ETC Basic SafeLandUSA
HSE Orientation
Housekeeping and Emergency Procedures
1. Emergency Procedures & Alarms
1. Fire
2. Tornado
3. Earthquake
4. Violent Incident
5. Shelter in Place
2. Smoking Policy
3. Restroom Location
4. Scheduled Breaks
Behavioral Safety
Behavioral Safety
 Behavior Based Safety (BBS) focuses
on what people do, analyzes why they
do it, and then applies a strategy to
improve what people do.
 To be successful a BBS program must
include all employees and requires buyin and support by everyone.
Behavioral Safety
 How BBS works:
 A site observation is conducted –
looking for safe behaviors and at-risk
behaviors.
 Feedback is given:
 Positive feedback first
 At-risk behaviors last
Behavioral Safety
 With at-risk behaviors, we must ask
“Why” the employee is putting
themselves at risk.
 Explain the associated negative impact
the at-risk behavior may have.
Behavioral Safety
 Behaviors are discussed
until the observer and
worker agree on
suggested
recommendations to
work more safely.
Behavioral Safety
 It is important to understand:
 Terminology of the work environment.
 How to recognize hazards.
 Mindset of the employee.
 How to reach the goal of a safe work
environment.
Behavioral Safety
 Effective Feedback:
 Must be sincere.
 Focus on actions that can be
observed (not attitudes).
 Focus on correct actions as well as
what can be done better.
Behavioral Safety
 Receiving Feedback:
 Listen with an open mind.
 Separate what the person says from
what you think about that person.
 Never overreact.
 Ask open, non-defensive questions.
 Focus on areas to improve.
 What is right should outweigh what is
wrong.
Behavioral Safety
 Hazard Recognition:
 Recognize the hazards in your work
area.
 A hazard is any source of energy that
has a potential to cause harm.
 If we can find the energy, we can
eliminate or lessen the hazard.
Behavioral Safety
 How do we identify hazards?
 Use your knowledge and experience.
 Use your senses – sight, sound,
touch, smell, feel.
 Use your job planning skills.
Behavioral Safety
 Types of Energy Sources:

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Motion
Chemical
Radiation
Electrical
Gravity
Heat/Cold
Biological
Pressure
Behavioral Safety
 In a culture of safety, everyone takes
personal responsibility for their own safety
as well as those around them.
Behavioral Safety
 Once the energy source is identified, the
hazard must be evaluated.
 Can the job be done safely?
 How can I make the job safer?
 If something unforeseen happens,
will I stop work?
 Am I in the right state of mind to work
safely?
Behavioral Safety
 Talking about safety is the key to success.
 Everyone is obligated to speak up when
they see someone performing an at-risk
behavior.
 A culture of safety creates a level of trust
that encourages people to speak up.
Review
Intervention
Intervention
Stop Work Authority (SWA)
• Assessing hazards correctly depends
on each employee taking responsibility
for their safety and that of their coworkers.
• It is through this process that you can
determine if work must be stopped.
Intervention
 Employees have the RIGHT and
AUTHORITY to stop work without
repercussions.
 Do it safely or not at all.
 There is always time do to it right.
Intervention
Always:
• Operate in a safe and
controlled condition.
• Ensure safety devices are in
place and functioning.
• Follow safe work practices
and procedures.
• Meet or exceed customer
requirements.
Intervention
Always:
• Maintain integrity of dedicated systems.
• Comply with all applicable rules and
regulations.
• Address abnormal conditions.
• Follow written procedures.
• Involve the right people in decisions that
affect procedures and equipment.
Intervention
How Intervention Works:
• Identify the perceived unsafe condition(s).
Intervention
Coordinate the “Stop Work Action”
•
Start with the supervisor.
•
If the supervisor is not available and
affected persons are in immediate
risk, initiate the “Stop Work”
intervention.
•
Notify all affected
persons of the stop
work issue.
Intervention
•
All parties shall discuss and gain
agreement on the stop work issue.
•
If the work is determined to be safe,
proceed with the work.
•
If the stop work issue is valid, resolve
the unsafe actions and proceed with
work.
•
If the stop work issue cannot be
resolved immediately, suspend work
until a resolution is achieved.
Intervention
•
Under no circumstances should
retribution be directed at any person(s)
who exercise in good faith their stop
work authority.
•
All stop work interventions and
associated detail shall be documented
and reported.
Stop Work Authority
(SWA)
Your Right, Your Responsibility
Review
Incident Reporting &
Investigation
Incident Reporting
 Incident reporting is more than just
notifying your company that an
incident has occurred. It is a way for
the company to look at what
happened, investigate all the
contributing factors and determine if
work can be made safer for you and
your co-workers.
