PROPANE DELIVERY OPERATIONS AND CYLINDER DELIVERY
MODULE 3
Vehicle Inspections, Identification, and Documentation
PROPANE DELIVERY OPERATIONS AND CYLINDER DELIVERY
Introduction
Regular vehicle inspections and proper maintenance are
critical to operating propane vehicles safely and efficiently.
U.S. DOT requires propane delivery drivers to inspect
their vehicles and document all maintenance before
driving on public roadways. Drivers must also be able to
verify proper vehicle identification information, such as
placards, shipping labels and data plates, and required
vehicle documentation.
After completing this module, you will be able to:
 Identify pre-trip and post-trip inspection
requirements for CMVs
 Know annual inspection and maintenance
requirements for CMVs
 Verify proper identification information for bobtails
and cylinder delivery vehicles
 Confirm that vehicles are carrying required DOT
documentation
LESSON 1
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PROPANE DELIVERY OPERATIONS AND CYLINDER DELIVERY
LESSON 1
Vehicle Inspections and Maintenance
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PROPANE DELIVERY OPERATIONS AND CYLINDER DELIVERY
Why Are Inspections Important?
Regular vehicle inspections and maintenance are not
only a DOT requirement; they also help ensure the safety
of both the driver and public. Inspections don’t take much
time and offer many benefits. Inspections:
 Reduce the chance of an accident, breakdown,
or injury.
 Help you become a safer worker while
maintaining efficiency during your daily
operations.
 Make your job easier, because as you check
your vehicle more often, the better your
inspections become.
 Can save you and your company money.
This lesson presents the different types of vehicle
inspections, with detailed content on those common to all
CMVs — pre-trip, post-trip, and annual inspections.
LESSON 1
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PROPANE DELIVERY OPERATIONS AND CYLINDER DELIVERY
Preparing for Inspections
Before performing any vehicle inspection, be sure to:
 Find an appropriate location to park the
vehicle, preferably away from people, other
vehicles, low hanging wires or tree limbs,
other potential hazards, or anything else that
may become a hazard as you pull away.
 Remove the keys from the ignition so no one
can move the vehicle during the inspection.
 Set the parking brake.
 Chock the wheels.
 Select the appropriate personal protective
equipment.
 Have a clean cloth handy to wipe the lights
and reflectors
 Have the tire pressure gauge available.
LESSON 1
5
PROPANE DELIVERY OPERATIONS AND CYLINDER DELIVERY
Types of Inspections
The different types of vehicle inspections include:
 Daily Inspections: May include pre- and posttrip, walk-around, on-the-road, and pre-transfer
inspections.
 Monthly Inspections: Required for the cargo
tank liquid transfer system, emergency
shutdown device and controls, delivery hose
assembly, and internal self-closing stop valve.
 Annual/Periodic Inspections: DOT requires a
qualified inspector inspect all CMVs annually,
in addition to the periodic or scheduled
inspections also performed by a qualified
inspector. An external visual inspection and
leakage test is also required annually for
bobtails (commonly referred to as VK).
LESSON 1
MORE
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PROPANE DELIVERY OPERATIONS AND CYLINDER DELIVERY
Types of Inspections cont.
 Five-Year Tank Inspections: DOT requires
the internal inspection of cargo tanks with a
manway; and all cargo tanks must be
hydrostatically pressure-tested every five
years.
Note: Monthly inspections, annual external visual
inspections and leak tests, and five-year tank
inspections are only required for bobtails.
LESSON 1
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PROPANE DELIVERY OPERATIONS AND CYLINDER DELIVERY
Types of Daily Inspections
Perform the following vehicle inspections on a daily basis:
 Complete a pre-trip inspection at the beginning of
your work day and a post-trip inspection at the
end.
 Perform a walk-around inspection after loading
your bobtail or cylinder delivery vehicle to
determine that it is working properly and efficiently.
 Inspect your load when you make stops on the
road. While on the road, the best drivers go a step
beyond by keeping their eye on all gauges for
signs of trouble, and using their senses to alert
them to changes in their vehicle’s performance.
 Inspect your cargo tank discharge system and
emergency discharge controls before transferring
propane. Make the pre-transfer inspection part
of your routine pre-trip inspection to save time and
unnecessary trips if the system has a problem or
malfunction.
LESSON 1
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PROPANE DELIVERY OPERATIONS AND CYLINDER DELIVERY
Pre- and Post-Trip Inspections
As a CMV driver, DOT requires you to perform pre- and
post-trip inspections to determine that your vehicle is in
safe operating condition before driving it on public
roadways.
