Program Director/Principal Investigator:
Lattier, David L.
BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH
Provide the following information for the Senior/key personnel and other significant contributors in the order listed on Form Page 2.
Follow this format for each person. DO NOT EXCEED FOUR PAGES.
NAME
POSITION TITLE
Lattier, David L.
Senior Scientist and Research Molecular Biologist,
United States Environmental Protection Agency
eRA COMMONS USER NAME (credential, e.g., agency login)
dlattier
EDUCATION/TRAINING (Begin with baccalaureate or other initial professional education, such as nursing, include postdoctoral training and
residency training if applicable.)
INSTITUTION AND LOCATION
DEGREE
(if applicable)
MM/YY
FIELD OF STUDY
University of Cincinnati
B.S.
06/84
Biology and
Mathematics
University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, and Children’s Hospital
Research Foundation, Institute for Developmental Research,
Department of Molecular Developmental Biology, Cincinnati, OH
Ph.D.
07/89
Developmental
Molecular Biology
09/89
Molecular biology
of pulmonary
function in
development
University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Department of
Neonatology, Division of Pulmonary Biology
Postdoctoral
University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Department of
Neonatology, Division of Pulmonary Biology; National Institute of
Heart, Lung and Blood, Program of Excellence in Molecular Biology
of Heart and Lung
Fellowship;
NIH New
Investigator
10/90
Molecular biology
of pulmonary
function in
development
United States Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research
and Development, National Exposure Research Laboratory
Senior
Scientist
10/97 to
present
Toxicogenomics &
Epigenetics
A. Personal Statement
My academic training and early career in scientific inquiry of molecular and cellular processes were rooted in basic
research and human health. Considering that contemporary methods in cell biology and molecular analyses were not
restricted to basic and clinical research, I joined the United Sates Environmental Protection Agency and began to apply
state-of-the-art molecular biology to measure exposure and effects of environmental toxicants using standard exposure
sentinels and a range of organisms found in the natural environment. In addition to current investigations that aim to
describe toxicity induced molecular changes in epigenetic mechanisms, I also strive to delineate - at the cellular level the critical intersection of human and ecological health.
Scientific investigations on which I am, or have been Principal Investigator, span an array of molecular and cellular
disciplines, and includes methods development within those spheres of scientific inquiry that will lead to immediate and
transferable biomarkers and bioindicators, central to a program in exposure science. I currently serve as a delegate to
the USEPA Genomics Task Force, which was responsible for promulgating the Interim Policy on Genomics and shaping
guidance regarding implications and potential applications of genomics research within USEPA, including research needs
in the area of toxicogenomics and risk assessment. Additionally, I currently serve as Co-Chair of the Genomics
Framework Performance-Based Quality Assurance Workgroup, a deliberative body appointed by USEPA Science Policy
Council. The joint genomics framework workgroup has produced guidance for microarray-based approaches that
delimits the Agency’s acceptance criteria for external genomics data in support of regulatory claims.
United States Environmental Protection Agency, Science Policy Council. Interim Policy on Genomics. (EPA, Washington,
DC, 2002). http://www.epa.gov/osa/spc/genomics.htm.
United States Environmental Protection Agency. Potential Implications of Genomics for Regulatory and Risk
Assessment Applications at EPA. Science Policy Council. EPA Publication No EPA 100/B-04/002 (EPA, Washington, DC,
2005). http://www.epa.gov/osa/pdfs/EPA-Genomics-White-Paper.pdf
Interim Guidance for Microarray-Based Assays: Regulatory and Risk Assessment Applications at EPA, 2008;
Genomics: Applications, Challenges, and Opportunities for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.
PHS 398/2590 (Rev. 06/09)
Page 1
NIH Biographical Sketch
Program Director/Principal Investigator:
Lattier, David L.
