Welcome to English II
AGS “World Studies”
Find a seat, any seat, and begin filling out the
Student Information Sheet before the bell rings.
There’s a back side, too. Thanks!
Today’s Agenda:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Welcome/Introductions
Distribution of the Syllabus (materials)
Group Dynamics in ELA
Habits of Thinking (probably tomorrow)
HW: Letter to Mrs. W due on Thursday for A
Day and Friday for B Day students.
Life of Pi Quiz  Thursday/Friday
Who is Webster?
When I’m not with you, I’m with…
Group Dynamics:
Time to shake it up.
Shake your booty up to the front of the room to form a
shoulder-to-shoulder line.
Put yourselves in a logical order.
Debrief: verbal and nonverbal communication in ELA
Day 2 – August 26/27
WELCOME BACK!
Sit where you sat yesterday at the end of the period. See
Webby if you have forgotten your seat number.
Today’s warm-up: Please pick up a piece of
paper and a marker from the front black table and
create a name-tent for your desk. First name only.
And point it to ME. (Because you know your
name, right?)
Then take out supplies: a pen or pencil, a piece
of paper, your RAW Book (if you have it), any classroom
supplies you have to donate.
Today’s Agenda:
1. Warm-up: Create nameplates
2. Habits of Thinking
3. Jump into the FOUNDATIONS OF ENGLISH
Analysis 101 Lesson
Literary Terms: detail and imagery
Habits of Thinking: remember and understand
Homefun: Letter/poem to Webby due next time!
Life of Pi Quiz scheduled for Thursday/Friday, too!
FOUNDATIONS of ENGLISH
The BIG Questions:
Who are you…
why are you here?
Letter to Webby; Group Dynamics Activity,
Habits of Thinking Chart
The Slightly Smaller Question:
What is your brain going
to have to DO in
English class?
Brainstorm a list of VERBS.
What is Webster
going to ask you to do?!?
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Remember
Understand
Apply
Analyze
Evaluate/Critique
Create
(all while “playing well with others”)
Analysis 101
Understanding Patterns of Thought and
Basic Elements of the Writer’s Craft
through
art!
“Landscape with the Fall of Icarus”
• Peter Bruegel
• c. 1558
• Musees Royaux des Beaux-Arts, Brussels
Remember
Write down:
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•
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•
the title of the painting
the name of the artist
one detail from the foreground
one detail from the background
Time Out for LIT TERMS!
How would you define the literary term
DETAIL?
A variation on 2-column notes: Create a
T-chart, and write out a definition in your
own words in the “My Definition” column.
Leave room on the right side of the T-chart
for “Webby’s Definition.”
Time Out for LIT TERMS!
DETAIL =
facts, observations, or
incidents that shape a story
 Consider facts omitted as well as
those included.
 Seemingly small facts often reveal the
theme.
Write down:
•
•
•
•
the title of the painting
the name of the artist
one detail from the foreground
one detail from the background
“Landscape with the Fall of Icarus”
Peter Bruegel
c. 1558
Musees Royaux des Beaux-Arts, Brussels
Understand
Write a brief description of the
scene depicted in the painting.
Block 3 – 8/28 and 8/29
Before the bell rings, assemble the STUFF YOU NEED:
1)
2)
3)
4)
Grab your RAW Book (from the green crate or your backpack).
Put class donations on Webster’s desk. 
Put your nameplate back up on your desk. If you have lost
yours, there are extra supplies at the front of the room – just
make another one!
Take out your “Letter to Ms. W.” It’s due today! (Normally you
would put homework in the box before the bell rings, but just
hang on to it for a sec.)
Grab a scan tron from the front table and locate your Analysis
of a Visual Text handout on your desk (it’s green) and your
English class syllabus (it’s blue).
Today’s Agenda:
1. Foundations of English Class – the syllabus
2. Life of Pi Quiz – nobody panic!!
3. Continue Foundations of Analysis Lesson
Literary Terms: imagery, allusion, theme
Habits of Thinking: understand, apply, analyze
HW: You have a HOMEWORK FREE weekend!
(At least for this class. Enjoy!!)
Reminder: Letter to Mrs. W due TODAY.
Turn in the letter/poem OR a “dog ate my homework” handout.
Sign up for community
communication!
http://remind.com/join/agscl
FB: Webby Web Class of 2017
Understand
Write a brief description of the
scene depicted in the painting.
The Legend of Daedalus and Icarus
Bonus LIT TERMS!
ALLUSION=
Bonus LIT TERMS!
ALLUSION=
Reference to a person, place, or
object (especially a literary work,
moment in history, pop culture
symbol, etc.) that provides
context or further meaning to the
situation being written about.
The smartest person in
the room is the room!
Block 4 – 9/2 and 9/3
Before the bell rings, assemble the STUFF YOU NEED:
1)
2)
3)
Grab your RAW Book (from the green crate or your backpack).
Put class donations on Webster’s desk.  Pick up handouts
from the front black cabinet (today it’s a calendar).
Put your nameplate back up on your desk. If you have lost
yours, there are extra supplies at the front of the room – just
make another one!
Locate your Analysis of a Visual Text handout and have it out
on your desk (it’s green).
The Legend of Daedalus and Icarus
Bonus LIT TERMS!
ALLUSION=
Bonus LIT TERMS!
ALLUSION=
Reference to a person, place, or
object (especially a literary work,
moment in history, pop culture
symbol, etc.) that provides
context or further meaning to the
situation being written about.
