off items in math, the student always writes phrase answers rather than
sentences) with the teacher.
Paraprofessionals should check with the supervising teacher to discuss ideas before
making any changes in student’s instruction.
Providing Direct Instruction with Guidance from the Teacher
Paraprofessionals help to increase the opportunities for students to master both
academic and nonacademic skills by providing one-on-one instruction that has been
developed by a teacher to meet the specific education needs of a student.
Systematic Instructional Procedures
Special education teachers use many concepts and procedures to teach functional,
academic, and social skills to students with moderate to severe disabilities. Listed below
are a few of the most commonly-used concepts and procedures. If a paraprofessional’s
supervising teacher frequently uses other techniques, he or she will need on-the-job
training in the use of these techniques. Included in the discussion below are discrete
and chained tasks, task analysis, and prompting procedures (a system of least prompts
and constant time delay).
Discrete vs. Chained Tasks
When designing systematic instruction, one thing the teacher must determine is whether
he/she is trying to teach the student a “discrete” or a “chained” task. Discrete tasks are
ones that require the learner to make a single response. Examples include reading
words, matching prices to coins, and indicating a preferred activity by pointing to a
picture of the activity. In contrast, chained tasks are tasks that require the learner to
make two or more separate, yet sequential, responses.
Examples include hand washing, making a bed, and cooking. Discrete tasks may be
taught separately (e.g., counting, labeling coins) or taught as a step within a larger,
chained task (e.g., counting coins before putting them in a vending machine to buy a
snack). For chained tasks, the teacher must perform a task analysis before proceeding
with instruction. A task analysis means generating a list of all the steps a student needs
to do in order to complete the task. In order to create the list, the teacher might observe
other students complete the task, talk with experts, or complete the task him or herself,
to make sure he/she knows what all is involved in performing the skill. Talking to an
expert might be important when teaching skills for use in a specific environment. For
example, for a student who wants to get a job as a housekeeper at a hotel, the task
analysis should reflect how the task is performed with the materials in that setting.
Prompts are often involved in instruction. There are generally seven categories of
prompts:
Independent prompt – verbal or written command to perform an entire task
Verbal prompt – verbal or written command to perform a step within the task
Pictorial prompt – picture or drawing of a step within the task
Gestural prompt — movement that directs a student’s attention toward an object or act
that constitutes a step in the task
Model prompt — a demonstration of the desired behavior for that step
Partial physical prompt — brief touching, tapping, or nudging to help the student
perform that step in the task
Full physical prompt — full physical guidance WITHOUT force to help the student
perform the step in the task
You can see that these prompt categories are arranged from least to most intrusive or
controlling. (That is, it allows a student more autonomy to use a verbal prompt than a
partial or full physical prompt.) Even though physical prompts are more “intrusive”, they
are sometimes necessary. It’s the teacher’s job to consider the pros and cons of each
type of prompt and to consider the individual needs of a student when deciding which
prompt(s) to use in a given situation.
Prompts can be used singularly (that is, just using one type of prompt with a student), in
combination (using more than one type), or as part of a system. Many different types of
“prompting systems” are used to teach students with disabilities. They are used
because they have been shown to be effective teaching strategies and because they
minimize the number of errors students make when learning a new skill.
System of Least Prompts
The system of least prompts is a technique for teaching that involves initially low levels
of student assistance and increasing the degree of assistance, as needed. The teacher
decides how the system is established (i.e., the task to be taught, which prompts to
include in the prompt hierarchy, the length of time that will be used between prompts,
and the reinforcer that will be used). A simplified prompt hierarchy that many teachers
use is: verbal, model, partial physical, full physical. The teacher performs a task
analysis if it is a chained task and arranges the prompts in a hierarchy from least
intrusive or controlling to most intrusive or controlling.
During an instructional session, the student is first asked to perform the task.
(Eventually, this command alone should lead the student to perform all the steps in the
task. But before the task is learned, it will take repetition of the command, along with the
system of prompts and reinforcement, to help the student through the process.) The
teacher or paraprofessional waits the specified length of time (for example, 5 seconds).
If the student performs the first step of the task correctly within that time, the instructor
provides reinforcement. If the student makes an error or has no response, the first
prompt in the hierarchy is given and then the instructor waits the specified period of
time. If the student performs the step correctly within this time, the instructor provides
reinforcement. If the student makes an error or has no response, the next prompt in the
hierarchy is given and the wait-period is provided. This continues up through the last
level of prompt, if necessary.
Once the student has completed the first step in the task analysis, he/she has the
opportunity to perform the second step in the task analysis. The instructor waits the
specified length of time, giving the student the opportunity to perform Step 2
independently (without any prompting). If the student does not perform the step within
the time interval (e.g., 5 seconds), the first prompt is given. The same procedures for
working through the prompt hierarchy (from least to most intrusive) are used with each
step in the task analysis until the entire task is completed.
Here is an example of how the system of least prompts could be used. For some
students, learning self-care tasks is a high priority. A system of least prompts could be
used in the following way to teach hair-washing, for example:
Student: Jerry Teacher: Ms. Sorenson
Task Analysis:
1. Gather materials
2. Go to sink
3. Turn on water
4. Wet hair
5. Open shampoo bottle
6. Squeeze shampoo into hand
7. Rub shampoo into hair
8. Rinse hair
9. Turn off water
10. Towel-dry hair
11. Put shampoo bottle away
Prompt hierarchy selected for this student:
1. Verbal
2. Partial physical
3. Full physical
Wait period selected – 5 seconds
Reinforcement selected – verbal praise and a pat on the back. In an instructional
session with a student named Jerry, the teacher, Ms. Sorenson, would start out by
guiding Jerry to the bathroom and giving the task command “Jerry, wash your hair.” The
teacher would then start counting silently to five, giving the student up to five seconds to
begin performing the first step in the process correctly. If Jerry does begin to gather the
materials within five seconds, Ms. Sorenson would provide verbal praise by saying
“Good job!” and would pat Jerry on the back. The teacher would then begin counting to
five silently, to give Jerry the chance to begin the second step in the process by himself.
If he goes to the sink within five seconds, Ms. Sorenson says “Yes, that’s right!” and
pats Jerry on the back. Again, she waits for up to five seconds for Jerry to initiate the
next step in the process. If at any point in the process, Jerry responds incorrectly or
does not begin the next step within the five-second time period, Ms. Sorenson simply
begins moving down the hierarchy of prompt types. For example, she will start with a
verbal prompt (e.g., “Jerry, go to the sink”). If Jerry has no response or an incorrect
response in the five-second wait period following this first prompt in the hierarchy, then
Ms. Sorenson would use a partial physical prompt simultaneously with the verbal
prompt (physical prompts should always be accompanied by a verbal prompt). A partial
physical prompt for Step 3 (“turn on the water”) might be a gentle nudging of Jerry’s arm
in the direction of the water faucet. At the same time that Ms. Sorenson provides this
partial physical prompt, she states, “Jerry, turn on the water.” If five seconds pass and
there is still no correct response, Ms. Sorenson should provide a full physical prompt, by
placing her hand over Jerry’s hand and guiding it to the faucet and turning the faucet on,
using his hand. Full physical prompts are not done with force. If the student resists the
paraprofessional’s guidance, the paraprofessional should discontinue the prompt and
inform the teacher.
Constant Time Delay
This is another instructional procedure that can also be used with either discrete or
chained tasks.
Again, the supervising teacher is responsible for deciding how to set up this prompt
system. The teacher must decide what prompts to use, how long the delay period will
be, how many trials there will be, what reinforcement techniques to use, and what data
collection system to use.
These decisions are based on the strengths and skills of the individual student, as well
as on the nature of the task being taught.
Basically, constant time delay has two phases or parts. The first phase involves giving a
command or asking a question and immediately ensuring that the student answers or
performs the task. These are called “zero-second trials” and teachers or
paraprofessionals do several of them in a row during the first phase of constant time
delay. For example, when working on picture identification with a student, the
paraprofessional might ask, “What’s this?” He or she immediately answers the question
and the student repeats the answer. After doing this a specified number of times, the
paraprofessional moves into phase two of constant time delay. In this phase, the
paraprofessional waits a specific number of seconds (for example, four seconds)
between the time that he or she asked the initial question and the time when the prompt
is provided that ensures the student will answer correctly. The paraprofessional or
teacher does this as many times as necessary for the student to learn the task or
answer. Initially, reinforcement is provided for all correct answers; as learning occurs,
however, the paraprofessional gradually changes the reinforcement schedule so that
the student is only reinforced for correct unprompted responses. You provide
reinforcement for all correct answers initially; as learning occurs, however, you gradually
change the reinforcement schedule so that the student is only reinforced for correct
unprompted responses.
General Guidelines for Providing Personal Care for Students







Make sure what you are doing or are being asked to do is a task that is
appropriate for you to do.
Remember that licensed, certified staff (nurses, therapists, special education
teachers) are responsible and accountable for managing students’ health care
needs.
Registered nurses or therapists determine if a student requires special health
care. They also decide who can provide it, and they are responsible for your
training and supervision.
Trained paraprofessionals may not train other unlicensed personnel.
Parents may not train unlicensed personnel.
Take medical directions only from a licensed nurse carrying out a doctor’s orders.
The following tasks are often part of the paraprofessional’s responsibilities:
 Positioning (helping students assume postures they cannot initiate and maintain
themselves)
 Lifting
 Transferring
 Carrying
 Feeding
 Assisting with toileting, diapering and feminine hygiene
Working with Non-Verbal Students
If available, use the communication system developed by the speech/language
pathologist—symbols, line drawings, and/or photographs—to communicate with
students.
Show basic respect.
Provide a predictable routine.
Interact with and talk to the student.
Give the student choices.
Position the student to make it easier to communicate.
Physically place yourself on the student’s level.
Be patient and wait for the student’s response to directions.
Guidelines for Lifting Students
Proper lifting maintains the back health and safety of the lifter and the student’s
independence, function, and range of motion.
When lifting students . . .
 Clear both transfer surfaces and the movement path.
 Stabilize the transfer surfaces. Lock wheelchair brakes and any wheeled support.
 Wear non-skid shoes.
 Tell the student what you will do in the lift and what they will be expected to do.
 Unfasten all straps and belts.
 Keep feet shoulder-width apart to improve balance.
 Bend mainly at the hips and knees while maintaining normal back alignment,
including an arch in the lower back.
 Lift the student as close to his or her center of gravity as possible, by the waist or
crossed arms.
 Hold the student as close to your body as possible to decrease the weight of the
load.
 Instruct and enable the student to help you as much as possible.
 Complete the lift before turning; do not twist your body while lifting.
 Use safety devices, including a gait belt, whenever possible.
If the student is heavier than 35% of your body weight . . .
 Use two people to lift.
 Transfer the student, rather than lift. Examples of transferring include moving the
student from the floor to a standing position; from a wheelchair to a mat or chair;
and from a standing table to a wheelchair.
 Use adaptive equipment to help lift the student.
 Always transfer rather than lift students who can assist you.
 Remember in lifting, transferring, and carrying, your personal safety and that of
the student are the primary concern.
 Consult with the physical therapist or nurse if you have questions.
Guidelines for Toileting, Diapering, and Hygiene









Respect the student’s privacy.
Remember important safety issues, such as how to handle body fluid and using
correct transferring techniques.
Allow the student as much independence as possible.
Learn how the student communicates the need to go to the bathroom.
Maintain the student’s privacy by closing the door or using a screen.
Wear gloves and bag and seal diapers or body fluid.
Dispose diapers and other supplies in a proper container.
Wash your own and the student’s hands.
Guidelines for Feeding
Feeding can be a problem for students with abnormal oral muscle tone or lack of
muscle control. They may have difficulty swallowing, poor head control, secretions, or
other factors that make feeding difficult and risky.
Paraprofessionals should . . .

 Understand the critical nature of the eating process.
 Attend carefully to the guidelines developed for a student’s feeding program.
Universal Precautions








Treat all human blood and certain bodily fluids as if they are known to be
infectious for blood-borne diseases.
Avoid direct contact with bodily fluids.
Use a barrier, such as gloves or a mask, and wash hands after removing gloves.
Don’t eat or touch your mouth or eyes while providing first aid care.
Clean up and dispose of waste products and needles appropriately.
Hand washing is the single most important thing you can do to prevent
transmission of infectious organisms.
o Soap in a dispenser and disposable towels are best.
o When water isn’t available, use germicidal wipes or a waterless, alcoholbased hand wash.
Disinfect surfaces with a bleach solution.
Creating an Effective Special Education Team
Determining the Roles of Team Members
Discuss and clarify each member’s role
Both school professionals and paraprofessionals need to know their roles and how to
use the skills and expertise of each team member effectively.
General factors to consider to determine the roles of team members. These include:
Expertise
Training
Comfort level
Time constraints
Knowledge levels of individual team members
Providing Appropriate Leadership
Leadership is critical for an effective team. The team leader is the school professional
designated as the paraprofessional’s supervisor, usually the supervising teacher. This
person is responsible for:
Assessing the paraprofessional’s skills and helping him/her use them.
Providing direction and ideas.
Identifying alternatives.
Raising questions.
Supplying feedback.
Soliciting input from the paraprofessional
Providing Training Opportunities for Paraprofessionals
Like everyone else in schools, paraprofessional are lifelong learners. Schools and
districts should:
Provide opportunities for paraprofessional to refine their skills and maintain their
current knowledge.
Evaluate the training they provide paraprofessional who work with students with
disabilities.
Consciously plan to provide training that is specific to the role that
paraprofessional play within the school.
The Characteristics of Effective Paraprofessional
Good interpersonal skills
A positive attitude
A desire for self-improvement
Self-confidence
Patience
Empathy
Concern for children
Section 3: Job
Descriptions &
Procedures
Geary County USD 475
Job Description
Classification
Classified
Division/Department Elementary
Job Category
Instructional Paraprofessional
FLSA
Title
Paraprofessional
Qualifications 48 College Credit Hours or the ability to pass a State
Approved Assessment within 90 days of employment.
Reports To
Supervising Teacher & Building Principal
Supervises
Students
Job Goal
PERFORMANCE RESPONSIBILITIES
1. Read aloud or listen to children read.
2. Assist students in performing activities/lessons that have been initiated by
the teacher.
3. Hand out papers and collect paper work.
4. Provide special help such as drilling with flash cards and spelling.
5. Assist in preparing instructional materials.
6. Reinforce learning instructional materials.
7. Assist children in learning their names, addresses, telephone numbers,
birthdays, and parent’s names.
8. Supervise free play activities in classroom.
9. Prepare flash cards and charts.
10.
Prepare art supplies and other materials, bulletin boards, etc.
11.
Hear requests for help, observe learning difficulties from pupils,
and report such matters to teacher.
12.
Score objective tests and papers and keep appropriate records for
teachers.
13.
Assist in educational demonstration for the class or small groups.
14.
Assist in setting up learning centers.
15.
Provide assistance with individualized programmed materials.
16.
Work with individual students or small groups on instruction as
planned by the classroom teacher.
17.
Escort students to other classes(art, music, PE) as needed.
18.
Support the teacher or other professional staff in various activities
(music, PE, etc.)
19.
Assist with organizing of field trips.
20.
Assist with supplementary work for advanced students.
21.
Escort children on educational trips outside the classroom with the
teacher.
22.
Attend inservice meetings provided by the district.
23.
Perform other duties or accept responsibilities determined by the
supervising teacher or building principal.
BASIC FUNCTION/PURPOSE
The instructional paraprofessional is a team member who works in special
education classes only under the supervision of the classroom teacher. The
paraprofessional frees the professional from routine daily tasks and also serves
as a part of the instructional team. The paraprofessional carries out the
educational program developed by the classroom teacher and support
personnel. The instructional paraprofessional must receive a minimum of
required hours of service training per year.
Terms of
Employment
9 Months
Salary Range
Commensurate with qualifications and experience
Evaluation
Frequency
Job performance will be evaluated a minimum of 1
times per year.
Instructions: Please sign below indicating that this document was
reviewed for accuracy with the incumbent. Give the original to the
employee and place a signed copy in the employee’s personnel folder. If
this is a revised job description, please attach the original.
Incumbent’s Signature
Immediate Supervisor’s Signature
Personnel’s Signature
Superintendent’s Signature
Revision Requested
Yes No
Final Approval Yes
No
Date
Date
Date
Date
Date
Date
Geary County USD 475
Job Description
Classification
Classified
Division/Department Middle School
Job Category
Instructional Paraprofessional
FLSA
Title
Paraprofessional
Qualifications 48 College Credit Hours or the ability to pass a State
Approved Assessment within 90 days of employment.
Reports To
Supervising Teacher & Building Prinicipal
Supervises
Students
Job Goal
PERFORMANCE RESPONSIBILITIES
1.
