Lesson observations: evaluating the
quality of teaching and learning
Leading Learning
Objectives:
● To increase leaders confidence in making lesson judgements and
giving feedback
Leading Learning
Teaching
There is an increased emphasis on the quality of teaching and improving
its effectiveness in raising pupils’ learning and progress.
● Good schools are expected to have good teaching and effective
systems for improving it
● The judgement on the quality of teaching must take account of
evidence of pupils’ learning and progress over time. Inspectors (and
schools) must not simply aggregate the grades awarded following
lesson observations
Leading Learning
Teaching
● Inspectors must not expect teaching staff to teach in any specific way
or follow a prescribed methodology
● There are very many different teaching styles and inspectors will not
make judgements about one ‘right’ way. There is no ‘ideal KHDA
lesson!’
● In lessons, inspectors will expect to see pupils who are fully engaged
in their learning and making good or outstanding progress
Good Teaching
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Good (2)
Teaching in most subjects, including English and mathematics, is usually good, with
examples of some outstanding teaching. As a result, most pupils and groups of pupils
currently on roll in the school, including disabled pupils, those who have special
educational needs, and those for whom the pupil premium provides support, make
good progress and achieve well over time.
Teachers have high expectations. They plan and teach lessons that deepen pupils’
knowledge and understanding and enable them to develop a range of skills across
the curriculum.
Teachers listen to, carefully observe and skilfully question pupils during lessons in
order to reshape tasks and explanations to improve learning.
Reading, writing, communication and mathematics are taught effectively.
Teachers and other adults create a positive climate for learning in their lessons and
pupils are interested and engaged.
Teachers assess pupils’ learning and progress regularly and accurately. They ensure
that pupils know how well they have done and what they need to do to improve.
Effective teaching strategies, including setting appropriate homework, and
appropriately targeted support and intervention are matched well to most pupils’
individual needs, including those most and least able, so that pupils learn well in
lessons.
Outstanding Teaching
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Outstanding (1)
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Much of the teaching in all key stages and most subjects is outstanding and never
less than consistently good. As a result, almost all pupils currently on roll in the
school, including disabled pupils, those who have special educational needs and
those for whom the pupil premium provides support, are making rapid and sustained
progress.
All teachers have consistently high expectations of all pupils. They plan and teach
lessons that enable pupils to learn exceptionally well across the curriculum.
Teachers systematically and effectively check pupils’ understanding throughout
lessons, anticipating where they may need to intervene and doing so with notable
impact on the quality of learning.
The teaching of reading, writing, communication and mathematics is highly effective
and cohesively planned and implemented across the curriculum.
Teachers and other adults generate high levels of engagement and commitment to
learning across the whole school.
Consistently high quality marking and constructive feedback from teachers ensure
that pupils make rapid gains.
Teachers use well-judged and often inspirational teaching strategies, including setting
appropriate homework that, together with sharply focused and timely support and
intervention, match individual needs accurately. Consequently, pupils learn
exceptionally well across the curriculum.
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Good and Outstanding lessons
Inspectors will continue to gather a lot of evidence for the teaching
grade from lesson observations. They will still grade lessons, and offer
feedback. School leaders will grade lessons and offer feedback on a
part of a lesson, perhaps with a specific focus.
● What aspects of a lesson are being judged when we are observed?
For example: planning, assessment
Good and Outstanding lessons
● What aspects of a lesson are being judged when we are observed?
Planning
Behaviour for learning
Assessment
Questioning
Homework
Meeting individual needs
Pace
Progress – for all
Subject knowledge
Use of resources
Deployment of other adults
SMSC (Spiritual, Moral, Social, Cultural)
Good and Outstanding lessons
● How can the observer gather evidence to make a lesson
judgement?
Sources of evidence?
Good and Outstanding lessons
How can the observer gather evidence to make a lesson judgement?
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Pupils
TA or other adults
Books
Lesson Plan
Display
Evidence of tracking: tracking sheets, mark book
Teacher
Observing learning
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When inspectors/school leaders observe teaching, they observe
pupils’ learning. Good teaching, which includes high levels of expertise
and subject knowledge, with the expectation that pupils will achieve
well, enables pupils to acquire knowledge, deepen their
understanding, and develop and consolidate skills.
Inspectors (leaders in school) must consider whether:
work is challenging enough for all pupils and meets their individual
needs
pupils’ responses demonstrate sufficient gains in their knowledge,
skills and understanding, including in literacy and mathematics
teachers monitor pupils’ progress in lessons and use the information
well to adapt their teaching
teachers use questioning and discussion to assess the effectiveness
of their teaching and promote pupils’ learning
pupils understand well how to improve their work.
What do Outstanding lessons look
like?
● Exceptional progress
● Inspiring
● Precisely targeted support of other adults
● High quality marking and dialogue
● Pupils understand in detail how to improve
● Consistent support
● Interventions have striking impact
● Acute awareness of prior learning used in planning
● Systematic checking of understanding