1.
PROGRAMME INFORMATION
Programme Title
Doctorate in the Creative Arts (DCA or D Creative Arts)
with pathways in Performing Arts and Writing
Department and Faculty
Faculty of ARTS
Date of most recent validation
15 November 2011
Date(s) when Programme Specification
revised
September 2015
Revalidation due date
Academic year 2017-18
Awarding Institution
University of Winchester
Teaching Institution (if different)
n/a
Programme also accredited by (if
relevant)
n/a
Title of Final Award
Doctorate in the Creative Arts (D Creative Arts) with
named pathways in Performing Arts and Writing;
[DCA (Performing Arts) and DCA (Creative Writing)
Title(s) of Exit Award(s)
PGDip Creative Arts (with named pathways in Performing
Arts or Creative Writing) after 120 credits at level 7
MProf (with named pathways in Performing Arts and
Creative Writing) after 120 credits at level 7 and 120
credits at level 8
Language of Study
English
Mode(s) of Attendance
On negotiation and long distance
Mode(s) of Delivery
P/T - blend of taught, distance and research
Intake start date(s) and number of
intakes per year
September , 1 intake per year
Normal Period of Study
3-6 years
UCAS Code
n/a
QAA Subject Benchmarking Group
n/a
2.
ADMISSIONS AND ENTRY REQUIREMENTS
Prospective students should consult the latest prospectus and/or course pages online for programme
entry requirements.
Prospective students for Taught programmes should consult the Admissions Policy for Taught
Programmes. Prospective students for Professional Doctorate programmes should consult the
Postgraduate Research Programmes Admissions Policy. Both are available on the University’s public
webpage.
3.
EDUCATIONAL AIMS AND LEARNING OUTCOMES
3.1
The aims of the Programme:
a) at level 7 are to:

Allow students to understand the experimental and fragmentary nature of early creative practice,
with a commitment to encouraging the artistic creation through performance and or writing

develop an understanding of the nature of originality in creative practice research and an ability to
apply that understanding to developing and justifying creative practice.

develop students’ experience and understanding of practical research methodologies in the arts,
and the philosophical and theoretical approaches that underpin them, so that they are able to
contribute to advancing knowledge through practice in their field of the creative arts

enable students to develop and evaluate the design and execution of practical research in the
creative arts

equip students with an extended understanding of generative and reflective methods in arts
research, and of the aesthetic, ethical and safety issues involved in aesthetic innovation

develop students’ ability to critically apply advanced general practical research skills to specific
programmes of development of creative work portfolios

provide students with a range of transferable skills relevant to further postgraduate study and the
workplace, including those of communication, project management, self-directed learning and
personal initiative

develop student autonomy in the learning process and to encourage self-directed learning
and at level 8 to
3.2

support students in designing, carrying out and, when appropriate, document extended projects
focused on innovation in artistic production, practice, and dissemination in innovative ways, which
will prioritise creative practice

develop a profound and embodied understanding of the nature of artistic experiment, the
multiple modes of enquiry that might inform it, the rhizomatic knitting together of conceiving,
executing, and reflecting on art that it requires, and the use of experimentation to ‘push’ creative
art practice in new ways

develop student skills in generating innovative aesthetic practice in their chosen art form(s) at an
advanced, professional level and to evidence this innovation within the submitted portfolio of
work and viva voce

