Presenter Disclosure
Speaker:
Mélanie Josée Davidson
Program Consultant, Programs Strategic Initiatives
Canadian Institute for Health Information
Relationships with commercial interests:
Nothing to disclose
1
Better Information for
Improved Health:
A Vision for Health System
Use of Data in Canada
May 2013
Canadian Institute for Health Information, in
collaboration with Canada Health Infoway, on behalf
of the Conference of Deputy Ministers of Health
Outline
•
•
•
•
•
•
Introduction
Drivers for action
Use, value and benefits
Building blocks
Guiding principles
Call to action
3
INTRODUCTION
4
Introduction
• Health system use of data
• Unique opportunity created by transition to
electronic records
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Privacy and Confidentiality
• Personal health information is not just data
• Health information privacy laws:
– Govern the collection, use, management and disclosure of
personal health information
– Generally permit secondary use of health data (paper or
electronic) for management and planning of the health
system
• Privacy-by-design principles and technological
advances for consent management and deidentification
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Drivers for Action
1. Growth of digitized data
2. Technological advances
3. Sustainability and performance
4. Shifting expectations
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Shifting Expectations
• 70% of Canadians support sharing their health
records for health system uses
• 75%+ comfortable sharing their information with
other health organizations and for research
• 80%+ not comfortable sharing their information
with private and for-profit organizations
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USE,
VALUE &
BENEFITS
•
•
•
•
Patients and families
Clinicians and care providers
Policy-makers and administrators
Health System
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Areas of Use
Clinical settings:
– quality improvement
initiatives
– effectiveness of front-line
care
– decision support
Health System
Management:
– productivity and efficiency
– allocation of resources
– quality, safety and patient
experiences
Population and public
health:
– surveillance, burden of
illness and quality of life
– management and
evaluation of public health
interventions
Health research:
– to inform clinical programs
– health system
management
– population and public
health
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Value and Benefits
Sustainability Performance
& Efficiency
Quality
& Safety
Patient
Experiences
Clinical settings
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Health System
Management
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Population and
public health
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Health research
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HSU Stories
www.cihi.ca
12
• 3 key building blocks
BUILDING
BLOCKS
– for responsible use of
health data
– to go from vision to reality
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Building blocks
are critical.
Data analysis
and use
Capacity
and
culture
Data availability
Data collection
Enablers: Governance,
policies and technology
14
GUIDING
PRINCIPLES…
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…for building strong governance
• Defined roles, responsibilities and authority for
transparency and accountability
• Current governance structures leveraged and
supplemented
• Identification & prioritization of information gaps
• Easier collaboration between organizations
16
…for privacy and security
• Enabling legislative frameworks and policies
• Best practices for privacy and security
• Known privacy breach procedures and
consequences
• Communicated legislated obligations, privacy
policies, and data responsibilities
• Informed Canadians
17
…for technology
• E-health strategies and investments include
secondary use
• Systems designed for interoperability and
secondary use of data
• Emerging technologies leveraged
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…for data collection, availability and use
• Data available to manage and plan for all
publicly funded health services
• Data standardized to maximize usability
• User’s information aligned with their process
– Contextualized and tailored results
– Presented for easy interpretation
– Actionable
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…to support capacity and culture
• Culture of measurement, information use and
continuous performance improvement
• Increased information literacy skills
• Tools and processes facilitate information use
• Innovations, successes and lessons learned shared
broadly
• Importance of health system use of data recognised
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CALL TO ACTION:
CONFERENCE OF DEPUTY
MINISTERS OF HEALTH
ENDORSEMENT
MAY 2013
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Moving forward collectively
• Engaging and communicating with key stakeholder groups
– Canadian public
– Health professional organizations
– Privacy commissioners
• Building a strong knowledge base and facilitating knowledge
sharing
– Evaluation of initiatives in progress
– Return on investment of current and future health system use
activities
• Ensuring that high-quality information is available and used
– Minimum data sets and coded data capture
– Articulation of priority information needs
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Moving forward collectively
• Engaging and communicating with key stakeholder groups
– Canadian public
– Health professional organizations
– Privacy commissioners
• Building a strong knowledge base and facilitating knowledge
sharing
– Evaluation of initiatives in progress
– Return on investment of current and future health system use
activities
• Ensuring that high-quality information is available and used
– Minimum data sets and coded data capture
– Articulation of priority information needs
23
CONCLUSION
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Risks of Inaction
If we don’t act now –
• Lost opportunity to increase sustainability and
performance
• Large retrofit costs in the future
• Erosion of pan-Canadian information
• Unrealized promise of e-health systems
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Conclusion
• The time is right
• Need concerted actions to strengthen building
blocks to go from vision to reality:
– Key enablers: governance, policies and technology
– Data: collection, availability, analysis and use
– Culture and capacity: to make better use of data and
information
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Advisory Committees
Health System Use Deputy Ministers Steering Committee
• Richard Alvarez, President and CEO, Canada Health Infoway
• Kevin McNamara, Deputy Minister of Health, Nova Scotia
• John Wright, President and CEO, Canadian Institute for Health Information
• Glenda Yeates, Deputy Minister of Health, Health Canada
Health System Use Technical Advisory Committee
• Susan Anderson, Alberta
• Dennis Giokas (Vice-Chair), Canada
• Mike Barron (Chair), Newfoundland
Health Infoway
• Roger Girard, Manitoba
and Labrador
• Charlyn Black, British Columbia
• Cheryl Hansen, New Brunswick
• Alison Blair (Chair, Knowledge Exchange • Glenn Irwin, Public Health Agency
Network), Ontario
of Canada
• Paul Chittick, Treasury Board of Canada • Susan Logue, Nova Scotia
• Scott Murray, Canadian Institute for
Secretariat
• Brent Diverty (Vice-Chair), Canadian
Health Information
• Brendan Seaton, Information
Institute for Health Information
• Neil Gardner, Saskatchewan
Technology Association of Canada
• Liam Whitty, Prince Edward Island
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Questions?
Mélanie Josée Davidson
Program Consultant,
Strategic Initiatives
[email protected]
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