COMMISSIONING
SPECIALISED
MENTAL HEALTH
&
WINTERBOURNE REVIEW
QUALITY ASSURANCE
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S N R
S U P P L I E R
J O N A T H A N
H E P W O R T H
M A N A G E R
S P E C I A L I S E D
Y O R K S H I R E & H U M B E R
M E N T A L
H E A L T H
NHS ENGLAND VALUES
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Respect and dignity
Commitment to quality of care
Compassion
Improving lives
Working together for patients
Everyone counts
NHS ENGLAND VISION
• Enable everyone to have greater control of their
health and their wellbeing, support people to live
longer, to have healthier lives
• To ensure that the care delivered is high quality and
that care services are compassionate, inclusive and
constantly improving
OUR PURPOSE
• We create the culture and conditions for health
and care services and staff to deliver the highest
standard of care and ensure that valuable public
resources are used effectively to get the best
outcomes for individuals, communities and society
for now and for future generations
Commissioning is the process of
planning, agreeing and monitoring
services.
Securing services is much more
complicated than securing goods and
the diversity and intricacy of the
services delivered by the NHS is
unparalleled.
Commissioning is not one action but
many, ranging from the health-needs
assessment for a population, through
the clinically based design of patient
pathways, to service specification and
contract negotiation or procurement,
with continuous quality assessment
NHS England commissions specialised
services, primary care, offender healthcare
and some services for the armed forces.
There are 10 Area Teams across England
with responsibility for commissioning
Specialised Mental health services.
Locally Yorkshire & Humber commissioning
for specialised MH is delivered from the
South Yorkshire and Bassetlaw area office
with responsibility for Medium and Low
Secure services, CAMHS T4, Eating Disorder
services for children and adults, Perinatal,
Neuropsychiatry, Gender Dysphoria and
Tier 4 Personality Disorder
QUALITY ASSURANCE
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Case Management
Supplier Management
Contract Reviews
Area Team Quality and Governance
Working with regulators and experts by experience
The Winterbourne View Concordat is
an action plan to ensure that all
people with learning disabilities receive
the health care and support they need
in the most appropriate setting.
Too many people with learning
disabilities end up unnecessarily in
hospital and are staying there for too
long. The Concordat aims to put
measures in place to lead to a rapid
reduction of this.
31 March 2014:
35% of patients that were in hospital on
1 April 2013 have now been
transferred.
Of a total of 2,615 patients, 256 have a
transfer date, of which 182 are before 1
June 1, 2014
1,702 patients do not have a planned
transfer date due to a clinical decision
preventing it.
Many of these people have very
complex needs. Some may be too ill or
possibly a danger to themselves or the
public.
A total of 534 patients are in high or
medium secure services and most are
subject to Ministry of Justice order.
“We need to redouble our efforts and
through the Winterbourne Joint
Improvement Programme, we will
continue working with our Area Teams
and Clinical Commissioning Groups to
ensure these patients receive the best
possible care.”
Jane Cummings, Chief Nursing Officer
for England
NHS England wrote to its Area Teams in
June setting out six priority actions to
focus on:
1, All patients are on a register
2, A local care co-ordinator is assigned
to each patient
3, Estimated transfer dates and care
plan reviews
4, A patient tracking list to schedule
reviews for people who have not been
assessed for six months
5, CCGs with five or fewer patients
should by the end of June 2014 ensure
that all have a transfer date
6, Patients in non-secure hospital
settings for two or more years should be
prioritised for review
There has been a 100 per cent
response rate from the 211 Clinical
Commissioning Groups (CCGs) and 10
NHS England Area Teams responsible
for specialised commissioning of secure
mental health and child and
adolescent mental health services who
were asked to submit information.
The information covers a number of key
important areas including the number
of patients currently in inpatient
care, whether they have been
transferred, is there a planned date to
transfer and how many had been
admitted in the last quarter.
NHS England recognises that more
progress needs to be made to help
more of these people move out of inpatient care into the community.
Consideration now needs to be given
to a new approach that places more
control and direction in the hands of
the people affected, their carers, and
the expert advocacy and voluntary
organisations involved.
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Commissioning specialised mental health and Winterbourne review