Incident Reporting
Types of incidents to report:
 Unsafe acts
 Unsafe conditions
 Any incident or injury – regardless of
severity
 Near hits
Incident Reporting
How to report an incident:
• Notify your Supervisor immediately
that something has happened.
• Fill out a written report.
Incident Reporting
There are two categories of incidents:
• Non-Recordable: incidents that are kept
on the company register but not
reportable to the Occupational Safety &
Health Administration (OSHA).
• Recordable: incidents that are required
by OSHA to be reported on an annual
basis.
Incident Reporting
Non-Recordable Injuries
• For Record Only (FRO): an injury has
occurred but no medical treatment is
required.
• First Aid By Professional (FABP): an
injury has occurred and you wish to see
a doctor.
• Medical treatment is limited
• No prescriptions are given
• Return to work with no restrictions
Incident Reporting
Recordable Injuries
 Medical Only (MO): an injury has
occurred that requires medical treatment.
 Treatment is more that FABP
 Prescriptions may be given
 Return to work with no restrictions
 Light Duty (LD): The employee receives
medical attention.
 Return to work with restrictions
Incident Reporting
• Lost Time (LT): an employee is injured
and unable to work for a period of time.
• Fatality (FA): loss of life.
Incident Reporting
Incident Investigations:
• Are conducted to determine who/what
is at fault.
• Look at all contributing factors such
as people, equipment, materials or the
work environment.
• Help to reduce future incidents.
Help your employer make a
safer work place for you and
your co-workers.
Work together.
Review
Substance Abuse Awareness
Substance Abuse Awareness
• There are approximately 12.1 million
people in America that perform a safety
sensitive job in transportation.
• These jobs are regulated by the
Department of Transportation (DOT)
drug and alcohol regulations.
• Your employer may have a policy to
prevent substance abuse along with
many other agencies that govern
prevention.
Substance Abuse Awareness
Workplace Impact
• Nearly ¾ of those who use illegal drugs
also work, and alcohol remains the leading
drug abused with one in every ten people in
the U.S. having a problem.
• People don’t check their substance abuse
problems at the door when they come to
work.
• Abuse has no boundaries: field workers to
upper management positions can be
affected.
Substance Abuse Awareness
Facts
•
•
•
•
12% of the workforce reports heavy drinking.
14% of employees abuse drugs on the job.
60% of drug users will sell drugs to co-workers.
40% of users will steal from the company.
•
•
•
•
•
8 times more likely to have attendance problems.
5 times more likely to file workers comp. claims
5 times more likely to have an accident.
3.5 times more likely to injure others at work.
300% higher medical costs and benefit usage.
Substance Abuse Awareness
Employee Health
• Substance abusers tend to neglect their
nutrition, sleep and other health needs.
• Substance abuse depresses the immune
system which can lead to more frequent
illness.
Substance Abuse Awareness
Safety
• Safety is affected with the use of alcohol
and drugs.
• Impairments affect:
• Vision
• Hearing
• Attention span
• Muscle coordination
• Alertness
• Mental acuity
Substance Abuse Awareness
Productivity
• Employees who abuse alcohol or use drugs
can be physically and mentally impaired on the
job.
• Substance abuse interferes with job
satisfaction and the motivation to do a good
job.
• Reduced output
• Increased errors
• Lower quality
• Low customer satisfaction
Substance Abuse Awareness
Decision Making
• Employees who use alcohol and/or
drugs often make poor decision and
have a distorted perception of their
abilities.
• Reduced innovation, creativity,
competitiveness and poor
daily/strategic decisions.
Substance Abuse Awareness
Morale
• The presence of an employee with drug
and/or alcohol problems places a strain on
relationships between co-workers.
• Higher turnover
• Diminished quality
• Reduced team effort
Substance Abuse Awareness
Security
• Employees with drug and/or alcohol
problems often have financial difficulties,
and employees using illegal drugs may
conduct illegal activities in the workplace.
• Theft
• Law enforcement involved
Substance Abuse Awareness
Image and Community Relations
• Accidents, lawsuits, and other incidents
may receive media attention.
• Reduced trust and confidence
• Reduced ability to attract high quality
employees
• Decreased business/financial wellbeing
Substance Abuse Awareness
Understanding Addiction
• Employees with addiction problems are often
unhappy with their lives, but fail to realize
their abuse is a major contributing factor.
• The struggle with addiction is characterized
by repeated failures to control use and a
need for greater amounts of the substance to
achieve the desired effect.
