Integral Psychology 5
Chapter 9: Some Developmental
Lines
Dr. Rodney H. Clarken
School of Education
Northern Michigan University
© Rodney H. Clarken 2004
1
This presentation is my
attempt to summarize
Chapter 9,
• of Ken Wilber’s Integral Psychology,
published in 2000, pp. 115-128.
• I recommend you view the earlier
presentations in this series and read
Integral Psychology for a more
complete and in depth understanding
of the content.
© Rodney H. Clarken 2004
2
Levels of development: self
sense: worldview
• Sensorimotor: material:
archaic
• Formal-reflexive: ego:
rational
• Emotional: body-ego:
magical
• Vision-logic: body-mind:
existential
• Representational &
Rule/role mind: persona:
mythic
• Psychic & Subtle: soul:
divine
• Causal & nondual: spirit:
one Spirit
© Rodney H. Clarken 2004
3
All developmental lines
• Are variations on the three irreducible modes:
aesthetic (subjective, I, UL), moral
(intersubjective, we, LL) and scientific
(objective, it/s, UR, LR)
• Subjective: e.g., self identity, affects, needs,
aesthetics
• Intersubjective: worldviews, linguistics, ethics
• Objective: scientific cognition
© Rodney H. Clarken 2004
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Consciousness
• Arises within the clearing created by
culture
• Subjectivity and intersubjectivity are
mutually arising and interdependent
• What you think is controlled by level of
development of individual and collective
© Rodney H. Clarken 2004
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Affect, emotions, feelings
• Energetic feeling tone of each level
• Consciousness is more a feeling
awareness than a thinking awareness
• Love is the foundation for and primary
force behind all emotions
© Rodney H. Clarken 2004
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Levels of affect
• Reactivity, sensations: touch,
temperature, pleasure, pain
• Impulse: tension, fear, rage, satisfaction
• L2: anxiety, anger, wishing, liking, safety
• L3: love, joy, depression, hate,
belongingness
© Rodney H. Clarken 2004
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Levels of affect, cont.
• L4: universal affect, global justice, care,
compassion, all-human love, worldcentric
altruism
• Awe, rapture, compassion
• Ecstasy, love-bliss, saintly commitment
• Infinite freedom-release, one taste
© Rodney H. Clarken 2004
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Levels of need, drive or
motivation: “food”
• Physical: food, water, warmth, labor
• Biological/emotional: breath, sex, elan
vital
• Mental: communication, symbols and
units of meaning
• Spiritual: virtues, relationship with Source
© Rodney H. Clarken 2004
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Relational Exchanges
• Each level needs to be in a relational
exchange
• Oppression and repression distort
exchanges, resulting in pathology
• All genuine needs reflect the
interrelationships necessary for life at
that level
© Rodney H. Clarken 2004
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Maslow’s needs hierarchy
• Survival, physiological
• Safety
• Social, belongingness
• Self-esteem
• Self-actualization
• Self-transcendence
© Rodney H. Clarken 2004
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Morals
• Includes principles of moral judgment
(how one reaches a moral decision) and
moral span (those deemed worthy of
consideration)
• You treat as yourself those with whom
you identify; it expands as you develop
from me to us (family, friends, community,
nation) to all of us (humanity)
© Rodney H. Clarken 2004
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Moral span
• Preconventional: egocentric, narcissistic,
“me”, locus of bodily self,
• Conventional: sociocentric, conformist,
“us”, locus of mythic-membership
• Postconventional: world centric,
universal, “all of us”, locus of rational
universal pluralism
© Rodney H. Clarken 2004
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Creativity
• Part of human nature and the Kosmos:
will
• Eros: the self-transcending pull or
allurement of the Kosmos, Spirit-in-Action
• Drives emergences of higher and wider
holons, an expansion of identity
© Rodney H. Clarken 2004
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Gender Identity
• Undifferentiated
• Differentiated, basic gender identity,
biological givens
• Conventional identity, cultural
constructions
• Trans differentiated, gender androgyny
© Rodney H. Clarken 2004
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Gender
• Deep features of development and self
stages are gender neutral
• However, men tend to develop with and
emphasis on agency (being in action)
and women on communion (being in
relationship), though both use both
© Rodney H. Clarken 2004
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Aesthetics
• You can analyze any activity, such as art, on
the level it comes from (subject, self) and the
level it aims at (object, reality)
• For example, art produced by the mental level
can take as its object something in the material,
mental or spiritual realms
• This dual analysis can be done with all modes
of consciousness
© Rodney H. Clarken 2004
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Dual analysis
• Rationality can take as its object the
sensorimotor realms, producing empiricalanalytical knowledge, the mental realms,
producing phenomenology and hermeneutics,
or the spiritual realm, producing theology
• With modernity, very high levels (reason)
confined their attention to very low realms
(matter)
© Rodney H. Clarken 2004
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Art levels
• Sensorimotor
• Perspectival:
naturalistic
• Emotionalexpressivist
• Magical imagery:
cave art, surrealist
• Mythological-literal:
religious, icons
• Aperspectival: cubist
abstract
• Symbolist: fantastic
• Archetypal
© Rodney H. Clarken 2004
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Gross Cognition
• Takes as its object the sensorimotor
realm, matter
• Begins with sensorimotor development,
moves to preoperational, then to
concrete operational to formal
operational where it begins taking the
world of thought as its object
© Rodney H. Clarken 2004
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Subtle cognition
• Takes as its object the world of thought
• A distinctive developmental line from
gross cognitions that goes through
similar stages
• Begins in infancy with imagination,
reverie, daydreams, creative visions,
transcendental illuminations and thoughts
© Rodney H. Clarken 2004
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Causal cognition
• The root of attention, the capacity for
Witnessing, equanimity, integration
• Can be traced to infancy, but cones
increasingly to the fore in the post formal
stages of development in psychic vision,
subtle archetype and meditative states
© Rodney H. Clarken 2004
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Different lines of the self
• Like cognition, self has three realms that
develop relatively independently:
• 1. Gross self: ego, frontal
• 2. Subtle self: soul, deeper psychic
• 3. Casual self: Spirit, Witness
© Rodney H. Clarken 2004
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Integral Psychology
• Involves waves (levels), streams (lines),
and states (ego, soul and spirit)
• Center of gravity of self moves by the
force of Love through all stages, from
body to mind to soul to spirit, with
concerns of the lower fading from
immediacy while the higher move to the
foreground
© Rodney H. Clarken 2004
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Integral therapy
• Works concurrently with ego, soul and
spirit as they unfold along side each
other, carrying their own truths, insights
and possible pathologies, recognizing
and strengthening the soul and spirit as
they emerge
• Integrate higher and lower domains into a
full-spectrum realization
© Rodney H. Clarken 2004
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References
• Most of the material in this presentation
was taken from Chapter 9 of Ken
Wilber’s Integral Psychology, (2000), pp.
115-128.
© Rodney H. Clarken 2004
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Contact information
Dr. Rodney H. Clarken
Director of Field Experiences and Professor
School of Education, Northern Michigan University,
1401 Presque Isle Avenue, Marquette, MI 498555348
Tel: 906-227-2160 (secretary), 227-1881 (office), 2262079 (home), Fax: 227-2764, email:
[email protected]
Website with this presentation and web cast and info
on courses, papers, Baha'i and China: http://wwwinstruct.nmu.edu/education/rclarken
© Rodney H. Clarken 2004
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Integral Psychology 5: Some Developmental Lines