Read aloud or listen to children read.
2.
Assist students in performing activities/lessons that have been
initiated by the
teacher.
3.
Provide special help such as drilling with flash cards and spelling.
4.
Assist in preparing instructional materials.
5.
Reinforce learning instructional materials.
6.
Hear requests for help, observe learning difficulties from pupils,
and report such
matters to teacher.
7.
Score objective tests and papers and keep appropriate records for
teachers.
8.
Assist in educational demonstration for the class or small groups.
9. Assist in setting up learning centers.
10.
Provide assistance with individualized programmed materials.
11.
Work with individual students or small groups on instruction as
planned by the
classroom teacher.
12.
Escort students to other classes(art, music, PE) as needed.
13.
Support the teacher or other professional staff in various activities
(music, PE)
14.
Assist with on field trips.
15.
Assist with supplementary work for advanced students.
16.
Escort children on educational trips outside the classroom with the
teacher.
17.
Attend inservice meetings provided by the district.
18.
Perform other duties or accept responsibilities determined by the
supervising
teacher or building principal.
BASIC FUNCTION/PURPOSE
The instructional paraprofessional is a team member who works in special
education classes only under the supervision of the classroom teacher. The
paraprofessional frees the professional from routine daily tasks and also serves
as a part of the instructional team. The paraprofessional carries out the
educational program developed by the classroom teacher and support
personnel. The instructional paraprofessional must receive a minimum of
required hours of service training per year.
Terms of
Employment
9 Months
Salary Range
Commensurate with qualifications and experience
Evaluation
Frequency
Job performance will be evaluated a minimum of 1
times per year .
Instructions: Please sign below indicating that this document was
reviewed for accuracy with the incumbent. Give the original to the
employee and place a signed copy in the employee’s personnel folder. If
this is a revised job description, please attach the original.
Incumbent’s Signature
Immediate Supervisor’s Signature
Personnel’s Signature
Superintendent’s Signature
Revision Requested
Yes No
Final Approval Yes
No
Date
Date
Date
Date
Date
Date
Geary County USD 475
Job Description
Classification
Division/Department
Job Category
FLSA
Classified
High School
Instructional Paraprofessional
Title
Paraprofessional
Qualifications
48 College Credit Hours or the ability to pass a State Approved
Assessment within 90 days of employment.
Reports To
Supervising Teacher & Building Principal
Supervises
Students
Job Goal
PERFORMANCE RESPONSIBILITIES
1. Read aloud or listen to children read.
2. Assist students in performing activities/lessons that have been initiated by the teacher.
3. Provide special help such as drilling with flash cards and spelling.
4. Assist in preparing instructional materials.
5. Reinforce learning instructional materials.
6. Hear requests for help, observe learning difficulties from pupils, and report such matters
to teacher.
7. Assist in educational demonstration for the class or small groups.
8. Provide progress updates to the case manager/coordinator for the students you assist.
9. Provide assistance with individualized programmed materials.
10. Work with individual students or small groups on instruction as planned by the classroom
teacher.
11. Escort students to other classes(art, music, PE) as needed.
12. Support the teacher or other professional staff in various activities (music, PE, etc.)
13. Assist with on field trips.
14. Assist with supplementary work for advanced students.
15. Escort children on educational trips outside the classroom with the teacher.
16. Attend staff development meetings provided by the district.
17. Perform other duties or accept responsibilities determined by the supervising teacher or
building principal.
BASIC FUNCTION/PURPOSE
The instructional paraprofessional is a team member who works in special
education classes only under the supervision of the classroom teacher.
The paraprofessional frees the professional from routine daily tasks and
also serves as a part of the instructional team. The paraprofessional
carries out the educational program developed by the classroom teacher
and support personnel. The instructional paraprofessional must receive a
minimum of required hours of service training per year.
Terms of Employment
Salary Range
Evaluation Frequency
9 Months
Commensurate with qualifications and
experience
Job performance will be evaluated
a minimum of 1 times per year.
Instructions: Please sign below indicating that this document was
reviewed for accuracy with the incumbent. Give the original to the
employee and place a signed copy in the employee’s personnel folder. If
this is a revised job description, please attach the original.
Incumbent’s Signature
Immediate Supervisor’s Signature
Personnel’s Signature
Superintendent’s Signature
Revision Requested
Yes No
Final Approval Yes
No
Date
Date
Date
Date
Date
Date
Geary County USD 475
Job Description
Classification
Division/Department
Job Category
FLSA
Title
Classified
Elementary
ARC Paraprofessional
ARC Paraprofessional
Qualifications
48 College Credit Hours or the ability to pass a State Approved
Assessment within 90 days of employment.
Reports To
Supervising Teacher & Building Principal
Supervises
Students
PERFORMANCE RESPONSIBILITIES
1. Assist students in performing activities/lessons that have been initiated by the teacher.
2. Assist in preparation and reinforcement of instructional materials.
3. Hear requests for help, observe learning difficulties from pupils, and report such matters
to teacher.
4. Provide assistance with individualized programmed materials.
5. Work with individual students or small groups on instruction as planned by the classroom
teacher.
6. Assist with redirecting students
7. Reinforce the school and classroom rules, policies, and procedures.
8. May need to monitor students on the bus.
9. Supervise and assist students when included into general education classes.
10. Assist in supervision of students during recess and lunch periods and accompany students
on community experiences.
11. Monitor students and assist in instructing self-care skills including feeding, dressing,
brushing teeth, using deodorant, combing hair, toileting, diapering, etc.
12. Instruct, assist and may transport students with vocational activities such as
shredding documents, recycling, cleaning tables, etc.
13. Instruct students in community skills such as street safety, stranger safety signs,
sight words, bank money skills, reading menus and ordering food.
14. Chart individual progress of students under the direction and supervision of the teacher.
15. Strictly adhere to confidentiality requirements regarding all matters pertaining to
students, parents, parent communications, and/or classroom activities. (Note: Unless
instructed otherwise by supervising teacher, all parent communication must come directly
from certified personnel.)
16. Supervise student in teacher-planned activity and help student to stay on task for
programs taught by supervising teacher.
17. Assist with activities of prescribed programs including those written by related service
personnel such as PT, OT and Speech.
18. Implement behavior management techniques in accordance with the directions given by
the supervising teacher (reinforcing appropriate behaviors in accordance with the
teacher’s plan, supervising timeout, etc.)
19. Control and monitor disruptive behaviors of disabled students in the
classroom, throughout the building, on the playground, during field trips
and during other community activities.
20. Prevent students from hurting themselves or others through the use of timeout room or other de-escalation strategies.
21. Provide observations, opinions and feedback to professional staff.
22. Attend professional development meetings provided by the district or supervisor
scheduled meetings.
23. Perform other duties or accept responsibilities determined by the supervising teacher or
building principal.
All decisions and/or questions regarding Special Education services are to be referred to the
supervising special education teacher.
BASIC FUNCTION/PURPOSE
The paraprofessional is a team member who works in special education classes only
under the supervision of the classroom teacher. The paraprofessional serves as a part of the
instructional team. The paraprofessional carries out the educational program developed by the
classroom teacher and support personnel. The paraprofessional must receive a minimum of
required hours of service training per year.
Terms of Employment
9 Months
Salary Range
Commensurate with qualifications and experience
Evaluation Frequency
Job performance will be evaluated a minimum of 1 times per
year.
Instructions: Please sign below indicating that this document was reviewed for accuracy
with the incumbent. Give the original to the employee and place a signed copy in the
employee’s personnel folder. If this is a revised job description, please attach the original.
Incumbent’s Signature
Immediate Supervisor’s Signature
Personnel’s Signature
Superintendent’s Signature
Revision Requested
Yes
No
Final Approval Yes
No
Date
Date
Date
Date
Date
Date
Geary County USD 475
Job Description
Classification
Division/Department
Job Category
FLSA
Classified
Elementary, Middle School, or High School
FLS Paraprofessional
Title
Instructional Paraprofessional
Qualifications
48 College Credit Hours or the ability to pass a State Approved
Assessment within 90 days of employment.
Reports To
Supervising Teacher & Building Prinicipal
Supervises
Students
PERFORMANCE RESPONSIBILITIES
1. Read aloud or listen to children read.
2. Assist in the preparation and reinforcement of instructional materials.
3. Assist children in learning chosen curriculum depending on their individual needs and
skills such as basic math, reading and writing skills.
4. Assist children in learning (speaking, recognizing and writing) their names, addresses,
telephone numbers, birthdays, and parent’s names.
5. Hear requests for help, observe learning difficulties from pupils, and report such matters
to teacher. Work with individual students or small groups on instruction as planned by
the classroom teacher.
6. Assist with redirecting students.
7. Escort students to other classes(art, music, PE) as needed.
8. Implement prescribed behavior management program for student.
9. Assist with activities of the prescribed programs including those written by related
service personnel such as PT, OT and Speech, including implementation of student’s
communication program.
10. Provide supervision in classroom, physical education, lunchroom, play ground and to and
from buses.
11. Monitor students and assist in instructing self-care skills including feeding, dressing,
brushing teeth, using deodorant, combing hair, toileting, diapering, etc.
12. Lift students in and out of wheel chairs for positioning, diaper changing or toileting.
13. Instruct, assist and may transport students with vocational activities such as
shredding documents, recycling, cleaning tables, etc.
14. Instruct students in community skills such as street safety, stranger safety signs,
sight words, bank money skills, reading menus and ordering food.
15. Supervise student in teacher-planned activity and help student to stay on task for
programs taught by supervising teacher.
16. Chart individual progress of students under the direction and supervision of the teacher.
17. Meet with teacher and other paras for building and room staff meetings.
18. Supervise and assist student when included into general education classes and accompany
student during any community experiences.
19. Strictly adhere to confidentiality requirements regarding all matters pertaining to
students, parents, parent communications, and/or classroom activities. (Note: Unless
instructed otherwise by the supervising teacher, all parent communication must come
directly from certified personnel.)
20. Instruct small and large groups in academics, sensory skills, art, money, domestics and
recreation planned by the classroom teacher. Provide observations, opinions and feedback
to professional staff.
21. Attend professional development meetings provided by the district or supervisor
scheduled meetings.
22. Perform other duties or accept responsibilities determined by the supervising teacher or
building principal.
All decisions and/or questions regarding Special Education services are to be referred to the
supervising special education teacher.
BASIC FUNCTION/PURPOSE
The paraprofessional is a team member who works in special education classes only
under the supervision of the classroom teacher. The paraprofessional serves as a part of the
instructional team. The paraprofessional carries out the educational program developed by the
classroom teacher and support personnel. The paraprofessional must receive a minimum of
required hours of service training per year.
Terms of Employment
9 Months
Salary Range
Commensurate with qualifications and experience
Evaluation Frequency
Job performance will be evaluated a minimum of 1 times per
year .
Instructions: Please sign below indicating that this document was reviewed for accuracy
with the incumbent. Give the original to the employee and place a signed copy in the
employee’s personnel folder. If this is a revised job description, please attach the original.
Incumbent’s Signature
Immediate Supervisor’s Signature
Personnel’s Signature
Superintendent’s Signature
Revision Requested
Yes
No
Final Approval Yes
No
Date
Date
Date
Date
Date
Date
Geary County USD 475
Job Description
Classification
Division/Department
Job Category
FLSA
Title
Classified
Elementary, Middle, High School
TLC Paraprofessional
TLC Paraprofessional
Qualifications
48 College Credit Hours or the ability to pass a State Approved
Assessment within 90 days of employment.
Reports To
Supervising Teacher & Building Prinicipal
Supervises
Students
PERFORMANCE RESPONSIBILITIES
1. Assist students in performing activities/lessons that have been initiated by the teacher.
2. Assist in preparation and reinforcement of instructional materials.
3. Hear requests for help, observe learning difficulties from pupils, and report such matters
to teacher.
4. Provide assistance with individualized programmed materials.
5. Work with individual students or small groups on instruction as planned by the classroom
teacher.
6. Assist with redirecting students.
7. Reinforce the school and classroom rules, policies, and procedures.
8. May need to monitor students on the bus.
9. Supervise and assist students when included into general education classes.
10. Assist in supervision of students during recess and lunch periods and accompany students
on community experiences.
11. Strictly adhere to confidentiality requirements regarding all matters pertaining to
students, parents, parent communications, and/or classroom activities. (Note: Unless
instructed otherwise by supervising teacher, all parent communication must come directly
from certified personnel.)
12. Assist with activities of prescribed programs including those written by related service
personnel such as PT, OT and Speech.
13. Implement behavior management techniques in accordance with the directions given by
the supervising teacher (reinforcing appropriate behaviors in accordance with the
teacher’s plan, supervising timeout, etc.)
14. Control and monitor disruptive behaviors of disabled students in the
classroom, throughout the building, on the playground, during field trips
and during other community activities.
15. Prevent students from hurting themselves or others through the use of timeout room or other de-escalation strategies.
16. Implement prescribed programs for students whose behaviors range from mildly to
severely disordered.
17. Maintain daily records of student behavior with “back and forth” notebooks, phone
contact logs, behavior point charts and citations for unacceptable behavior.
18. Provide observations, opinions and feedback to certified personnel.
19. Attend professional development meetings provided by the district or supervisor during
scheduled meetings.
20. Perform other duties or accept responsibilities determined by the supervising teacher or
building principal.
All decisions and/or questions regarding Special Education services are to be referred to the
supervising special education teacher.
BASIC FUNCTION/PURPOSE
The paraprofessional is a team member who works in special education classes only
under the supervision of the classroom teacher. The paraprofessional serves as a part of the
instructional team. The paraprofessional carries out the educational program developed by the
classroom teacher and support personnel. The paraprofessional must receive a minimum of
required hours of service training per year.
Terms of Employment
9 Months
Salary Range
Commensurate with qualifications and experience
Evaluation Frequency
Job performance will be evaluated a minimum of 1 times per
year.
Instructions: Please sign below indicating that this document was reviewed for accuracy
with the incumbent. Give the original to the employee and place a signed copy in the
employee’s personnel folder. If this is a revised job description, please attach the original.
Incumbent’s Signature
Immediate Supervisor’s Signature
Personnel’s Signature
Superintendent’s Signature
Revision Requested
Yes
No
Final Approval Yes
No
Date
Date
Date
Date
Date
Date
Geary County USD 475
Classified Employee
Handbook
July 2009
This handbook is not meant as a wage offer or a guarantee of a job or position. As
a handbook, it does not qualify to be grieved. It is simply a guide for classified
employees. All USD 475 Board of Education policies supersede anything in the
handbook.
Geary County USD 475
Classified Employee Handbook
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Section and Title
Page
1.
INTRODUCTION
1
2.
DISTRICT MISSION STATEMENT
1
3.
EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER
1
4.
LOYALTY OATH
2
5.
BENEFITS AND COMPENSATION
5.1
Insurance
5.2
Salary Protection
5.3
Leaves and Absences
5.4
Vacation Days
5.5
Holidays
5.6
Payday
5.7
Non-Taxable Section 125 – Salary Reductions
5.8
Salary Deductions
5.9
Annuities – Deductions
5.10 Kansas Public Employees Retirement System (KPERS)
5.11 Workers’ Compensation
5.12 Unemployment Compensation
2
2
3
3
7
7
8
8
8
8
8
9
9
5.13
Activity Passes
9
6.
SCHEDULES
6.1
Work Schedule/Attendance
6.2
Overtime
6.3
Time Cards/Badge Swiper
6.4
Breaks
6.5
Attendance
10
10
10
10
10
10
7.
CONDUCT
7.1
Disciplinary Procedure
7.2
Drug Free Workplace
7.3
Sexual Harassment
7.4
Racial Harassment
7.5
Relations with Students
7.6
Employee Protection
7.7
Staff-Community Relations
7.8
Confidentiality
7.9
Staff Responsibilities for Discipline
i
7.10 Gifts
7.11 Solicitations
7.12 Dress Code
7.13 Conflict of Interest
7.14 Outside Employment
7.15 Suspension
7.16 Separation of Employment
11
11
11
12
14
16
16
16
16
17
17
17
17
18
18
18
18
8.
DISTRICT PROCEDURES
8.1
Board Policy
8.2
Classified Complaint Procedures
8.3
Discrimination Complaints
8.4
Hiring
8.5
Classified Employee In-processing
8.6
Identification Cards
19
19
19
19
20
20
21
8.7
8.8
8.9
8.10
8.11
8.12
8.13
8.14
8.15
8.16
8.17
8.18
8.19
8.20
8.21
8.22
8.23
8.24
8.25
8.26
8.27
Probationary Status
Evaluations
Supervision
Assignment and Transfer
Criminal Convictions
Notification of Wage
Drug and Alcohol Testing
No Child Left Behind Law
Job Descriptions
Retirement
Nepotism
Organizational Chart
Distribution of Materials
Personal Property
Reimbursement/Travel Expense
Weapons
Job Openings/Postings
Staff Development
Telephone & Cell Phone Use
Computer Software and Hardware Guidelines
E-mail and Internet Policy
21
21
21
21
21
21
22
22
22
22
22
22
22
22
22
22
23
23
23
23
25
9.
