OECD innovation strategy:
content analysis and
implementation opportunities
Ilona Dubra
Latvijas Universitāte
Ekonomikas un vadības fakultāte
AS LUXHOUSE
Kalngale, Rubeņu iela 9,
E-pasts: [email protected]
2015. gada 8. aprīlis
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The relationship between human
capital and innovation
“Innovation as a creation of new knowledge and
ideas to facilitate new business outcomes, aimed at
improving internal business processes and
structures, and to create market driven products and
services. Innovation encompasses both radical and
incremental innovation” (Plessis, 2007, 21)
human capital component such as skills,
knowledge, people expertise are treated as an
important source of competitive advantage to
individuals, organizations and societies (Gimeno et
al, 1997, 755)
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OECD Innovation Strategy policy
principles for promotion of
innovation in 21st century
1.Empowering people to innovate
2. Unleashing innovations
3. Creating and applying knowledge
4. Applying innovation to address global and
social challenges
5. Improving the governance and measurement
of policies for innovation
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3
R&D intensity (R&D expenditure as
% of GDP), all sectors, EU – 27 and
selected countries – 2007
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R&D personnel in head account in
business enterprise sector, as a percentage
of persons employed, EU – 27 and selected
countries - 2006
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5
Innovative enterprises as a
percentage of all enterprises by main
NACE group, EU – 27 and selected
countries – 2006
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Conclusion
companies should invest in human capital, or in another words in
employees knowledge, skill, competencies that will enhanced
company performance
OECD Innovation Strategy is based on five main principles for
government action: empowering people to innovate, unleashing
innovations, creating and adapting knowledge, applying innovation
to address global and social challenges, improving the governance
and measurement of policies for innovation
Germany, Belgium, France, Ireland, Denmark, Estonia, Finland,
Austria, Luxemburg, Sweden were the leaders in innovative
enterprises as a percentage of all enterprises by main NACE group
in 2006 but Latvia, Hungary and Romania in the tale
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1 OECD innovation strategy: content analysis and implementation