The smartest person in
the room is the room!
Time Out for LIT TERMS!
How would you define the literary term
IMAGERY?
Continue the My Def/Webster’s Def
process in your own notes.
IMAGERY
Words/phrases that appeal to the five senses
(often referred to as sensory details)
»Visual Imagery
»Auditory Imagery
»Olfactory Imagery
»Gustatory Imagery
»Tactile Imagery
Apply
Use the graphic organizer to describe the
imagery of the painting (things you could
see, hear, smell, taste, and touch if you
were inside the painting).
Then, determine the MOOD created by
the imagery.
This break brought to you by
LIT TERMS!
Turn to the notes you started (about detail
and imagery) and answer these questions:
What is the difference between mood
and tone?
What does the literary term theme mean?
TONE
The speaker’s (author’s/narrator’s) attitude
toward the subject matter; conveyed as an
emotion-clarifying adjective
MOOD
The emotion evoked in the audience/reader
Analyze
• What is a theme of the painting,
“Landscape with the Fall of Icarus”?
• List three (or more) specific details that
support this theme.
Welcome to the GRID!
G = Grammar/Style Mini-Lesson
R = Root Words/Vocabulary
I = Independent Reading Time
D = Dissection Day!
Block 4: Sept 4th and 5th
• We’ve been looking at a painting for three days.
Today, we move on to words! Sentences, even!!
The FOUNDATION of a sentence = parts of
speech.
• Today’s warm-up: notes + Mad Lib review
Work with a
partner to fill in the
Mad Lib blanks.
Try to
REMEMBER:
What are the 8
parts of speech?
____
________
Article
adjective
_______
____
conjunction
article
________
noun
____ _______
adj.
noun
______
_____
__ ____ ______
adverb
verb
prepositional phrase.
Grammar Review:
Parts of Speech
Noun
Pronouns
Verb
Adjective
Adverb
Preposition
Conjunction
Interjection
Back to the analysis lesson!
(I believe we left off with theme.)
Analyze
• What is a theme of the painting,
“Landscape with the Fall of Icarus”?
• List three (or more) specific details that
support this theme.
THEME
The author’s message to the reader
• Thematic statements are written as sentences
– Ex. “love” is not a theme, but “love sucks” is
– One-word responses are often TOPICS or MOTIFS, but
not themes
• Themes convey universal truths
• Themes, like thesis statements, could be argued
against…there is not ONE true theme for a story;
multiple possible themes exist
Evaluate/Critique
Which detail of the painting most
effectively conveys the theme?
Justify your answer.
Lit Terms!
Define syntax in your own words.
Define diction in your own words.
Literary Analysis
SYNTAX: Add punctuation to William
Carlos William’s poem. Where should
there be commas, semicolons, and
periods?
DICTION: Circle or highlight the words
that stand out to you for some reason.
What is the overall effect or pattern?
SYNTAX
Sentence structure (when analyzing syntax,
consider word order, length, types of
sentences, shifts, devices)
DICTION
Word choice (diction reveals voice!)
• Diction shifts depending on topic, purpose, and occasion
• There is no such thing as “good” diction or “bad” diction
• Diction, detail, and imagery are interconnected
Create
Read William Carlos Williams’ poem
“Landscape with the Fall of Icarus,” then
write a new poem from the perspective
of someone else connected to the scene.
With this activity, you’re shifting POINT
OF VIEW – the final word on our
“Superseven” list!
POINT OF VIEW
The narrator’s position in relation to the
story being told:
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First person (I, me, my)
Second person (you)
Third person (he, she, it)
POV reveals PERSPECTIVE
Requirements for the Poem
• at least 10 lines long (line breaks are
important – consider syntax!)
• Include details that shed light on your new
perspective
• Incorporate imagery -- appeal to at least
two senses (sight, sound, taste, touch,
smell)
• Carefully select diction to convey your
speaker’s attitude toward the event (think
about tone and theme, here)
Pair/Share
Reader’s
and
Writer’s
Notebook
All entries
attempted and
in the RAW
book: 90
Sharing
creations: 5
pts. each for
up to a 110.
2011
Tuesday 8/30; Wednes. 8/31
Please pick up your composition book
from the green/black crates up front.
Put your name and class period on the
first page of the notebook, then turn to
the next blank page. Begin thinking
about the word RAW.
Note:
5th period photos  9:50
6th period photos  11:10
8th period photos  3:30
2011 Writing
Workout #1:
It was raw.
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Write ¾ of a page or more.
Show, don’t tell.
Any mode or genre is fine.
Develop your VOICE.
Create
Read William Carlos Williams’ poem
“Landscape with the Fall of Icarus,” then
write a new poem from the perspective
of someone else connected to the scene.
With this activity, you’re shifting POINT
OF VIEW – the final word on our
“Superseven” list!
Analysis 101 Lesson, continued
Create a poem about Brueghel’s
painting, but SHIFT the POINT OF
VIEW.
Begin your poem with: According
to…(the plowman, the sheep, Icarus,
Daedalus, a fish, a siren, etc.), then
describe the moment as YOU see it.
Pay attention to detail, imagery,
diction, syntax, tone, and theme.
Requirements for the Poem
• at least 10 lines long (line breaks are
important – consider syntax!)
• Include details that shed light on your new
perspective
• Incorporate imagery -- appeal to at least
two senses (sight, sound, taste, touch,
smell)
• Carefully select diction to convey your
speaker’s attitude toward the event (think
about tone and theme, here)