COMMITTEE ASSIGNMENTS
9.1
Classified Employees Advisory Council
25
25
10.
RECORDS
10.1 Personnel Records
10.2 Required Records
25
25
26
11.
ii
REPORTS
11.1 Child Abuse
11.2 Reporting Possible Criminal Conduct
11.3 Vandalism
26
26
26
26
12.
HEALTH
12.1 Asbestos Management Plan Notice
12.2 Bloodborne Pathogens
12.3 Communicable Disease/Employees
26
27
27
28
13.
SAFETY AND SECURITY
13.1 Safety Policy
13.2 Safety Procedure
13.3 Reporting of Accidents
13.4 Drills
13.5 Inclement Weather
13.6 Securing the Work Area
13.7 Building Opening and Closing Time
13.8 Keys
13.9 Crisis Plan
13.10 Safe and Violence Free Workplace
28
28
29
30
30
30
30
30
31
31
31
14.
EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES
14.1 Appropriate Use of Equipment and Supplies
14.2 Copying/Duplicating/Inventory/Ordering Procedures/
Requisitions
14.3 Vehicle Request
31
31
APPENDICES
32
15.
31
32
1.
INTRODUCTION
Welcome to the Geary County Schools!
Geary County Schools wishes to express appreciation to you for your willingness to
be a part of the staff for the Geary County USD 475. This handbook has been
prepared to assist you in becoming acquainted with our district and its policies and
procedures.
Geary County USD 475 serves students in the Junction City, Fort Riley, Milford,
and Grandview Plaza areas and is a diverse, multicultural, innovative school district
with a state and national reputation for school improvement. Assessment scores on
state and national tests have improved steadily since 1987. This school district was one
of the two pilot North Central Association Outcomes Accreditation high schools in the
state and was a guiding force behind the State of Kansas Quality Performance
Accreditation (QPA) plan initiated in 1989.
The Geary County school district consists of thirteen elementary schools, two
middle schools, one high school, and Larry Dixon Center, Early Childhood Center, Head
Start, McConnell Maintenance Complex, and the Mary E. Devin Center for Education
Support.
This handbook is not meant as a wage offer or a guarantee of a job or position. As
a handbook, it does not qualify to be grieved. It is simply a guide for classified
employees. All USD 475 Board of Education policies supersede anything in the
handbook.
Some classified positions may be subject to a pre-employment health screening
based on the job requirements. If this is the case, the employee will bear full
responsibility for payment of this fee.
2.
DISTRICT MISSION STATEMENT: “The mission of Geary County USD 475
is to inspire learning, empowering all students to become contributing members of
society with the personal, professional and social skills necessary for their success.”
3.
EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER: The board shall hire all employees on
the basis of ability and the district’s needs. The district is an equal opportunity
employer and shall not discriminate in its conditions, or privileges of employment
because of an individual’s race, color, religion, sex, age, disability, or national origin.
Inquiries regarding compliance may be directed to the district staff member
appointed annually by the Board of Education at its July meeting. The name and
contact instructions are available from the Clerk of the Board at the Board of Education
office. Inquiries may also be directed to:
1
Equal Employment Opportunity Commission
400 State Avenue, 9th Floor
Kansas City, KS 66101
(913) 551-5655
or
Kansas Human Rights Commission
900 SW Jackson, 8th Floor
Topeka, KS 66603
(785) 296-3206
or
United States Department of Education
Office for Civil Rights
10220 North Executive Hills Blvd, 8th Floor
Kansas City, MO 64153-1367
4.
LOYALTY OATH: As required by current law, all employees will be asked to
sign a Loyalty Oath at the time of employment. This oath indicates the employee’s
promise to support the Constitution of the United States and the Constitution of the
State of Kansas and to faithfully discharge the duties of their respective position. It is
signed and notarized by personnel on site.
5.
BENEFITS AND COMPENSATION: Employees are eligible for benefits and
a possible increase in their hourly wage, after they have satisfactorily completed their
90-day probationary period. Should this probationary period be unsatisfactory, the
supervisor has the option of extending it for another 90-day period.
5.1
Insurance: Geary County USD 475 provides a group health insurance plan
along with a group dental insurance plan. An employee who wishes to enroll in the
coverage must be enrolled in both the medical and dental insurance policies. The plan
includes both individual and family coverage. The Payroll Department can be contacted
for specifics on available coverage.
The Board of Education provides a contribution towards the cost of insurance
coverage for those employees who elect to participate in the district plan. Under no
condition will the board’s contribution exceed the cost of the premium for the lowest
option for that respective coverage.
Employees failing to enroll during their first opportunity will have to wait until
the open enrollment period unless a qualifying event occurs (i.e., marriage, divorce,
birth, death, commencement or termination of spouse’s employment). At the current
time, May is the month designated as open enrollment for our plan with the health
insurance coverage effective July 1st. For specific details on coverage, refer to the group
health insurance booklet.
2
5.2 Salary Protection: The Board of Education provides salary protection via
purchase of an appropriate insurance policy for all classified personnel. Benefits for a
disability resulting from a covered illness or accident begin after a 14-day waiting
period or the end of the employee’s accumulated sick leave whichever is
greater. In order to qualify for benefits, the employee must be totally disabled and
submit a claim form that has been completed by an attending physician. Benefits are
paid at approximately 66 2/3 percent of your annual salary for a maximum period of 26
weeks. Employees hired after July 1st are subject to pre-existing conditions which
occurred during the 12 months immediately before the date that coverage becomes
effective.
5.3 Leaves and Absences: All leave is to be approved by immediate supervisor
prior to use, if at all possible. No leave time may be used as part of a severance
arrangement. Employees resigning will not be paid for leave days after the last day they
are physically present. See the Classified Employees Leave Chart, included as Appendix
15.1, for a breakdown of how leave is accumulated. See Appendix 15.2 for a copy of the
Request for Leave Form.
5.3.1 Vacation: It is intended that all vacation time be used in the same fiscal year in
which it is earned. The fiscal year runs from July 1st through June 30th. Accumulated
vacation leave from the previous fiscal year must be taken by the end of December or be
forfeited. Vacations should be scheduled with and approved by the employee’s
immediate supervisor, and should be taken when they will least interfere with the
primary work of the school or department. Earned vacation leave may be used during
Winter Break, Spring Break, or other days the students are not in attendance during the
school year, provided the supervisor has approved the leave time in advance.
In lieu of bonus days, 12-month employees with continuous
(uninterrupted)* service to the district earn additional vacation days at the
rate of:
1 and 1/8 days per month for those with 10 to 14 consecutive years of service (total of 13
½ days for the year)
1 and ¼ days per month for those with 15 to 19 consecutive years of service (total of 15
days for the year)
1 and ½ days per month for those with 20 or more consecutive years of service (total of
18 days for the year)
*Employees with interrupted service who returned to the district prior to July 1, 2008,
are grandfathered in and eligible to earn vacation time according to their total years of
service. However, any employee leaving the district after July 1, 2008 who later returns
to district employment would no longer be able to count prior years toward this benefit.
5.3.2 Sick Leave: Used by the employee for personal sickness only; includes trips to the
doctor, hospital, and dentist.
5.3.3 Family Leave: Used by the employee if any family member is ill, including doctor,
dentist, and hospital visits; also includes leave for funerals of members of the immediate
family. Immediate family includes: husband, wife, parents, children, grandparents,
grandparents of spouse, grandchildren, brother or sister, father-in-law, mother-in-law,
brother-in-law, sister-in-law; other remote relatives may be included if approved by the
Superintendent.
5.3.4 General Personal Day: Used for any personal business desired by employee; but
must be approved by their supervisor prior to taking this leave.
5.3.5 Professional Leave: Used when employee is attending a meeting, etc. at
employer’s request.
5.3.6 Lost Time without Pay: Used when employee does not have any leave under the
category that is applicable, employee is charged with lost time.
5.3.6.1 Lost Time without Pay: Seniority and earned benefits do not accrue during
periods of unpaid leave such as, but not limited to FMLA and extended usages of lost
time.
5.3.7 Jury Duty/Court Subpoena: Used when employee is on jury duty or issued a
court subpoena. A copy of the notice or subpoena must be provided to the immediate
supervisor. Paid leave is not extended to employees appearing in court whose subpoena
arises out of an action initiated against the district on their behalf or any other legal
proceeding in which school district business is not involved.
5.3.8 Suspension With/Without Pay: The immediate supervisor may recommend to
the Director of Human Resource Services to suspend an employee with or without pay.
5.3.9 Bereavement: Used by employee in the event of death of spouse, child, parent,
brother, sister or other approved by Superintendent when all Family leave has been
used. Such leave shall be limited to and charged against the accumulated and unused
sick leave.
5.3.10 Maternity Leave: This is deducted from sick leave.
5.3.11 Adoption: Used in the event of the adoption of a child by an employee. The
employee is allowed to use available sick leave for preparation and/or adjustment to a
new family member. The number of days cannot exceed five unless approved by the
Superintendent.
5.3.12 Family and Medical Leave: FMLA requires covered employers to provide up to
12 weeks of unpaid, job-protected leave to “eligible” employees for certain family and
medical reasons. Employees are eligible if they have worked for their employer for at
least one year, and for 1,250 hours over the previous 12 months. The FMLA permits
employees to take leave on an intermittent basis or to work a reduced schedule under
certain circumstances. Other benefits such as seniority and earned benefits do not
accrue when an employee is on unpaid FMLA leave. Contact the Payroll Department for
additional information on how to apply. A more complete list of rights and
responsibilities may be found in the appendix on page 35 or on the HR page on the
Intranet.
5.3.13 Military Leave: Employees are entitled to military leave under the Uniformed
Services Employment and Reemployment Act of 1994. The Act applies to military
service that began on or after December 12, 1994 or military service that began before
December 12, 1994 if the employee was a reservist or National Guard member who
provided notice to the employer before leaving work.
Reemployment rights extend to persons who have been absent from work
because of “service in the uniformed services.” The uniformed services consist of the
following military branches:


Army, Navy, Marine Corps, Air Force, or Coast Guard.
Army Reserve, Navy Reserve, Marine Corps Reserve, Air Force Reserve, or
Coast Guard Reserve.
 Army National Guard or Air National Guard.
 Commissioned corps of the Public Health Service.
 Any other category of persons designated by the President in time of war or
emergency.
“Service” in the uniformed services means duty on a voluntary or involuntary
basis in a uniformed service, including:






Active duty.
Active duty for training.
Initial active duty for training.
Inactive duty training.
Full-time National Guard duty.
Absence from work for an examination to determine a person’s fitness for any
of the above types of duty.
The employee may be absent for up to five (5) years for military duty and retain
reemployment rights. There are, however, exceptions which can exceed timing,
frequency, duration, or nature of an individual’s service. The law enhances protections
for disabled veterans including a requirement to provide reasonable accommodations
and up to two (2) years to return to work if convalescing from injuries received during
service or training.
The returning employee is entitled to be reemployed in the job that they would
have attained had they not been absent for military service, with the same seniority,
status and pay, as well as other rights and benefits determined by seniority. If
necessary, the employer must provide training or retraining that enables the employee
to refresh or upgrade their skills so they can qualify for reemployment. Which the
individual is performing military service, he or she is deemed to be on a furlough or
leave of absence and is entitled to the non-seniority rights accorded other individuals on
non-military leaves of absence. Individuals performing military duty of more than 30
days may elect to continue employer sponsored health care for up to 18 months at a cost
of up to 102 percent of the full premium. For military service of less than 31 days, health
care coverage is provided as if the individual had never left. All pensions which are a
reward for length of service are protected.
Individuals must provide advance written or verbal notice to their employer for
all military duty. Notice may be provided by the employee or by the branch of the
military in which the individual will be serving.
Notice is not required if military necessity prevents the giving of notice; or, the
giving of notice is otherwise impossible or unreasonable.
Accrued vacation, general personal, or bonus leave may be used (but it’s not
required) while performing military duty. The individual’s timeframe for returning to
work is based upon the time spent on military duty.
TIME SPENT ON
MILITARY DUTY
Less than 31 days:
More than 30 but less
Than 181 days:
More than 180 days:
RETURN TO WORK OR APPLICATION
FOR REEMPLOYMENT
Must return at the beginning of the next
regularly scheduled work period on the
first full day after release from service,
taking into account safe travel home
plus an eight (8) hour rest period.
Must submit an application for
reemployment within 14 days of release
from service.
Must submit an application for
reemployment within 90 days of release
from service.
The individual’s separation from service must be under honorable conditions in
order for the person to be entitled to reemployment rights. Documentation showing
eligibility for reemployment can be required. The employer has the right to request that
an individual who is absent for a period of service of 31 days or more provide
documentation showing:



the application for reemployment is timely;
the five-year service limitation has not been exceeded; and,
separation from service was under honorable conditions.
If documentation is not readily available or it does not exist, the individual must
be reemployed. However, if after reemploying the individual, documentation becomes
available that shows one or more reemployment requirements were not met, the
employer may terminate the individual, effective immediately. The termination does
not operate retroactively.
Questions should be directed to Veterans’ Employment and Training Service,
U.S. Department of Labor.
Kansas law also requires reemployment if an individual is called to active duty by
the state.
5.4 Vacation Days: Employees working less than 12 months with
continuous (uninterrupted)* service to the district earn additional vacation
days at the rate of:
1/8 days per month based on your Notification of Wage for those with 10 to 14
consecutive years of service
¼ days per month based on your Notification of Wage for those with 15 to 19
consecutive years of service
½ days per month based on your Notification of Wage for those with 20 or more
consecutive years of service
*Employees with interrupted service who returned to the district prior to July 1, 2008,
are grandfathered in and eligible to earn vacation time according to their total years of
service. However, any employee leaving the district after July 1, 2008 who later returns
to district employment would no longer be able to count prior years toward this benefit.
5.5 Holidays: Holidays are paid for the number of hours worked per day, as
indicated on the employee’s Notification of Wage. Employees who consistently
work fewer hours than indicated on their notification will be reviewed by
the Director of Human Resources and may receive a new notification of
wage reflecting actual hours worked resulting in a consequent reduction
in holiday pay and benefits. The appropriate pay schedule for the current year will
indicate which holidays will be paid. In order to be eligible for holiday pay, you
are expected to work the last regularly scheduled workday before the
holiday and the first regularly scheduled workday following the holiday.
The supervisor has the discretion to approve pay for employees who are absent due to
illness. A doctor’s note may be requested to substantiate a medical need for the
absence. Overtime pay cannot be earned based on holiday hours paid.
Overtime pay will only be paid based on actual hours worked. Temporary
employees, classified subs, Lunchroom/Playground Aides, and Part-time are not eligible
for holiday pay.
5.6 Payday: Payday is on or about the 20th day of each month. In the event a payday
falls on a Saturday, Sunday or holiday observed on a Monday, payday will be the Friday
directly preceding it. See handout given at orientation for pay periods and cut off dates.
5.7
Non-Taxable Section 125 – Salary Reductions: Employees of Geary
County USD 475 are permitted to take identified benefits under the 125 Salary
Reduction Plan. This means annual taxable income will be reduced by the amount of
the eligible premiums. Benefits chosen under salary reduction must remain in force
for the entire plan year.
(1)
According to IRS regulations, the only allowable exceptions are due to
changes in family status such as marriage, divorce, death, birth or adoption of a child, or
a change in the employment status of the employee or spouse.
(2)
The benefits include salary protection insurance, health insurance, cancer
insurance, dependent care reimbursement, medical expense reimbursement and group
life insurance up to $50,000. The balance of the premium for life insurance over
$50,000 becomes a salary deduction and will be taxable.
5.8 Salary Deductions: Employees desiring changes in wage deductions must
submit a written statement to the Superintendent or his/her designated representative
in accordance with established procedures and regulations. This pertains to optional
deductions, such as health insurance, direct deposit of employees’ checks, change of
address, number of dependents, annuities, etc.
5.8.1 Enrollment Periods for Annuities: Changes in annuities may be made in January
and September by submitting a written request to the Superintendent in accordance
with established guidelines and procedures.
5.9 Annuities – Deductions: The Board of Education will authorize deductions
and make the proper remittance for tax deferred annuities for those employees making
written requests to do so, provided the annuity company to which payments are to be
submitted is among those on the Board’s approved list. Changes in annuity deductions
should be made in September or January. The Board of Education reserves the right to
approve or disapprove any annuity company. No life insurance may be written into the
annuity. You may request a payroll deduction for an annuity with one company only.