support students in developing an ability to evidence the bullet points above using a combination
of communication strategies appropriate to the artistic innovation being carried out, be these
through the body of artwork itself; through a combination of artwork and
reflection/contextualisation; or through reflective documentation practice.
The Learning Outcomes of the Programme are:
Upon completion of the programme students will be able to demonstrate Knowledge and Understanding
(K&U) and Skills and Other Attributes (S&OA)
PG Dip (Performing Arts or Creative Writing)
Holders of the PG Dip (120 credits at level 7) will have:
1. an ability to draw artistic merit from experimental ideas (K&U) (S&OA)
2. a systematic understanding of preparing a creative portfolio that can be carried forward as a viable
creative work (K&U) (S&OA)
3. a systematic practical, aesthetic and theoretical knowledge, and a critical awareness of current range
of practical systems, methods, and techniques used for creating artistic work (K&U) (S&OA)
4. a comprehensive understanding of the range of practical skills used to generate, trace, document and
reflect on their own professional practice (K&U) (S&OA)
5. developed an originality in the application of techniques for generating creative work, together with a
practical understanding of how these techniques function (K&U) (S&OA)
6. established how to interrogate the ways research-based practice can push aesthetic boundaries
forward and innovate (K&U) (S&OA)
7. a conceptual understanding that enables the student to evaluate critically methods used and theories
used to analyze, understand, and advance practice in the area of creative specialization. (K&U) (S&OA)
MProf (Performing Arts or Creative Writing) (120 credits at level 7 and 120 credits at level 8)
In addition to the learning outcomes for the PG Dip, holders of the MProf (Performing Arts or Creative
Writing) will have demonstrated:
1. an ability to undertake a sustained programme of creative development and artistic creation through
performance and or writing (K&U) (S&OA)
2.
an ability to undertake a sustained programme of Research and Development in their art form that is
evidenced through critical engagement with creative activity (K&U) (S&OA)
3. an understanding and practical application of how artistic experimentation can enrich their practice
and the language of practice in their domain (K&U) (S&OA)
4. a comprehensive understanding of the ways one evidences the research and development process
through practical outcomes (K&U) (S&OA)
5. an ability to undertake (1 & 2) in a way that evidence suggests an original contribution to professional
and scholarly understanding of how Research and Development processes, as understood by the
artistic profession, can make original contributions to aesthetic and creative product innovation (K&U)
(S&OA)
Holders of the DCA (Performing Arts or Creative Writing) will have demonstrated:
1. the creation and interpretation of new knowledge, as embodied in one of: creative art work; a
combination of artwork and reflection; or documentation of artwork and reflection. This will be
channeled through original research-creation, in other words advanced, informed, sophisticated
creative practice, of a quality to satisfy review by peers, extend the forefront of the discipline, and
merit publication, live performance, or other professional dissemination in a framework that defines it
as artistic innovation and an original contribution to the field of creative practice (K&U) (S&OA)
2. a systematic acquisition and understanding of a substantial body of practical knowledge which is at the
forefront of an academic discipline or area of professional practice and which is evidenced in the
creative work (K&U) (S&OA)
3. the general ability to conceptualise, design and implement a project for the generation of highly
sophisticated creative innovation at the forefront of the discipline, and to adjust the project design in
the light of unforeseen problems (K&U) (S&OA)
4. a detailed understanding of applicable techniques for creative research and advanced practice-based
creative enquiry in an academic context. (K&U) (S&OA)
See Appendix 1 for mapping of module to learning outcomes.
The professional doctorate is primarily designed to facilitate students’ abilities to take artistic practice
further, in new directions. Writers emerge from this doctorate with a refreshed portfolio of work, with
strong, savvy, competitive and intelligent documentation and with an enhanced ability to both
demonstrate and articulate their work’s originality. This should improve their ability to justify work in
terms of publishing and funding and to market their work to appropriate environments, bringing new
perspectives, skills and approaches to other opportunities. For those seeking to teach in further or higher
education from a practical, creative perspective, this doctorate acts as a significant plus on a curriculum
vitae and there is the opportunity to take an appropriate teaching module.
The programme addresses the graduate employability skills of students in the following ways:
Level 8 qualifications recognise leading experts or practitioners in a particular field. Learning at this level
involves the creation of new and creative approaches that extend or redefine existing knowledge or
professional practice1. It prepares candidates for expert roles in their chosen fields of study by supporting
their development through workplace research, involving theoretical and practical reflection in and on
action. It reflects the University’s strategic objectives of developing local and regional involvement and
supporting developmental work in partner institutions such as arts organisations, cultural organisations,
and the sphere of the creative practitioner.
This programme develops the sophisticated and advanced creative practitioner who can advance their
field, take risks, and create daring innovation in their sphere. The creative practitioner is usually selfemployed. They need to be a self-starter who makes their own opportunities. In an ideas-driven cultural
sector, the creative practitioner must now, more than ever, be able to market themselves as innovative, as
daring, as having ideas and concepts at their disposal that funders and disseminators, be these commercial
or subsidized-sector, most need. This programme is largely about giving practitioners space to develop
ideas that put them in a position to market their work as ‘cutting edge’. It is also envisaged that artistic
commissions/contracts may be easier to attain if the work is helped to be relevant and ‘cutting edge’
through a critically creative and creatively critical responsiveness to the demands, questions and
experiences presented by the programme.
This programme thus helps its students not only innovate but also defend and articulate that innovation in
the language that counts most: the language of the work itself. Workshops in marketing that work are
integrated within each module descriptor, adapted to the appropriate arts sector in question.
4.
PROGRAMME STRUCTURE, LEVELS, MODULES, CREDIT AND AWARDS
This section outlines the levels of study, modules and credits required for each programme (where there is
more than one) and for final and exit awards.
The programme has a simple structure. It takes the following form: Studio 1, Studio 2, and Studio 3 as per
the below chart. Individual module descriptors are annexed to the application.
Module code and title
Level 7
Studio 1: Practice, Research,
Creativity, Aesthetics,
Innovation (Performing Arts)
Studio 1: Practice, Research,
Creativity, Aesthetics,
Innovation (Creative Writing)
Credits
Core
Mand
Option
Comments
(eg pre/co-requisites)
120
All
PA
-
-
Delivered over 12 months
120
All
CW
-
-
Delivered over 12 months
Exit award: PGDip (named pathway)
Level 8
Studio 2: Research and
Development (Performing
Arts)
1
120
http://www.ucmk.ac.uk/courses/course-levels
All
PA
-
-
Delivered over 12 months
Studio 2: Research and
Development (Creative
Writing)
120
All
CW
Delivered over 12 months
Exit award: MProf (named pathway)
Subsequent to the above Level 8 module is the Studio 3 THESIS, taken by all students. This is 300 credits at
level 8, ending in the terminal exit award (DCA [Performing Arts] and DCA [Creative Writing].
5.
LEARNING, TEACHING AND ASSESSMENT
5.1
Means of delivery:
The Key Information Set (KIS) Activity Type is indicated in brackets.
The programme will only be available via part-time study, directed as it is toward working, or practicing,
artists. The programme strengths are embedded in the way our practitioners, performers and writers are
all actively engaged in public artistic and literary engagement as well as academic research. This will be
undertaken through a combined series of:






creative workshops involving tutors and creative peer reviewing (KIS: practical classes and
workshops)
critical workshops involving tutors and critical peer reviewing (KIS: practical classes and
workshops)
theoretical seminars (KIS: seminar)
visits from professional practitioners
final thesis proposal meetings with academic team and individual tutors (identified by specialisms)
(KIS: guided independent study)
final thesis preparation with Director of Study and appropriate supervisory team members (KIS:
guided independent study)
A blended learning approach will be used, making the most efficient use of university resources by
concentrating the direct teaching in blocks of time which avoid the most pressured parts of the semester,
while allowing students to develop as a community of practice by engaging in forum discussions on the
learning network. The use of WIMBA (or any other updated facility) and video-conferencing technology
will enhance the team’s potential for supporting students working at a distance from the University.
The programme's learning, teaching and assessment strategies are designed to foster informed debate
between creative practice that researches, critical and self-reflexive thinking and a cross-disciplinary
perspective. In the University based programme, learning is achieved through a combination of lectures,
seminars, workshops and tutorials. Stress will be laid on active participation, staff-student interaction and
collaboration and student-led discussion and seminars.
After passing the first two modules, supervisory teams for the thesis will be negotiated between the
programme team, the doctoral student and RDQC. Proposed Director of Studies and team will be
identified in advance of the preparation of the thesis proposal and will be submitted to RDQC for approval
before the development and submission of the thesis proposal. The progress of the thesis and the
conduct of the supervisory team will conform to the University Masters regulations and the expectations
of RDQC, which will monitor the student’s progress.
5.2
Types of assessment employed:
The Key Information Set (KIS) Activity Type is indicated in brackets.
All of the Modules, from the Studio 1 to Studio 3 will be assessed on a combined creative and critical
portfolio, specifically:
Studio 1: Practice, Research, Creativity, Aesthetics, Innovation (Performing Arts)
A sample portfolio might include:







A 3-4000 word survey of the latest theorisation exploring practice-as-/ practice-led research in
performance, assessing the implications of that writing for the author’s practice (KIS: written
assignment)
An 3000- 8000 word position paper, selecting theorisation from third and fourth wave feminist theory
and recent queer studies theory, phenomenology and post-structuralist critique and applying these to
the development of compositional principles for performance of self, site, and text (KIS: written
assignment)
Documentation of a 12 minute solo devised performance exploring queer selves (KIS: written
assignment)
Live presentation of fragments of performance making, scriptwriting, or installation making, on an
appropriately related thematic topic 20 minute performance-installation that embodies fourth-wave
feminist approaches to exploring space through speech and writing; including audio recording (KIS:
project output other than a dissertation)
Scripts and performance scores that demonstrate the structural and dramaturgical thinking
underpinning the live and documented work fragments (KIS: written assignment)
A reflexive journal narrating and analysing the process undertaken work (KIS: written assignment)
Ethics approval forms and health and safety clearance forms for relevant live work, documentation,
etc.
Studio 1: Writing, Research, Creativity, Aesthetics, Innovation (Creative Writing)
A sample assignment portfolio might include:







12,000 words and fragment of collected literary experiments in writing a novel (for adults or
children)
A complete short story or draft short collection, or fragments of stories
Fragments and experiments leading to a collection of poetry
A short screen or stage play along with fragmenbts and collected ideas and experiments
A reflexive rational on the writer’s journey, to include evidence of critical, theoretical ideas
Drafts and notes relating to the above to show how the piece(s) evolved
Ethics approval forms and health and safety clearance forms for relevant live work,
documentation, etc.
Studio 2: Research and Development (Performing Arts)
A sample portfolio might include:
either
 A live showing of forty mintues’ worth one hour’s worth of performance segments extracts that
are devised and performed by the student accompanied by performance scores
 or
 A live showing of 35 minutes’ worth of performance extracts with appropriate documentation of
25 more minutes accompanied by scripts, stage directions and a design
 or
 Documentation of a three-day’s duration experimental performative installation accompanied by
an 8 000 word contextualising statement
In all cases, the research underpinning the portfolio contents must be perceptible within the artistic
product in the sense that the product must express an original contribution to the field of professional
performance research. If this is not evident in the artwork argument can be made for this as part of the
portfolio in a range of other forms, from media presentation to performance lecture to writing.
Studio 2: Research and Development (Creative Writing)
A sample portfolio might include:

A sample portfolio might include the accumulation of artistic experiments and fragments of
creative writing leading to committed development of potentially publishable prose (such as early
novel drafts) or drafts and completed sections of poetry with or without illustration; non-fiction
writing; the compilation of an anthology, with appropriate introduction, documentation, critical
support and afterword; the editing of a recognised text with appropriate introduction,
documentation, critical support and afterword; the presentation of writing on computer disc/CD
ROM/website etc or a recorded public performance of writing/storytelling at a professional
standard, together with such supporting material as the supervisor, in consultation with the
student, considers appropriate.
Studio 3: Thesis (Performing Arts)
A sample portfolio might include:
either

A live showing of one hour’s worth of performance extracts that are devised and performed by the
student accompanied by performance scores
or

A live showing of 35 minutes’ worth of performance extracts with appropriate documentation of
25 more minutes accompanied by scripts, stage directions and a design
or

Documentation of a three-day’s duration performative installation accompanied by an 8 000 word
contextualising statement
In all cases, the research underpinning the portfolio contents must be perceptible within the artistic
product in the sense that the product must express an original contribution to the field of professional
performance research. If this is not evident in the artwork argument can be made for this as part of the
portfolio in a range of other forms, from media presentation to performance lecture to writing.
In all cases, there will be a viva voce.
Studio 3: Thesis (Creative Writing)
A sample portfolio might include:
either

or

or

A novel plus a reflexive rationale
A collection of poetry plus a reflexive rationale
A collection of short stories plus a reflexive rationale
But at all times the portfolio will be negotiated with the Programme Leader and the supervising tutor. In all
cases, the research underpinning the portfolio contents must be perceptible within the artistic product in
the sense that the product must express an original contribution to the field of professional writing
research. If this is not evident in the artwork argument can be made for this as part of the portfolio in a
range of other forms, from media presentation to performance lecture to writing.
In all cases, there will be a viva voce.
The aims of the programme at level 7 are to:

Demonstrate an understanding of the experimental and fragmentary nature of early creative
practice, with a commitment to encouraging the artistic creation through performance

Demonstarte an understanding of the nature of originality in creative practice research and an
ability to apply that understanding to developing and justifying creative practice.