B. Positions and Honors
Positions and Employment
1989-1993; New Investigator, National Institute of Heart, Lung and Blood Program, University of Cincinnati, College of
Medicine, Department of Neonatology, Division of Pulmonary Biology, Children’s Hospital Research Foundation,
Cincinnati, OH
1993-2007; Research Molecular Biologist, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and
Development, National Exposure Research Laboratory
2007-Present;Senior Scientist and Research Molecular Biologist, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Office
of Research and Development, National Exposure Research Laboratory
Other Experience and Professional Memberships
Honors
1998
2003
2006
2007
2007
2009
2010
USEPA, Science and Technology Achievement Award, Level II
USEPA/ORD, Bronze Medal, Efforts in Technology Transfer
USEPA, Science and Technology Achievement Award, Honorable Mention
USEPA/ORD, Honor Award, Scientific Initiatives
Tenured as US Government Senior Scientist, endorsed by Technical Qualification Board
USEPA, Office of Water, Science and Technology Achievement Award
USEPA/ORD Teamwork Award; Computational Toxicology Team
C. Selected Peer-reviewed Publications (Selected from 35 peer-reviewed publications)
Most relevant
1. D. A. Wiginton, D. J. Kaplan, J. C. States, A. L. Akeson, C. M. Perme, I. J. Bilyk, A. J. Vaughn, D. L. Lattier and J. J.
Hutton. 1986. Complete sequence and structure of the gene for human adenosine deaminase. Biochemistry. 25:
8234-8244.
2. D. L. Lattier, J. C. States, J. J. Hutton and D. A. Wiginton. 1989. Cell type-specific transcriptional regulation of the
human adenosine deaminase gene. Nucleic Acids Research. 17: 1061-1076.
3. B. Aronow, D. Lattier, R. Silbiger, M. Dusing, J. Hutton, G. Jones, J. Stock, J. McNeish, S. Potter and D. Witte. 1989.
Evidence for a complex regulatory array in the first intron of the human adenosine deaminase gene. Genes and
Development. 3: 1384-1400.
4. R. J. Bohinski, J. A. Huffman, J. A. Whitsett and D. L. Lattier. 1993. Cis active elements controlling lung cell-specific
expression of human pulmonary surfactant protein B gene. J.Biol.Chem. 268: 11160-11166.
5. A. L. Miracle, G. P. Toth and D. L. Lattier. 2003. The path from molecular indicators of exposure to describing
dynamic biological systems in an aquatic organism: Microarrays and the fathead minnow. Ecotoxicology. 12: 457
462.
6. K. Gallagher, W. H. Benson, M. Brody, A. Fairbrother, J. Hasan, R. Klaper, D. Lattier, S. Lundquist, N. McCarroll, G.
Miller, J. Preston, P. Sayre, J. Seed, B. Smith, A. Street, R. Troast, V. Vu, L. Reiter, W. Farland and K. Dearfield. 2006.
Genomics: Applications, Challenges, and Opportunities for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Human and
Ecological Risk Assessment. 12: 572 590.
7. R. L. Wang, D. Bencic, A. Biales, D. Lattier, M. Kostich, D. Villeneuve, G. T. Ankley, J. Lazorchak and G. Toth. 2008.
DNA Microarray-Based Ecotoxicological Biomarker Discovery. Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry. 27: 664–
675.
8. D. L. Lattier, Lazorchak, J., Fulk, F., and Kostich, M. 2012. A Look Backwards at Environmental Risk Assessment: An
Approach to Reconstructing Environmental Exposures. in Human Pharmaceuticals in the Environment (ed. B.W.
Brooks and D.B. Huggett), pp. 109-137. Springer New York.
PHS 398/2590 (Rev. 06/09)
Page 2
NIH Biographical Sketch
Program Director/Principal Investigator:
Lattier, David L.
Additional recent publications of importance to the field (in chronological order)
D. L. Lattier. 2013. Representational Differences in Transcriptomes; Retooling Differential Display for Lab-On-Chip. In
process, to be submitted, Nature Methods.
D. Research Support
Ongoing Research Support
Completed Research Support
PHS 398/2590 (Rev. 06/09)
Page 3
NIH Biographical Sketch
Download

PHS 398/2590 (Rev. 06/09), Biographical Sketch Format Page