Pre- and post-trip inspections are required for any
placarded vehicle, including:
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
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Bobtails
Cylinder delivery vehicles
Towed tank-setting trailers
Straight trucks and tractor-trailer flat-bed
combinations transporting ASME stationary tanks,
or DOT portable or intermodal tanks
These inspections are critical for discovering damaged or
missing parts, and other problems that could cause an
accident, breakdown, or delay of your trip.
LESSON 1
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PROPANE DELIVERY OPERATIONS AND CYLINDER DELIVERY
Post-Trip Inspection Requirements
Even though pre-trip inspections happen earlier in your
workday, we are going to present post-trip inspections
first because they are more comprehensive and have
reporting requirements that affect the pre-trip inspection.
Post-trip inspections are key to the inspection and
maintenance process. After driving your vehicle all day,
you may become aware of problems that have
developed throughout the day.
DOT requires that you prepare a written Driver Vehicle
Inspection Report (DVIR) for each vehicle you have
operated at the end of the workday. Try to do the posttrip inspection the same way every time. This will help
you remember what things to look for and make it less
likely to overlook something.
LESSON 1
MORE
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PROPANE DELIVERY OPERATIONS AND CYLINDER DELIVERY
Post-Trip Inspection Requirements cont.
During the post-trip inspection, you must examine and document on the DVIR the condition
of the following vehicle parts and accessories.
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Service brakes, including trailer brake connections
Steering mechanism
Windshield wiper(s)
Horn
Coupling devices
Parking (hand) brake
Lighting devices and reflectors
Tires, wheels, and rims
Rear-vision mirror(s)
Emergency equipment, including fire extinguisher, reflective triangles, and spare
electrical fuses
On the DVIR, you are required to list any defects that would affect the safe operation of your
vehicle or result in a breakdown.
LESSON 1
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PROPANE DELIVERY OPERATIONS AND CYLINDER DELIVERY
Pre-Trip Inspection Requirements
The pre-trip inspection happens at the beginning of
each work day and does not require a written DVIR. It
only requires a:
 Review of the last posted DVIR: During the
pre-trip inspection, you must review the last
posted DVIR and sign the report only if
problems were noted. By signing the report,
you acknowledge that you’ve read the report
and all necessary repairs have been made.
 A walk-around of the vehicle to determine
that it is in safe operating condition:
During the pre-trip inspection, you should
check the oil level, belts and hoses with the
engine running, tires, lights, and gauges to
make sure no changes have occurred since
the last post-trip inspection.
LESSON 1
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PROPANE DELIVERY OPERATIONS AND CYLINDER DELIVERY
Annual/Periodic Inspections and Maintenance
DOT requires that a qualified inspector perform an
annual inspection on all CMVs and an external visual
inspection and leakage test on bobtails. These
inspections may be performed by separate firms and
completed on different forms. It is illegal to drive a
CMV without a current annual inspection, and
both the employer and the driver are responsible
if the inspection is not current. You must carry
proof of the inspection, which may be in the form
of a decal, on the vehicle.
DOT also requires periodic or scheduled maintenance
on your vehicle, which is typically performed by a
qualified individual or contracted garage. This
maintenance must be documented. Some states
require periodic inspections that are more frequent
than annual inspections. See your specific company
policy to determine how often this maintenance needs
to be performed on your vehicle.
LESSON 1
Note: DOT requires that air
brake inspectors have special
qualifications.
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PROPANE DELIVERY OPERATIONS AND CYLINDER DELIVERY
LESSON 2
Vehicle Identification Requirements
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PROPANE DELIVERY OPERATIONS AND CYLINDER DELIVERY
Verifying Proper Vehicle Identification
In addition to inspecting your vehicle’s parts and
systems, it is important to always check your vehicle
for proper identification before leaving the bulk plant
each day.
DOT regulations require specific markings and labels
for bobtails and cylinder delivery vehicles that identify
the hazardous materials being carried on the vehicle.
This lesson reviews identification requirements for:
 Bobtails
 Cylinder Delivery Vehicles
LESSON 2
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PROPANE DELIVERY OPERATIONS AND CYLINDER DELIVERY
Bobtail Identification Requirements
DOT requires specific identification information for
bobtails, including:
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Placards
Product shipping name
Cargo tank inspection and test markings
Quench tempered or non-quench
tempered markings
 Data plate(s)
LESSON 2
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PROPANE DELIVERY OPERATIONS AND CYLINDER DELIVERY
Bobtail Placards
According to 49 CFR, any vehicle that transports 1,001 lb or
more aggregate gross weight of hazardous materials must
be placarded on the front, rear, and each side.