Demonstrate a working understanding of practical, aesthetic and theoretical knowledge, and a
critical awareness of current range of practical systems, methods, and techniques used for
creating artistic work in generating and realizing new contemporary performance and writing
today

Demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of the range of skills used to generate, trace,
document and reflect on their own professional practice

Evidence originality in the application of techniques for generating creative work, together with a
practical understanding of how these techniques function

Establish how to interrogate the ways research-based practice can push aesthetic boundaries
forward and innovate

Critically evaluate methods and theories used to analyze, understand, and advance practice in the
area of creative specialization.
and at level 8 to

Design and carry out and, when appropriate, document an extended project focused on
innovation in artistic production, practice, and dissemination in innovative ways, which will
prioritise creative practice

Develop a profound and embodied understanding of the nature of artistic experiment, the
multiple modes of enquiry that might inform it, the rhizomatic knitting together of conceiving,
executing, and reflecting on art that it requires, and the use of experimentation to ‘push’ creative
art practice in new ways

develop student skills in theorising and analysing creative practice

extend students’ skills in supporting and developing the creative practice of individuals and teams

support students in designing, carrying out and analysing extended creative projects which are
focused on change and innovation

develop students ability to analyse appropriately the critical and creative work of others

develop an ability to research, evaluate and utilise appropriate resources
On successful completion of this programme, students will be able to demonstrate the following skills
of:
Knowledge and understanding
By the end of the degree students should have gained an advanced knowledge and understanding
of:
Level 7
 a specialised area of creative practice and research methods
 the philosophical, theoretical, ethical and practical issues relevant to creative practice
Level 8
 how to design, manage and conduct an innovative and extended piece of creative practice and
research, and to communicate and disseminate findings in a range of different ways
Intellectual and cognitive skills
By the end of the degree students should be able to:
Level 7
 experiment with and identify and evaluate appropriate areas of creative practice
 produce creative work of a professional standard
 demonstrate a critically creative and creatively critical awareness concerning their research
methods, strengths and limitations
 understand more fully the complexity of creative practice
 present and defend their creative practice and research in a range of fora
Level 8
 contribute to the creation and interpretation of new creative practice knowledge
 make informed judgements on complex issues in their specialist field.
Transferable skills and attributes
By the end of the degree students should have developed their ability to:
Level 7
 search, retrieve and organise information, using IT resources where appropriate
 plan, manage and carry out creative projects independently to meet deadlines
 work effectively as part of a team
 appraise the ethical dimensions relevant to research activity and make judgements based on
available evidence and arguments
 produce coherent and concise oral and written reports for a range of audiences, using relevant it
resources
 reflect critically on their own work and respond to feedback from peers and experts
 motivate themselves and others and engage in active problem solving
Level 8
 recognise and take responsibility for their career development and needs in their ongoing creative
practice
 exercise personal responsibility and autonomous initiative in complex and unpredictable situations
in professional creative practice
 recognise that learning at this level involves the creation of new and creative approaches that
extend or redefine existing knowledge of creative practice.
The interests of students with protected characteristics will be taken into consideration and reasonable
adjustments to assessments will be made provided that these do not compromise academic standards as
expressed through the learning outcomes.
6.
QUALITY ASSURANCE AND ENHANCEMENT
6.1
Mechanisms for review and evaluation:
Quality assurance and enhancement at Module Level
Students provide feedback to module tutors through Module Evaluation Forms, reviews and other
responses. The tutor collates the evaluation forms and produces a response for discussion at Programme
Committee. The response identifies good practice and proposes remedies for any points of concern. The
response is made available to students at the next running of the module.
Quality assurance and enhancement at Programme Level
The Programme Committee evaluates the success of the programme, paying particular attention to
student feedback and student representatives. Minutes from the Programme Committee and the External
Examiners report will inform the Annual Programme Evaluation which is submitted for approval to the
