Regional Transparency Initiatives:
Objectives & Challenges
Law Enforcement & Anti-Corruption Conference
22 - 24 March 2011
Jamaica
power for private gain the abuse of entrusted power for private gain the abuse of
entrusted power for private gain the abuse of entrusted power for private gain the
abuse of entrusted power for private gain the abuse of entrusted power for private
gain the abuse of entrusted power for private gain the abuse of entrusted power for
private gain the abuse of entrusted power for private gain the abuse of entrusted
power for private gain the abuse of entrusted power for private gain the abuse of
entrusted power for private gain the abuse of entrusted power for private gain the
abuse of entrusted power for private gain the abuse of entrusted power for private
gain the abuse of entrusted power for private gain the abuse of entrusted power for
private gain the abuse of entrusted power for private gain the abuse of entrusted
power for private gain the abuse of entrusted power for private gain the abuse of
entrusted power for private gain the abuse of entrusted power for private gain the
abuse of entrusted power for private gain the abuse of entrusted power for private
gain the abuse of entrusted power for private gain the abuse of entrusted power for
private gain the abuse of entrusted power for private gain the abuse of entrusted
power for private gain the abuse of entrusted power for private gain the abuse of
entrusted power for private gain the abuse of entrusted power for private gain the
abuse of entrusted power for private gain the abuse of entrusted power for private
WHAT IS
CORRUPTION?
gain the abuse of entrusted power for private gain the
abuse of entrusted power for private gain the abuse of entrusted power for private
gain the
(including nepotism and cronyism) entrusted power for
private gain the abuse of entrusted power for private gain the abuse of entrusted
power for private gain the abuse of entrusted power for private gain the abuse of
entrusted power for private gain
WHY FIGHT CORRUPTION?
CORRUPTION…
FEEDS POVERTY
WASTES RESOURCES
SEEDS VIOLENCE
AND
UNDERMINES the RULE of LAW
DISTORTS MARKETS
& FAIR COMPETITION
UNDERMINES
DEMOCRACY AND HUMAN RIGHTS
JEOPARDISES SOUND GOVERNANCE
AND ETHICS
COST OF CORRUPTION
Annual Total Costs of Corruption
(Including: Bribes, Cartel Pricing, Fraud,
Illicit Trade and Money Laundering)
THIS DWARFS THE SPENDING ON:
United Nations Millennium
Development Goals - US$60 billion
World Food Program 2008 - US$3.72 billion
(146 million people including 62.2 million
children)
US$1 trillion – US$1.6 trillion
Haiti Reconstruction (estimate)
- US$11 billion
Polio eradication programme (3 year)
- US$2.6 billion
Sources: World Bank, TI Global Corruption Barometer 2009, United Nations,
The Guardian, World Health Organisation, World Food Program
WHAT IS TRANSPARENCY INTERNATIONAL
A global coalition fighting corruption:
•
80 National Chapters worldwide
•
13 more in the process of accreditation
•
International Secretariat
•
Board of Directors & Advisory Council
•
29 Individual Members
•
Senior advisors and other volunteers
HOW IS TI FINANCED?
• Diverse income structure:
government development agency budgets and foundations
donations from private sector companies
income from honoraria
• See financial reports at www.transparency.org/about_us/annual
TI APPROACH
•
combine local and international expertise
•
politically non-partisan
•
not investigators
•
consultative
•
fight corruption at its roots
TTTI VISION & MISSION
VISION
A world in which government, politics, business, civil
society and the daily lives of people are free of corruption.
MISSION
To work towards a country, and region, that are free of corruption.
TI in the COMMONWEALTH CARIBBEAN
Implementing a TI chapter in each Caribbean nation will help to monitor
and eradicate some of the key corruption issues facing the region
•Illicit enrichment of public officials
•Unregulated political parties and campaign financing
•Trafficking of drugs, arms, humans and money laundering
•Poor procurement practices, lacking transparency and accountability
•Limited information sharing
•Weak law enforcement and /or judiciaries
•Poverty and Inequality
TI APPROACH: EVIDENCE-BASED ADVOCACY
An important tool for monitiring corruption is the CORRUPTION
PERCEPTION INDEX (CPI)
The CPI ranks countries according to the degree to which corruption
is perceived to exist among public officials and politicians
T&T was first included in the Index in 2001, scoring 5.3 out of 10 (a
country perceived to be free of corruption would score 10) and
achieving 31st place out of 91 countries ranked.
There are now some 180 countries ranked and T&T‘s score is down
to 3.8 and ranking 73rd.
New Zealand, Denmark, Singapore and Sweden tend to occupy the
top spots (scores of 9.4 t0 9.2)
CORRUPTION PERCEPTIONS INDEX
Public sector corruption
TI in the COMMONWEALTH CARIBBEAN
• In 2010 the CPI ranking of some Caribbean countries showed
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Barbados 20th (7.4)
St.Lucia 22nd
St Vincent 31st
Trinidad and Tobago 73rd
Jamaica 87th
Guyana 116th
Haiti 168th
•Corruption eventually undermines the institutions that are
essential for our personal security and quality of life, such as
civil service, the police service and the judiciary.
Transparency in the CARIBBEAN
There is a need to develop and adopt a pan-Caribbean common
strategic approach to deal with corruption; initial steps should include:
•A Caribbean-wide anti-corruption network, with shared resources
•Harmonising legislation across the region so as to reduce the
exploitation of weaker legal frameworks
•Addressing money laundering issues regionally
•Strengthening the capacity and independence of relevant non-state actors and state actors
•Public education to combat tolerance of corruption
•Develop and sharing of information and communication
TI in the COMMONWEALTH CARIBBEAN
Strategies which inhibit or eradicate corruption can benefit a country in
many ways. Some benefits, most applicable to the Commonwealth
Caribbean, are
• Value for money in terms of Government expenditure
• The ability to address poverty and social development issues with resources that would
otherwise be lost to corruption
• The development of a honest and competent Civil Service with a focus on meeting the
expectations of the national community efficiently
• The development of a law enforcement system that is not subject to undue influence in the
discharge of its duties
• The development of a local body of suppliers and contractors who are globally competitive
through being accustomed to compete on a basis of quality, performance and price on a level
playing field
• A reduction in the levels of tolerance which support the development and maintenance of
the criminal culture that affects our security and way of life.
LEADING the FIGHT in CORRUPTION
The anti-corruption drive must be coordinated from various perspectives
• The work of Transparency and local chapters will compliment work being done by
•Integrity Commissions
•Academia
•CSO’s & NGO’s
•Law Enforcement Agencies
•Legal and Judicial Agencies
UPCOMING EVENTS & PUBLICATIONS
• Corruption Perceptions Index
October, global launch
• International Anti-Corruption Conference
2012
• Integrity Awards Ceremony
November
• Global Corruption Barometer
December
• Promoting Revenue Transparency
early 2011
Thank You
TRANSPARENCY INTERNATIONAL
www.transparency.org
TRINIDAD & TOBAGO
TRANSPARENCY INSTITUTE
www.transparency.org.tt
Deryck L. Murray
[email protected]
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TRANSPARENCY INTERNATIONAL Jamaica (TTTI) Presentation