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CH 10: Interpersonal Relationship Types (slide 1)
Copyright © 2013, 2009, 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved
Chapter 10: Interpersonal
Relationship Types
1. Characteristics
 Interpersonal relationship
 Mutually productive
 Mutual positive regard (liking, trust, support,
shared interests)
CH 10: Interpersonal Relationship Types (slide 2)
Copyright © 2013, 2009, 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved
Friendship Relationships
2. Friendship types
 Reciprocity – equal
 Receptivity – imbalance between giver and
receiver but still satisfactory (student/teacher)
 Association – transitory (classmates, neighbors)
3. Friendship needs
CH 10: Interpersonal Relationship Types (slide 3)
Copyright © 2013, 2009, 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved
Friendship Relationships (cont.)
4. Friendship and communication
 Relationship theories from Chapter 9 apply
 Three stages of friendship
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Contact – hesitant
Involvement – dyadic consciousness
Close and intimate friendship – exclusive unit; make
sacrifices
CH 10: Interpersonal Relationship Types (slide 4)
Copyright © 2013, 2009, 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved
Friendship Relationships (cont.)
5. Culture, gender, and technology
 Culture – collectivist cultures value frienships
more than individualist cultures do
 Gender – women’s friendships are built on
disclosure and intimacy; men’s are built on
shared activities
 Technology – network convergence: as friends
grow close, their online social networks overlap
CH 10: Interpersonal Relationship Types (slide 5)
Copyright © 2013, 2009, 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved
Friendship Relationships (cont.)
 Love is a feeling characterized by closeness,
caring, intimacy, passion, and commitment
 Love is an interpersonal relationship
developed, maintained, and sometimes
destroyed by communication
 Communication skills can enhance a love
relationship
CH 10: Interpersonal Relationship Types (slide 6)
Copyright © 2013, 2009, 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved
Love Relationships
1. Six love types
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Eros – beauty and sexuality
Ludus – entertainment and excitement
Storge – peaceful and slow
Pragma – practical and traditional
Mania – elation and depression
Agape – compassionate and selfless
CH 10: Interpersonal Relationship Types (slide 7)
Copyright © 2013, 2009, 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved
Love Relationships (cont.)
2. Love and communication
 Personal idioms
 Increased self-disclosure
3. Love, culture, gender, and technology
 Culture – individualist cultures value love
relationships; collectivist cultures value
friendship
 Gender – men tend to be more romantic and
less realistic about love than women are
CH 10: Interpersonal Relationship Types (slide 8)
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Love Relationships (cont.)
 Family includes the children, relatives, and
assorted significant others surrounding a
primary relationship
 A primary relationship denotes the two
relationship between the two principal
parties
 Communication patterns of nuclear families
apply to all forms of families
CH 10: Interpersonal Relationship Types (slide 9)
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Family Relationships
1. Characteristics of families
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Defined roles
Recognition of responsibilities
Shared history and future
Shared living space
CH 10: Interpersonal Relationship Types (slide 10)
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Family Relationships (cont.)
2. Couple types
 Traditional – sacrifice independence for
relationship
 Independent – stress individuality
 Separate – relationship of convenience, not love
CH 10: Interpersonal Relationship Types (slide 11)
Copyright © 2013, 2009, 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved
Family Relationships (cont.)
3. Family types
 Conformity orientation – degree to which family
members agree on attitudes, values, and beliefs
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High conformity – harmonious; children agree with
parents
Low conformity – greater conflict; children permitted
to disagree with parents
CH 10: Interpersonal Relationship Types (slide 12)
Copyright © 2013, 2009, 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved
Family Relationships (cont.)
3. Family types (cont.)
 Conversation orientation – degree to which
family members can speak their minds
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High conversation – discusses issues and opinions
Low conversation – little discussion
CH 10: Interpersonal Relationship Types (slide 13)
Copyright © 2013, 2009, 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved
Family Relationships (cont.)
3. Family types (cont.)
 Four types
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Consensual – high conversation, high conformity;
open communication and disagreement
Protective – high conformity, low conversation;
stress agreement, avoid conflict
Pluralistic – low conformity, high conversation;
encourages different attitudes, open communication
Laissez-faire – low conformity, low conversation;
avoid interaction and confrontation, value privacy
CH 10: Interpersonal Relationship Types (slide 14)
Copyright © 2013, 2009, 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved
Family Relationships (cont.)
4. Family and communication
 Equality pattern
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Equal share in communication transaction
Equal power
Equitable relationship
 Balanced split pattern
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Equal relationship but each is dominant in a specific
domain
CH 10: Interpersonal Relationship Types (slide 15)
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Family Relationships (cont.)
4. Family and communication (cont.)
 Unbalanced split pattern
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One person is more regularly in control of the
relationship
More powerful – looks, expertise, money,
 Monopoly pattern
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One person is the authority, controls the other
Lectures instead of communicates
CH 10: Interpersonal Relationship Types (slide 16)
Copyright © 2013, 2009, 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved
Family Relationships (cont.)
5. Family, culture, gender, and technology
(cont.)
 Culture and families – cultural differences
influences families and family relationships
 Gender and families – in some cultures only
males can dissolve a marriage
 Technology and families – in some cases,
technology contributes to decreased family
communication
CH 10: Interpersonal Relationship Types (slide 17)
Copyright © 2013, 2009, 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved
Family Relationships (cont.)
1. Types of workplace communication
 Lateral communication – between equals
 Upward communication – lower to upper levels
in the hierarchy
 Downward communication – higher to lower
levels
 Grapevine messages – don’t follow formal lines;
not yet public, more interpersonal messages
CH 10: Interpersonal Relationship Types (slide 18)
Copyright © 2013, 2009, 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved
Work Relationships
2. Networking relationships
 Informal – everyday interactions
 Formal – systematic and strategic
3. Mentoring relationships
 Crucial for rising in hierarchy and developing
skills
 Can be online
CH 10: Interpersonal Relationship Types (slide 19)
Copyright © 2013, 2009, 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved
Work Relationships (cont.)
4. Romantic relationships at work
 Advantages
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Easy place to meet romantic partner
Can lead to greater work satisfaction
 Disadvantages
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Can cause negative gossip
Can cause problems for managers
Can cause problems for one-sided romances or after
a break-up
CH 10: Interpersonal Relationship Types (slide 20)
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Work Relationships (cont.)
1. Jealousy – a feeling in reaction to a threat to
a relationship.
 Parts of jealousy
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Cognitive – suspicious thinking and worrying
Emotional
Behavioral
 Dealing with jealousy
CH 10: Interpersonal Relationship Types (slide 21)
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The Dark Side of Interpersonal
Relationships
2. Bullying
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Verbal or physical
A pattern
Not illegal
Cyberbullying
Dealing with bullying
CH 10: Interpersonal Relationship Types (slide 22)
Copyright © 2013, 2009, 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved
Dark Side of Relationships (cont.)
3. Violence
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Verbal or emotional
Physical
Sexual
Dealing with violence
CH 10: Interpersonal Relationship Types (slide 23)
Copyright © 2013, 2009, 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved
Dark Side of Relationships (cont.)