Faculty Academic Development Committee. Issues for attention are identified and included in the action
plan for the following year.
Quality assurance and enhancement at Department Level
The Annual Programme Evaluation is submitted to the Department for discussion and to draw out
department objectives.
Quality assurance and enhancement at Faculty Level
The Annual Programme Evaluation is submitted to the Faculty Academic Development Committee which
has oversight of learning development in the Faculty, including via the Peer Observation of Teaching.
Quality assurance and enhancement at University Level
The quality of the programme is monitored by an External Examiner appointed by the University’s Senate
Academic Development Committee. The External Examiner’s Report is distributed to the Vice-Chancellor,
First Deputy Vice-Chancellor, Director of Academic Quality and Development, the Faculty Dean and Faculty
Head of Quality. A summary of all external examiner reports is received at Senate Academic Development
Committee. An annual audit of Faculties is conducted by Senate Academic Development Committee.
Quality assurance and enhancement for Staff
The quality of learning and teaching is supported by the Peer Observation of Teaching and Staff
Development, by Staff Development and Review, by attendance at conferences and curriculum-focused
staff development, by external involvement such as external examining and by involvement in research
and knowledge exchange activities.
6.2 Indicators of Quality and Standards
External Examiner Report(s)
Annual Monitoring process
Student feedback including the National Student Survey or Postgraduate Taught Experience Survey
Student representation at Faculty level and University level committees
Programme Revalidation
Higher Education Review
7.
7.1
THE REGULATORY & POLICY FRAMEWORK
The programme conforms fully with the University’s:
Academic Regulations for Postgraduate Research Programmes
7.2
No exemptions from the Academic Regulations are required.
7.3
External Professional Statutory Regulatory Body Accreditation
None
7.4
Engagement with UK Quality Code and Subject Benchmarks
Validation and Revalidation assure the University of the Programme’s continued engagement with FHEQ
and appropriate consideration of subject benchmarks. Between validations external examiners assure the
University that this engagement remains active and evident.
7.5
None
Engagement with Work Based Learning and Placements Approved Procedures
Appendix 1a
Grid mapping Modules to Programme/Level Learning Outcomes
Knowledge of a
specialised area of
creative practice
research methods
Knowledge of the
philosophical, theoretical,
ethical and practical issues
relevant to creative practice
Knowledge of how to design,
manage and conduct an
innovative and extended piece of
creative practice research, and to
communicate and disseminate
findings in a range of different
ways
Studio 1
(performing)
√
√
Studio 1
(writing)
√
√
Studio 2
(performing)
√
√
√
Studio 2
(writing)
√
√
√
Appendix 1b
identify and evaluate appropriate areas of creative
practice
Studio 2: Writing
Studio 2: Performing
Studio 1: Performing
Studio 1: Writing
Mapping of modules against Programme Specific Skills learning outcomes
(Section 2 of Programme Specification)
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
demonstrate a critically creative and creatively critical
awareness concerning their research methods, strengths
and limitations
√
√
√
√
understand more fully the complexity of creative
practice
√
√
√
√
present and defend their creative practice and research
in a range of fora
√
√
√
√
contribute to the creation and interpretation of new
creative practice knowledge
√
√
make informed judgements on complex issues in their
specialist field.
√
√
produce creative work of a professional standard
Studio 2: Writing
Studio 2: Performing
Studio 1: Performing
Studio 1: Writing
Appendix 1c
Mapping of modules against Transferable Skills learning outcomes
(section 2 of Programme Specification)
search, retrieve and organise information, using IT resources where
appropriate
√
√
√
√
plan, manage and carry out creative projects independently to meet
deadlines
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
appraise the ethical dimensions relevant to research activity and
make judgements based on available evidence and arguments
√
√
√
√
produce coherent and concise oral and written reports for a range
of audiences, using relevant it resources
√
√
√
√
reflect critically on their own work and respond to feedback from
peers and experts
√
√
√
√
motivate themselves and others and engage in active problem
solving
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
work effectively as part of a team
recognise and take responsibility for their career development and
needs in their ongoing creative practice
exercise personal responsibility and autonomous initiative in
complex and unpredictable situations in professional creative
practice
recognise that learning at this level involves the creation of new and
creative approaches that extend or redefine existing knowledge of
creative practice
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Creative Arts Doctorate - University of Winchester