Those employees under the grandfather clause who now have more than one company
may continue until such time that any change (roll over or cancellation) is made; no
replacement above the single deduction will be accepted at that time.
5.10 Kansas Public Employees Retirement System (KPERS): KPERS includes
all classified employees, provided the employee assignment exceeds 630 hours per year
or 3.5 hours of work per day for at least 180 days duty annually. Determination as to
whether the given position is covered by KPERS is made by the local designated agent.
KPERS deductions are at the rate of 4 percent (4%) on total wages earned by an
employee. The State of Kansas likewise remits to KPERS, on behalf of each employee.
This amount has varied from 3 to 7 percent of the employee’s wages. The Payroll
Department should be contacted if more detailed information is needed.
5.11 Workers’ Compensation: Workers’ Compensation is provided for all
employees of the Board of Education. The policy provides benefits including medical
expenses, lost wages, disability benefits and death benefits for an injury while on duty.
The injured employee is required to verbally report the injury immediately and in
writing within ten (10) days or the claim may be barred. Forms are provided through
the building principal. The report of the injury must be sent to the Human Resource
Services Department at the Mary E. Devin Center for Education Support. Additional
information about your rights and responsibilities under workers’ compensation may be
obtained from your supervisor or the district office. The District reserves the right to
investigate all claims at anytime.
5.11.1 Coverage: Benefits are for personal injury from accident or occupational disease
arising out of and in the course of employment with the district. Injuries which occur
during recreational or social events under circumstances where the employee is under
no duty to attend, and where the injury did not result from the performance of tasks
related to normal job duties are not covered under workers’ compensation.
An employee who is off work and drawing workers’ compensation shall be
required to provide the Human Resource Services Department with a written doctor’s
release before the employee is allowed to return to work. In addition, should the
employee be released to return to work by a doctor and fail to do so, all benefits under
workers’ compensation shall be restricted as provided by current statute.
5.11.2 Coordination With Leave Benefits: The workers’ compensation plan will provide
coverage for medical expenses and wages to the extent required by statute to those
employees who qualify. Whenever an employee is absent from work and is receiving
workers’ compensation benefits due to a work-related injury, the employee may use
available paid sick leave to supplement the workers’ compensation.
Available paid sick leave may be used for this purpose until 1) available paid sick
leave benefits are exhausted; 2) the employee returns to work; or 3) employment is
terminated.
5.12 Unemployment Compensation: For answers to questions regarding
unemployment insurance policies, benefits, and claims, see your personnel
representative or contact the nearest Department of Human Resources, District Job
Insurance Office.
5.13 Activity Passes: The district photo identification card will serve as an activity
pass for district employees only to district-sponsored activities with the exception of
specified athletic tournaments and KSHSAA events.
6.
SCHEDULES: The board delegates to the Superintendent or his/her designee
the authority to develop time schedules for all classified employees.
6.1
Work Schedule/Attendance: Employees are considered probationary for the
first 90 days of employment and are required to be at work all 90 days unless
specifically excused by their immediate supervisor. It is also expected an employee will
not miss more than 14 days during any one year unless there are extraordinary
circumstances. Excessive absenteeism is grounds for disciplinary action, up to and
including termination.
6.2 Overtime: Overtime must be authorized prior to working it and is paid at an
hourly rate of 1 ½ times your normal hourly rate after you have worked more
than 40 hours in a week. No leave (holiday, sick, general, vacation, family
or any other leave) is to be considered part of the 40 hours for calculating
overtime pay. Paid holiday hours do not count toward the 40-hour
requirement for paying overtime. A week is defined as beginning on Sunday and
ending on Saturday.
6.3 Time Cards/Badge Swiper: Hourly employees are required to use the
appropriate time keeping device for the building where the job is being performed.
Employees are responsible for properly recording all their time worked and to review
their time worked for accuracy. Clocking in and out for other employees is strictly
prohibited. Employees must clock out anytime they leave a building. No
employee is authorized to complete work at home. Failure to follow
procedures for clocking in and out may result in disciplinary action up to
termination of employment.
6.4 Breaks: Allowing time for breaks is not required by law, it is a privilege
extended by USD 475. Break times are under the authority of your supervisor, as
sometimes other business concerns interrupt daily routines. Your work responsibilities
take precedence over breaks. Breaks should not exceed 15 minutes and should not be
taken in conjunction with lunch or the beginning or ending of the day. Breaks should
be taken at the worksite, leaving the worksite requires the employee to clock
out during the break. District employees work a variety of schedules and are
permitted varying amounts of time for lunch depending upon their regular working
schedule.
6.4.1 Lunch Breaks: All employees working six or more hours will have a
lunch break. A lunch break must be at least 30 minutes long, duty free,
and occur within the first 6 hours of the workday. Staff are expected to
clock out for lunch.
6.5 Attendance: Geary County USD 475 views attendance as one of the most
important facets of your job performance. All employees are here to serve the
educational needs of our students. The employees’ attendance is required to fulfill this
responsibility. Supervisors expect a 90% attendance rate and expect all employees to
report to work at the appropriate time. Employees are expected to arrive at work before
they are scheduled to start and be at their work station productively engaged in school
district business by the scheduled start time. All time off must be requested in advance.
All unapproved absences will be noted. Excessive absences, including those for sick
leave, may result in disciplinary action, up to and including termination. Failure to
report to work for three consecutive days without notification to your immediate
supervisor will be considered job abandonment and result in termination.
7.
CONDUCT
7.1
Disciplinary Procedure: It is the policy of Geary County USD 475 that all
employees are expected to comply with the district’s standards of behavior and
performance and that any noncompliance with these standards must be remedied.
Under normal circumstances, the district endorses a policy of progressive discipline in
which it attempts to provide employees with notice of deficiencies and an opportunity to
improve. It does, however, retain the right to administer discipline in any manner it
sees fit. This policy does not modify the status of employees as employees-at-will or in
any way restrict the district’s right to bypass the disciplinary procedures suggested.
7.2 Drug Free Workplace: The board believes that maintaining a drug free
workplace is important in establishing an appropriate learning environment for the
students of the district. The unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensing, possession,
or use of a controlled substance by an employee in the workplace is prohibited.
7.2.1 Drug Free Schools and Community (Employee Conduct): As a condition of
continued employment in the district, all employees shall abide by the terms of this
policy.
Employees shall not unlawfully manufacture, distribute, dispense, possess, be
under the influence of, or use illicit drugs, controlled substances, or alcoholic beverages
on district property or at any school activity. Compliance with the terms of this policy is
mandatory.
Disciplinary sanctions which are consistent with local, state, and federal law will
be imposed on employees who violate the standards of conduct up to and including
termination and referral for prosecution. A disciplinary sanction may include the
completion or an appropriate rehabilitation program.
Employees who are found violating the terms of this policy will be reported to the
appropriate law enforcement officers. Additionally, any employee who violates the
terms of this policy will be subject to the following sanctions:
(1)
Short term suspension with pay.
(2)
Short term suspension without pay.
(3)
Long term suspension without pay.
(4)
Required participation in a drug and alcohol education, treatment,
counseling, or rehabilitation program.
(5)
Termination or dismissal from employment.
Prior to applying sanctions under this policy, employees will be afforded all due
process rights to which they are entitled under the provisions of Kansas law. Nothing in
this policy is intended to diminish the right of the district to take any other disciplinary
action which is provided for in district policies.
Any employee who is convicted under a criminal drug statute for a violation
occurring at the workplace must notify the Superintendent of the conviction within five
days after the conviction.
Within 30 days after the notice of conviction is received, the school district will
take appropriate action with the employee. Such action may include the initiation of
termination proceedings, suspension, placement on probationary status, or other
disciplinary action. Alternatively, or in addition to any action short of termination, the
employee may be required to participate satisfactorily in a drug abuse assistance or
rehabilitation program as a condition of continued employment. The employee shall
bear the cost of participation in such program.
If it is agreed that an employee should enter into and complete a drug education
or rehabilitation program, the cost of such program will be the responsibility of the
employee. A list of drug and alcohol counseling, treatment, and rehabilitation programs
available for employees of the district, is on file with the Director of Human Resource
Services. Employees are responsible for contacting the directors of the programs to
determine the cost and length of the program, and for enrolling in the programs.
7.2.2 Drug Testing: Any employees who is suspected of being under the
influence of alcohol or drugs in the workplace will be subject to alcohol
and drug screening.
7.2.3 Tobacco Use: The use of tobacco products by any person, in any
form, is prohibited on school property and in any school building, owned,
leased or rented by the school district or in any school district vehicle.
7.3 Sexual Harassment: The Board of Education is committed to providing a
positive and productive working and learning environment, free from discrimination on
the basis of sex, including sexual harassment. Sexual harassment will not be tolerated
in the school district. Sexual harassment of employees or students of the district by
board members, administrators, certified and support personnel, students, vendors, and
any others having business or other contact with the school district is strictly prohibited.
Sexual harassment is unlawful discrimination on the basis of sex under Title IX of
the Education Amendments of 1972, Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, and the
Kansas Acts Against Discrimination. All forms of sexual harassment are prohibited at
school, on school property, and at all school-sponsored activities, programs or events.
Sexual harassment against individuals associated with the school is prohibited, whether
or not the harassment occurs on school grounds.
It shall be a violation of this policy for any student, employee, or third party
(visitor, vendor, etc.) to sexually harass any student, employee, or other individual
associated with the school. It shall further be a violation for any employee to discourage
a student or another employee from filing a complaint, or to fail to investigate or refer
for investigation, any complaint lodged under the provisions of this policy. Violation of
this policy by any employee shall result in disciplinary action, up to and including
termination.
Sexual harassment shall include, but not be limited to, unwelcome sexual
advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual
nature when:
(1)
Submission to such conduct is made either explicitly or implicitly a term
or condition of an individual’s employment.
(2)
Submission to or rejection of such conduct by an individual is used as the
basis for employment decisions affecting such individual.
(3)
Such conduct has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with an
individual’s work performance or creating an intimidating, hostile or offensive working
environment.
Sexual harassment may result from verbal or physical conduct or written or
graphic material. Sexual harassment may include, but is not limited to: verbal
harassment or abuse; pressure for sexual activity; repeating remarks to a person, with
sexual or demeaning implication; unwelcome touching; or suggesting or demanding
sexual involvement accompanied by implied or explicit threats concerning an
employee’s job status.
The district encourages all victims of sexual harassment and persons with
knowledge of such harassment to report the harassment immediately. Complaints of
sexual harassment will be promptly investigated and resolved.
Employees who believe they have been subjected to sexual harassment should
discuss the problem with their immediate supervisor. If an employee’s immediate
supervisor is the alleged harasser, the employee should discuss the problem with the
building principal or the district compliance coordinator. Employees who do not believe
the matter is appropriately resolved through this meeting may file a formal complaint
under the district’s discrimination complaint procedure.
Complaints received will be investigated to determine whether, under the totality
of the circumstances, the alleged behavior constitutes sexual harassment under the
definition outlined above. Unacceptable conduct may or may not constitute sexual
harassment, depending on the nature of the conduct and its severity, persuasiveness and
persistence. Behaviors which are unacceptable but do not constitute harassment may
also result in employee discipline.
Any employee who witnesses an act of sexual harassment or receives a complaint
of harassment from another employee or student shall report the complaint to the
building principal/supervisor. Employees who fail to report complaints or incidents of
sexual harassment to appropriate school officials may face disciplinary action. School
administrators/supervisor who fails to investigate and take appropriate corrective
action in response to complaints of sexual harassment may also face disciplinary action.
Initiation of a complaint of sexual harassment in good faith will not adversely
affect the job security or status of an employee, nor will it affect his or her
compensation. Any act of retaliation against any person who has filed a complaint or
testified, assisted, or participated in an investigation of a sexual harassment complaint
is prohibited. Any person who retaliates is subject to immediate disciplinary action, up
to and including termination of employment.
To the extent possible, confidentiality will be maintained throughout the
investigation of a complaint. The desire of confidentiality must be balanced with the
district’s obligation to conduct a thorough investigation, to take appropriate corrective
action, or to provide due process to the accused.
False or malicious complaints of sexual harassment may result in corrective or
disciplinary action against the complainant.
A summary of this policy and related materials shall be posted in each district
facility. The policy shall also be published in student, parent, and employee handbooks
as directed by the district compliance coordinator. Notification of the policy shall be
included in the school newsletter or published in the local newspaper annually.
7.4 Racial Harassment: The Board of Education is committed to providing a
positive and productive working and learning environment, free from discrimination,
including harassment, on the basis of race, color, or national origin. Racial harassment
will not be tolerated in the school district. Racial harassment of employees or students
of the district by board members, administrators, certified and support personnel,
students, vendors, and any others having business or other contact with the school
district is strictly prohibited.
Racial harassment is unlawful discrimination on the basis of race, color, or
national origin under Titles VII Civil Rights Act of 1964, and the Kansas Acts Against
Discrimination. All forms of racial harassment are prohibited at school, on school
property, and at all school-sponsored activities, programs, or events. Racial harassment
against individuals associated with the school is prohibited, whether or not the
harassment occurs on school grounds.
It shall be a violation of this policy for any student, employee, or third party
(visitor, vendor, etc.) to racially harass any student, employee, or other individual
associated with the school. It shall further be a violation for any employee to discourage
a student or another employee from filing a complaint, or to fail to investigate or refer
for investigation, any complaint lodged under the provisions of this policy. Violations of
this policy by an employee shall result in disciplinary action, up to and including
termination.
Racial Harassment is racially motivated conduct which:
(1)
Affords an employee different treatment, solely on the basis of race, color,
or national origin, in a manner which interferes with or limits the ability of the employee
to participate in or benefit from the services, activities, or programs of the school;
(2)
Is sufficiently severe, pervasive, or persistent so as to have the purpose or
effect of creating a hostile working environment;
(3)
Is sufficiently severe, pervasive, or persistent so as to have the purpose or
effect of interfering with an individual’s work performance or employment
opportunities.
Racial harassment may result from verbal or physical conduct or written or
graphic material.
The district encourages all victims of racial harassment and persons with
knowledge of such harassment to report the harassment immediately. Complaints of
racial harassment will be promptly investigated and resolved.
Employees who believe they have been subjected to racial harassment should
discuss the problem with their immediate supervisor. If an employee’s immediate
supervisor is the alleged harasser, the employee should discuss the problem with the
building principal or the district compliance coordinator. Employees who do not believe
the matter is appropriately resolved through this meeting may file a formal complaint
under the district’s discrimination complaint procedure.
Complaints received will be investigated to determine whether, under the totality
of the circumstances, the alleged behavior constitutes racial harassment under the
definition outlined above. Unacceptable conduct may or may not constitute racial
harassment, depending on the nature of the conduct and its severity, pervasiveness, and
persistence. Behaviors which are unacceptable but do not constitute harassment may
also result in employee discipline.
Any employee who witnesses an act of racial harassment or receives a complaint
of harassment or receives a complaint of harassment from another employee or a
student shall report the complaint to the building principal/building supervisor.
Employees who fail to report complaints or incidents of racial harassment to
appropriate
school
officials
may
face
disciplinary
action.
School
administrators/supervisor who fails to investigate and take appropriate corrective
action in response to complaints of racial harassment may also face disciplinary action.
Initiation of a complaint of racial harassment in good faith will not adversely
affect the job security or status of an employee, nor will it affect his or her
compensation. Any act of retaliation against any person who has filed a complaint or
testified, assisted, or participated in an investigation of a racial harassment complaint is
prohibited. Any person who retaliates is subject to immediate disciplinary action, up to
termination of employment.
To the extent possible, confidentiality will be maintained throughout the
investigation of a complaint. The desire for confidentiality must be balanced with the
district’s obligation to conduct a thorough investigation, to take appropriate corrective
action, or to provide due process to the accused.
False or malicious complaints of racial harassment may result in corrective or
disciplinary action against the complainant.
A summary of this policy and related materials shall be posted in each district
facility. The policy shall also be published in student, parent, and employee handbooks
as directed by the district compliance coordinator. Notification of the policy shall be
included in the school newsletter or published in the local newspaper annually.
7.5
Relations with Students: Employees shall maintain relationships with
students which are conducive to a safe and effective educational environment to include
social networking sites. Employees shall not have any interaction of a sexual nature
with any student at any time regardless of the student’s age or status.
7.6 Employee Protection: An employee may use reasonable force necessary to
ward off any attack, to protect a student or another person, or to quell a disturbance
which threatens physical injury to others.
7.7
Staff-Community Relations: Staff members are encouraged to participate in
community activities and organizations, insofar as these activities do not infringe upon
school time. Prior permission must be obtained from the Superintendent or his/her
designee for participation in any community activity which takes place during school
time.