Placards indicate the hazard class name and number. The red
color and flame symbol indicate that flammable gas is being
transported. The number 1075 is the UN identification number
or shipping number, and indicates that LP-gas is being
transported. The number 2 identifies the hazard class or
division.
The placard must be no closer than 3″ to any other marking or
labeling. Any faded, missing, or illegible placards must be
replaced before the cargo tank is filled.
Some states require that you place a decal on the rear of the vehicle that reads, “WE STOP
AT RAILROAD CROSSINGS.”
Note: Propane used as motor fuel for the vehicle is not classified as hazardous material
transported in commerce and is not to be placarded.
LESSON 2
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PROPANE DELIVERY OPERATIONS AND CYLINDER DELIVERY
Placarding Methods
There are two methods for placarding a vehicle.
The first method uses a single, combined DOT/UN
placard. This placard is a red diamond shaped sign with
an edge minimum of 10.8″. It contains the universal
flammable icon, the UN identification number/proper
shipping number (1075), and the material’s hazard
class (2). This is referred to as “diamond on point.”
LESSON 2
MORE
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PROPANE DELIVERY OPERATIONS AND CYLINDER DELIVERY
Placarding Methods cont.
The second method uses two separate DOT and UN
placards. The DOT placard is a red diamond shaped
sign with an edge minimum of 3.9″. It contains the DOT
hazard class name for LP-gas (FLAMMABLE GAS) and
the hazard class number (2). The UN placard is a
rectangular orange sign which contains the hazardous
material’s UN identification number/proper shipping
number (1075).
LESSON 2
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PROPANE DELIVERY OPERATIONS AND CYLINDER DELIVERY
Bobtail Product Shipping Name
Like placards, a product shipping name is also required
on the front, back, and both sides of the bobtail. Typically,
the shipping name is located on the upper part of each
head and both sides of the cargo tank.
The shipping name must be legible. It is usually written in
all capital letters to more easily comply with the minimum
letter height requirement of 2 inches and for ease of
reading from a distance. Proper DOT shipping names
are:
 PROPANE
 BUTANE
 LIQUEFIED PETROLEUM GAS
Bobtails marked with the specific name of the LP-gas,
such as PROPANE or BUTANE, can only carry that
specific gas. Bobtails marked LIQUEFIED PETROLEUM
GAS can carry either propane or butane.
LESSON 2
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PROPANE DELIVERY OPERATIONS AND CYLINDER DELIVERY
Bobtail Data Plates
Cargo tanks used to transport and transfer propane
must have data plates attached to the tank on either
the driver or passenger side of the vehicle. Although
there is much more information included on a data
plate, some of the most critical information for a
driver to be able to identify is presented.
 Tank manufacturer’s name
 Serial number
 DOT specification number (cargo tanks are
built according to DOT design codes MC330
or MC331, as well as ASME specifications)
 Vessel material specification number
 Water capacity in pounds and gallons
LESSON 2
MORE
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PROPANE DELIVERY OPERATIONS AND CYLINDER DELIVERY
Bobtail Data Plates cont.
 Water capacity in pounds and gallons
 Original test date
 Design working pressure of the tank
The cargo tank’s inspection code, retest dates, and QT or NQT markings are displayed
near the data plate.
LESSON 2
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PROPANE DELIVERY OPERATIONS AND CYLINDER DELIVERY
Discovery: Bobtails
LESSON 2
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PROPANE DELIVERY OPERATIONS AND CYLINDER DELIVERY
Cylinder Delivery Vehicle Identification Requirements
Like bobtails, cylinder delivery vehicles also have specific
DOT placarding requirements. Placard holders should be
located on the front, back, and both sides of the cylinder
delivery vehicle.
The placard must meet the following requirements, based
on the amount of propane being shipped:
 When transporting cylinders with a gross weight
of 1,001 lbs or more, you must display a placard
in each holder.
 The placard must display 1075.
 In addition to placarding requirements, each
cylinder must be marked with the proper shipping
name (propane, butane, or liquefied petroleum
gas) and the UN identification number/proper
shipping number (UN 1075).
LESSON 2
Note: If you haul multiple
products, see your company
policy.