• Not everyone who uses alcohol or
experiments with illegal drugs becomes
addicted.
Substance Abuse Awareness
Understanding Addiction
• It is very difficult to recognize the
differences between use, abuse and
addiction unless you are a trained
professional.
• If you suspect use, abuse or addiction do
not try to treat the employee yourself, get
help.
Substance Abuse Awareness
Use
• Use is typically socially accepted or
medically authorized.
• Examples include having a drink with
friends or taking a prescribed anti-anxiety
medication.
• Use can be experimental, social/recreational
or a stress reliever.
Substance Abuse Awareness
Abuse
• The use of a substance that is illegal or
harmful to oneself or others is considered
problematic.
• Examples include blackouts, accidents or
injuries, legal problems, poor job
performance, and family or health
problems.
Substance Abuse Awareness
Addiction
• A number of individuals use or abuse
without becoming addicted, but for many
the abuse continues despite attempts to
stop.
• The repeated, compulsive seeking or use of
a substance despite adverse social,
psychological and/or physical
consequences characterizes addiction.
• A wide range of substance, both legal and
illegal, can be abused addictively.
Substance Abuse Awareness
Addiction
• Addiction to alcohol and other drugs is:
• Chronic: Once you develop the addiction, you will
always have to deal with/manage it.
• Progressive: Addiction gets worse over time. A
biochemical change in the nervous system can
persist even after the substance leaves the blood.
• Primary: Addiction is not just a symptom of an
underlying problem. The addiction itself needs to
be medically treated as the primary illness.
• Terminal: Addiction leads to disease and possibly
death.
Substance Abuse Awareness
Denial
• One of the most disturbing and confusing
aspects of addiction is that it is
characterized by denial.
• The user often seems to be the last to know
that his/her life is out of control.
• There are effective strategies used by
professionals to help break through this
denial.
Substance Abuse Awareness
Signs and Symptoms
• Signs that someone is developing a problem
with alcohol and/or drugs cover a wide range
and many of them are apparent on the job.
• No one wants to believe that a friend, coworker or family member has an abuse
problem.
• Subtle changes in behavior are discounted,
changes.
• Changes in friends, lack of interest in old
hobbies are minimized.
Substance Abuse Awareness
Signs and Symptoms
• Emotional:
• Aggression
• Depression
• Burnout
• Paranoia
• Anxiety
• Behavioral:
• Denial
• Slow reactions
• Excessive talking
• Impaired coordination
• Can’t sit still
• Slow/slurred speech
• Poor attention
span
• Irritability
• Lack of energy
Substance Abuse Awareness
Signs and Symptoms
• Physical:
• Weight loss
• Sweating
• Chills
• Smells of alcohol
Substance Abuse Awareness
Enabling
• Enabling is action that you take to protect the
person with the problem from the consequences
of his or her actions.
• Covering up with excuses or doing their work.
• Rationalizing the abuse.
• Withdrawing from the problem.
• Blaming yourself for the problem.
• Controlling the abuse by throwing away the
supply.
• Threatening to stop covering up.
Substance Abuse Awareness
Covering Up
• Often the person with a problem will use
“traps” to protect themselves when being
confronted.
• Sympathy
• Excuses
• Apologies
• Diversions
• Innocence
• Anger
• Pity
• Tears
Substance Abuse Awareness
Employee Assistance Program (EAP)
• The EAP can help employees decide what to
do about their alcohol or drug problem.
• The EAP can also help decide if someone in
your family or work group has a problem.
• Conversations with the EAP are protected
and records are kept confidential.
• There are clear limits on when and what
information the EAP can share and with
whom.
Substance Abuse Awareness
Outside Help
• If your company does not have
and EAP, you should still seek
help.
• Alcoholics Anonymous
• Narcotics Anonymous
• County or State addiction
agencies
• County or State mental health
agencies
Substance Abuse Awareness
Drugs of Abuse
• It is important to realize that all drugs, including
alcohol, chemically alter the mind and body.
• Drugs and alcohol can hinder judgment, distort
perception, decrease reaction time and interfere
with other skills necessary to do a job safely.
• We will review the signs and symptoms of :
•
•
•
•
Alcohol
Marijuana
Cocaine
Methamphetamine
Substance Abuse Awareness
Alcohol
• Alcohol is a depressant and is the leading
drug of abuse.
• Alcohol slows down the central nervous
system and brain function, reduces
coordination and reflex actions.
• People who would not ordinarily behave in
inappropriate ways can be persuaded to
change their behavior.
