An Overview of Human
Sexuality
Center for Development of Human Services
Institute for Community Health Promotion
SUNY Buffalo State
© 2014 New York State Office of Children and Family Services
Center for Development of Human Services
Institute for Community Health Promotion
SUNY Buffalo State
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Acknowledgement
This material was developed by the Center for Development of Human Services
(CDHS), Institute for Community Health Promotion, SUNY Buffalo State under
a training and administrative services agreement with the New York State
Office of Children and Family Services.
Disclaimer
While every effort has been made to provide accurate and complete
information, the Office of Children and Family Services and the State of New
York assume no responsibility for any errors or omissions in the information
provided herein and make no representations or warranties about the suitability
of the information contained here for any purpose. All information and
documents are provided “as is,” without a warranty of any kind.
For information about this and other training programs, please visit:
http://cdhs.buffalostate.edu
© 2014 New York State Office of Children and Family Services.
Introductions
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Name
Where you live
Length of time fostering
One expectation of training
© 2014 New York State Office of Children and Family Services
Objectives
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Define sexuality
Identify normal patterns of development
Describe motivations of sexually active teens
Define sexual responsibility
Promote child’s healthy sexual development
Assess media messages to youth
Identify and dispel common myths about sex
List major methods of contraception
© 2014 New York State Office of Children and Family Services
Take a Stand –
Agree or Disagree…
• Men and women are different in their
feelings and desires
• Women should stay home to care for
children
• Parents should share feelings about their
sexuality
• Girls should not ask boys out
• Sex should be reserved for marriage
© 2014 New York State Office of Children and Family Services
Agree or Disagree – con’t
• Birth control is the woman’s responsibility
• Teens should be scared into abstinence by
seeing those dying of AIDS
• Masturbation is healthy and natural
• Either sex should feel free to initiate
sexual acts
© 2014 New York State Office of Children and Family Services
My Parents Told Me..
1.
Identify recorders
and reporters
2. Break into small
groups
3. Identify your
parents’ message
about each topic
4. Do you agree or
disagree with their
message?
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Money
Friendship
Love
Relationships
Being Gay/Lesbian
Marriage
Sex
Masturbation
Being a Man/Woman
© 2014 New York State Office of Children and Family Services
Approaches to Convey
Message
• Telling/Moralizing
• Modeling
• Clarifying Values
© 2014 New York State Office of Children and Family Services
Small Group Activity
1.
Share message you want
to convey about topic
2.
Identify approach you’d
use:
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Telling/Moralizing
Modeling
Clarifying values
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Money
Friendship
Love
Relationships
Being Gay/Lesbian
Marriage
Sex
Masturbation
Being a Man/Woman
© 2014 New York State Office of Children and Family Services
Human Sexuality
• Is a function of the total personality
• Is universal and connected to all developmental
areas
• Includes biological processes
• Includes self-concept
• Expressed in interactions with either sex
• Includes sexual orientation
• Is powerfully influenced by religion, culture,
family and friends
© 2014 New York State Office of Children and Family Services
SEX
• Biological qualities particular to the
male and female
• Encompasses the biological processes
associated with reproduction
• Entails behavior specific to sexual
relations
© 2014 New York State Office of Children and Family Services
LGBTQ and more
Definitions
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Sexual orientation
Gender identity
Gender expression
Lesbian
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Gay
Bisexual
Transgender
Questioning
A Straight Guide to
LGTB Americans
www.hrc.org
© 2014 New York State Office of Children and Family Services
Sexual Development
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Physical
Emotional
Mental
Social
Moral
© 2014 New York State Office of Children and Family Services
Life Cycle of Sexuality
• Birth to 3 years
• 4 – 8 years
• 9 – 12 years
• 13 – 18 years
© 2014 New York State Office of Children and Family Services
Teenage Sexuality
• On average, teens begin intercourse at 16
• By 19, 20% males and 33% females haven’t had
sexual intercourse
• 40% of 14 yr olds will be pregnant by 19
• 50% of sexually active teens don’t use birth
control; most wait 6 months for RX
• 50% pregnancies occur w/in first 6 mos.
• 96% teen moms keep their babies
© 2014 New York State Office of Children and Family Services
Youth Sexuality and
Parental Response
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Define the behavior/situation
Identify your feelings
Clarify your values
Define problem in terms of its
effects on the youth’s development
and its consequences for others
© 2014 New York State Office of Children and Family Services
Reasons People Have Sex:
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For fun
Out of love
To have a baby
Out of curiosity
To prove adulthood
To prove fe/maleness
To show control
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Out of attraction
Out of fear
For revenge
To be touched
For money
For attention
To feel loved
Due to peer pressure
© 2014 New York State Office of Children and Family Services
Is what’s good for the goose
good for the gander ?
• How is sex the same/different for teens
and adults?
• In what ways is sex satisfying to teens?
• In what ways is sex unsatisfying to teens?
• What motivates teens to have sex when
its not satisfying?
© 2014 New York State Office of Children and Family Services
I can’t get no
satisfaction…
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Partners can be selfish
Sex can be scary
Sex can be painful
Teens may feel guilt, shame if its at
odds with belief system
• Sex doesn’t guarantee satisfaction
© 2014 New York State Office of Children and Family Services
Foster Parent’s Role in Child’s
Healthy Sexual Development
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Promote child’s overall development
Build child’s self-esteem
Establish and maintain child’s connections
Create climate for openly communicating
about sexual matters
© 2014 New York State Office of Children and Family Services.
SEX is all around us…
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TV
MTV
Popular songs
Magazines
Billboards
Commercials
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Movies
CD covers
Posters
Books
Telephone 900 #’s
Internet porn
Sexting
© 2014 New York State Office of Children and Family Services
Questions Kids Ask
• Identify your feelings/values
• Identify questions that you cannot
answer
• Identify resources for gathering
needed information
© 2014 New York State Office of Children and Family Services
Dispelling the Myths
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Be open to communicating about sex
Discuss and model your values
Respond to youth’s emotional needs
Provide accurate and concrete
information: e.g., reproduction,
contraception, pregnancy, parenthood
and STDs
© 2014 New York State Office of Children and Family Services
Contraception
• Birth control pills
• Condoms
• Contraceptive
foam/jelly
• Diaphragm
• IUD
• Contraceptive
sponge
• Natural family
planning
• Withdrawal
• Abstinence
• Norplant
• Cervical cap
• Deprovera shot
• The patch
© 2014 New York State Office of Children and Family Services
Factors that Affect Teen’s
Use of Contraceptives
• Psychological factors
• Motivational factors
• Values
© 2014 New York State Office of Children and Family Services
Understanding the complexity of
sexual development helps the
foster parent guide sexual
decision-making and sexual
responsibility.
© 2014 New York State Office of Children and Family Services
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Human Sexuality () - Center for Development of Human Services