Introduction
THE CRUCIBLE
Task
Process
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Resources
Assessment
Conclusion
Credits
Teacher page
The purpose of this webquest is to give students an opportunity
to construct a basic understanding of the procedures surrounding
the Salem Witch Trials prior to reading The Crucible by Arthur
Miller. This webquest will be used as a lesson for English classes
and targeted toward high school students.
By Stacy Perryman
INTRODUCTION
Introduction
Task
Process
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GUILTY OR INNOCENT? WITCH ONE?
Using Arthur Miller's play "The Crucible," the students will explore
the life of someone during this time period. Students will prepare to
assume the role of a person during this time period and participate
in a trial to determine the guilt or innocence of one of the accused.
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Resources
Assessment
Conclusion
Credits
Teacher page
From June through September of 1692, nineteen men and
women, all having been convicted of witchcraft, were carted
to Gallows Hill, a barren slope near Salem Village, for hanging.
Another man of over eighty years was pressed to death under
heavy stones for refusing to submit to a trial on witchcraft
charges. Hundreds of others faced accusations of witchcraft.
Dozens languished in jail for months without trials. Then,
almost as soon as it had begun, the hysteria that swept
through Puritan Massachusetts ended.
Introduction
TASK
Task
Process
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Resources
Assessment
Conclusion
Credits
Teacher page
You will assume the role of a character in The Crucible. This
task involves investigating and gathering information of your
job description. In order to fully understand this time period
you must research the background of the Salem Witch Trials.
You will be placed in groups of 4 or 5 students. Once you
have established your roles, it is time to prepare for court.
You are to pick from: an accused witch, a judge, a lawyer, or
a family member of the accused. Finally your group will
conduct a mock trial to determine the verdict of guilt or
innocence! Leave the jury with no doubt in their mind that
the verdict they chose was the correct one!
PROCESS
Introduction
(Page 1)
Task
Process
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Page 4
Now that you picked a role from this time period, it is
time to get started. Here is what you need to do now
that you are in your groups:
1.
Resources
2.
Assessment
3.
Conclusion
Credits
Teacher page
4.
Research a career choice according to your role
and complete the career chart.
Visit the links to learn about your role in
reference to the Puritan lifestyle
Complete the questions on Puritan living and
prepare for your mock trial
Get with your group and prepare for trial.
PROCESS
Introduction
Task
Process
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Page 2
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Page 4
(Page 2)
Research a career using one of the following sites:
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http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/23-1011.00
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http://www.careeroverview.com
Fill in the information on the Career chart seen below. A hard
copy of this worksheet has been given to each member of your
group.
Job Description:
Resources
Assessment
Conclusion
Credits
Experience:
Education and/or
Training
Tasks
(list at least 5)
Important Abilities
Important Skills
Teacher page
How will you need to use
the above qualities to do
your job well for this
case against the witches?
PROCESS
Introduction
(Page 3)
Task
Process
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Page 4
Resources
Assessment
Conclusion
Credits
Teacher page
Visit the following links and learn about what your life was back
in 1692. Be sure to go on trial and gain experience as either a
lawyer, judge, accused witch or a family member. This could be
useful for your performance in your OWN trial!
• http://questgarden.com/47/17/3/070225090947/index.ht
• http://www.nationalgeographic.com/salem/
• http://www.history.com/videos/salem-witch-trials#salemwitch-trials
• http://www.60secondrecap.com/library/the-crucible/
• http://law2.umkc.edu/faculty/projects/ftrials/salem/scopesj
eopardy%5B1%5D.htm
Now that you have viewed the slides, answer the following
questions:
1)
2)
3)
4)
What was the primary influence in a Puritan's life?
In which way did the Puritans live? Describe their lifestyle.
What were the jobs like during this time?
What were some of the problems afflicting people living in
Salem?
5) What was it like to be a family member of one of the accused?
Introduction
PROCESS
(Page 4)
Task
Process
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Page 4
Resources
Assessment
Conclusion
Credits
Teacher page
No matter what role you play in these trials, it is time to
perform. Get in your groups and get ready for your mock trial.
The rest of the class will serve as your jury. Leave it all out in
the courtroom. Be sure to keep the following questions in mind:
1. What was the most common offense that the witches were
accused of?
2. What did most of the witches do in the cases?
3. What was said about the Devil in most of the cases?
4. Where did most of the “accusers” live?
5. Where did most of the “accused” live?
6. What was the role of Ipswich Road?
RESOURCES
Introduction
Task
Process
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Resources
Assessment
The following sites are career links. They include information
related to specific careers and resources for assistance. They
also have links to other agencies.
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http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/23-1011.00
http://www.careeroverview.com
The following sites will be used to learn historical facts about
the Salem Witch Trials. They include a mock witch trial along
with informative facts about the Puritan lifestyles.