Substance Abuse Awareness
Alcohol
• Signs and symptoms may include:
• Sweating
• Lack of coordination
• Nausea/Vomiting
• Slowed reaction time
• Tremors
• Poor judgment
• Delusions
• Reduced inhibitions
• Seizures
• Death
Substance Abuse Awareness
Marijuana
• Marijuana is known for its intoxicating effects
and dreamy state of relaxation and euphoria.
• All forms of marijuana have a negative
physical and mental effect.
• Motivation and cognition may be altered,
making the acquisition of new information
difficult.
Substance Abuse Awareness
Marijuana
• Signs and symptoms may include:
• Increased heart rate
• Increased appetite
• Altered smell,
hearing, time, sight
• Bloodshot eyes
• Lack of coordination
• Dry mouth/throat
• Paranoia
• Chronic sore throat
• Psychosis
Substance Abuse Awareness
Cocaine
• The most widely used stimulant.
• Powerfully addictive drug leading to
physical and psychological dependence.
• Stimulates the central nervous system.
• Using contaminated equipment to inject
cocaine or other drug can transmit HIV,
hepatitis and other diseases.
Substance Abuse Awareness
Cocaine
• Signs and symptoms may include:
• Dilated pupils
• Mood swings
• Increased pulse
• Depression
• Insomnia
• Hallucinations
• Paranoia
• Seizures
• Elevated blood
pressure
• Anxiety
• Loss of appetite
• Agitation
Substance Abuse Awareness
Methamphetamine (Meth)
• Meth is a highly addictive stimulant which
has long lasting effects that can cause
user to stay awake for days during
binges.
• Meth is white or yellowish, odorless, and
bitter tasting powder that dissolves in
water.
• Other names for meth: crystal, ice, yabba,
glass, yellow bar, speed, trash, crack.
Substance Abuse Awareness
Methamphetamine (Meth)
• Meth is typically ingested orally, injected
intravenously, smoked or snorted.
• Meth can start to affect he body within 3-5
minutes and can last up to 12 hours.
• Chronic meth users also often display poor
hygiene, pale, unhealthy complexion and
sores on their bodies from
picking at “crank bugs”.
Substance Abuse Awareness
• Drug and alcohol use, abuse and
addiction can affect more than just the
user.
• It is important that if you or someone you
know needs help don’t wait. Get help
immediately.
• The decisions you make about drug and
alcohol use can affect you, your family
and your co-worker.
ACT RESPONSIBLY
Review
Prevention of
Workplace Violence
Prevention of Workplace Violence
• All employees should expect and
receive a secure workplace with a
mutual respect toward all co-workers
and personnel.
• It is impossible to plan for every event
that may unfold on the worksite.
• All employees must prepare themselves
with basic emergency planning,
response and evaluation skills to handle
unforeseen events.
Prevention of Workplace Violence
• Workplace Violence: any behavior, act
or statement that would be interpreted
by a reasonable person to be
aggressive, intimidating, harassing, or
unsafe, and that carries an expressed or
implied intent to cause harm to a person
or property.
Prevention of Workplace Violence
Zero Tolerance
• No responsible company will ignore,
condone, or tolerate disruptive,
threatening, or violent behavior by
any employee while at the workplace.
Prevention of Workplace Violence
• Most people will not become violent
without warning.
• An escalating series of clues usually
precedes an act of workplace violence.
• The risk of an outburst is greatly
increased when a combination of
warning signs are ignored.
Prevention of Workplace Violence
Warning Signs:
• Boundary crossing
• Chemical
dependence
• Concentration
problems
• Depression
• Inconsistent work
patterns
• Obsessive interest in
weapons
• Pathological ‘blamer’
• Romantic obsession
• Safety issues
• Paranoia
Prevention of Workplace Violence
• Employees become aware of a violent act
by the sounds of an explosion, gunfire,
scuffling or by observation of events.
• Employees are responsible for taking any
threat or violent act seriously.
Prevention of Workplace Violence
• Report any acts of violence or threats of
violence to your supervisor, or if
necessary, the appropriate authorities.
Prevention of Workplace Violence
If a violent situation arises:
• Stay calm
• Speak slowly and softly to reduce the
momentum of the situation.
• Move away from any objects that may
be used to harm you.
• Position yourself, if possible, so that
an exit route is readily accessible.
Prevention of Workplace Violence
• Explosion – Leave the area immediately.
• Gunfire – Take refuge in a secured area
with limited visibility to anyone on the
outside.
• Physical Threat – Leave the area
immediately.
• Hostage Situation – Leave the area; take
no chances to endanger the life of the
hostage.
Prevention of Workplace Violence
• In an emergency situation, it is
important to always remain calm and
call for help.
Review
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