Thank you for your investment in
the university, in our country,
and in me
Professor john a. powell
Haas Institute for a Fair and Inclusive Society, Executive Director
and The Robert D. Haas Chancellor’s Chair in Equity and Inclusion
University of California, Berkeley
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The Challenges &
Opportunities of Diversities
Research Clusters
Diversity &
Democracy
Diversity &
Health
Educational
Disparities
Economic
Disparities
LGBTQ
Citizenship
Disability
Religious
Diversity
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The Network
Research
Relationships
UCB & system Wide
Government
Direct service
and
organizing
Institutions
Translation to change frame
Non-university based
research
Communications
Sharing
input
Community
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Diversity in the United States
As a fact, the United States is
richly diverse place.
2010 U.S. Census estimates
that of the approximately
310 million Americans, there
are:
– 230 million Whites
– 40 million Latino/as
– 35 million Black or African
American
– 16 million Asian Americans
– 4 million Native American
– 3 million Arab Americans
U.S. Census Bureau, 2010
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Diversity in the United States
2008 population estimates:
– 54 million people have a disability
– By age:
• 5 percent of children 5 to 17 have
disabilities
• 10 percent of people 18 to 64 have
disabilities
• 38 percent of adults 65 and older
have disabilities
2008 American Community Survey, http://factfinder.census.gov
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Diversity in the United States
Percent and number of adults who identify as LGBTQ
http://williamsinstitute.law.ucla.edu/wp-content/uploads/Gates-How-Many-People-LGBTApr-2011.pdf
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Challenges &
Opportunities of Diversity
• “One of the most important
challenges facing modern
societies, and at the same time
one of our most significant
opportunities, is the increase in
ethnic and social heterogeneity
in virtually all advanced
countries”
• “The central challenge for
modern, diversifying societies
is to create a new, broader
sense of ‘we’.”
Putnam, R. “E Pluribus Unum: Diversity and Community in the Twenty-first Century—
The 2006 Johan Skytte Prize Lecture.” Nordic Political Science Association, 30.2 (2007):
1.
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Limitations of Diversity
• What work does
diversity do?
• What are its
limitations in
aiming for
fairness,
inclusion, and
equity
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Social Cleavages in Our Society
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Putnam’s Vision of Diversity
To develop “bridging
social capital”
networks” that are
both “outward looking
and accompany people
across diverse social
cleavages”
Source: Putnam, Robert D., 2000, Bowling Alone: The Collapse and Revival of
American Community, Simon & Schuster, New York, NY.
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Our Vision of Diversity
Diversity +
Equity
Diversity +
Inclusion
Diversity
Where Social
Cleavages
Disappear
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Our Approach
Power
Implicit Bias /
Mind Science
Structures/
Institutional
Arrangements
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The Context of Opportunity
Matters
Some people ride the
“Up” escalator to reach
opportunity
Others have to run up the
stairs to get to opportunity
Targeted Universalism
Structural Inequity
produces consistently
different outcomes for
different communities.
Targeted Universalism
responds with universal
goals and targeted solutions
VS.
Structural Inequity
©2012 Connie Cagampang Heller
Targeted Universalism
For more information, visit: http://www.iupress.indiana.edu/catalog/806639
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