7.8
Confidentiality:
7.8.1 Student Information: Confidential student information, whether written or oral,
shall be handled in a confidential manner and be discussed only with the
parents/guardians of the particular student and the appropriate school personnel.
Violations of this rule which violate the privacy rights of students could result in
disciplinary actions being taken against the employee, including termination.
7.8.2 Personnel Information: Confidential personnel information, whether written or
oral, shall be handled in a confidential manner and be discussed only with the
appropriate school personnel. Violations of this rule which violate the privacy rights of
personnel could result in disciplinary actions being taken against the employee,
including termination.
7.8.3 Electronic Communication of Confidential information: Electronic
communication of confidential information (e-mails, faxes, texting, and
other form of electronic communication falls under FERPA). The use of email, etc. is legal document and should be used cautiously.
7.9 Staff Responsibilities for Discipline: Each employee is responsible for
maintaining proper control and discipline in the school. An employee may use
reasonable force necessary to ward off an attack, to protect the student or another
person, or to quell a disturbance which threatens physical injury to others.
7.10 Gifts: Staff members are prohibited from receiving gifts from vendors, salesmen,
or other such representatives where the intent of the gift, either expressed or implied, is
to influence the employee or cause the employee to represent the vendor, salesman, or
other such representatives in a favorable light to the employee’s immediate supervisor,
Superintendent of Schools, or the Board of Education.
7.11 Solicitations: All persons seeking to sell, solicit, or display an item to any
school employee on school premises must first secure permission from the building
principal/supervisor and Superintendent, as the case may be, before any appointment is
made.
7.11.1 Solicitations by Staff Members: Solicitations of students or other school
employees by staff members during regular school hours or regular business hours for
any reason, except school-sponsored activities or approved non-profit organizations, is
prohibited.
7.11.2 Solicitations of Staff Members: Solicitations of staff members by any vendor,
student, other district employee, or patron of items relating directly to the expenditure
of district funds during normal school hours are prohibited unless permission is granted
by the building principal/supervisor.
7.12 Dress Code: In general, proper personal wear is important for employee safety
and portrayal of a professional image. Footwear should provide good traction and
comfort when walking. Traction soled footwear should be worn in winter weather to
help prevent slipping on snow or ice. Clothing should provide protection from the
environment. Clothing considered inappropriate for wear includes the following:






clothing depicting tobacco, alcohol, illegal substances, gang behavior, or
offensive language
clothing that does not cover the stomach, back or chest
boxer or spandex shorts
shorts or skirts less than finger-tip length when arms are held down to the
sides
tank tops or halter tops
any article of clothing, jewelry or makeup which detracts from the educational
process
Any employee not adhering to the above guidelines will receive a verbal warning
and possibly be sent home to correct the problem.
7.13 Conflict of Interest: School district employees are prohibited from engaging in
any activity which will detract from the effective performance of their duties. No
employee will attempt to sell, or endeavor to influence any student of this school district
to buy any product, article, instrument, service or other such item which would directly
or indirectly benefit said school employee. No school employee will enter into a contract
with the school district other than a contract for employment unless the contract is
approved by the Superintendent.
7.14 Outside Employment: Classified employees shall not engage in outside
employment which impairs the effectiveness of their service to the school district.
7.15 Suspension: The Superintendent or his/her designee shall have the authority to
suspend classified employees for cause, with or without pay.
7.16 Separation of Employment: It should be understood that your employment
with Geary County USD 475 is considered to be “employment-at-will.” This means that
both you and the school district are free to terminate the employment relationship at
any time with or without cause.
An exit interview may be conducted for anyone who leaves the school district.
Your comments about the policies and procedures of Geary County USD 475 may lead to
improvement.
All district property (i.e., ID badges, keys, etc.) in an employee’s possession must
be returned upon separation. If these items are not returned, the District shall assess a
fee for each item not returned.
7.16.1 Termination: The Superintendent or his/her designee may terminate a classified
employee at any time, with or without cause.
7.16.2 Resignation: In the event you find it necessary to resign, please notify your
immediate supervisor in writing. It is customary to give at least two weeks notice so that
the school district can make arrangements to adjust schedules and find a replacement.
Employees who leave in good standing will be given consideration if they wish to return
to work at a later date.
7.16.3 Job Abandonment: An employee will be considered to have voluntarily resigned
should he/she fail to personally notify management of an absence for three (3)
consecutive scheduled work days or walks off the job without authorization.
8.
DISTRICT PROCEDURES
8.1
Board Policy: Employees shall follow and be familiar with policies and
regulations established by the Board of Education. Employment is based upon
observance by the employee of the rules and regulations of the Board of Education and
the Superintendent of Schools.
8.2 Classified Complaint Procedures: A complaint may be filed against another
employee. The person filing the complaint must file it with the immediate supervisor. If
the complaint is against the immediate supervisor, the complaint may be filed with the
immediate supervisors’ supervisor. If a satisfactory resolution is not reached, the
complaint may then be filed with the Director of Human Resource Services. The
Director of Human Resource Services’ decision is final.
8.3 Discrimination Complaints: The district is committed to maintaining a
working and learning environment free from discrimination, insult, intimidation, or
harassment due to race, color, religion, sex, age, national origin, or disability.
Any incident of discrimination in any form shall promptly be reported to an
employee’s immediate supervisor, the building principal, or the district compliance
coordinator for investigation and corrective action by the building or district compliance
officer. Any employee who engages in discriminatory conduct shall be subject to
disciplinary action, up to and including termination.
Discrimination against any individual on the basis of race, color, national origin,
sex, disability, age, or religion in the admission or access to, or treatment or
employment in the district’s programs and activities is prohibited. The name, position,
address, and phone number of the district compliance coordinator, designated by the
Board of Education to coordinate compliance with discrimination requirements
contained in the Title VI and Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX of the
Education Amendments of 1972, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and the
Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 may be obtained from the Clerk of the Board at
the Board of Education office.
Complaints of discrimination should be addressed to an employee’s immediate
supervisor or to the building principal unless that is the person whom the complaint is
being filed against. In such case complaints should be taken to that persons’ supervisor.
Complaints against the Superintendent should be addressed to the Board of Education.
Complaints will be resolved using the Title VI and Title VII of the Civil Rights Act
of 1964, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, Section 504 of the
Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990.
8.4 Hiring: It shall be the policy of the Board of Education to secure for all positions
the most highly qualified persons possible. Persons selected as finalists for any position
in Unified School District 475 shall be selected on the basis of their qualifications for the
vacancies involved and for their apparent potential for growth.
It is the desire of the Board of Education that all district employees
(administrators, teachers, and classified personnel) reside within the boundaries of
Geary County Unified School District. The Superintendent and/or his/her designee will,
as a matter of procedure, inform persons who are candidates for any position, during
the course of the interview, of the board’s desire for employees to reside within the
boundaries of the district. Given that all qualifications are equal, preference will be
given to persons who will as employees reside in the district.
Furthermore, the Superintendent will at the regular January meeting each year
provide the Board of Education with information regarding the current resident status
of all school district employees.
8.4.1 Positions: The Board of Education will hire classified employees as they interpret
the needs of the district.
8.4.2 Employment Status: All classified employees are employed on an “at-will” basis,
regardless of their length of service, and may be terminated at any time, with or without
cause.
8.4.3 Compensation Guides and Notifications of Wage: Classified employees shall be
paid according to pay rates approved by the board. The board delegates to the
Superintendent or his/her designee the authority to adjust established rates.
8.4.4 Fingerprinting/Criminal Background Records Check: All employees will be
subject to fingerprinting for a criminal background records check. Employment is
provisional until the results of these checks have been received by Geary County USD
475. If the results reveal conviction(s) of any offense or any attempt to commit any
offense specified in K.S.A. 1999 Supp. 72-1397 and amendments thereto, employment
may be terminated.
8.4.5 Pre-Employment Health Screening: Some classified positions may be subject to a
pre-employment health screening based on the job requirements. If this is the case, the
employee will bear full responsibility for payment of this fee. All employees coming
into daily contact with students will have on file proof of a negative TB
Skin Test.
8.5 Classified Employee In-processing: All new classified employees are
required to attend an in-processing meeting with the Human Resource Services and
Payroll Departments, and must attend this meeting prior to beginning work with the
district. This meeting will include completion of required paperwork and training. At
this meeting employees will be given a copy of this handbook. Should an employee
transfer from one position to another, increasing the number of hours worked weekly,
the Human Resource Services Department will contact the employee if attendance in
another portion of this meeting is required.
8.6 Identification Cards: A photo identification card will be provided to all
employees. Lost or stolen identification cards must be reported immediately to the
employee’s immediate supervisor and the employee will pay a fee to replace. Employees
will display their cards while performing school district duties.
8.7 Probationary Status: The first 90 days of employment with the school district
are considered probationary. Within the 90 day probationary period, the employee will
be evaluated by his/her immediate supervisor. If work performance is satisfactory, the
employee may receive an end of probation increase in pay and could become eligible for
all benefits.
8.8 Evaluations: All classified employees shall be evaluated twice during their first
year of employment and at least once a year during subsequent years. Evaluation
documents will be on file at the Mary E. Devin Center for Education Support. Classified
employees shall be evaluated by their immediate supervisor on their personal qualities,
their commitment to duty and work-related skills related to their job description. A
copy of the completed and signed evaluation will be given to the employee and the
evaluator, with the original being sent to the Human Resource Services Department.
8.9 Supervision: The Superintendent or his/her designated representative has the
responsibility to supervise all classified employees not directly under the supervision of
a building administrator/supervisor. A building administrator/supervisor has the
responsibility to supervise all classified employees who are assigned to his/her building.
8.10 Assignment and Transfer: The Board of Education delegates to the
Superintendent or his/her designee, the authority to assign and reassign personnel.
8.11 Criminal Convictions: Any employee convicted of a felony or driving under
the influence, or who enters a plea of guilty or diversion agreement, must notify the
Superintendent within five days after the conviction or diversion agreement.
8.12 Notification of Wage: Notifications of Wage will be issued at the beginning of
an employee’s employment. Notification of Wages for each year will be issued on or
around July 1st for 12 month employees and at the beginning of the school year for 9 and
10-1/2 month employees. Any employee who consistently works fewer hours
than the number recorded on the Notification of Wages shall be subject to
a reduction in hours and a consequent reduction in benefits, including but
not limited to hours earned for holiday pay, sick leave, and vacation time.
8.13 Drug and Alcohol Testing: The district reserves the right to provide for drug
and alcohol testing at anytime.
8.14 No Child Left Behind Law: Under requirements of the No Child Left Behind
Law and district implementation procedures, classified employees who provide
assistance with instruction must show proof of 48-semester hours or higher or pass a
Kansas State Department of Education approved Para Assessment.
8.15 Job Descriptions: Job descriptions are on file in the Human Resource Service
office and may be obtained upon request.
8.16 Retirement: The retirement age for any staff member will be in accordance with
current law.
8.17 Nepotism: No employee is permitted to be supervised or to supervise a relative
so that one relative’s work responsibilities, salary, or career progress could be influenced
by the other relative. For purposes of this procedure, relative is defined as a spouse,
child, parent, sibling, grandparent, grandchild, aunt, uncle, first cousin, or
corresponding in-law or “step” relation.
8.18 Organizational Chart:
Appendix 15.3.
The district’s Organizational Chart is attached at
8.19 Distribution of Materials: Materials from sources outside of the district may
not be distributed on school grounds without prior permission from the Communication
Coordinator and the school principal. Examples of outside materials include, but are
not limited to, political materials, special interest materials, and advertisements. The
principal shall determine the time, place, and manner for materials distribution.
8.20 Personal Property: The district is not responsible for employees’ personal
property and does not provide insurance on employees’ personal property. If an
employee’s personal property is broken, damaged or stolen while the employee is on the
job, repair or replacement is the employee’s responsibility.
8.21 Reimbursement/Travel Expense: Guidelines, regulations, and forms for
travel can be located on our website located at www.usd475.org.
Travel between buildings or in the district in the exercise of official assignments
will be reimbursed at a mileage rate established by the Board of Education. No mileage
will be reimbursed for employees getting to their initial employment site or from their
last employment site of the day to their home.
8.22 Weapons: Possession of any weapon or facsimile is strictly prohibited. This
includes any weapon found on a person or in any vehicle on school premises or at any
school sponsored event. Any items used with the intent to inflict harm/injury to
another person may be considered a weapon.
8.23 Job Openings/Postings: As positions become available in the school district,
they are posted at the Mary E. Devin Center for Education Support as well as on the
district web site. Notification is also sent to each school and work site in the school
district. School district employees must notify the Human Resource Service department
in writing of their interest to transfer to an open position posted.
8.24 Staff Development: It is the responsibility of the school district to provide staff
development. The employee’s attendance and participation at required training is
expected.
8.25 Telephone Use: Telephones are for business use only. Please keep all personal
phone conversations brief and infrequent. Personal long distance calls should not be
made except in an emergency. If an employee must make a personal long distance
phone call, the employee must use a calling card.
8.25.1 Cell Phone Use: Our primary purpose is the appropriate education of students.
Therefore, cell phone use during times students are in classes should be restricted to
emergency calls.
8.26 Computer Software and Hardware Guidelines:
8.26.1 Computer Use
Use of District Computers/Privacy Rights: Computer systems are for educational
and professional use only. All work by students or staff shall be subject to unannounced
monitoring by district administrators. The district retains the right to discipline any
student, up to and including expulsion, and any employee, up to and including
termination, for violations of this policy.
Copyright: Software acquired by district staff using either district or personal
funds, and installed on district computers, must comply with copyright laws. Proof of
access to copyright must be filed in the district office. The district technology
department administrator will be responsible for the process and may also require the
original media to be filed in the district file.
Software: No software, including freeware or shareware, may be installed on any
district computer until cleared by the district technology department administrator.
The district technology department will verify compatibility of the software with existing
software and hardware, and prescribe installation and de-installation procedures.
Program files must be approved by the district technology department administrator
before being installed on any district server or computer. Staff and students shall not
install software on district computers or computer systems without prior approval from
the district technology department administrator.
Hardware: District staff shall not install unapproved hardware on district
computers, or make changes to software settings that support district hardware. No
equipment shall be attached to the local area network without approval of the district
technology department administrator.
Audits: The administration may conduct periodic audits of software installed on
district equipment to verify legitimate use.
E-Mail: District staff and students shall have no expectation of privacy when
using district e-mail or other official communications systems. Any e-mail or computer
application or information in district computers or computer systems is subject to
monitoring by the administration.
Ownership of Employee Computer Materials: Computer materials or devices
created by employees as part of any assigned district responsibility or classroom activity
undertaken on school time shall be the property of the district. Computer materials or
devices created by employees using district supplies or equipment for projects beyond
duties assigned by the district and without prior written approval of the immediate
supervisor shall be the property of the district.
8.26.2 Procedures for Implementing Computer Use Policy
Software: To set the stage for future, to provide standardization, to minimize email virus susceptibility, and to better utilize our technicians’ time, only the following
products are supported on district computing platforms for e-mail: Outlook.
Mailboxes: Mailboxes will be provided on district servers for personnel
designated by District Administration and Building Principals.
Usage: This section stipulates the proper use of the district’s e-mail system. All
messages distributed via the system, even personal e-mails, are the district’s property.
You must have no expectation of privacy in anything that you create, store, send or
receive on the system. Your e-mails can be monitored without prior notification if it is
deemed necessary by the Administration. If there is evidence that you are not adhering
to the guidelines set out in this policy, the district reserves the right to take disciplinary
action, including termination and/or legal action. If you have any questions about this
policy contact your administrator.
Prohibitions: You may not



Send or forward e-mails containing libelous, defamatory, offensive, racist, or
obscene remarks or terrorist threats. If you receive an e-mail of this nature,
you must promptly notify your supervisor.
Send unsolicited e-mail messages or chain mail.
Forge or attempt to forge e-mail messages, or disguise or attempt to disguise
your identity when sending e-mail.
Care: You must take the same care in drafting e-mail as you would for any other
communication. An informal style within the district is encouraged. An informal style
offers brevity without rudeness. When forwarding a message created by someone else
be aware that you may be violating the original writer’s rights. Forward only messages
where there is a reasonable expectation that the originator would not object.
Personal Usage: While the district’s e-mail system is for business, it allows
personal usage if it is reasonable and does not interfere with work.
Archiving and Retention: While the e-mail servers are backed up and information
is archived for system integrity purposes, it is not for the purpose of future retrieval.
With that in mind, you should not expect e-mails to be restored on an individual basis.
8.27 E-mail and Internet Policy: Employees shall have no expectation of privacy
when using district e-mail or other official communications systems. E-mail messages
shall be used only to conduct approved and official district business. All employees
must use appropriate language in all messages. Employees are expected to conduct
themselves in a professional manner and to use the system according to these guidelines
or other guidelines published by the administration.
