FOR
VEHICLE ACCIDENTS AND
EXTRICATION PROCEDURES
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The basic principal for commanding a vehicle
accident remains the same as any incident.
There are, however, many diverse and different
type tasks being coordinated which differ from
the fire scene which need constant evaluation.
Safety, as always, remains the number one
priority.
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When training for these types of incidents, it is
sometimes helpful to use a basic benchmark
type system to assist.
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The use of this benchmark system during
training will allow the FF to be more familiar
with the step by step process of commanding
this type of incident, and forces the IC to
prioritize.
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ESTABLISH COMMAND
SCENE SURVEY (INNER AND OUTER)
HAZARD IDENTIFICATION / MITIGATION
PATIENT(S) LOCATED
PATIENT CARE
STABILIZATION
PLAN OF ACTION
RESOURCE AVAILABILITY
EXECUTE PLAN, PRIORITIZE TASKS
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Commanding an incident which requires such
technical and precise procedures to
accomplish the goals is unique in many forms.
The stress level is elevated, and the close
proximity to the incident adds to confusion.
A sense of Speed, at times, may outweigh the
necessary and actual priority of safe, effective
task performance. Time is of the essence,
however, time can be reduced by confident,
proper, and safe technique.
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A distinct understanding of the action –
reaction law is necessary for both the IC and
the Technician.
Each cut that is made or metal relocated will
have a reaction to the rest of the vehicle which,
if not controlled by cribbing and on-going
stabilization, can have detrimental
consequences to both the rescuer and
patient(s).
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Commanding the extrication scene requires a
broad spectrum of familiarity with many
different aspects of scene management,
extrication techniques, vehicle construction,
the stabilization process, etc.
The Incident Commander does not have to be
an expert in all of these fields, but needs to
know his or her resources to work with, and
should be above average with their own
competency level of the extrication process.
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The Incident Commander must be available to
options discovered during the extrication
process or rescuer input. They cannot,
however, lose command and control.
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When the loss of control becomes apparent to
those on scene, we invite freelancing and other
hazardous action to take place.
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A firm, confident stature is necessary and will
ultimately instill confidence to the entire rescue
crew.
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THE ATTITUDE OF THE INCIDENT
COMMANDER WILL DICTATE SCENE
PERFORMANCE!
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As the first arriving unit, there are three
simple yet effective things to remember
which can assist your initial actions.
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1. WHAT HAVE I GOT.
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2. WHAT AM I DOING.
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3. WHAT DO I NEED.
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These 3 simple phrases can help the IC
begin their command decisions and
priorities
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You can think of this much like a UCAN report.
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What are your conditions?
What actions are you taking?
What are your needs?
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Establish Command
Scene Survey
Traffic Management
Occupant(s) Located
Hazard ID / Mitigate
Stabilization
Patient Access
Rescuer Access
Patient Care
On-Going Stabilization
Resource Availability
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Personnel abilities
Patient Path of Egress
Plan of Action
Alternate Plan of Action
Glass Management
Extrication Procedures
Patient Removal
Scene Breakdown
Evaluation of Performance
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By simply establishing COMMAND, you are
building the foundation by which all other
activities are being built.
It is the starting point for the accountability
system.
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All other responding units are aware of who is
making the decisions, and are expecting to
hear what their task assignment will be.
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ESTABLISH IT, CONTROL IT, MAINTAIN IT
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An essential part of your command.
Do not confuse your initial scene report with
your complete scene survey.
A complete scene survey is more detailed and
takes more time. Locate Hazards, patients,
initiate patient care.
All information gathered may not necessarily
be communicated to other units.
You begin to formulate a plan of action, and
establish your inner and outer perimeters.
Know your resources
available
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INCIDENT COMMAND - Advanced Extrication