Chapter 13
Consumption to Satisfaction
BABIN / HARRIS
© 2009 South-Western, a division of Cengage Learning.
Learning Outcomes
LO1
Understand the basic consumption process, and the
link from consumption to value to satisfaction.
LO2
Understand satisfaction, dissatisfaction, and
disconfirmation/expectancy theory.
LO3
Know that emotions other than satisfaction can affect
postconsumption behavior.
LO4
Describe some ways that consumers dispose of
products.
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LO1 Basic Consumption Process
Consumption: the
process that
converts time and
goods, services,
or ideas into
value.
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LO1 Consumption and Product Classification
Durable goods
Consumed over long
periods of time.
Nondurable Goods
Consumed quickly.
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LO1 Situations and Consumer Reactions
Temporal
factors
Antecedent
conditions
Physical
environment
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Tailgate 101
Tailgating is a social setting.
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LO1
Exhibit 13.2: Transfer of Meaning
in Consumption
Meaning transference:
process through which
cultural meaning is
transferred to a product
and onto the
consumer.
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LO1
Exhibit 13.3: Consumption, Value,
and Satisfaction
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LO2 Satisfaction and Dissatisfaction
Satisfaction
A mild, positive
emotional state
resulting from a
favorable appraisal
of a consumption
outcome.
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LO2
Consumer Satisfaction
• A postconsumption phenomenon.
• Results from a cognitive appraisal.
– Also referred to as satisfaction
judgment.
• A relatively mild emotion that does
not create strong behavioral
reactions.
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LO2
Disconfirmation Theory: The
Basic Disconfirmation Process
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LO2
Expectations
Consumer
expectations have
two components:
(1) The probability
that something will
occur and
(2) an evaluation of
that potential
occurrence.
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LO2
Sources of Expectations
Word-of-mouth
Experience
Advertisements
Personal factors
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LO2
Exhibit 13.7
A Multi-item Satisfaction Scale
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LO3
Know that emotions other than
satisfaction can affect
postconsumption behavior.
© 2009 South-Western, a division of Cengage Learning.
LO3 Other Postconsumption Reactions
•
•
•
•
•
Delight
Disgust
Surprise
Exhilaration
Anger
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LO3 Delight and Anger
• Delight – combo of joy and surprise
– Rather than expectancy/disconfirmation theory,
enhancing self-esteem needs may be the cause
of delight
– Something extraordinary happens…
• Anger – outrage
– Results from a violation of fairness/equity theory
– Bad things occur – customer don’t return,
spread negative WOM
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LO3
Cognitive Dissonance
• Lingering doubts about a decision that
has already been made.
• Sometimes known as buyer’s regret.
• Conditions:
– Consumer is aware that there are many
attractive alternatives.
– Decision is difficult to reverse.
– Decision is important and involves risk.
– Consumer has low self-confidence.
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LO3 Cognitive Reducing Strategies
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LO4
Consumer Disposal
Consumer refuse: any packaging
that is no longer necessary for
consumption to take place or, in
some cases, the actual good that
is no longer providing value to
the consumer.
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LO4
Disposing of Refuse
Trashing
Recycling
Converting
Trading
Donating
Reselling
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LO4
Now That’s Handy!
By finding alternative
uses for old products,
consumers can extend
the value that they
receive.
© 2009 South-Western, a division of Cengage Learning.
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