Any e-mail or computer application or information in district computers or
computer systems is subject to monitoring by the administration. The district retains
the right to duplicate any information in a computer, computer system, or server.
Employees who violate district computer policies are subject to disciplinary action up to
and including termination.
9.
COMMITTEE ASSIGNMENTS
9.1
Classified Employees Advisory Council: The Classified Employees Advisory
Council meets periodically with the Superintendent of Schools and other staff to discuss
issues and concerns of the classified employees. The Council’s representation consists
of two representatives for each classified group, each serving on a rotating two-year
basis. For each group, there is one City and one Post representative. In September, a
call for volunteers/nominations will be sent out to fill the vacant representative
position(s).
The FHAEOP President serves as one of the office personnel
representatives.
Other groups represented are food service, maintenance,
paraprofessionals, and teacher assistants/aides/monitors.
10.
RECORDS
10.1 Personnel Records: Employees have the right to inspect their personnel files
upon request. An appointment will be scheduled at which time a district representative
and the employee will review the personnel file.
10.2 Required Records: Employees must keep their personal information up-todate by notifying the Payroll Department of changes concerning the following:





Address and telephone numbers
Legal name (name change)
Marital status
Name, number and age of dependent children
Number of tax exemptions
11.
REPORTS
11.1 Child Abuse: As required by law, any employee of the school district who has
reason to know or suspect that a child has been injured as a result of physical, mental,
emotional abuse or neglect or sexual abuse shall report the matter promptly to the local
Social Rehabilitation Services Office. When the department is not open for business, the
reports shall be made to the appropriate local law enforcement agency.
School employees will not contact the child’s family or any other persons to
determine the cause of the suspected abuse or neglect. It is not the responsibility of
school employees to prove that the child has been abused or neglected.
11.2 Reporting Possible Criminal Conduct: Employees of the school district
shall promptly report to the building principal/supervisor or designee pursuant to
Board of Education procedures any possible criminal activity occurring on school
property or at school sponsored activities. The building principal or designee, pursuant
to Board of Education policy, shall report the matter to the Superintendent’s office and
will also report to the Junction City Police Department or the appropriate Fort Riley
agency any acts which constitute the commission of a felony or a misdemeanor; or an
act which involves the possession, use, or disposal of explosives, firearms or other
weapons as defined by current law. Acts to be reported to law enforcement shall
include, but not be limited to, any student’s possession or use of controlled substances,
any altercation that results in substantial bodily injury to a student, any suspected
sexual offense to include, touching, fondling, or battery, and any incident that involves
possession of a weapon as defined in Board of Education policies JCDBB/JCDBC.
The principal of each building shall prepare all reports required by law and/or
regulation and present them to the Board of Education and the State Board of Education
at least once annually. Reports shall not include any personally identifiable information
about students. These reports and this policy shall be made available upon request to
parents, patrons, students, and employees.
11.3 Vandalism: All employees are to immediately report vandalism to their
immediate supervisor.
12.
HEALTH
26
12.1 Asbestos Management Plan Notice: A copy of the district’s Notice to School
Employees regarding the Asbestos Management Plan in the Geary County Unified
School District #475 is included in Appendix 15.5. This annual notice is being provided
to you in compliance with the Asbestos Hazard Emergency Response Act (AHERA)
regulations of the Environmental Protection Agency.
We wish to assure you that there is no cause for great concern regarding this
notice. If you have further questions regarding this notice, please contact the district’s
Asbestos Program Manager at the McConnell Maintenance Center, 717-4360.
12.2 Bloodborne Pathogens:
12.2.1 Definition: Any disease-producing bacterium or micro-organism contained in
blood and other body fluids.
12.2.2 Most Common: The two most common bloodborne pathogens are HIV – (AIDS)
Human Immunodeficiency Virus, and HBV – Hepatitis B Virus. Exposure to both HIV
and HBV can be either through blood or sexual transmission. However, HBV is much
easier to contract than HIV because the virus can live in dried blood for at least one
week.
12.2.3 Prevention:
(1)
Universal Precautions: Assume all human blood and other potentially
infectious materials are infected (body fluid must contain blood).
(2)
HBV Shot Series: Category I employees will be contacted about having the
HBV shot series and MUST either have the shots or sign a declination form indicating
they do not want them. The HBV shot series is a three shot series and is at the school
district’s expense for Category I and other required employees.
(3)
Latex Disposable Gloves: Gloves should be worn any time there is direct
contact with body fluids.
(4)
Do Not Get Blood on You: Always wash your hands after an incident –
gloves or not.
(5)
Good Housekeeping Practices: Always clean up any areas that have had
blood/body fluids with a throw away paper towel(s) and the specified disinfectant found
in body spill kits.
12.2.4 Location of Bloodborne Pathogen Control Plan: Control Plans are located in the
school nurse’s office, with the head secretary in each school, and in the office of the
Clerk of the Board.
12.2.5 Exposure Determination:
(1)
Incident: A first aid incident involving the clean up of blood. If you have
rendered first aid, you must fill out the FIRST AID INCIDENT REPORT FORM, Part A.
(2)
Exposure Incident: First aid incident with an EXPOSURE. There must be
blood (someone else’s) in your eye, mouth, or on your skin with some kind of entry
point. This could be a cut, rash, abrasion, puncture wound, etc.
12.2.6 Notification Procedure:
(1)
Notify your supervisor, school secretary or school nurse.
(2)
Fill out BBP-3, Parts A and B.
(3)
When an exposure incident occurs, the employee will report to the Geary
Community Hospital Emergency Room within 24 hours. If you have not had the HBV
shots already, the series will be started immediately. Even if an employee has gone
through the HBV shot series, they are still required to report to the hospital for blood
work to determine if the previous series was effective.
(4)
This is all considered POST EXPOSURE EVALUATION AND FOLLOWUP. You will have to go back to the Emergency Room at least two more times during the
year for evaluation and will have to have the last two HBV series shots.
12.3 Communicable Disease/Employees: At any time the Superintendent knows,
or has reason to believe, that an employee is suffering from a communicable disease
which may be detrimental to the health, safety, or welfare of the students and other
employees, the Superintendent may require a Certification of Health and any additional
information deemed necessary and appropriate to determine the terms of continued
employment of the subject employee.
Failure to file any Certification of Health as required shall be a basis for
suspension from employment under Board of Education Policy GBK.
The Superintendent or his/her designee shall make necessary and appropriate
decisions with respect to the employment of the subject employee so as to protect and
promote the health, safety, and welfare of the students and other employees. Any
employment decision shall be made in consideration of the medical judgment obtained
from the County Health Officer (Geary County, Kansas) and/or the subject employee’s
licensed physician.
13.
SAFETY AND SECURITY
13.1 Safety Policy: Safety is a joint venture at Geary County USD 475. The school
district provides a clean, hazard free, healthy, safe environment in which to work in
accordance with the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. As an employee, you
are expected to take an active part in maintaining this environment. You should observe
all posted safety rules, adhere to all safety instructions provided by your supervisor and
use safety equipment where required. Your work place should be kept neat, clean, and
orderly.
It is your responsibility to learn the location of all safety and emergency
equipment, as well as the appropriate safety contact phone numbers.
All safety equipment will be provided by the school district, and employees will
be responsible for the reasonable upkeep of this equipment. Any problems with or
defects in equipment should be reported immediately to management.
As an employee, you have a duty to comply with the safety rules of the school
district, to assist in maintaining the hazard free environment, to report any accidents or
injuries – including any breaches of safety – and to report any unsafe equipment,
working condition, process or procedure, at once to a supervisor.
Employees may report safety violations or injuries anonymously to the Safety
Committee, if they are not the injured or violating party. NO EMPLOYEE WILL BE
PUNISHED OR REPRIMANDED FOR REPORTING SAFETY VIOLATIONS OR
HAZARDS. However, any deliberate or ongoing safety violation, or creation of hazard,
by an employee will be dealt with through disciplinary action by the school district, up to
and including termination.
13.2 Safety Procedure: Our record in the area of safety demands improvement
because:
(1)
families.
Injuries often bring about human suffering to school employees and their
(2)
The direct cost of insurance premiums and indirect costs of disrupted
work schedules and damaged equipment might better be spent in a number of areas.
It is the intent of USD 475, therefore, to provide and maintain safe working
conditions and to follow operating practices that will safeguard all employees and result
in safe, efficient operations.
To accomplish this very important goal, we assign the responsibility, authority,
and accountability for accident prevention to all supervisory personnel within their
individual area of operations. This includes the thorough investigation of any accident
in a timely manner using the USD 475 Accident Investigation Report.
It is the responsibility of the Director of Business Operations to administer a total
accident prevention effort covering all employees and to work with the Safety
Committee to develop Safety Programs for the school district.
This safety program requires the participation of every employee in observing
safe work practices at all time and in all places along with reporting unsafe acts and
conditions to your supervisors.
13.3 Reporting of Accidents: Should an on the job injury occur, the injured
employee is required to report the injury verbally to his/her supervisor immediately and
to follow up in writing within ten (10) days or the claim may be barred. Forms are
provided through the building principal. The report of the injury must be sent to the
Human Resource Services Department at the Mary E. Devin Center for Education
Support. Additional information about your rights and responsibilities under workers’
compensation may be obtained from your supervisor or the district office. See Appendix
15.6 for a copy of the Report by Injured Employee form.
13.4 Drills: The school district conducts both fire drills and tornado drills. Please see
the department/school specific information regarding these drills.
13.5 Inclement Weather: There are days during the work year where schools
and/or the Mary E. Devin Center for Education Support may be closed due to inclement
weather. Should schools or the Mary E. Devin Center for Education Support be closed
due to inclement weather, This procedure will be followed with the classified hourly
positions:
13.5.1 The employee may use applicable leave for the day(s) missed due to inclement
weather. Applicable leave is defined as vacation leave, and personal leave. A day is
defined as the maximum workday shown on the employee’s Notification of Wage. Sick
leave and family leave cannot be used for this purpose.
13.5.2 Supervisors, at their discretion, may work with employees who do not have
available leave to make up time missed.




Make up time is to be allowed only for work that needs to be completed at that
time.
Available leave must be used before making up time.
No overtime will be allowed.
Under no circumstances are employees allowed to make up more time than that
missed due to inclement weather.
13.5.3 Custodial and/or Maintenance workers are not covered under this procedure.
They are expected to work on inclement weather days.
13.6 Securing the Work Area: Every employee shall secure their work area prior to
leaving for breaks and/or the end of the work day. This includes cleaning, locking and
storing items as necessary.
13.7 Building Opening and Closing Time: All buildings in USD 475 open and close
at different times. You should check with the immediate supervisor to ascertain the
times for the building(s) in which you will be assigned.
13.8 Keys: Keys will be issued to employees on an as needed basis. Do not duplicate
keys. Immediately report the loss of any keys to your immediate supervisor. Employees
may be responsible for the costs associated with the replacement of keys. Keys are
expected to be turned in upon termination of employment.
13.9 Crisis Plan: Each building has a crisis plan. You should ask your immediate
supervisor to review it. Plans are usually maintained in the building principal’s office or
the Superintendent and Board Clerks’ office.
13.10 Safe and Violence Free Workplace: USD 475 has a zero tolerance for
violence. If you engage in any violence in the workplace, or threaten violence in the
workplace, your employment will be terminated immediately. No talk of violence or
joking about violence will be tolerated.
13.10.1 Definition: “Violence” includes physically harming another, shoving, pushing,
harassing, intimidating, coercing, brandishing weapons, and threatening or talking of
engaging in those activities. It is our intent to ensure that everyone associated with USD
475, including employees and customers, never feels threatened by any employee’s
actions or conduct.
13.10.2 Reporting Violence: It is everyone’s business to prevent violence in the
workplace. You can help by reporting what you see in the workplace that could indicate
that a co-worker is in trouble. You are in a better position than management to know
what is happening to those with whom you work. You are encouraged to report any
incident that may involve a violation of any of the district’s policies and procedures that
are designed to provide a comfortable workplace environment. Concerns may be
presented to your immediate supervisor. If for any reason you feel that your concerns
are not heard at this level, you may present them to the department manager or building
principal and then to the Director of Human Resource Services if you feel this is
necessary.
14.
EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES
14.1 Appropriate Use of Equipment and Supplies: All employees are expected
to possess prior knowledge of the use of equipment and supplies in the district.
However, prior to placement, the immediate supervisor will arrange training on
equipment and will schedule regular training sessions.
14.2 Copying/Duplicating/Inventory/Ordering Procedures/Requisitions:
Should you have a need for any of the above referenced services, the Business
Department produces a manual which outlines procedures for each of the processes
listed above. You should contact the Business Department directly for additional
information.
14.3 Vehicle Request: Use of school district vehicles may be requested through the
receptionist at the Mary E. Devin Center for Education Support for school district
business only.
15.
APPENDICES
15.1
Leave Chart
15.2 Requests for Leave Form
15.3 Employee Rights & Responsibilities Under the Family & Medical
Leave Act
15.4 Request for Advance Pay
15.5 Asbestos Management Plan: Plans are located in all offices of all schools and
in the Business Department and the Superintendent’s office at the Mary E. Devin Center
for Education Support.
15.6 Reports by Injured Employee Form
15.7
Alphabetical Listing of Handbook Topics
CLASSIFIED EMPLOYEES LEAVE CHART
Secretaries/Clerks/Technology
Returning 12
month
secondary &
DC
Aides/Paraprofessionals/Food Service
Returning 9/10
month
secondary &
elementary
After
probation
1st year
employees
See
*1A below
Sick Leave
Allowed per Year
13
10
Sick Leave
Maximum
60
60
Returning
Employees
10
60
After probation 1st
year employees
See *2A below
Probation period is 90 days in length*. After completion of probation the following will apply:
___________________________________________________
After probation
1 month
4 months
Completed
later
later
SICK LEAVE
*1A=
2 days
4 days
4 days
*2A=
2 days
4 days
4 days
*3A=
2 days
4 days
4 days
Probation period is 90 days in length*. After completion of probation the following will apply:
___________________________________________________
After probation
1 month
4 months
Completed
later
later
FAMILY LEAVE
___________________________________________________
*1A=
2 days
2 days
1 day
*2A=
2 days
2 days
1 day
*3A=
2 days VACATION
2 days
1 day
*probation
time is subject
to supervisor
12 month employees earn 1 day of vacation for each full month of employment.
Appendix 15.2
Appendix 15.3
EMPLOYEE RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES
UNDER THE FAMILY AND MEDICAL LEAVE ACT
Basic Leave Entitlement
FMLA also includes a special leave
FMLA requires covered employers to
entitlement that permits eligible
provide up to 12 weeks of unpaid, jobemployees to take up to 26 weeks of
protected leave to eligible employees for
leave to care for a covered
the following reasons:
servicemember during a single 12• For incapacity due to pregnancy,
month period. A covered
prenatal medical care or child birth;
servicemember is a current member of
• To care for the employee’s child after
the Armed Forces, including a member
birth, or placement for adoption or
of the National Guard or Reserves, who
foster care;
has a serious injury or illness incurred in
• To care for the employee’s spouse, son
the line of duty on active duty that may
or daughter, or parent, who has a
render the servicemember medically
serious health condition; or
unfit to perform his or her duties for
• For a serious health condition that
which the servicemember is undergoing
makes the employee unable to
medical treatment, recuperation, or
perform the employee’s job.
therapy; or is in outpatient status; or is
Military Family Leave
on the temporary disability retired list.
Entitlements
Benefits and Protections
Eligible employees with a spouse, son,
During FMLA leave, the employer must
daughter, or parent on active duty or call
maintain the employee’s health coverage
to active duty status in the National
under any “group health plan” on the
Guard or Reserves in support of a
same terms as if the employee had
contingency operation may use their 12continued to work. Upon return from
week leave entitlement to address
FMLA leave, most employees must be
certain qualifying exigencies. Qualifying
restored to their original or equivalent
exigencies may include attending certain
positions with equivalent pay, benefits,
military events, arranging for alternative
and other employment terms.
childcare, addressing certain financial
Use of FMLA leave cannot result in the
and legal arrangements, attending
loss of any employment benefit that
certain counseling sessions, and
accrued prior to the start of an
attending post-deployment
employee’s leave.
reintegration briefings.
Eligibility Requirements
Employees are eligible if they have
worked for a covered employer for at
least one year, for 1,250 hours over the
previous 12 months, and if at least 50
employees are employed by the
employer within 75 miles.
Definition of Serious Health
Condition
A serious health condition is an illness,
injury, impairment, or physical or
mental condition that involves either an
overnight stay in a medical care facility,
or continuing treatment by a health care
provider for a condition that either
prevents the employee from performing
the functions of the employee’s job, or
prevents the qualified family member
from participating in school or other
daily activities.