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PROPANE DELIVERY OPERATIONS AND CYLINDER DELIVERY
LESSON 3
Vehicle Documentation Requirements
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PROPANE DELIVERY OPERATIONS AND CYLINDER DELIVERY
Shipping Papers
In addition to proper markings and labels, you must carry
required documents including shipping papers, emergency
response information, and a hazmat certificate of
registration in your propane transport vehicle.
DOT requires that shipping papers accompany each
shipment of propane transported in commerce. They
should be available for authorities in the event of an
accident or an inspection. When driving, the shipping
papers must be within immediate reach when a lap safety
belt is in place, or in a holder mounted on the inside of
your door. If you leave the vehicle, place these documents
in the door holder or where they can be seen on the
driver’s seat.
LESSON 3
MORE
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PROPANE DELIVERY OPERATIONS AND CYLINDER DELIVERY
Shipping Papers cont.
Shipping papers must contain the hazard identification information as it applies to bobtails
and cylinder delivery vehicles including:
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Proper shipping name
UN identification number/proper shipping number
Hazard class division
NONCORROSIVE
Maximum quantity of LP-gas
If permanent shipping papers are used, the date and number of cylinders loaded at the
beginning of the delivery route must be recorded (typically with a wax pencil marker). If
single-trip shipping papers are used, they should be completed according to company
procedures.
NOTE: The required sequence of information provided on shipping papers has been
changed by the DOT. The industry will have until January 1, 2013 to comply with the new
format.
LESSON 3
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PROPANE DELIVERY OPERATIONS AND CYLINDER DELIVERY
Emergency Response Information
You must carry emergency response information along
with the hazmat shipping papers in your CMV. You
must keep this information readily available for
emergency responders, enforcement authorities, and
company personnel, in the event of an incident.
The emergency response information must also be
available at LP-gas transfer and storage facilities in
case of emergency.
Each state may have different requirements. Be sure
to follow your company’s policy and state
requirements, as well as DOT regulations.
LESSON 3
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PROPANE DELIVERY OPERATIONS AND CYLINDER DELIVERY
Contents of Emergency Response Information
At a minimum, the emergency response information
must include the following:
 Description of the hazardous material
 Immediate precautions to take in the event of
an incident
 Risks of fire or explosion and immediate
methods for handling small and large fires
 Initial methods for handling spills or leaks in
the absence of fire
 Immediate hazards to health and preliminary
first aid measures
 Emergency response telephone numbers
This information must be either on the shipping papers
or kept with the shipping papers.
LESSON 3
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PROPANE DELIVERY OPERATIONS AND CYLINDER DELIVERY
Complying With Emergency Response Information Requirements
Propane companies and their drivers must comply with
emergency response information requirements. Often,
companies will develop and provide their own
emergency response information sheet to their drivers
which would be part of the shipping papers.
If an emergency response information sheet is not
available, you can comply with these requirements by
carrying a copy of the shipping papers with one of the
following:
 A Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS)
 The North American Emergency Response
Guidebook
 Guide 115 of the North American Emergency
Response Guidebook , which covers
flammable compressed gases
LESSON 3
30
PROPANE DELIVERY OPERATIONS AND CYLINDER DELIVERY
Hazmat Certificate of Registration
All drivers or companies transporting hazardous
materials are required to register with the DOT, and
must carry either:
 A current copy of the Hazmat Certificate of
Registration, or
 Another document bearing the US DOT
Hazmat Registration Number. For example,
sometimes this information is included on the
permanent shipping papers.
LESSON 3
31
PROPANE DELIVERY OPERATIONS AND CYLINDER DELIVERY
Summary
Some important points to remember from this module are:
 Pre-trip inspections, post-trip inspections, and annual inspections are required
for any type of vehicle transporting propane. Bobtails also have monthly, annual
external visual and leakage tests, and five-year tank inspection requirements.
 The DVIR helps drivers conduct pre-trip and post-trip inspections by listing all of
the common parts and systems that must be examined. The DVIR must be
completed during the post-trip inspection and reviewed during the pre-trip
inspection to ensure any noted defects have been repaired.
 Any cylinder delivery vehicle or container with 1,001 lb or more aggregate gross
weight of hazardous materials must be placarded on each side.
 DOT requires all vehicles transporting hazardous materials to carry shipping
papers, written emergency response guidelines, and a hazmat certificate of
registration. The driver is responsible for ensuring the vehicle is in compliance
before beginning a trip.
LESSON 3
32
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