i t ’s good and
good for you
Chapter Four
Managing Marketing Information to
Gain Customer Insights
Copyright © 2012 Pearson Education
Chapter 4- slide 1
Chapter Goals

Market research, the need and the forms
 Information systems increase the usefulness of data
 Growing role of technology in marketing research
 Conducting a market research project

Gathering and using information about competitors
 Ethics enters into the performance of marketing research
Uses of Marketing Research
Markets
Market Segments
Marketing
Mix
Expectations
Satisfaction
Competition
Marketing Research
The development, interpretation, and
communication of decision-oriented
information to be used in all phases
of the marketing process.
Marketing Research
 Marketing research—the development,
interpretation, and
communication of decision-oriented information to be used in all
phases of the marketing process.
 It
 It
influences planning, implementation, and evaluation.
focuses not only on information gathering, but on analysis and
implications as well.
Scope of Marketing Research
Activities
Syndicated
Services
Decision
Support
System
Marketing
Information
System
Marketing
Research
Activities
Marketing
Research
Project
Marketing Information Systems
On-going, organized procedure
to generate, analyze, disseminate,
store, and retrieve information
for use in making
marketing decisions.
Marketing Information Systems
Characteristics of an ideal MkIS.
 1.
Includes real-time data.
 2.
Generates regular reports and recurring studies as needed.
 3.
Integrates old and new data to provide updates and identify
trends.
 4.
Analyse data using statistical and mathematical models that
represent the real world.
Benefits of a MkIS
 a.
Provides a fast and more complete information flow for
decision making.
 b.
Allows a wider variety of data to be collected and used.
 c.
Allows continual monitoring of marketing mix performance.
 d.
Provides benefits to firms of all sizes.
Factors affecting how well an MkIS
functions
 a.
The nature and quality of the available data.
 b.
How the data are processed and presented to provide useful
information.
 c.
The working relationship between MkIS operators and
decision makers.
MKIS Limitations
 Managers
might not define exactly what information they need on
regular basis.
 Cost
of operating and up dating a MKIS is expensive.
 MKIS
 Need
is vot suited to the solution of unanticipated problems.
for highly trained programmers anfd computer systems to
produce information that managers requested.
Decision Support Systems
Computer-based
Allows
Interaction
with Data
Uses various
methods of analysis
Integrates, analyzes
interprets
information
Decision support systems
 Decision
support systems (DSS)—a computer-based procedure
allowing managers to interact directly with data using a variety of
methods to integrate, analyze, and interpret information.
 A.
MkIS and DSS both rely on a wide variety of data.
 B.
They are both able to analyze data.
 C.
Unlike a MkIS, a manager using DSS can interact directly
with data to produce customized reports.
 D.
A DSS complements instead of replaces an MkIS by adding
speed and flexibility to the research process.
 E.
DSS has cost as a major drawback, which currently limits its
use to large firms.
Decision Support Systems
Data
DATABASE
DATA
WAREHOUSE
DATA
MINING
Assembled data pertinent
to a particular topic
Enormous collection of data
from external or internal
sources compiled by a firm
Sophisticated techniques
capable of identifying
patterns and relationships
in masses of data
Major data sources
 1.
Internal vs. external—sales force, sales records,
manufacturing, etc. vs. research suppliers, in-house proprietary
collection.
 2.
Continuous flow vs. occasional or periodic suppliers.
 3.
Retail scanners—electronic devices at retail checkouts that
read bar codes and provide relevant information with regard to
individual and combined purchases.
 4.
Single-source data—data which can be traced to individual
households or purchasing units.
Marketing Research Projects
Marketing Research Procedure
Step four: plan and conduct the formal
investigation.
 Sources

a.
 b.
Primary data—new data gathered specifically for the purposes at hand.
Secondary data—data already gathered for some other purpose and
available for present use.
 Sources

a.
 b.
 c.
 d.
 e.
 f.
 g.
of information.
of secondary data.
Records and reports from within the firm.
Libraries.
All three levels of government.
Trade, professional, and business associations.
Private research firms.
Advertising media.
University research programs
Sources of Information
Inside the company
SECONDARY
DATA
Outside the company
Sources of primary data
 a.
Firm’s sales force.
 b.
Firm’s suppliers.
 c.
Current or potential customers
Sources of Information
Cookies
PRIMARY
DATA
Scanner
Observation
Personal
Observation
Laboratory
Experimental
Field
Test
Market
Mail
Survey
Telephone
Face
to
Face
Internet
Select a primary data-gathering method
method—collecting data by observing a person’s
actions or market events.
 Observation
 Survey
method—data gathered through face-to-face, telephone
interviews, or mail surveys.
 Experimental
method—using data gathered to determine the
results of changing one variable in a situation while holding all
others constant. These include laboratory experiments, field
experiments, and test marketing.
Characteristics of survey methods in
general

a.
 b.
 c.

The information is first-hand.
Error bias may originate in survey construction and the interview process.
Surveys may be expensive, time consuming, and involve problems with
respondents (non-response, inability to respond, misleading responses,
etc.).
i.Characteristics of personal interviews.
 a.
Provide the most in-depth information and flexibility.
 b.
Surrounding context adds information and a basis for interpretation.
 c.
Respondents may not always be typical of the population of focus.
 d.
Shopping mall intercept and focus groups are types of personal interviews
 ii.Characteristics of
 a.
 b.
 c.
Save time.
Are relatively low cost and easy to administer.
Require survey instrument to be short.
 İii.Characteristics
 a.
 b.
 c.
 d.
 e.
telephone surveys.
of mail surveys.
Very economical and allows wide geographic spread.
Lack of interviewer bias.
Good mailing lists may be hard to obtain.
Low response rates and low level of control.
A similar but alternate medium is the Internet; its use in
research data collection is increasing.
Characteristics of observation methods.
 a.
May be collected personally or mechanically.
 b.
Data collected is highly accurate.
 c.
Data interpretation can be highly subjective and/or
biased.
Characteristics of experimental methods
 a.
 b.
May be done in the lab or the field.
Levels of environmental control vary.
 Test
marketing duplicates real world market conditions to
measure consumer responses to variations in marketing tactics;
however they are expensive and public.
 Simulated
test markets have lower costs, higher control, and are
more proprietary; limits inclusion of some real world variables and
responses.
Survey
Data-gathering form
Question wording
Response format
Questionnaire layout
Pretesting
Representative
Sample
Random samples
Convenience samples
Marketing Research Procedure
Analyse
the Data and Present a Report.
Conduct
a Follow-up.