Subject to certain conditions, the
continuing treatment requirement may
be met by a period of incapacity of more
than 3 consecutive calendar days
combined with at least two visits to a
health care provider or one visit and a
regimen of continuing treatment, or
incapacity due to pregnancy, or
incapacity due to a chronic condition.
Other conditions may meet the
definition of continuing treatment.
Use of Leave
An employee does not need to use this
leave entitlement in one block. Leave
can be taken intermittently or on a
reduced leave schedule when medically
necessary. Employees must make
reasonable efforts to schedule leave for
planned medical treatment so as not to
unduly disrupt the employer’s
operations. Leave due to qualifying
exigencies may also be taken on an
intermittent basis.
Substitution of Paid Leave for
Unpaid Leave
Employees may choose or employers
may require use of accrued paid leave
while taking FMLA leave. In order to
use paid leave for FMLA leave,
employees must comply with the
employer’s normal paid leave policies.
Employee Responsibilities
Employees must provide 30 days
advance notice of the need to take FMLA
leave when the need is foreseeable.
When 30 days notice is not possible, the
employee must provide notice as soon as
practicable and generally must comply
with an employer’s normal call-in
procedures.
Employees must provide sufficient
information for the employer to
determine if the leave may qualify for
For additional information:
1-866-4US-WAGE (1-866-487-9243)
FMLA
TTY: protection
1-877-889-5627and the anticipated
WWW.WAGEHOUR.DOL.GOV
timing and duration of the leave.
U.S. Department of Labor | Employment Standards Administration | Wage and Hour Division
WHD Publication 1420 Revised January 2009
Sufficient information may include that
the employee is unable to perform job
functions, the family member is unable
to perform daily activities, the need for
hospitalization or continuing treatment
by a health care provider, or
circumstances supporting the need for
military family leave. Employees also
must inform the employer if the
requested leave is for a reason for which
FMLA leave was previously taken or
certified. Employees also may be
required to provide a certification and
periodic recertification supporting the
need for leave.
Employer Responsibilities
Covered employers must inform
employees requesting leave whether
they are eligible under FMLA. If they
are, the notice must specify any
additional information required as well
as the employees’ rights and
responsibilities. If they are not eligible,
the employer must provide a reason for
the ineligibility.
Covered employers must inform
employees if leave will be designated as
FMLA-protected and the amount of
leave counted against the employee’s
leave entitlement. If the employer
determines that the leave is not FMLAprotected, the employer must notify the
employee.
Unlawful Acts by Employers
FMLA makes it unlawful for any
employer to:
• Interfere with, restrain, or deny the
exercise of any right provided under
FMLA;
• Discharge or discriminate against any
person for opposing any practice
made unlawful by FMLA or for
involvement in any proceeding under
or relating to FMLA.
Enforcement
An employee may file a complaint with
the U.S. Department of Labor or may
bring a private lawsuit against an
employer.
FMLA does not affect any Federal or
State law prohibiting discrimination, or
supersede any State or local law or
collective bargaining agreement which
provides greater family or medical leave
rights.
FMLA section 109 (29 U.S.C. §
2619) requires FMLA covered
employers to post the text of this
notice. Regulations 29 C.F.R. §
825.300(a) may require additional
disclosure
Appendix 15.4
USD 475 Geary County Schools
Request for Advance Pay
Staff may make a request due to an emergency for an advance payment of wages earned once in a
calendar year.
Procedure:
 Submit this request to the Human Resource Services Administrator
 Payroll administrator provides wage calculation and verification
 Human Resource Services Administrator approves/denies and returns to payroll
 Payroll provides notice to employee of approval or denial
(if approved, employee must pick up the check in person)
Employee:
Social Security Number:
Reason for Request:
Amount Requested $
Phone Number:
Employee Signature:
Date:
Payroll Verification
Hours Worked:
Hourly Rate:
Payroll Supervisor:
Wages Available:
Date:
Human Resource Services Approval/Denial
Amount Approved $
Human Resource Services Administrator: ______________
Notice:
Date:
I understand this is an advance payment on wages earned. The total
amount will be deducted from the
pay check.
(month of next check)
Check Number:
Employee Signature:
Amount of Check $
Date:
GEARY COUNTY UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT
Junction City, Kansas 66441
Appendix 15.6
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * REPORT BY INJURED EMPLOYEE * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
Sex: M / F
Employee
Name ______________________________________________DOB ___________
(First)
(Middle)
(Last)
Address____________________________________________________________
(Street)
(City)
(State)
(Zip)
Home Phone (_______) ________________________Social Security # ___________
Job Title ________________Date of Injury __________Time _____
Exact Location of Accident:_______________________________________________
(School / Bldg / Room)
In your own words, please describe what happened:
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
* Substance/object that directly caused injury
_________________________________________________
* Describe in detail nature/extent of injury, indicate part of body involved:
________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________
Were you working at your regular job at the time of injury?
YES ( )
NO ( )
* If NO, please
explain______________________________________________________________
What was employee doing when injured?
__________________________________________________________________
What physical problems do you relate to this injury?
___________________________________________
__________________________________________________________
Did you report this injury to your supervisor?
YES ( )
NO ( )
If not, why not?
_____________________________________________________________________
Date Reported: ______________________
Supervisor’sName:___________________________
Were you working at your regular job at the time of the injury?
YES ( )
NO ( )
If not,
please explain:
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
Did you go to a hospital/clinic?
YES ( )
NO ( )
Address of
hospital/clinic:__________________________________________________________
_______
Name of treating
physician:______________________________________________________________
__
Have you returned to regular duty? _____________ Light Duty?
_____________Date_________________
Were there witnesses?
YES ( )
NO ( )
If yes, list
witnesses:___________________________
________________________________________________________________
Any additional comments:
_____________________________________________________________________
X_______________________________________X______________________
Signature of Principal / Supervisor
Date
X______________________________X_______________________________
Signature of Employee
Date
**This form must be filed with the Director of Human Resource Services immediately
following any “on the job” injury. A report will be made for workers’ compensation
insurance from this information.**
Appendix 15.7
Alphabetical Listing of Handbook Topics
Topic
Section
Activity Passes
Annuities – Deductions
Appropriate Use of Equipment and Supplies
Asbestos Management Plan Notice
Assignment and Transfer
Attendance
Benefits and Compensation
Bloodborne Pathogens
Board Policy
Breaks
Building Opening and Closing Time
Cell Phone Use
Child Abuse
Classified Complaint Procedures
Classified Employee In-Processing
Classified Employees Advisory Council
Committee Assignments
Communicable Disease / Employees
Computer Software and Hardware Guidelines
Conduct
Confidentiality
Conflict of Interest
Copying / Duplicating / Inventory / Order Proc / Requisitions
Criminal Convictions
Crisis Plan
Disciplinary Procedures
Discrimination Complaints
Distribution of Materials
District Mission Statement
District Procedures
Dress Code
Drills
Drug and Alcohol Testing
Drug Free Workplace
E-mail and Internet Policy
Employee Protection
Equal Opportunity Employer
Equipment and Supplies
Topic
5.13
5.9
14.1
12.1
8.10
6.5
5.0
12.2
8.1
6.4
13.7
8.25.1
11.1
8.2
8.5
9.1
9.
12.3
8.26
7.
7.8
7.13
14.2
8.11
13.9
7.1
8.3
8.19
2.
8.
7.12
13.4
8.13
7.2
8.27
7.6
3.
14.
Section
Page
9
8
31
27
21
10
2
27
19
10
30
23
26
19
20
25
25
28
23
11
16
18
31
21
31
11
19
22
1
19
17
30
22
11
25
16
1
31
Page
Evaluations
Gifts
Health
Hiring
Holidays
Identification Cards
Inclement Weather
Insurance
Introduction
Job Descriptions
Job Openings / Postings
Kansas Public Employees Retirement System (KPERS)
Keys
Leaves and Absences
Loyalty Oath
Nepotism
No Child Left Behind Law
Non-Taxable Section 125 – Salary Reductions
Notification of Wage
Organizational Chart
Outside Employment
Overtime
Payday
Personal Property
Personnel Records
Probationary Status
Racial Harassment
Records
Reimbursement / Travel Expense
Relations with Students
Reporting of Accidents
Reporting Possible Criminal Conduct
Reports
Required Records
Retirement
Safe and Violence Free Workplace
Safety and Security
Safety Policy
Safety Procedure
Salary Deductions
Salary Protection
Schedules
Securing the Work Area
Separation of Employment
Sexual Harassment
Topic
Solicitations
Staff – Community Relations
Staff Development
Staff Responsibilities for Discipline
Supervision
8.8
7.10
12.
8.4
5.5
8.6
13.5
5.1
1.
8.15
8.23
5.10
13.8
5.3
4.
8.17
8.14
5.7
8.12
8.18
7.14
6.2
5.6
8.20
10.1
8.7
7.4
10.
8.21
7.5
13.3
11.2
11.
10.2
8.16
13.10
13.
13.1
13.2
5.8
5.2
6.
13.6
7.16
7.3
Section
7.11
7.7
8.24
7.9
8.9
21
17
26
20
7
21
30
2
1
22
23
8
31
3
2
22
22
8
21
22
18
10
8
22
25
21
14
25
22
16
30
26
26
26
22
31
28
28
29
8
3
10
30
18
12
Page
17
16
23
17
21
Suspension
Telephone Use
Time Cards / Badge Swiper
Unemployment Compensation
Vacation Day
Vandalism
Vehicle Request
Weapons
Workers’ Compensation
Work Schedule / Attendance
7.15
8.25
6.3
5.12
5.4
11.3
14.3
8.22
5.11
6.1
18
23
10
9
7
26
32
22
9
10
This handbook is not meant as a wage offer or a guarantee of a job or position. As a
handbook, it does not qualify to be grieved. It is simply a guide for classified employees. All USD
475 Board of Education policies supersede anything in the handbook.
GEARY COUNTY UNIFIED SCHOOLS
CLASSIFIED PERSONNEL EVALUATION REPORT
AIDES/PARAPROFESSIONALS
NAME:
POSITION:
JOB
LOCATION:
IMMEDIATE SUPERVISOR:
PERIOD COVERED BY THIS
EVALUATION:
EVALUATOR:
Place an X in the degree of performance box which most accurately reflects the rating of this employee
for each skill area evaluated. The degree of performance is determined as the skill area related to the
job standards established for this employee.
5
4
3
2
1
CODE FOR EVALUATION
Not Applicable
HIGH
LOW
I.
WORK RELATED SKILLS
5
4
3
2
1
5
4
3
2
1
5
4
3
2
1
Job Knowledge. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
.Quality of Work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
.Quantity of Work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
.Work Organization. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
.Care of Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
.Follows Direction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
.Judgement & Common Sense. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
.In-Service Growth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
.
II.
COMMITMENT TO DUTY
Loyalty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Morale. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Attitude Toward Job. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Job Assignment Responsibility. . . . . . . . . . . . .
Initative. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Attendance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
III.
PERSONAL JOB SKILLS
Gets along with co-workers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Dependability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cooperativeness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Appearance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Physical Health. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Attitude (General) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
.Conduct . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
.Relations with Public. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
.Relations with Staff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
.Relations with Students. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Punctuality. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
.Uses Time Wisely . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
.
I consider this staff person’s overall performance to be:
SUPERIOR
SATISFACTORY
UNSATISFACTORY
EVALUATOR COMMENTS: (This space may be used by the evaluator to comment in regard to the
evaluation given above or to comment on other aspects of the employee’s performance as needed.)
EMPLOYEE COMMENTS: (this space may be used by the employee to comment in regard to the evaluation
given above or to other aspects of performance as needed.)
The employee signature on this report does not represent either acceptance or approval of the
evaluation. Signatures indicate only that the employee has reviewed this form in conference with the
evaluator.
Copies to:


Signature of Evaluator
Date
Signature of Employee
Date
Evaluator
Employee
Personnel Office
For any area marked 5, please comment on.
For any area marked 1, identify specific steps to be taken to improve performance to an acceptable
level and the appropriate time frame.
Section 4: Appendix
Terminology
504
ADA
BIP
Charter Schools
CD
Terminology 504
Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973
defines disabilities for educational purposes.
Having a disability does not automatically qualify
a student for Special Education services.
If they can perform (with accommodations) at a
level consistent with their abilities, they will
probably not qualify as a Special Education
student.
For example, a student who uses a wheelchair
may be able to function well academically
without special help – therefore, that student
would not need Special Education classes.
We often call these students “504 Students.”
They may need some modification of their school
program. In some cases, Physical Education may
not be a required class. In another situations, a
student may be allowed extra time to complete
school assignments or to receive instruction at
home or in a health care setting.
Americans with Disabilities Act - The intent of this
legislation was to "level the playing field" so that
people with disabilities could access public
buildings, obtain employment, and participate in
society.
Behavior Intervention Plan - A plan developed by
a licensed professional (usually a Special
Education teacher) to assist a student with
behavior problems to develop appropriate
behavior.
Public schools organized by members of the
community to address perceived needs of
students which may not be addressed in the
traditional schools.
Communication Disorder – Special Education
category for students with a speech and language
impairment (such as stuttering) and is severe
enough to affect their education.
Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973
defines disabilities for educational purposes.
Having a disability does not automatically qualify
a student for Special Education services.
If they can perform (with accommodations) at a
level consistent with their abilities, they will
probably not qualify as a Special Education
student.
For example, a student who uses a wheelchair
may be able to function well academically
without special help – therefore, that student
would not need Special Education classes.
We often call these students “504 Students.”
They may need some modification of their school
program. In some cases, Physical Education may
not be a required class. In another situations, a
student may be allowed extra time to complete
school assignments or to receive instruction at
home or in a health care setting.
ADA
Americans with Disabilities Act - The intent of this
legislation was to "level the playing field" so that
people with disabilities could access public
buildings, obtain employment, and participate in
society.
BIP
Behavior Intervention Plan - A plan developed by
a licensed professional (usually a Special
Education teacher) to assist a student with
behavior problems to develop appropriate
behavior.
Charter Schools
Public schools organized by members of the
community to address perceived needs of
students which may not be addressed in the
traditional schools.
CD
Communication Disorder – Special Education
category for students with a speech and language
impairment (such as stuttering) and is severe
enough to affect their education.
ED or BD
Emotional Disturbance or Behavior Disturbance –
Special Education category for students with
behaviors which disrupt their education. This can
include depression or phobias in addition to
“acting out” inappropriately. The "Behavior
Disorder" label has been replaced with the
"Emotional Disturbance" label. Educators who
have been around a while often use the term
"BD" instead of the current term of "ED" or
"Emotional Disturbance."
ELL
English Language Learner - a person who's first
spoken language is NOT English and is in the
process of learning English
ESY
Extended School Year - Education provided
outside of the regular school year program.
FAPE
Free Appropriate Public Education - This term
refers to the right for each person (with or
without a disability) to obtain a free education
according to their needs.
FERPA
Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA)
– a Federal law which protects the privacy of
student educational records. FERPA gives parents
certain rights with respect to their children's
education records. These rights transfer to the
student when he or she reaches the age of 18 or
attends a school beyond the high school level.
File Holder
The Special Ed teacher who in is charge of a
particular students educational program and has
responsibility for documenting her progress and
keeping important information in her file.
FBA
Functional Behavior Analysis – a problem solving
process for defining events in the environment
that reliably predict and maintain a student’s
problem behaviors
IDEA
Individuals with Disabilities Education Act – The
law which regulates services that should be
provided to students, defines who qualifies for
Special Education, record keeping and training
requirements for all persons who provide
services to Special Education services, and many
other aspects of Special Education.
IEP
Individualized Education Program - Each Special
Education student is required to have this
document that outlines their goals and
educational objectives. It should be reviewed and
updated yearly.
Inclusion
Regular education classes combined with special
education services so the special education
student is included in the typical school
experience for at least one-half of the school day.
Instructional Team
Educators who work together to teach a specific
group of students. An example of an instructional
team could be a classroom teacher,
paraeducator(s), and the school administrators.
More than one teacher can be on an instructional
team. Typically, regular education teachers are
not part of a Special Educational instructional
team since they do not attend the team meetings
in the Special Education Department.
Instructor
A teacher, paraeducator, intern, classroom
volunteer, etc. who is responsible for delivering a
lesson or demonstration. They should use
effective teaching practices.
Learning Disability – correctly, it should be
Specific Learning Disability. – Special Education
category for students with a disability involving
reading, writing, math, and sometimes speech.
LD
LEA
Local Education Agency – For example, a school
(public or charter) or a school district.
LRE
Least Restrictive Environment - The idea is for
Special Education students to be with their peers
as much as possible.
Mainstreaming
Students with special needs are educated with
their typically developing peers in the "regular"
classroom setting for part of the school day.
