NSPCC:
Programmes for
children living in
high risk families
Pam Miller, Senior Analyst,
Strategy Unit, NSPCC
NSPCC: Priority Themes
Seven Priority Themes
• neglected children
• sexually abused children
• physically abused children in
high risk families
• children under one
• looked after children
• children with disabilities
• minority ethnic children
Physical Abuse in High
Risk Families
• Theme launch: Glasgow, 6 March 2012
• Service Commissions currently being
undertaken
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SMILES
FED-Up
Caring Dads, Safer Children
New Orleans Intervention Model (NIM)
Domestic Abuse Recovering Together (DART)
Bespoke services (Parkside Mental Health Services and
Family Alcohol Services)
Family SMILES (Simplifying
Mental Illness plus Life Enhancement
Skills)
•A family approach for children
who live with parental mental
health difficulties
•Based on the Australian SMILES
programme
Family SMILES – programme
specifics
• Eight week group work programme for children aged 6 to 13
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Reduce risk of harm to children who live with parental mental ill health
Improve the child’s capacity to cope more effectively
Develop protective factors in the child’s life and strengthen resilience
Improve self-expression and creativity
Increase self esteem
Reduce feelings of isolation
Provide age appropriate education about mental illness
• Six individual sessions with parent(s)
– Enhance the parent child relationship
– Develop and enhance protective parenting
– Reduce behaviours that increase levels of vulnerability and risk to the child.
Family SMILES –
implementation and evaluation
• Nine NSPCC locations
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Coventry
Belfast
Southampton
Lincoln
Grimsby
Bristol
Manchester
Prestatyn
Middlesbrough
• Evaluation tools
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Rosenberg self esteem questionnaire
Health of the Nation Outcome Scales Child & Adolescent Mental Health (HONOSCA)
Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ)
Child Abuse Predictive Inventory (CAPI)
FED-Up – Family Environment:
Drug Using Parents
• A family approach for children
who live with parental
substance misuse
•Based on FEDUP and SMART
groups
FED-Up – programme specifics
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Twelve week group work programme with children aged 5 to 12
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Provide a non-stigmatising, non-threatening environment which can support children
living at home and ensures they are kept safe.
Support children and young people by giving them a voice and someone to turn to for
emotional support and promotion of their well being
Enhance the child’s self-esteem
Provide a safe environment for children in which to share experience and express
wishes and feelings, which are acknowledged and heard
Promote social skills and social inclusion
Develop a safety plan for the child through an approach which is pragmatic and
interactive in order to raise awareness of personal safety appropriate to the child’s age
and understanding.
Parents are worked with individually prior to the group work with the children
starting and then during the time the children are attending the group.
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Promote parents knowledge and understanding of the impact of parental substance
use upon their child/ren
Enhance protective parenting.
FED-Up – implementation and
evaluation
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Fourteen NSPCC locations
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Blackpool
Coventry
Crewe
Glasgow
Grimsby
Hounslow
Hull
Lincoln
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Liverpool
Londonderry
Manchester
Sheffield
Stoke
Warrington
Evaluation tools
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Rosenberg self esteem questionnaire
Health of the Nation Outcome Scales Child & Adolescent Mental Health
(HONOSCA)
Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ)
Child Abuse Predictive Inventory (CAPI)
Caring Dads, Safer Children
• Programme is not a perpetrator
programme
•Programme to work with violent
fathers in a parenting context
•The Caring Dads programme
was developed in Canada
Caring Dads, Safer Children –
programme specifics
• Seventeen week group; eight to twelve men in each group; two
hours per session
• Group co-lead by male and female facilitators
• Men should currently care for or have contact with their children
• Partners/ex-partners are offered support via the partner
engagement worker
• Children will be contacted at times during the group and at the
end of the group to gather their views on progress made in the
relationship with their father
Caring Dads, Safer Children implementation and evaluation
• Four NSPCC locations
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Cardiff
Prestatyn
Belfast
Peterborough
• Evaluation
– Key difference from other evaluations and programmes is that assessment
of parenting includes views of children.
– Parenting Stress Index
– Parental Acceptance and Rejection Questionnaire
– Controlling Behaviour Inventory
– Well being scales
Caring Dads, Safer Children –
quantitative profile of fathers
• Reporting on 72 men for whom we have data
• Will be able to report on the following:
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demographic information recorded on CRIS/Alpha
results of standardised measures
% of scores that are clinically significant
agencies already involved with father
Facilitators’ views on fathers’ commitment to the programme
Attrition and reasons for attrition and non-attendance
Caring Dads, Safer Children –
profile of their children
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Data available on 114 children*
Age: Ranged between 0 to 17 years. Mean = 6, Median = 5
Relationship to father: 88% child, 7% step-child, 5% NK
Gender: 44% female, 54% male, 2% NK
Father lives with children? 30% Yes, 65% No, 5% NK
Ethnicity: 46% Any Other White Background, 38% White
British, 7% Welsh, 5% Mixed Background
*Not total number of children, awaiting data from groups.
Questions?
• Di Jerwood, Development
Manager, Physical Abuse in High
Risk Families, NSPCC, 01347
810492, [email protected]
•Pam Miller, Senior Analyst,
NSPCC, 0207 825 7438,
[email protected]
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NSPCC programme for children living in high risk families