Conclusion
Credits
Teacher page
• http://questgarden.com/47/17/3/070225090947/index.ht
• http://www.nationalgeographic.com/salem/
• http://www.history.com/videos/salem-witch-trials#salemwitch-trials
• http://www.60secondrecap.com/library/the-crucible/
• http://law2.umkc.edu/faculty/projects/ftrials/salem/scop
esjeopardy%5B1%5D.htm
ASSESSMENT
Introduction
Teacher Name: Ms. Perryman
Student Name:
Task
Process
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Resources
CATEGORY
4
3
2
1
Role
Point-of-view,
arguments, and
solutions
proposed were
consistently in
character.
Point-of-view,
arguments,
and solutions
proposed were
often in
character.
Point-of-view,
arguments, and
solutions
proposed were
sometimes in
character.
Point-of-view,
arguments, and
solutions proposed
were rarely in
character.
Historical Accuracy
All historical
information
appeared to be
accurate and in
chronological
order.
Almost all
historical
information
appeared to be
accurate and in
chronological
order.
Most of the
historical
information was
accurate and in
chronological
order.
Very little of the
historical information
was accurate and/or in
chronological order.
Knowledge Gained
Can clearly
explain several
ways in which
his character
\"saw\" things
differently than
other characters
and can clearly
explain why.
Can clearly
explain several
ways in which
his character
\"saw\" things
differently than
other
characters.
Can clearly
explain one way
in which his
character \"saw\"
things differently
than other
characters.
Cannot explain one way
in which his character
\"saw\" things differently
than other characters.
Required Elements
Student included
more information
than was
required.
Student
included all
information
that was
required.
Student included
most information
that was
required.
Student included less
information than was
required.
Assessment
Conclusion
Credits
Teacher page
________________________________________
Introduction
CONCLUSION
Task
Process
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Resources
Assessment
Conclusion
Credits
Teacher page
Congratulations! You completed this task. After
performing a mock trial, did you get the verdict you
wanted? You should have a better understanding of the
roles played in the hysteria of the Salem Witch Trials
during 1692. Now with that information, prepare an
appeal to vindicate the accused or retry to indict. What
outcome will you get now?
CREDITS
Introduction
Task
Process
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Page 4
Resources
Assessment
Conclusion
Credits
Teacher page
Sources:
• http://questgarden.com/47/17/3/070225090947/index.ht
• http://www.nationalgeographic.com/salem/
• http://www.history.com/videos/salem-witch-trials#salem-witchtrials
• http://www.60secondrecap.com/library/the-crucible/
• http://law2.umkc.edu/faculty/projects/ftrials/salem/scopesjeopa
rdy%5B1%5D.htm
Permissions
We all benefit by being generous with our work. Permission is
granted for others to use and modify this WebQuest for
educational, non-commercial purposes as long as the original
authorship is credited. The modified WebQuest may be shared only
under the same conditions. See the Creative Commons Attribution •
Non-Commercial• Share-Alike license for details.
Teacher’s Page
Introduction
Introduction
Learners
Standards
Procedures
Resources
Students’ Page
This webquest was created in conjunction with the
teaching of Arthur Miller’s The Crucible.
This webquest is a cooperative learning assignment
and will work best with high school aged students.
Teacher’s Page
Learners
Introduction
Learners
Grade Level:
Standards
The intended audience of this
webquest consists of 9th or 10th graders.
Procedures
OBJECTIVES:
Resources
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Students’ Page
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Select career and research job descriptions
Complete career worksheet
Research the history and lifestyle of the
Puritans and answer questions
Prepare for a mock trial with direct focus on
your role (job)
Perform mock trial
Evaluate group performance
Teacher’s Page
Introduction
Learners
Standards
Procedures
Resources
Students’ Page
Standards
Pennsylvania State Standards
1.1 Learning to Read Independently
• Apply Comprehension & Interpretation Skills
1.2 Reading Critically in All Content Areas
• Draw Inferences
• Distinguish Fact from Fiction
• Examine Analysis & Evaluation
1.4 Types of Writing
• Analyze & Create Informational
• Analyze & Create Persuasive
1.6 Speaking & Listening
• Listen to Others
• Contribute to Discussions
• Participate in Group Presentations
1.8 Research
• Locate Information
• Organize Main Ideas
• Summarize Main Ideas
• Present Main Ideas
Teacher’s Page
Procedures
Introduction
Learners
Standards
Procedures
Resources
Procedures:
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Introduce The Crucible by Arthur Miller
Students research careers and complete a job description
chart
Students are divided into groups of 4 or 5 students
Students view the Webquest
Students prepare and present a mock trial
Additional component: Students can retry or appeal the court
decision by submitting a written explanation as to why there
should be a second trial
Students’ Page
Assessments:
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Students will be graded according to the Evaluation Rubric
(located on student page)
Modifications (Special Needs Inclusion):
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Extended time
One-on-One Assistance
Adapted Assignment
Teacher’s Page
Resources
Introduction
Learners
Standards
Procedures
Resources
Materials:
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Access to computer lab classroom
Book, The Crucible, by Arthur Miller
Arts & craft supplies (props for trial)
Career (Job Description) chart (Process Page 2)
The Crucible Webquest Rubric (Assessment)
Sources:
Students’ Page
•
Rubistar was used to create the rubric
(http://rubistar.4teachers.org/)
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