Medicaid
Health insurance available to low income
individuals with disabilities.
OCR
Office of Civil Rights - the federal agency charged
with protecting the civil rights of all American
residents.
OSEP
Office of Special Education Programs.
Resource
A part of Special Education – typically refers to
student with mild to moderate disabilities. Most
of the time, a "Resource Student" will have
mainstream classes with their peers for most of
the school day, along with their Special Education
classes.
RTI
Response to Intervention – a multi-tiered
approach to providing services and interventions
to struggling students at increasing levels of
intensity.
SID
Severe Intellectual Disability - Special Education
category for students with significant IQ deficits
and ability to adapt
Instruction delivered by specially trained teachers
to help students with disabilities reach their
maximum potential. Often, this term is used to
refer to students who are "self contained" meaning they spend most of their school day in a
Special Education classroom.
Special Education
SSI
Social Security Income – paid to individuals with
disabilities significant enough to prevent them
from becoming employed at a subsistence level.
It provides them with means to sustain
themselves. Parents can receive SSI on behalf of
their disabled children.
TBI
Traumatic Brain Injury – Special Education
category for students with an acquired injury to
the brain, which affects the student’s ability to
learn.
Title I
The full title is "Title I — Improving The Academic
Achievement Of The Disadvantaged" and is part
of NCLB (No Child Left Behind) legislation. Its
purpose is to help students from disadvantaged
backgrounds to reach their full academic
potential.
Transition
In Special Education, this refers to the ongoing
process of preparing students for a successful life
after they leave the school system. In addition to
the traditional academic skills, students need to
learn social, everyday living, and vocational skills.
Vocational Rehabilitation
A state agency with the mandated goal to help
people with disabilities to become employable.
They can provide support to qualified individuals
(after they leave school) to reach their
employment goals. It is often referred to as "Voc
Rehab." They are may be invited to IEP meetings
as part of a student's transition process.
Qualifying Students for Special Education
For a student to receive services in Special Education, they must
o Have a qualifying disability AND
o Need Special Education services to reach their potential
At times, this can be very confusing. A student may (for example) have a severe health problem such as Muscular
Dystrophy. If the student is able to succeed in the traditional school setting, they won’t qualify for Special Education
services. However, under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, they may qualify for accommodations to their
school program - such as having a personal aide. A student with a temporary disability (like a broken leg) would
temporarily be a “504 student” and could have his or her class requirements modified for a time.
There is a process to decide if a student qualifies for Special Education services. Usually, it starts with a variety of
assessments. A team of professionals will review the results and consider other aspects of a student's background. As a
group, they will decide on a plan for the student. The plan should include RTI considerations, placements, additional
services, and supports. Based on student performance over time, the team may decide the student will benefit from
services in Special Education.
The IDEA Special Education
categories are:
1. Autism
8. Orthopedic Impairment
2. Deaf/blindness
9. Other Health Impaired
3. Developmental Delay
10. Specific Learning Disability
4. Emotional Disturbance
11. Speech-Language Impairment
5. Hearing Impairment/Deafness
12. Traumatic Brain Injury
6. Intellectual Disability
13. Visual Impairment
7. Multiple Disabilities
Sometimes students have more than one disability. For example, a student may have a learning disability and use a
wheelchair. If that is the case, the question becomes, “Which disability affects the student’s education the most?”
Their classification is determined by the answer. Of course, the student will receive appropriate services for any
disability regardless of his classification.
Each category or classification is very broad. The classification isn’t very useful in understanding the needs of the
INDIVIDUAL student. For example, one student with the label of “Specific Learning Disability” could have problems
with reading and writing but the student may be good in math and have strong social skills. A different student with
the same label could be socially awkward, impulsive, and have poor writing skills but have strong reading and
vocational skills.
That said, here is some information on the categories/classifications that are commonly encountered. If you work with
students who are in categories not listed, you should ask your supervisor for help in understanding your students and
meeting their needs.
Learning Disability
This is the most commonly identified disability. These students have average or above average IQs but have problems
They may described as having dyslexia, perceptual disabilities, brain injury, minimal brain dysfunction, and so on. Their
problems are NOT a result of lack of education, a disadvantaged background, poor hearing or eyesight, or emotional
disturbance.
Characteristics (a student may have one or
several)
easily frustrated – doesn’t persevere
That said, here is some information on the categories/classifications that are commonly encountered. If you work with
students who are in categories not listed, you should ask your supervisor for help in understanding your students and
meeting their needs.
Learning Disability
This is the most commonly identified disability. These students have average or above average IQs but have problems
They may described as having dyslexia, perceptual disabilities, brain injury, minimal brain dysfunction, and so on. Their
problems are NOT a result of lack of education, a disadvantaged background, poor hearing or eyesight, or emotional
disturbance.
Characteristics (a student may have one or
several)
ulty decoding written language
easily frustrated – doesn’t persevere
Intellectual Disability
These students have IQs that are significantly below average as well as problems with adaptive behavior. They will
have this disability for their whole life. They will most likely struggle with self care and independent living skills
(cooking, shopping, finding and keeping employment, transportation, etc.).
Characteristics (a student may have one or
several)
low academic skills (reading, writing math,
etc.)
–
forgets easily
inability to put her thoughts into words
understanding what she is saying
– for
example, he can count change at school but
doesn’t know how to use that skill on a job
comprehend
-vocational or
vocational skills
work experiences (babysitting,
lawn mowing, etc.) typical for their age group
numbers, etc.)
reactions
Ideas for supporting these students
– one step at a time.
o Make sure they master each step before moving on.
o Review often.
o Give lots of practice.
o Demonstrate (don’t just explain) tasks.
o Give multiple opportunities to practice a new skill. She may forget it easily.
– don’t rush her.
probably understands it.
Emotional Disturbance
These students have emotional or behavior problems that last over a long period of time. These behaviors are not a
result of a crisis such as a divorce of parents or a death. These problems have an adverse influence on their education.
In Utah, this category used to be called “Behavior Disorder.” We often still hear this term or its shortened version “BD
Characteristics (a student may have one or
several)
destructive to themselves and others
have problems associating their behavior
with consequences
ack of confidence
communicate with others
Ideas for supporting these students
front of an "audience."
o Calmly discuss the problem, Explain when a behavior is inappropriate, Keep voice low and soft , Let the student calm
down.
Hearing Impairment/Deafness
These students have problems hearing but may not be deaf.
Ideas for supporting these students
udents who are totally deaf and do not read lips will not be communicating in their first language.
English is a second language for them. Therefore, misunderstandings and miscommunications easily occur. Abstract
concepts are often difficult to share.
se an interpreter if a student needs it.
Autism
Autism significantly affects a person’s ability to communicate (verbally and/or nonverbally) and to interact socially in a
typical manner. It is a spectrum disability that covers a wide range of abilities. Some people will be able to function fairly
well, especially with appropriate training and support. Others seem to be in a world of their own.
Characteristics (a student may have one or
several)
o hard time relating to others
o socially awkward
o little or no empathy for
others
o severe problems in transitioning from one
activity (or location) to another
o developmentally behind peers and may
learn skills out of typical sequence
o has a hard time making and maintaining
friendships
o significant problems with communication
(speech)
o peculiar speech patterns
o very literal in understanding speech and
doesn’t understand idioms, humor, sarcasm,
word plays, etc.
o may be unusually sensitive or insensitive to
sensory stimuli
o rocking, flapping, head
banging,etc.
Ideas for supporting these students
going to a new location.
- work experience, accessing public transportation,
independent living skills, etc.
idioms.
Speech-Language Impairment
This classification used to be called “Communication Disordered.” This disorder includes things such as stuttering,
impaired articulation, language impairment, or voice impairment.
Ideas for supporting these students
lectures so they can concentrate on what is being said
their thoughts
Traumatic Brain Injury
Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) means an injury to the brain (such as from an accident, surgery, etc.) and adversely affects a
child's educational performance. It may be a temporary or permanent disability.
The effects of the injury vary from person to person. Generally, people with TBI improve over time. Recovery may take
many years. It is impossible to predict the amount of improvement, or how long it will continue.
The effects of the injury can show up in areas such as:
ADHD (Attention Deficient Hyperactive Disorder)
This is a condition that describes a student with "developmentally inappropriate" degrees of inattention, impulsiveness,
and hyperactivity." ADHD may not be identified until the student enters school and they begin to stand out. Boys seem
to be affected more often than girls.
There are three types of ADHD:
– Impulsive
Primary Characteristics:
- unable to stay on task; easily distracted
- acts without thinking
- "much too busy" often showing up as fidgeting and squirming
Associated Characteristics:
- unable or resistive to compliance with adult requests
- difficulty in delaying gratification, "governed" by the closest attractive thing or by what they want in
their environment
- trouble interacting with peers and adults, often described as easily frustrated, "bossy,"
uncooperative, or able to maintain long lasting friendships
Students can learn to manage their behaviors. ADHD lasts beyond childhood. It is seen in a wide variety of situations but
is noticed at school because students have to pay attention, sit in his seat, and have appropriate behavior. Students with
ADHD may be served by Special Education or a “504” plan.
NOTE: According to federal legislation, school personnel should not recommend medication.
Ideas for supporting these students
Teach organizational skills.
antity during tasks.
Use natural consequences whenever possible.
Cerebral Palsy
This condition is due to damage to the brain. It occurs in the womb or soon after birth. It can be a minor impairment or it
can be very involved.
Typical impairments:
exes
Other possible impairments:
durance.
Ideas for supporting these students
Teacher's Self Evaluation Checklist Teacher:
Ask yourself........
Do I have clearly defined roles for my paraeducator(s)?
Have I checked to see that my paraeducator(s) understands these
roles?
Do I know the school, district, and state standards for
paraeducators?
Does my paraeducator(s) know the standards concerning
paraeducator roles?
Does my paraeducator(s) know those roles that are strictly teacher
roles (e.g., writing lesson plans, designing curriculum changes,
etc.)?
Have I identified the responsibilities which I can appropriately
delegate?
Have I clearly communicated my priorities for student learning to
my paraeducator(s)?
Do I communicate clearly and problem solve with my
paraeducator(s)?
Do I clearly share my vision and take steps to ensure effective
teamwork?
Do I meet regularly with my paraeducator(s) to plan and discuss
student progress?
Do I monitor my paraeducator(s) performance on a daily basis?
Do I provide ongoing constructive feedback through coaching and
modeling?
Do we celebrate student learning and other accomplishments of
our goals?
Rate yourself:
1= Needs work
2=Okay, but
not great
3=Great
List your ideas
for
improvement
or note the
things that you
do especially
well.
Supervisor/Administrator's Self Evaluation Checklist
Principal or Supervisor
Rate yourself on the following:
I have a clearly informed the paraeducators under my
supervision of their roles?
I have checked to see that all paraeducators understand
the difference between their roles and the roles of
teachers.
I include teachers in the hiring process for the
paraeducators assigned to them?
I have informed our paraeducators of employment
expectations and pay issues.
I have informed the paraeducators of their “Chain of
Command” and whom to go if they have complaints or
employment issues.
I have shared the school, district, and state guidelines for
paraeducators with each of them.
I have made certain my school has an infrastructure to
provide support to paraeducators.
I have made certain paraeducators can directly receive
important information such as district communications,
conferences, and workshops via phone calls, email and
direct mailings.
I have identified ways to include paraeducators as part of
the school's instructional team?
Do I have a performance based evaluation system for
paraeducators, and a way to provide feedback to the
paraeducator(s)?
Do I include teachers in the evaluation process for their
paraeducators?
Do I meet regularly with my paraeducators and teachers
to plan and discuss student progress?
Have I found ways to recognize paraeducators for their
achievements?
Do we celebrate student learning with the instructional
team?
Rate yourself: 1=
Needs work 2=Okay,
but not great 3=Great
List your ideas for improvement or
note the things that you do especially
well.
Resources
National Organizations
National Resource Center for Paraprofessionals (NRCP) www.nrcpara.org/
Project Para: Paraeducator Self-Study Program http://para.unl.edu/
AFT Paraprofessionals and School-Related Personnel www.aft.org/psrp/
National Clearinghouse for Paraeducator Resources
www.usc.edu/dept/education/CMMR/Clearinghouse.html
CEC Standards for Paraeducators ww.cec.sped.org/ps/parastds.html
NEA: National Education Association Homepage www.nea.org/index.html
NEA: Education Support Professionals www.nea.org/esphome
NEA: Academy www.nea.org
CEC
http://www.usc.edu/dept/education/CMMR/Clearinghouse.html
CEC Profiles for Paraeducators
www.cec.sped.org/AM/Template.cfm?Section=Job_Profiles&Template=/CM/ContentDisplay.cfm&
ContentID=2086
Schools and Staffing Survey, National Center for Educational Statistics (NCES)
www.nces.ed.gov/surveys/sass/
Office of Civil Rights. http://www.hhs.gov/ocr/
Other States/Districts/University Projects
Utah State Resources www.nichcy.org/stateshe/ut.htm
Utah School Employees Association (USEA) www.useautah.org/
The Utah Personnel Development Center (UPDC) www. updc.org/
Utah Education Association (UEA) www.utea.org/
Utah Education Network (UEN) www.uen.org/
Utah Paraeducators www.utahparas.org
Rhode Island Technical Assistance Project www.ritap.org/
Grant Wood AEA Paraeducator Page www.aea10.k12.ia.us/prof/paras/index.html
Minnesota Paraprofessional Consortium http://ici2.umn.edu/para/
Washington Education Association Paraeducator Issues
www.washingtonea.org/support_professionals.html
Paraeducator Support - University of Vermont www.uvm.edu/%7Ecdci/parasupport/
Project Para Website, University of Nebraska http://para.unl.edu/
Washington State's website for paraprofessionals www.paraeducator.com/
Study of Personnel Needs in Special Education (SPeNSE) www.spense.org/results.html
Center on Personnel Studies in Special Education (COPSSE) www.coe.ufl.edu/copsse
www.ed.gov/pubs/paraprofessionals/
-skills.com/paraeducators.html
s Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory
www.nwrac.org/links/paraed.html
Training Products
www.rnt.org/channels/clearinghouse/audience/paraeducators/default.htm
-SPED Staff Training Solutions www.trisped.org/
Publications
www.ed.gov/pubs/Paraprofessionals/index.html
www.cec.sped.org/Content/NavigationMenu/ProfessionalDevelopment/CareerCenter/
Paraeducator Links Pages
s in General Education Classrooms University
of Vermont www.uvm.edu/~cdci/parasupport/
-to-Teacher Programs, National Teacher Recruitment Clearinghouse
www.recruitingteachers.org/become/paraprograms.html
cators Resources, Center for Multilingual, Multicultural
Research www.usc.edu/dept/education/CMMR/cmmrhomepage.html
General Disability Links
101 Ways to Praise a Child!
1. Wow
2. Way to go
3. Super
4. That's it!
5. Outstanding
6. Excellent
7. Great
8. Good
9. Neat
10. Well done
11. Extraordinary
12. I knew you could do it
13. I'm proud of you
14. Fantastic
15. Super star
16. Nice work
17. Looking good
18. You're on top of it
19. Beautiful
20. Now you're flying
21. You're catching on
22. Now you've got it
23. You're incredible
24. Bravo
25. You're fantastic
26. Hurray for you
27. You're on target
28. You're on your way
29. It's everything I hoped for
30. How smart
31. Good job
32. That's incredible
33. Hot dog
34. Dynamite
35. Thumbs up
36. You're unique
37. Nothing can stop you now
38. Good for you
39. Congratulations
40. Remarkable job
41. Beautiful work
42. Spectacular
43. Out of sight
44. Keep up the good work
45. You're precious
46. Great discovery
47. You've discovered the secret
48. You figured it out
49. Fantastic job
50. Hip, hip, hurray
51. Bingo
52. Magnificent
53. Marvelous
54. Terrific
55. You are important
56. The time you put in really shows
57. Sensational
58. Super work
59. Creative job
60. Terrific job
61. Fantastic job
62. Exceptional performance
63. You're a real trooper
64. You are responsible
65. You rock!
66. You are exciting
67. You learned it right
68. What an imagination
69. What a good listener
70. Fabulous
71. You're growing up
72. You tried hard
73. You care and it shows
74. Beautiful sharing
75. What a performance!
76. You're a good student
77. I trust you
78. Take a bow
79. You mean a lot to me
80. You make me happy
81. Right on!
82. You made it happen
83. Brilliant
84. Class act
85. I respect you
86. Nice going
87. That's correct
88. You should be proud
89. Phenomenal
90. You are a real trooper
91. Great answer
92. What a great idea
93. Awesome
94. A+ job
95. Top notch
96. You made my day
97. That's the best
98. You've made progress
99. You've got what it takes
100. I knew you had it in you
101. You've outdone yourself
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Parprofessional Handbook - Geary County Schools USD 475